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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







MISC:   Victoria was my Queen posted by: Titlist on 9/20/2003 at 6:52:03 PM
A lot of petty squabbling going on, but the English Three Speed, endures!

http://www.lyred.com/lyrics/Kinks/Arthur+Or+The+Decline+And+Fall+Of+The+British+Empire/Victoria/

Long ago life was clean
Sex was bad and obscene
And the rich were so mean
Stately homes for the lords
Croquet lawns, village greens
Victoria was my queen
Victoria, victoria, victoria, 'toria

I was born, lucky me
In a land that i love
Though i am poor, i am free
When i grow i shall fight
For this land i shall die
Let her sun never set
Victoria, victoria, victoria, 'toria
Victoria, victoria, victoria, toria

Land of hope and gloria
Land of my victoria
Land of hope and gloria
Land of my victoria
Victoria, 'toria
Victoria, victoria, victoria, 'toria

Canada to india
Australia to cornwall
Singapore to hong kong
From the west to the east
From the rich to the poor
Victoria loved them all
Victoria, victoria, victoria, 'toria
Victoria, victoria, victoria









VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Sekine Medaille GS 2 Spd posted by: Tom M on 9/19/2003 at 5:36:52 AM
I found a bike today that is very interesting. It is a Sekine Medialle GS with a Shimano 2 speed rear hub. The hub shifts with a strange type of lever. It has high and low. The shifter is part of the brake lever, they cannot be separated. The bike can shift when standing still like the first Bendix 2 speed bikes. The bike is a ladies with 26 x 1 3/8" wheels. The rims are nice steel ones. The fenders are stainless in mint shape and very detailed design. The brakes are alloy as is the stem. The bars are like Raleigh upright bars. The bike is in excellent shape with original tires with the nipples on the treads. The rest of the bike looks new. There is a few scratches here and there. Has anyone seen a bike like this.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Sekine Medaille GS 2 Spd posted by Dave on 9/19/2003 at 1:26:05 PM
Tom, Years ago I bought from a resale shop a 24" wheeled bike that had a Shimano 2-speed but it was a BMX freewheel on the back and the 2-speed trigger shifted the front derailler. It had a fixed Shimano 2-jockey wheel chain tensioner,(there's a mouthful!), which I still have in a parts box. The trigger shifter broke one day,(this was a Murray kids bike),and the rear wheel started to break spokes so I stripped the bike for parts. This is the first time I've heard of a 2-speed rear hub.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Sekine Medaille GS 2 Spd posted by Tom M on 9/19/2003 at 2:54:48 PM
The hub is quite small for a hub with internal gears. It also has a small cog with only 14 teeth. The flange on the hub is maybe 2 1/2" wide and the gearing is in a cog setup on the right side of the flange not inside the hub. It also has the fulcrum lever like other Shimano 3 spd hubs. The rear cable must have been replaced as it is black and brake cables are white. I will get pictures of it in the next day and post them. The bike is all apart for a good cleaning. I am sure the bike has almost no miles on it.
I saw another Sekine bike a few years ago with interesting gearing. It was a fold up bike with 20" wheels. The rear hub was a 4 speed from what I can remember. I didn't pay too much attention to it. Seems to me it was internal gearing but don't remember any more about it.
Sekine bikes are quite plentiful here in Winnipeg. The factory was only 2 hours away.
On the weekend I saw a ladies 27" Medialle with flat bars and alloy fenders. A guy I work with rides a Medialle with Shimano components, steel rims QR front hub. Plain looking bike. Our Police auction this spring had at least 20 Sekine bikes mostly wrecks. There was 1 interesting one with everything high end parts, not Campy. It sold for over $100. Most of them go for $20.






AGE / VALUE:   Fuji Sport 10 posted by: humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/18/2003 at 11:21:23 PM
Where is the blue, mens 10 speed Fuji bike on the list of Fuji's bikes. Where does it rank.
Thanks


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Fuji Sport 10 posted by gary m on 9/18/2003 at 11:28:05 PM
that is the bottom of the pail Chris, entry level. should be a steel wheeled device. could be fixed up though. i think what you want is called a Gran Sport SE

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Fuji Sport 10 posted by Chris on 9/20/2003 at 5:23:45 PM
Thanks for the tip, I thought it was of no account.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Fuji Sport 10 posted by Chris on 9/22/2003 at 4:51:44 PM
The bike now sits in the garage shaking wit fear that I may throw it out.
I have a pal whom I'll give it to. He'll stick it in the basement to rust.
Either way, what a way to go!






