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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity posted by: Rob on 8/29/2003 at 5:00:57 PM
I thought you Schwinnophiles would like this...Yesterday I spotted a mid-70's Schwinn Varsity locked to a parking meter...No big deal, you say...Well...Schwinns from that era are kind of rare in Vancouver...I guess Schwinn wasn't into exporting...too bad...This bike was in pretty good shape...some scrapes and scratches...a really nice bright green color with the black and white oval head badge. The owner is evidently a 'minimalist'...no fenders, racks, lights...just bare bike...I looked for few second...nowadays showing too much interest in something that's not yours can get you dirty looks or worse if the owner shows up...

There really is something eyecatching about those bikes...I've thought for a while I've got to get a hold of one...Hmmm, I guess that means a trip to Seattle...then, there's the problem that if you look too hard, the good stuff seems to be elusive...maybe it's better to just wait and keep casually looking around, and maybe I'll stumble onto the perfect deal...hmmm...


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity posted by Ken on 8/29/2003 at 5:41:44 PM
Here (in Illinois), a couple of varsities went for $1 apiece at last Saturday's police auction. I came home with a nice Suburban, two Japanese 10-speeds, a 3-speed, and a bmx -total outlay, $9.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity posted by Dave on 8/29/2003 at 5:55:32 PM
I'm watching a lime green 25" Varsity near the Metra train station , (in Chicago) that has been locked to a lightpole for several monthe slowly lose all its parts. The frame and rear wheel,seatpost and deraillers are about all that's left now.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity posted by DannyJoe on 8/31/2003 at 2:03:05 AM
I have to agree that Illinois is the mecca for Schwinn's, and you can usually find some bargains. In my basement sit's my superclean Varsity, Conti and Super Sport from '73-'74 year's very nice original bikes and I have $25(US) total invested in the three.

I have found them for $1, $5, and the most I paid was $10 for a LW Schwinn of the '60's-'70's period, just last week I picked up a early Japan made World Traveler a Varsity and a Colligiate 5spd and paid zilch, the owner was giving them away, I couldn't walk away from a deal like that.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity posted by JONathan on 8/31/2003 at 5:26:56 AM
Location, location. Around here, I rarely spot any "Varsities", "Continentals" or "Super Sports". Right now, I'm sitting on one original equipped green Varsity. The other Vars is red; fitted for modern use, except for the crank. It's in good cosmetic shape, but not pristine like the green one; which I'm keeping all original. Red was $7, 10 years back. Green was $5, last year. '71 yellow Super Sport was $30, excellent condition. It was filthy, but cleaned up real good. Yellow '70 Continental was a "haul-away" at the end of a church rummage sale this year. I haven't touched it, but it'll clean up real nice. During the past 3 months, here in N. Ca., I haven't seen one of the three models. I think that the Japanese bikes were "king" as they were sold everywhere. The Schwinns were less common, it seemed to us.
Lots of really cool Taiwan and Japan Schwinns. They were really superior bikes, IMHO, just not the unique character and historic significance of the Chicagos. Just a couple....JONathan

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity posted by Titlist on 9/1/2003 at 10:02:36 PM
I know where a Continental is, copper colored? Nice bike? This one, is a big size, and what is this, with some seat post making the saddle stick way up, like a guy would need legs about 5 feet high, I don't know.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity posted by jon in seattle on 9/2/2003 at 10:48:27 AM
just had a bike yard sale this labor day weekend,I was selling a nice red varsity for $10.00,no buyers,would have sold it for 5.00,mixed interest in these bikes that I've seen here in seattle,have lots of parts for these bikes also,if your coming to seattle drop me a line. jon

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity posted by Dave on 9/2/2003 at 9:00:21 PM
Go to the muffler shop @927 S. Western in Chicago. Above the shop is Working Bikes, a cooperative that rebuilds old bikes picked up by metal haulers to be either sold to the general public or shipped to 3rd world countries for use by relief agencys or church groups. I went once and it is an amazing place that has,IMHO, every Schwinn lightweight ever built.You can also reach them @www.workingbikes.com. They generally sell them at slightly more than resale shops but the resale shops here in the city are really picked over anyway.FYI






AGE / VALUE:   1982/3 Eddy Merckx posted by: jeremy on 8/29/2003 at 1:54:29 AM
I know someone (not that well) who has either an 82 or 83 Eddy Merckx w/ super record.

This period was about 2 years after Merckx set up shop with the help of DeRosa.

Anyone have any knowledge of early 80's Merckx? Did they still use the kind of classic road geometry that Merckx himself used when he raced?







MISC:   Nishiki "Olympic" or Raleigh "Grand Prix" 10-speeds posted by: JONathan on 8/28/2003 at 11:30:47 PM
What I got going is a couple 10-speeds are up for sale at this thrift store and I need to pick only one.
Both have cottered cranks. Raleigh: Simplex shifters and front der.; rear der. was changed to a SunTour GT; wraparound seat-stays; steel rims alloy hubs; alloy stem and bars; Weinmann "Vainqueur" 610/750 cp's; Raleigh "Heron" steel cranks...other components are junky.
Nishiki: Shimano "Tourney GS" rear der. and front; shifters are Shimano clickers on the stem (real big sticks); Dia-Compe version of 610/750's; 34 skip-tooth granny; qr wheels; alloy hub, front; steel rear; steel rims; heavy-duty rat-traps (serviceable type) with toe clips; real nice alloy bars with SR stem...rest is junky.
The Raleigh is blue with worn paint. Nishiki is a silver with very good condition.
I am thinking "parts", but would to get the one with greater value as a vintage frame. Price is a nominal consideration.
My guess is the Nishiki is a better ride. The Raleigh looks older and funkier. Which one is a better get?
No rush, the 1/2-off sale goes on Friday, so I got some time to research. Appreciate your opinions, as usual. Thanks in advance.
JONathan


   RE:MISC:   Nishiki posted by JONathan on 8/29/2003 at 12:06:08 AM
Addition to above. Nishiki has "American Flyer" red washers on the chainring bolts; Raleigh has serial number on seat-tube; starts with "GE" then a bunch of numbers following.
Thanks, JONathan

   RE:RE:MISC:   Nishiki posted by JONathan on 8/29/2003 at 12:09:47 AM
Maybe it's "EG", not "GE". I can't remember and I get em mixed up sometimes, unless I write them down.