AGE / VALUE:   box lining and similar small but magnificent touches posted by: Chris on 9/18/2003 at 11:11:46 PM
The light blue box lining on this 1956 Flying Scot track bike are really something.
They are so well done, beautiful and complete.
It's on the bike all over. decorative and wonderful. This bike is really something special.

This has what I call vintage bike "Mojo"
I cleaned the Brampton headset and it is like brand new!
It gleams.

I want to learn to do box lining by hand and I'm going to start. Perhaps after 10 years of continuous practice I'll be decent enough.

No way would this ever be restored. It's too nice but where would I ever find somebody who would do such a nice job as what is there now?
Sorry for rambling on about this Scot again. I was looking at those decorated panels today again.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   box lining and similar small but magnificent touches posted by Titlist on 9/19/2003 at 1:57:48 AM
Cool, I've got to think, the box lining, is; well, as Kwai Chang Kain might have said, "tell us Master" ; I mean, that sounds to me, like the lining, the contiguous brush strokes in some bikes, like around the lugs and on some mudguards. Excuse me, this is a bit greek to me; I hope you tell us, and I don't look silly for asking this.

   RE: box lining posted by Aldo Ross on 9/19/2003 at 1:00:41 PM
You can see pics show a little bit of white box lining on a blue Legnano at Classic Rendezvous:

http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Italy/Legn_1962-2htm.htm

   RE:RE: box lining posted by Dave on 9/19/2003 at 1:30:10 PM
My Hobbs has this detailing. Some of the paint chipped off of the top of a seatstay so I could see how they painted a base layer of the stripe color then painted over it with the top color to create the box lining.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   box lining and similar small but magnificent touches posted by David on 9/19/2003 at 1:44:16 PM
Even my 1955 Schwinn T&C tandem has nice painted box lining. There are decals for the trademarks but painted lines. Even after 48 years of scratchy abuse they look very classy.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   box lining and similar small but magnificent touches posted by Titlist on 9/19/2003 at 2:15:21 PM
Yes, the Motobecane 3 speed has it, I would need to check the Super Tourer, but I believe it does as well.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   box lining and similar small but magnificent touches posted by sam on 9/20/2003 at 2:02:26 AM
Very old experenced men! The young could do the common stuff,maybe after 20years,they move up to club bikes.And I bet you didn't touch their brushes!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   box lining and similar small but magnificent touches posted by Phillip on 9/20/2003 at 7:31:19 AM
Don't let these stalking bumwipes, interfere with your fun here, kindly invite them to speak to the police, for everyone's rights to justice, report them to oldroads. Someone who stalks someone, just to try to molest them, can't be worth a hill of beans. Cowards at that too, to allow the rest of us to know their identity






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Helium French Bikes posted by: Titlist on 9/18/2003 at 3:35:39 PM
Helium French Bikes, http://bulgier.net/pics/bike/CoolBikes/Peugeot_'Helium'/DT_decal.jpg ; apparently upscale model, made by Peugeout, but I thought at one point, it was it's own company.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Helium French Bikes posted by Warren on 9/19/2003 at 4:18:23 AM
A popular Helium model was the "folder" model with the odd 22" tires and usually in white. I'm not so sure that it actually folded though.They branded the same bike as a Peugeot as well. I think you have to special order the tires so beware if you see one.






MISC:   Vehicular Cycling Website posted by: Titlist on 9/18/2003 at 2:41:45 PM
http://www.magma.ca/'ocbc/index.html

; this is an interesting website, Canada being so close and really, offering so many unique cycling goods, not readily found in the US; may find me visiting there one day, especially, with some of the friends I have made on this website. I've had a drought of bad luck, with automobiles and have really stuck with cars mainly for about 6 mos. This may change soon. Should I make a trip, I may request some pointers. THe above website is interesting, but I really do wonder; if it takes some famous incident as we have recently come to hear about, to create awareness. I also feel, I am not doing my proper part, if there are times, I don't use lights, are times, I don't have my night lights going, this a unique problem again, if some has a handfull or more bicycles.


     Vehicular Cycling Website posted by John E on 9/19/2003 at 2:40:53 PM
The sole rational argument against wearing a helmet is risk compensation, i.e., that the helmet may give one a false sense of security, thereby encouraging risky behaviour. Personally, I am emphatically pro-helmet, but also opposed to mandatory helmet legislation for adults.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Vehicular Cycling Website posted by JONathan on 9/19/2003 at 9:37:13 PM
I have gotten used to my helmut, after I found a good one that is comfortable, fits snug and appears to be fairly well designed for the purpose. I hardly know it is on and it provides a good mounting for a head-lamp.
However, I realize the limited impact protection compared to my motorcycle helmut. Even so, they must greatly reduce the effect of hitting blacktop and concrete. To me, it is an issue of plain common sense. Strap up, ride long and prosper.
JONathan

   RE:MISC:   Vehicular Cycling Website posted by Rob on 9/18/2003 at 10:16:54 PM
Titlist...