   RE:MISC:   Nishiki posted by Rob on 8/29/2003 at 12:29:11 AM
JONathan

Both sound a bit interesting...though both are pretty modest bikes...The Shimano pieces on the Nishiki must be an after market thing...I think I would lean towards the Nishiki, but the price would have to be pretty low...the Olympic from what I understand doesn't rank high in Nishiki line-up...Tange No. 5 Tubing??...which is plain gauge...

   RE:MISC:   Nishiki posted by Titlist on 8/29/2003 at 2:08:32 AM
I don't recommend NOR rebuke either,

From my experience, I have only with the Gran Prix, mainly 1970

I think, the Gran Prix, has some nice compact geometry, mine has high tensil steel, looking much like this one at the Retro Raleighs site, with downtube Simplex shifters, http://www.retroraleighs.com/grand-prix.html .... Mine is a 1970 bicycle. It's heavy, somewhat, that compact geometry, on a few descents, did tell me to watch it...furthermore, the brake hoods, first, rather intriguing, made me wonder at first, might this bike be more recent. Nice hoods, I think, with Carlton on them. In fact, I wonder, if when I looked at Mikes Carlton, if the hoods might have looked alike, I like the bar tape as well, good handlebars, truly...

A Super Gran Prix exists, that might be remarkable well in some ways, this link http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3621098755&category=7298&rd=1 , of a past auction ;

Then, RAleigh USA made some Gran Prixs I think. So, it is interesting to know of which model we are dealing with.

I am very lucky, that with some extra time, work cutbacks mainly, that during that time, I have scored some okay bikes, by going into the Thrift stores.

I do not know the Nishikis well.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Gran Prix Brake Hoods posted by Titlist on 8/29/2003 at 2:43:13 AM
Those brake hoods, not gum hoods, but plastic, nice to hold onto, like some modern brake hoods, aero brake hoods.

Got to say, since I saw some Gitane go for $15 but then add around $50 to ship; my Gran Prix came via Chicago. There was an auction with a reserve, and when you see a reserve, you know, you can horse around some, starting price, $9.95. Minutes to go, no one bid, I didn't really need a bike, was watching it. Bid 15, no, I figured, it might have quite a reserve, I bid 25, and that nabbed it. I had to be honest, so I paid it up. It is in very good shape. Being like that 1970 grand prix, not sure about the decals, look a bit different, than later models. I do think, it would be somewhat tiring to drag out. But who knows? I"ve heard of people putting Mountain Bike bars, on such. Who knows, what one might be able to do.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Nishiki posted by Titlist on 8/29/2003 at 2:56:40 AM
Looks like The Nishiki, is a better deal, now that I re-read the original post.

Size has got to count, if one is too big for you.

I'm a Nottingham Nut, so, that dictates what I do often.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Nishiki posted by Dave on 8/29/2003 at 1:00:14 PM
I have a Gran Prix just like that I found with a "free bike" sign on it and I would have to favor that. It was left outside but for a straight gauge frame is fairly rust free. My '72 was built by Gazelle in Holland for Raleigh and those white Carlton brake hoods are cool too,(I fitted them on my Mercier). The 23.5" frame is a little big so I put 700" wheels alloy wheels on it and the fit is perfect. Just my 2c's.

    Nishiki vs Raleigh posted by John E on 8/29/2003 at 3:32:10 PM
The Raleigh is probably a bit lighter than the Olympic, but your first concern should be how well each frame's geometry accommodates you. Since I hate steel rims, stem shifters, low-end steel Shimano derailleurs, and cottered cranks, I cannot get too excited about either specimen, but perhaps that's just because I have no room for any additional bikes. Either one should make a decent enough cruiser, commuter, or transportation bike.

   RE: Nishiki vs Raleigh posted by Gralyn on 8/29/2003 at 3:46:27 PM
Well, here's the deal in my area: OK, you know where there is a Raleigh Grand Prix and a Nishiki....and from the descriptions...sounds like most of the older bike-boom stuff...just your average....no special "finds". .....but the thing that gets me is....they are in the store...and you may go back later and get one of them. That's amazing! Actually, I used to have that option a couple years ago. Bikes like these would turn up...I wouldn't be able to decide....after a few days....I might pick one of them up....sometimes I could wait until they were marked down..then pick them up. Well, that's not the case anymore. In my area, any bike like that will not sit on the shop for a day. For me - if I spot one like that...and if I want it...or could use the parts...I have to grab it up immediately...otherwise, tomorrow....or later this evening...it will be gone! They way it has worked for me around here is....you just have to be in the right place at the right time.
And hey, just FYI: I've seen bike shops have some of these old bikes....specifically an old Raleigh Grand Prix....for sale listed at over $100. (of course if it was in pretty good condition...about $30 would be reasonable).
I can't even remember what my last decent "find" was: Maybe either the Lotus Excelle, or a Raleigh Technium.

   RE: Nishiki vs Raleigh posted by Gralyn on 8/29/2003 at 3:46:47 PM
Well, here's the deal in my area: OK, you know where there is a Raleigh Grand Prix and a Nishiki....and from the descriptions...sounds like most of the older bike-boom stuff...just your average....no special "finds". .....but the thing that gets me is....they are in the store...and you may go back later and get one of them. That's amazing! Actually, I used to have that option a couple years ago. Bikes like these would turn up...I wouldn't be able to decide....after a few days....I might pick one of them up....sometimes I could wait until they were marked down..then pick them up. Well, that's not the case anymore. In my area, any bike like that will not sit on the shop for a day. For me - if I spot one like that...and if I want it...or could use the parts...I have to grab it up immediately...otherwise, tomorrow....or later this evening...it will be gone! They way it has worked for me around here is....you just have to be in the right place at the right time.
And hey, just FYI: I've seen bike shops have some of these old bikes....specifically an old Raleigh Grand Prix....for sale listed at over $100. (of course if it was in pretty good condition...about $30 would be reasonable).
I can't even remember what my last decent "find" was: Maybe either the Lotus Excelle, or a Raleigh Technium.