(Just a reminder, because of the fonts OldRoads uses the apostrophe before the ocbc should be a tilde.)

Interesting site...the helmet debate rages on...as for me putting on my helmet is second nature now...automatic...and it doesn't bother me at all to wear it.. I never think about it...a bit like buckling up in a car...but, neverthless, I can see that some people don't like being forced to do things under penalty of law, and I would agree that if there is a practical way to educate people they can decide for themselves...My 2 cents worth...

   RE:RE:MISC:   Vehicular Cycling Website posted by Titlist on 9/19/2003 at 1:12:08 AM
Thanks for the response, also, forgive me, for at times, writing something, not always coherent, I have solely almost relied on bikes for this year. Last night, of all things, I had to drive about 10 miles no lights, from St. Paul to Bloomington, most of it is a bike path in a forest, I have done this before, call out late at night, mainly being to warn off any deer that might run into my path. So, sorry I wrote that this morning, after a fairly hectic night, I wrote that message. Blinkers are portable. Sorry, if this is a glib and bland problem. Don't mean to bore.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage Klein Frameset posted by: Luker on 9/18/2003 at 3:40:56 AM
I recently acquired, along with some parts, a damaged Klein frameset. The front derailleur had gotten caught in the chainrings and ripped off, along with the hangar and a little bit of the frame (about 1 square cm gone). Normally, I'd write this off as a loss, but on closer examination, I found that this bike has serial number 0014. So...in the interest of historical preservation, has anyone had any experience with repairs of this nature? Klein doesn't seem inclined to respond to my inquiries directly...

thanks in advance - luker


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage Klein Frameset posted by gary m on 9/18/2003 at 5:20:15 AM
well it sounds to me like a braze on bracket got ripped off clean. i would file it smooth, and hang a clamp on derailleur in its place and ignore it. that tube has lost such a small amount of its total integity i wouldnt even think twice about it. welding on an alloy frame scares me more then having a hole under a clamp.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage Klein Frameset posted by Tom on 9/18/2003 at 12:30:04 PM
Another option would be to fabricate a new hanger. The section which butts against thew seat tube could be made oversize to ensure it covers the hole and re-inforce the area. It could be held in place with pop rivets.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage Klein Frameset posted by Dave on 9/18/2003 at 1:15:43 PM
Kleins are extermely light and harsh rides. I had a early '90's Quantum but after about 70 or 80 miles on a ride my whole upper body would tire out,(maybe a carbon fork wouldv'e helped.)However the bike weighed 18.5 lbs and was the lightest one I've ever owned. I sold it to a budding Tri-athelete, which was a good use for it.






AGE / VALUE:   "Space Flite" single speed posted by: JONathan on 9/18/2003 at 2:26:19 AM
I checked a strange (as in hard to believe) single speed "Space Flite" that had twin downtubes starting at the head-tube and looking like a mixte, but the tubes terminated into the seat-tube instead of the rear dropout. Then I noticed a couple of pipes connecting the twin tubes with the down-tube about halfway down. The twin tubes are about 5/8" diameter as are also the struts.
The struts look incredibly crudely welded, with sharp edges where the tubes attached and gaps. The weld was not a completed task. Sloppy work. The Seat-stays and chain-stays are crimped onto the dropouts. The front fork has a double crown...like stacked steel plates with the fork blades pushing on through. The terminus is squashed into dropouts. Kind like if you put a pipe in a big ol vise and cranked it all the way down to make the wall into parallel flat surfaces.
The Handle bars are wide with a gradual sweep...very funky. Cheap looking stem clamp...crude but effective. The threaded part of the bolt sticks through about 1/2" past the nut. The seat is broad and might be leather. I was in a hurry to get moving, so I may check tomorrow, On the fork blade, near the crown, is a decal that looks like a ring slanted at a angle with two open traingles poking through it...like the letter "M" only triangles without a 90 deg. angle.
The chain guard has "Space Flite", misspelled on purpose I suppose, across the length.
26x1.3/8" steel wheels with a SA "sc" hub. The head badge was missing except for two rivets. It looked like it was pretty large size. The bike ride amazing well. The head set is sound and well machined. I can get it for 17.50 US. Is this anything you have seen?
Is it a good one to restore or is it one for the soup pot?
It has Raleigh tires! I think it is 1965.
I may get it, if anyone gives a nod. No rush on this one. It'll be there. This place has a long turn around on bikes.
Cheers, JONathan


   RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Dave on 9/18/2003 at 1:23:19 PM
I suppose you could ride it until the frame goes. I had a Roadmaster MTB that I found on a bike path once. It was flat black and had poor looking "tack welds" where the frame was stamped together. I rode it about 3 months then when rounding a corner heard a loud snap. The left rear seatstay broke off @the droupout,right on the tack weld. I was able to ride it another mile home with the rear wheels rubbing but the frame was gone. Too bad, I did like the ride quality.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by JONathan on 9/18/2003 at 4:03:45 PM
Thanks for that information, Dave. Although I have become quite creative in sneaking these hulks into the herd out back, I think it best to let this one slide.
The lack of quality in construction, compared to Schwinns from the same era, is a bit hard to fathom. This was before the frantic production efforts of the bikeboom, so there is little excuse for the sloppy job. I mean, it is almost as much work to do it right, as to make it look shoddy, yet the results are infinitely more esthetic and functional.
Either they're standards were low, or they had a small degree of contempt for the consumers..."they won't notice".
THis one had the fade going bigtime on the paint job, yet the wheels turned ture and there was little sign of physical damage. It never got put through the test enough to end up in the situation you described happened with yours.
While I spun to the back of the lot to check for the bikes, I had to find an emplyee to price the bike, during which time (looking for him) I stumbled on a sack of "brand new" Dia-Compe brake levers, handlebar tape and bar caps; obviously changed out for another setup. $3 was all it took for those.
Again, bumbling luck is where it's at, when looking for bikes. Spur of the moment stuff works...like order out of chaos...mayne.
In fairness, as sloppy as this bike looked in construction, the materials used were tough enough to cover for it. High margin for error.
And, as kids were the main users of these rides, the product was like a notch above a toy to the buyer, who aould not scrutinize the workmanship with great interest. Then, you look at a Sears, Austrian 3-speed, from the same era and think; "How could the other bikes compete"? The Schwinn were the exception, but they were expensive.
JONathan






FOR SALE:   Schwinn Traveler - Mint posted by: Tim on 9/17/2003 at 6:22:36 PM
I am new to this discussion forum and am impressed how civil all of the posters are! And I thought I was the only persn who thought that 1970s or 80s road bikes are cool. Anyhow, in the the For Sale discussion group I have posted a '84 Schwinn Traveler. It would be on a trade basis only. Please take a look if you are interested, but keep in mind the frame is large, 24", about 61 cm. Thanks!


   RE:FOR SALE:   Schwinn Traveler - Mint posted by Gralyn on 9/17/2003 at 6:45:35 PM
Is it my imagination? Or is this forum, the number of folks who post, and the number of posts, growing?

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Schwinn Traveler - Mint posted by JC on 9/17/2003 at 7:24:41 PM
I've been following this web site since around 1998.
It keeps growing, and growing, and growing...

Performance isn't too bad, and there are no pop-ups!

   RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Schwinn Traveler - Mint posted by JONathan on 9/17/2003 at 9:51:40 PM
I saw a "SOLD" 10-speed traveler in the listings. Went for $69.
Is it a silvery/gray color, 12 speed? Incredibly good riding boke.
Maybe it has not been posted in the list. I'll check later. You say; "mint"! Must be ready to roll.
Weinmann "vainqueurs" and Sugino vp cranks? I like the steel chainrings and SunTour Ar rear derailer.
What you looking for?
JONathan

   RE:FOR SALE:   Schwinn Traveler - Mint posted by Rob on 9/17/2003 at 11:07:55 PM
Yes...the site is definitely growing, though I think this "back to school" time of year has given it a bit of boost in the last few weeks. I've been visiting this site regularly for about two years now and have found it a terrific source of information...I love those old road bikes, particularly the late '60's through to the early '80's. It seems these days there is nothing I like better than going for a nice long ride on one of my old bikes. I look forward each morning and evening to my commute (nine miles each way)...rain or shine...(of course, I don't have to say which I would prefer...:)...)

As to the civility of the site, it is, indeed, excellent. Occasionally the odd "flamer" strays in, but they don't stay long. The subject matter is sufficiently esoteric that you have to be truly interested to want to hang around...