   RE:RE: Nishiki vs Raleigh posted by JONathan on 8/29/2003 at 5:35:08 PM
Gralyn, I wonder if the reason for these bikes hanging around long enough for a cup'ojoe is that they are not highly sought items in the broadest sense. I see mostly new bikes, yet a decided increase in vintage fare has occurred. First off, you gotta know something about working up a bike. That means something to do with mechanical tools and busting knuckles occasionally. Plus, the bucks have to be a factor. My main interset in thrift stores is the bikes, although as a cheapskate, I occasionally get other things. Most people I see in the stores are not that interested in the bikes. What appears to happen is guys, like me, are into collecting bikes and they make frequent checks. Practically nobody fixes up vintage bikes and I know lots of folks. The topic is esoteric enough, that I don't even bring it up, and when I do...I feel like I need to justify my interest...like; "I'm not cuckoo". I know one guy, whose about 90 years into life, who fixes them up. I met him at a rummage sale. He was having a rough time getting good bikes, yet that's all relative to what was around a few years back and beyond. I think (know?) that the bike numbers have dwindled, but it may be simple attrition without replacements. The bikeboom stuff is a fixed number, and source numbers can only go in one direction...that's down. I think the depressed economy has contributed to some rise seen on the streets, but then, maybe they are being discovered to some significant degree. They make total sense to me. I mean why not? Thanks for the comments, all. The Raleigh seems to have the most favor. I've got a few hours to figure it out. Appreciate all the inputs, trully beneficial to making a wiser decision. I got steered clear of that DBS. I'd be scratchin my noggin trying to figure out what to do with that hulk. The Nishiki has the skip-tooth granny. I can't see where that is any advantage. There would be greater chainwear, I believe, which may have been to the advantage of chain makers. Cheers, and good day....JONathan

   RE:RE:RE: Nishiki vs Raleigh posted by Titlist on 8/29/2003 at 8:09:39 PM
I'll tell you one thing, there was a fellow on Ebay, he'd ship, USPS, UPS, but also by Amtrak, one has to pick it up at the train station, but it costs only about $15, too, one wouldn't have to take apart the bicycle to much to ship it that way. That tidbit of info, could come in handy sometimes.

My Gran Prix, really, is in very good condition, superficial rusts, and the decals, the reason, I mentioned this, they seem to be on that bicycle very well. I'm not even sure if Decal is the correct word for this. Some other decals, I have seen been affected by using a serious cleaner, maybe Windex. These seem almost as painted on.

In the bike shop, the other day, I noticed, the gentleman, placed the bike into the stand, this is fine, but it seems even this, can put wear on decals. Water bottle clamps too. I never noticed before, the Champions colors, I believe, the rainbow striping of black, green, yellow, . Now, that I know what that symbolizes, I am seeing it on so many bikes, usually, as a wrap around decal/sticker on the seat post tube.

A lot to get under one's skin. I have one bike, won't say which, originally, treated it a bit like a clunker, let it be sufficient to say, after treating it like that for about 6 months, reading some of these forums, etc. it has virtually, turned into my favorite ride. Now, I try to take great pangs to take great care for it.

   RE:RE:RE:RE: Nishiki vs Raleigh posted by JONathan on 8/30/2003 at 4:01:32 AM
A huge throng had gathered outside the store for the 1/2 off sale. I went in the tailend and I never thought I'd have a chance at either bike, but nobody, I mean zero people were looking at the bike rack. I took both bikes off the rack and immediately decided on the Raleigh. It was really lightweight compared to the Nishiki. The Raleigh had a smudge where a sticker was placed just under the seat lug, which must have been the tubing specification. The narrow steel Araya rims are in great shape...new looking front rim and just a bit of tarnish on one section on the rear. Wheels are true! What a zoo, but I was the only "bike guy" in the store. One guy looked at the Raleigh just as I was wrapping up my evaluation of it on the floor. Took me 1/2 hour to get through the register. It was definitely worth the wait. Does anybody know if the Grand Prix models had Reynolds 531? It was a one-arm load into the back of the truck, pretty light, even with a rack, kickstand (which had blue paint on it when I removed the rediculuous thing) and the steel wheels. The rear hub is alloy with flange diameter between small and high size; call it "mid-flange". I rode the bike across the parking lot to the truck. Nice tires. Schwinn hp touring types. Well, thanks gents for all the good advice. I had low anticipation that it would be there, especially considering my polite and unfrenzied approach to it's acquisition.
Always works out when I don't get too focused. Thanks, JONathan
BTW, the Nishiki was an OK bike, the Grand Prix scored huge in the floor comparison side by side.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE: Nishiki vs Raleigh posted by Titlist on 8/31/2003 at 2:08:20 AM
You told us a good story, enough of these, a book could be written, to matters, my frame material sticker is a bit broken, seems like it says, tensile steel, may furthermore, have some numbers on it, in my case, not 531 nor any of that Reynolds series, but possibly some of the other materials.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE: Gran Prixs posted by Titlist on 8/31/2003 at 2:33:27 AM
As stated above, a Dutch Made, Raleigh Gran Prix by Gazelle, so are Gran Prixs, uniquely, maybe among a few other models, have been made in Ireland as well. A lot of research can be done on this topic. I am fairly sure, mine says "Made in England"






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Traveler w/2 speed kickback posted by: Hammett on 8/28/2003 at 5:43:10 PM
I ride British lightweights generally, but my neighbor is moving and is having a sale...so I ended up buying a Schwinn Traveler in pretty nice shape. I haven't looked at it up close (its still in his garage), but I am guessing later 1960s vintage.

Does anyone have any info on this bike (when they were built, reliability, any harder to work on than a Sturmey-Archer?)

I have been looking for a kickback so I couldn't pass it up.

By the way, I paid $25.

Thanks for the info!


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Traveler w/2 speed kickback posted by Eric Amlie on 8/29/2003 at 12:50:38 PM
The Travelers were made from the early-mid fifties up through 1966. I think the kickback two speed hubs started in 1960. You can check the serial number on the left rear dropout to date the bike. This site has the code for the serial numbers or you can go to;

http://www.angelfire.com/rant/allday101/SchwinnCodes1.html

If you want to get down to the day the frame was made.

I guess neither the Sturmey three speed or the Bendix automatic is all that bad to work on if you are reasonably handy but they both scare me. The weak point of the Bendix hub is the indexing spring. If it's bad, the hub won't shift. They can still be had but they are pricey. Mark Smith(mnsmith) on the Schwinn forums has a website with the exploded views and overhaul procedures for the Bendix kickback.

The Traveler was Schwinn's deluxe bike of that type and the fenders are stainless steel, not chromed steel like the lesser models.

Nice bikes but heavy(heavier than your English lightweights I suspect). I have several of them.

   RE: 2 speed kickback posted by Eric Amlie on 8/29/2003 at 12:59:22 PM
Here is the URL for the Bendix info on MNSmith's site:

http://www.bunchobikes.com/repair2.htm

   RE:RE: 2 speed kickback posted by Titlist on 8/29/2003 at 11:54:36 PM
I'll have to do a double take on where I know a Traveller currently is, in good shape, better get there early.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fixed - fixed for the road posted by: Gralyn on 8/28/2003 at 2:44:36 PM
I have a few fixed-gear bikes....on which I currently have no brakes. I want to ride some of them on the road - and will need to install a front brake. So, I was thinking of the process here.....un-tape the left side of the bars...install the lever, install the caliper, re-tape the bars. So, I had an idea....(and this works because the stem size is the same) ....have a set of bars with lever already attached....and taped....connected to a front brake set. So, whenever I want to ride on the road - I can take off the bars w/o brakes, replace with the one with a brake....bolt-on the brake caliper....and I'm ready to go. It seems a lot easier to me than having to re-tape, re-position, the brake lever, etc, etc. With this, the lever would already be positioned and ready to go...I wouldn't have to do any re-taping.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fixed - fixed for the road posted by steve on 8/28/2003 at 3:22:10 PM
Amen to that! Whenever I want to change the control setup on a bike, I find it easier just to assemble a new stem/bars/brakelevers/shifters(maybe) package rather than untape/retape the existing one. With side-pull brakes and clip-on top-tube cable guides, you could install a rear brake to boot and hang the whole thing up on a hook when you don't need it. (Tip o' the hat to Recycled Cycles here in Seattle, for having all the required parts available for pocket change!)

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fixed - fixed for the road posted by Dave on 8/28/2003 at 4:01:22 PM
Another solution which I did was to put a old mountain bike brake lever on the top of the handlebar,(this is how some cyclocross bike are built) just on the inside of the raised bar section. It works fine but I will probably change it because I have another built up bar set for time trialing.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Fixed - fixed for the road posted by Warren on 8/28/2003 at 5:13:47 PM
If you can find a 60's or 70's Mercier/Gitane/Peugeot "town bike", you may be able to get a pair of these guidonnet levers. They are wonderfully comfortable for fixed gear rides.

Check them out...
http://www.sheldonbrown.org/rochet/pages/rochet04.html

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fixed - fixed for the road posted by Gralyn on 8/28/2003 at 5:56:27 PM
I had thought of using a mountain bike brake on the top of the handlebar....but I didn't have any around that would fit....but I do like that idea.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fixed - fixed for the road posted by JONathan on 8/28/2003 at 6:43:15 PM
Your plan has appeal for the convenience factor. The only question is what effect does frequency of bar changes have on the stem clamp fatigue. The alloy stems are decidely weak, esepcially on a road-bike, IMHO. MTB stems are a way better design, as are their brakes; even the old school cantilevers on posts. OTOH, since you have the numbers, how would having two set up in the desired configuration; one on each bike. I guess I'm real lazy.
Just 2'c's...JONathan

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fixed - fixed for the road posted by Keith on 8/29/2003 at 3:31:06 PM
Where do you ride your brakeless fixed gear bikes?

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fixed - fixed for the road posted by Dave on 8/29/2003 at 6:00:50 PM
Strictly at the Velodrome although I've seen more than one downtown Chicago messenger riding them , (probably thins out the messenger herd) , which isn't very smart.






MISC:   Aussie Road Ace, Roo on the Badge posted by: Titlist on 8/28/2003 at 2:25:00 PM
well, saw a Road Ace on the Street, looked closer and closer, a Kangaroo, is on the head badge. In the action of jumping. It was parked, I looked at it some, did not care to be conspicous. Vintage, tires like might front using Prestas.

A bit of an outing, saw a Star Bike, white, then, think, I saw a 2nd Star Bike, copper colored, Japanese Brand. fairly sure. I have a Star Bike, an ATB. Came with nice knobbies, though 27 inches, took it out on a Mountain Bike Trail, rough in spots, did okay. Doesn't have a Triple Chain Ring, but in the lowest gear, it made some pretty steep climbs, largest back cog being 34 teeth. I got this bike as a freebie, I like it. Forged Suntour Dropouts. Foot Straps. Saw a Raleigh ATB, Vintage, I would think, of a gentleman, your Royal Blue color. Had the same (can the word flight deck be used?) control levers, Shimano Unishift with D-Rings; Dia Compe Brake levers. I was a bit astonished on the similarities. One can see, some fly with their mountain bikes, ha, I wondered, at this one post, if the guy circled the trail once, while I was on my first run, when he passed me. Maybe I am not going to bunny hop some log mounts, but with the knobbies, on loose ground, one can get rolling pretty well. Other than the more Herculean obstacles on some mountain bike trails, doing the hops, this ride really goes well. For the record, the Titlist Shimano front derailleur is on it, back is a Crane Rear Derailleur, I am informed, a very good derailleur, found on net selling for $55.


   RE:MISC:   Aussie Road Ace, Roo on the Badge posted by Titlist on 8/28/2003 at 2:51:31 PM
I mentioned freebie above, but within weeks, as is always the case, repairs needed, not too much. Sugino Crank with the Star Bike as well. Pastel Blue color. Has plenty of chipping, that I should probably do something to avoid corrosion.

   RE:MISC:   Aussie Road Ace, Roo on the Badge posted by Dave on 8/28/2003 at 3:00:36 PM
Titlist, The Crane rear derailler was the first generation of "Dura Ace" and is supposedly of good quality , a cut above the "Altus" , "Lark" , "Falcon" , or "Eagle" , although the ones named after birds worked well they were fairly heavy. I have a derailler box with two old junked out "Altus" deraillers but the newer one do seem to be a bit better.FYI






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Torque posted by: David on 8/27/2003 at 11:13:11 AM
How tight should the crankarm bolts be on an aluminum cotterless crank? The max torque I can apply using only a peanut butter wrench?


   RE:   Torque posted by Eric Amlie on 8/27/2003 at 12:28:44 PM
I read somewhere it should be 18 foot-pounds for the tapered square end spindles. I generally go to 20. Don't know about the newer splined end spindles.

   RE:RE:   Torque posted by JONathan on 8/27/2003 at 7:19:16 PM
I have a torque-wrench (torsion bar/analog) which raises more questions than answers. You have precision, but is the actual torque accurate? I wonder. The threads and parts usually have residual slime coat of lubrication of all sorts. I wipe off the parts and get them as clean and as dry as possible. I apply the torque wrench and it feels like it gets tighter and tighter with not much change in the reading. Is this because the slight film of lubrication is causing the bolt push the crankarm further onto the tapered spindle? Is the "reading" artificially low? Pretty tricky stuff. I usually just go with what feels right...not too tight, but tight. Sounds dumb, but I question my "mechanical" approach, which to me is less scientific than common sense reasoning. I guess I'm wondering if the torque wrench is a good thing to use on the bike. I've used it on cars and the uniformity is important when you have several bolts along a flat surface, to be sure. On the crank, you have this aluminum alloy being scrunched onto a high-test tapered spindle by a high-grade bolt...much like a log-splitter would split logs...the crankarm being analogous to the log. Any words of wisdom appreciated....Cheers, JONathan

     Torque wrench reading posted by John E on 8/27/2003 at 8:04:26 PM
Because of the variables JONathan mentions, even the best torque wrench is only a rough guide for tightness. Tightening torque means something only while the bolt is still turning; once it seats, one can indeed keep turning the wrench to a higher and higher reading.

I have always lubricated the threads and spindle end and torqued aluminum cranks by feel, and have had very few problems with this admittedly primitive mechanical system. I always check them after the first 50mi/80km or whenever they begin to creak. That being said, when I do mistighten any mechanical threaded system, including an automotive spark plug in an aluminum head, I am historically more likely to undertorque it than to overtorque it.

   RE:  Torque wrench reading posted by JONathan on 8/27/2003 at 10:08:24 PM
A "primative" approach for a "primative" machine. Makes sense to me. It's not like the crank is going at 17K rpm. Actually, I think if you consider the powerplant, a bike is pretty advanced. In this case, I would offer primative as intelligent, just as "specialized" doesn't mean "advanced". I always knew that I was smarter than a wrench! Thanks for the advice and/or answer to my question.

   RE:  Torque wrench reading posted by Ron on 8/28/2003 at 12:11:38 AM
I am not so familiar with torque values on bikes, but in general, there are two types of torque values, torque to stretch, and torque to yield. Many automotive assemblies are torque to yield, which means torquing the bolt until it has a permanent lengthening, and once disassembled, the bolt is discarded.
Most everything else is torqued to stretch, where the bolt is stretched to a point less than the yield strength of the bolt. It is important that the threads are clean and free of anything that would affect the final torque. Usually this means that there is no lubricant on the threads. Values for aluminum components would be lower due to the lower yield strength.

   RE:RE:  Torque wrench reading posted by JONathan on 8/29/2003 at 3:32:04 AM
Hey, Ron, that is very useful to know about the different torques.
Learn somethin evryday. Thanks, JONathan

   RE:RE:RE:  Torque wrench reading posted by Torque wrenches on 8/29/2003 at 10:35:08 PM
Hi Jonathan,

Here's a quote about this very subject in an article by
Lennard Zinn (a pretty sharp guy and frame builder) and a
response to it in Velonews online, and the link to the full article:

http://velonews.com/tech/report/articles/4885.0.html

Corey

"I strongly believe in the use of torque wrenches for properly and safely assembling bicycles. However, I have become somewhat gun-shy about it due to unexpected negative consequences of using them that have been relayed to me..."


   RE:RE:RE:RE:  Torque wrench reading posted by JONathan on 8/30/2003 at 6:11:09 AM
Thanks for posting. I read the article, which left me further baffled by the whole idea.
If I place a breaker bar on the crank bo;t and carefully measure out one foot and place a 10 kg. weight at that point, the torque is 22 Ft.-Pounds; which sems like not very much "torque". This would only prove accurate at Mean Sea Level, since weight is a function of gravity which diminishes with separation of the two masses. With a spring scale calibrated at MSL to "zero", then I could apply the force with any means. Mow, the torque is really not vertical! It is applied over an incline plane with variable (transient) static friction coeeficients. Which brings me back to the "common sense" principle. Which is centered around the error-on-the-low end of the range. Tight, but not too tight.
The poinyt raised in the article briefly touched on the idea of standardizing how torque values are determined. The reason I will rely on judgement instead of the torque wrench is to avoid over-torquing. Just my 2c's...JONathan






MISC:   Eye Candy; Bike Lust; , Allegro posted by: Titlist on 8/27/2003 at 4:24:28 AM
Okay, my name, comes from some front derailluer, Shimano once put out, and they don't even spell it, like the American version and company Titleist does. Pretty sure.

A lot going around, I was looking at Mike's Carlton, classic, John E. mentions his Capo, at times.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3624031374&category=22681



Can't help, but think, this "Allegro", is a classic, exactly, from the same time ... more or less. Feel like I shouldn't plug the auctions up there again, but this one is fascinating, paint and all. A frame, Swiss, illustration of a cyclist on there. Interesting bit of history. 531 ; opening at $20 , I got to think, reserve and all. I don't know, a grand at least it will go at?


   RE:MISC:   Eye Candy; Bike Lust; , Allegro posted by David on 8/27/2003 at 11:12:53 AM
I doubt it'll get $200; too many problems.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Eye Candy; Bike Lust; , Allegro posted by Mike on 8/27/2003 at 12:03:12 PM
I saw that too and thought it would make a nice project. Sure there are problems but I think that they can be overcome.

   RE:MISC: Eye Candy; Bike Lust; , Allegro posted by Warren on 8/27/2003 at 12:39:36 PM
I think this is exactly the place to plug auctions. We're a bunch of enthusiasts who share info. If an item comes up, we can all bid on it fair and square. It's sour grapes to complain that an item you're bidding on got outed.

    Allegro posted by John E on 8/27/2003 at 2:47:01 PM
I have always admired Allegros, but never owned one. I wonder whether the missing head tube spacer is simply the hanger for the front centerpull brake, as I am sure a Swiss bike of this vintage would have come with Vainqueur 999s.

   RE: Allegro posted by Titlist on 8/27/2003 at 10:36:32 PM
That site, seems to refer to www.allegrobikes.com ; histrionics, I should catch up with come winter time. That one seems remarkably intact. To me, more artistic than a Ducat; seeming to be made a big fuss about in the past.

Some folks may plug their goods here, not I. Maybe at some point, I can put up something for auction. I like it, that it is such a market for various items, from around the country.

   RE:RE: Allegro posted by Art on 8/28/2003 at 1:59:15 AM
This is an interesting frame, even with the headset problems. Allegro did some pretty interesting things with their paint designs, this being one of them. They did a lot of experimenting with colors,colors on chrome, fades, that sort of thing. They didn't paint every bike in the same way. The Allegro website is also good, if you haven't checked it out. Allegro, at least the frame I have, used French threading. Aren't French and Swiss pretty compatible. Would a set of French cups fit the headset better than the Magistronis? Mine is a '61, all chrome, the paint and decals long gone before I got the frame. Mine has campy dropouts and the oiler like this one. Personally, if I was looking to build up a classic frame, and I could resolve the headseat problems, I would prefer this frame with it's paint and graphics over a PX 10 or a even a Paramount!

   RE:RE:RE: Allegro posted by Art on 8/28/2003 at 2:01:26 AM
Sorry, I should have said that is uses SWISS threading rather than French.

    Allegro posted by John E on 8/28/2003 at 4:43:33 PM
French, Swiss, and Austrian (at least Capo) headsets are interchangeable.

French and Swiss adjustable BB cups are the same, but the fixed BB cup is clockwise threaded for French bikes before the late 1970s and anticlockwise (properly) threaded for later French bikes and all Swiss bikes I have seen. (I have reverified that Austrian bikes use English/ISO BB threading, which is identical to Swiss except in having 24 TPI instead of 25.4 TPI = 1 mm threading.)






AGE / VALUE:   khs classic posted by: josh on 8/27/2003 at 3:51:44 AM
I was wondering the value of khs classic that I am wanting to sell or trade. It is a small bike and has suntour arx deraillers with suntour downtube shifters. Diacompe brakes and levers with 27 by 1 araya wheels. it appears to have been barely ridden. Any Ideas on what is fair price would be great







AGE / VALUE:   Frejus 10 speed posted by: Schwinnderella on 8/27/2003 at 1:07:39 AM
I bought a woman's Frejus a few weeks ago.Originally I was attracted to the aluminum Frejus fenders and the Wastyn Cycles Dealer sticker.It was really dirty,after cleaning it up today it looks real nice. Has a
Henri Gauthier leather saddle,Balilla center pulls and weinmann brake levers,Simplex chainrings,changers and Simplex levers marked made in Italy.The rims are steel.Hubs and crank arms are marked Frejus. I am aware this is not
a high quality bike,but I think it has a nice vintage look,I am guessing early 60's.I wonder if this bike was originally equiped with upright bars. The saddle and pedals make me think it could have been,but I notice
the brake levers have grey cable housings,the changers have white cable housings.I also wonder if they would have mixed Weinmann levers and balilla calipers? Below is a link to a pic. Comments?
http://www.ameritech.net/users/hlansdowne/frejusgreen.jpg


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Frejus 10 speed posted by Warren on 8/27/2003 at 1:40:00 AM
Sweet and clean. Looks like an original town bike to me...it might get a few bucks from a Frejus collector. I'd say mid 60's. The guys at classicrendezvous might like that one


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Frejus 10 speed posted by Titlist on 8/27/2003 at 2:00:52 AM
That Rear Deraileur, ? Can you tell us what that is?

This place has been jumping lately, enjoy

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Frejus 10 speed posted by Titlist on 8/27/2003 at 2:15:50 AM
THat's some beauty,

For some reason, Rise Bars, give a bike an aura of BEAUTY only to me, that I don't find, on the RAMS HOrns, that's only me.

OTHERS????

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Frejus 10 speed posted by schwinnderella on 8/27/2003 at 3:04:36 AM
The rear changer is a simplex ,i do not know the model ,but it is one of those with the plastic body.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Frejus 10 speed posted by Oscar on 8/27/2003 at 3:17:51 AM
Sweet bike, Schwinnderella. I especially love the saddle. I've seen plenty of Italian bikes with Ballilla calipers and Weinmann levers. I've also seen them the other way around, too. Ballilla levers, especially with the see-through hoods and very nice.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Frejus 10 speed posted by JONathan on 8/27/2003 at 7:01:44 AM
Rockin' righteous. Dig those pedals. The honest essence, so well represented in a beautifully unpretentious construction. Thanks for posting.
Take it for a spin, like sailin' on a summer's breeze. JONathan

     Frejus 10 speed posted by John E on 8/27/2003 at 8:06:51 PM
I believe that Simplex derailleur is the late 1960s predecessor of the black Prestige of bike boom Peugeot UO-8 fame.






AGE / VALUE:   Frejus 10 speed posted by: Schwinnderella on 8/27/2003 at 1:07:39 AM
I bought a womam's Frejus a few weeks ago.Originally I was attracted to the aluminum Frejus fenders and the Wastyn Cycles Dealer sticker.It was really dirty,after cleaning it up today it looks real nice. Has a
Henri Gauthier leather saddle,Balilla center pulls and weinmann brake levers,Simplex chainrings,changers and Simplex levers marked made in Italy.The rims are steel.Hubs and crank arms are marked Frejus. I am aware this is not
a high quality bike,but I think it has a nice vintage look,I am guessing early 60's.I wonder if this bike was originally equiped with upright bars. The saddle and pedals make me think it could have been,but I notice
the brake levers have grey cable housings,the changers have white cable housings.I also wonder if they would have mixed Weinmann and balilla calipers? Below is a link to a pic. Comments?
http://www.ameritech.net/users/hlansdowne/frejusgreen.jpg







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Help adjusting Valentino derailluer posted by: Jason on 8/26/2003 at 12:59:55 PM
does anyone know of a website the explains how to set up older Campagnolo derailluers I picked up a old road bike with a valentino rear derailluer front deailluer is also campy. The rear doesn't pull back to take up the chain slack after shifting for the big chain ring to the small one any help would be great.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Help adjusting Valentino derailluer posted by Steven on 8/26/2003 at 1:31:15 PM
Are you sure that the derailleur spring is still strong enough for the job? You must realize that your derailleur is likely over 30 years old and they do have a limited lifespan. The other possibility is that you do not have the right length chain.

      Help adjusting Valentino derailluer posted by John E on 8/26/2003 at 2:20:49 PM
If the derailleur cage has enough travel to take up the chain slack, but does not do so on its own, you will need to adjust or replace the spring. Also, make sure the cage pivot is well-lubricated and able to turn without binding. The Valentino was Campag.'s bargain-basement model, but it is robust.

Another thought -- if someone permitted the cage to unwind one extra turn, you may be able to solve your problem by rotating it one full turn clockwise (as viewed from the back of the derailleur), to restore the necessary anticlockwise spring torque.






AGE / VALUE:   Gran Sport posted by: jfisherhr on 8/26/2003 at 5:59:44 AM
I just got an older bike, probably from the '70s, but doesn't say what brand of bike it is. Maybe someone can help me figure this out...?

Anyway, here are some specifics:

Model Name: Gran Sport
Color: Metallic Silver
Front Derailleur: Suntour Spirit
Rear Derailleur: Suntour Honor
Tires: KMS 27 x 1 1/2
Brakes: Dia-compe
Serial Number: 70500358

Thanks in advance,
jfisherhr


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Gran Sport posted by Dave on 8/26/2003 at 2:11:30 PM
Sounds like a Raleigh road bike to me, I have a '72 Gran Prix but that originally had French parts and cottered cranks but they went to Japanese parts by the later 70's. What color is it and does it have white or black bands on the downtube and seattube?

    Gran Sport posted by John E on 8/26/2003 at 2:50:54 PM
Introduced in 1968, the SunTour Honor and Sprit were low-end models. This Gran Sport sounds like a department store or private labeled early 1970s Japanese bike to me. Look for a Made in Japan sticker or a frame tubing pedigree decal. Also, tell us about the crankset, pedals, and shifters (stem-mounted versus downtube-mounted).

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Gran Sport posted by jfisherhr on 8/26/2003 at 4:28:45 PM
it's all metallic silver, with sort of red highlights around the lugs, although these look like they were maybe added later, because they're awfully shoddy.

the crankset is an SR double crank, the pedals are super-generic metal jobs with reflectors hanging below, and the shifters are suntour power shift stem-mounts.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Gran Sport posted by Dave on 8/26/2003 at 6:29:57 PM
Sounds like John is correct . I have a 1964 Varsity that was fitted with a Honor rear derrailer but I bent it in an accident and it needs replacing , definitely a low price model bike you have and most likely early 70's.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Gran Sport posted by DannyJoe on 8/27/2003 at 1:49:20 AM
I spotted a '70's 10spd this past weekend in a guy's collection and the brand name was Grantsport, at least that's what my feeble memory is telling me it was, didn't really pay to much attention to it's detail.






AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian "DBS" Oglaend 10-speed posted by: JONathan on 8/26/2003 at 4:24:29 AM
Need some advice about a bike for sale at 42.50$US. It is made in Norway; headbadge has "DBS" in block letters; seat-tube has decal "?onas Oglaend" across it; down-tube has "WINNER" decal (had sense of humor anyway) and SunTour "GT" front and rear. Downtube shifters; Weinmann 610/750 cp's and a hard plastic saddle "made in Germany". The interesting features are; (1) in the middle of the headtube opposite the badge is what appears to be a lock screw threaded into a knurled nut; similar to a tappet adjuster on an engine; (2) the seat-stays are very thin-diameter and are hardly tapered; (3) the crank is one-piece and the whole bearing ring moves around the BB; crank-arms are fairly small diameter; (3) the frame is not lugged and the welds are heavy beaded around the joints; (4) the seatpost is about the smallest I've ever seen; (5) the dropouts are very thin and broad and (6) the brake bridge is a large plate welded at several points and with holes for other attachments besides the brake. Is this a worthy bike to add to a the herd? I don't have a Norwegian bike! However, the price is borderline for my budget, although I have some carryover from last month's surplus...I was "good", according to criteria I can't comprehend...Thanks, in advance.
Itching to buy one! JONathan


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by Dave on 8/26/2003 at 2:21:35 PM
Not to sure about Norweigian (my Grandfather on my Dad's side ancestory) but Sheldon Brown guide disparages the Swedish made Monarch/Crescent bikes and very poorly made machines, sloppily assembled and not very sturdy. This one may be simular so "Caveat Emptor",(let the buyer beware).

   pass on it posted by John E on 8/26/2003 at 3:00:00 PM
The good: The SunTour GT was a decent mid-level offering. The Weinmann Vainqueur centerpulls are the best part of the bike.


The bad: The crankset is junk. The frame is junk.


The ugly: The dropouts, the brake bridge, and the saddle are junk.


Are the wheels any good? How about the handlebars and stem? If you think the derailleurs, brakes, and possibly the wheelset merit the $42 ante, buy it, salvage them, and scrap the frameset and crank.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by schwinnderella on 8/26/2003 at 3:29:33 PM
I had one of these as I recall it was a light green.I took a few parts and junked the rest as John E suggests.I believe mine had Huret changers and levers.I believe Jonas Ogleand was a bicycle importer possibly in New York.I believe mine was probably early 70's I found mine on the curb.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by JONathan on 8/26/2003 at 4:06:46 PM
Thanks, everyone. Me thinks; "Let sleeping 'dogs' lie". The suggested components are in good condition, indicative of little use over a wide span of time with indoor weathering. Since nobody is standing up cheering this discovery, I guess the best thing is to wait it out for the inevitable drop in price; assuming some "walk-on" doesn't pick it up. The bikes are moving at a good clip, except for the accummulative junky rides that use thrift stores as a filter. This bike looked great next to the hodge-podge of dilapidated iron hulks posted up around it. Do folks actually buy the junk? The bikes seem to disappear over time, but they also have a huge dumpster in back.
Thanks, again. Now, I need a pizza to celebrate my wise decision....JONathan
BTW, I still cannot determine what that set-screw on the head-tube is supposed to do, except gore a kneecap. Maybe it is a steering damper for rough roads.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by JONathan on 8/26/2003 at 4:27:15 PM
The color is light green, too. The unsaturated hue was a pleasant surprise to see in a "regular" bike. Classic example where a good paint-job is big plus toward selling a bike that otherwise is lacking favorable attributes.
Pretty nice ol "runner", it could be.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by Rob on 8/26/2003 at 6:00:40 PM
'Oglaend DBS' was basically the Norwegian national bike manufacturer, with a very long history...the factory was apparently closed several years ago by the conglomerate which had owned it in recent years...DBS apparently produced a wide range of different types of bikes. DBS stands for "Den Beste Sykkel"..."the very best bicycle". They apparently produced some interesting bikes along the way, plus a lot of basic transportation...as to whether or not the one you're looking at is worth bothering about, I would trust your instincts...it does sound marginal to me. The DBS 'La Migliore', a vintage lightweight, is one model they made that sounds interesting...I don't know how they were equipped, and I imagine they were pretty rare on the ground. Like the Swedish Crescent, most are probably OK, but basic...with a few interesting, and likely pretty rare, models....I've seen a number of Crescents, but the price was never low enough to justify what would be a basic bike... the Crescent to look for has the unlikely model name, "Pepita"...

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by freespirit on 8/26/2003 at 8:42:03 PM
DBS Ogloend made a top-of-the-line bike that was 531db with a campy driveline. Its shown in Eugene Sloanes "THE ALL NEW COMPLETE BOOK OF BICYCLING" 3rd edition (1980), also one of my favorite bike books with lots of pictures and a really good reference for information on vintage bikes and parts.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by Rob on 8/26/2003 at 9:43:46 PM
Here's a link to the only photo I could find of a DBS La Migliore...not a great photo:

http://www.hovik.com/index.asp?target=/sykkel/sykkelstallen.asp&lang=ENG

And some better photos of Crescents in general and the Crescent Pepita Special, in particular:

http://hem.passagen.se/cykhist/cyklar-c.html
http://www.campyonly.com/images/retrobikes/2002/crescent_ps1973.jpg


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by Titlist on 8/27/2003 at 4:22:43 AM
I read a book, "Pedaling For Glory" about the Tour De France, of 1996 or 1997, Bjarne Riis won it. Any time, something Scandinavian comes up, well, there is precedence. Just makes one think. And appreciate.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by JONathan on 8/27/2003 at 7:36:28 AM
La migliore....the "best". That's a bike. Looks like they stay on the flats with that gearing. Thanks for posting that one. That bike is one of the nicest I've seen and Norway doesn't get much press time about their bikes.
I like the minimal, efficient look. Built to cruise. La Migliore and the "winner", that's juxtaposition for you. They came correct with the Milgliore. They must have sent the "winners" as exports during the bikeboom and kept the La Migliores.
Can't say I blame 'em for that, I'd try to unload those "winners" myself....JONathan

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by Titlist on 8/27/2003 at 2:59:25 PM
If ever important, http://www.joeclark.org/icebike.html ; the Ice Bike Mailing List, I think, has some Scandinavians, subscribing. Read the archives, some gentleman would speak about drinking Old Deet, I am not sure what that might be. In my mind, I think, something like Jagermeister, to make it through the cold wintry nights. Bjarne Riss, TdF winner, apparently was Norweigan. I am afraid of confusing those countries. I've seen those jerseys around, for Norway. Thought Vintage Velos had them. Speaking of; they had the Della Santa jersey, I thought immaculate, but pricey.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Norwegian posted by Dave on 8/27/2003 at 7:55:12 PM
Thor Husvold is a Norweigan pro racing cyclist w/Credit Agricole, last year and won a stage in the Tour of France. Big & strong he almost dropped out in the first week from heat exhaustion but recovered.I think another team has him this year....






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Truing wheels posted by: Darryl on 8/26/2003 at 12:13:33 AM
Some further helps on truing/building wheels. A good but inexpensive book on truing/ building is THE BICYCLE WHEEL by Jobst Brandt. I have been able to build about 8-9 wheelsets using Brandt's book. To make truing easier (or even build a wheelset) you should buy a cheap or used truing stand ($25 - $50) and a wheel dishing guage ($15 - $20). They will last a lifetime. I get a lot of satisfaction out of wheelbuilding.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Truing wheels posted by Randy on 8/26/2003 at 2:04:27 AM
I got into collecting vintage light weights about eight months ago. There is a very good article on building and truing wheels on Sheldon Brown's web site. I followed this article and I can now do a good job with the whole process of setting up a wheel. Get a practice wheel at the landfill site and learn how. It is really not that difficult. If you are at all interested I touch on subjects like this on my web site "Vintage Life Cycles". http://www.geocities.com/randyjawa/index.html

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Truing wheels posted by Ken on 8/26/2003 at 6:09:12 PM
Jobst Brandt is one of the great minds of cycling, as well as one of America's great curmudgeons. Lots of people have taken issue with his singular worldview, but no one questions his knowledge of how wheels work. Get acquainted with him on http://pardo.net/bike/wheel/
While I'm here I should take issue with Randy's landfill suggestion. Good parts give great satisfaction when they go together into good wheels, but contrariwise, trying to get a flat spot out of a rim is no way to learn wheelsmithing.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Truing wheels posted by Titlist on 8/26/2003 at 9:06:27 PM
Go to a bicycling coop; what they had plenty of??? Wheels... and what do I have plenty of? Wheels...

At times, one can't throw anything away. I did a stick shifter, don't really need it, but they seem to be a neccessity for your low rider, etc. bikes.