   RE:RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Schwinn Traveler - Mint posted by Tim on 9/18/2003 at 4:59:05 AM
Jonathan, look in the Discussion Area: General for sale/wanted.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Schwinn Traveler - Mint posted by JONathan on 9/18/2003 at 5:16:23 PM
AH! I got the post. I can appreciate the dilemma. I'm out here in N. Ca., a bit out of your circuit or I would talk turkey.
Thanks for the info. Those are fine rides. Way worth what they cost...I'd say a "best buy", for sure. I wonder how many fine bikes were made that were left for naught due to marketing
events. Taking them for parts would be a shame. Unless the bike is trashed, I keep it together. Sometimes I find a worthless bike with a few good components that were obvious upgrades.
I would keep the "trav", myself. They are worth the space. There are a dozen bikes I'd let go, before looking hard at the ol' Trav.
That dog...he wants to hunt!
Cheers, JONathan






AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by: gnarfleuall on 9/17/2003 at 3:48:46 PM
just picked up an Essex tri-directioal Mountain Trike.
anyon have any ideas where i can find a set if omin-directional 3 sided pedals with the combo sae/metric thread conversion kit? i also need a counter-rotating horn shaft, and a 3 peice front axle.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by JONathan on 9/17/2003 at 4:30:12 PM
Hmmmm. MTB tricycle? They used to make tricycle ATV's, I say "used to", because the only ones that I see, now are 4-wheeled...and probably for a good reason! How is it on a traverse? You could try the MTB page.
As for the three-sided pedals. Is there an advantage in using that type? How about the drag-angle?
Whatever works.
JONathan

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Dave on 9/17/2003 at 5:42:14 PM
Sounds like a British machine they have a lot of Tricycles and I have ridden in a couple of PBP's with them. They are sturdy but heavy,esp. ones with differentials. They don't climb very well either but decend very rapidly. There are some very expensive aluminum framed trikes though,(some with 2 front wheels) that lie very close to the ground out now. One brand is the "Wind Cheetah" which did cost $5000.00 for the bike and another $5000.00 for the aerodynamic fairing,(about 4/5 yrs ago). These do climb better than the old style 700cm wheeled trikes.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Keith on 9/17/2003 at 7:03:05 PM
Are we being spoofed?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by JONathan on 9/17/2003 at 9:58:30 PM
I had a bicycle where the two wheels went different directions at the same time, instantaneously. Would that be bi-directional?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Rob on 9/17/2003 at 10:52:57 PM
Could be a "spoof", but I think it's better to take people at face value...If someone knows what the poster is talking about, I guess they'll respond...as for me I've never heard of any of this...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Smitty on 9/18/2003 at 1:25:17 AM
"gnarfleuall" I wonder what this stands for. "gonna fool you all"

   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by gnarfleuall on 9/18/2003 at 5:25:04 AM
with further inspection i have found i will need a 3/4 traversing rod and a self adjusting relay valve. does anyone have any of these laying around?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Keith on 9/18/2003 at 4:48:18 PM
I have an early Edward Lear model, but it can only be used if you're also running dual overhead cams.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Keith on 9/18/2003 at 5:00:13 PM
P.S. You'll also need 2 helicoil release plates, added to later models, since the self ajusting valves were found to exert too much tortional stress on the ball joint, leading to premature failure of the bearing sleeve. This can lead to catastrophic failure and loss of steering on rapid descents.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Oscar on 9/18/2003 at 6:19:26 PM
Further, I would reconfigure the flux capacitor based on wind direction and lunar phase.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by gnarfleuall on 9/18/2003 at 6:41:57 PM
i did find a service bulletin relating to replacment of an oscillating central pivot bearing due to a number of failures relating to torsional flexing. I have ordered a pair of Helicoil release plates, and a pair of quick release
type bearing sleeves. BTW my flux capacitor is a newer style self calibrating model. is anyone also aware of the proper inflation in kilopascals for the barium release venturi? i may be able to run mine this weekend, thanks for all the help.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Keith on 9/18/2003 at 6:57:41 PM
Inflation depends on whether the release venturi has English, French, Swiss or Italian threads. Phil Wood used to make vacuum operated release levers that could be used with differing thread types with adaptor rings, but Phil stopped making them in 1984, when the new greaseguard pivot ring was introduced. Campagnolo once supplied these. They were light and expensive, but would break at the axle-crank juncture. It's listed in Chuck Berto's new book, The Undulating Crank.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Grant on 9/18/2003 at 7:18:25 PM
I grew up in Essex in the 1960s, and I remember the older club members using these tri-directional trikes in special club races. These weren't mtb models -- they ran with standard sized sew ups.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Keith on 9/18/2003 at 7:22:38 PM
When I lived in Italy before going to medical school, I got to know the Masi family personally. Masi made a model with very aggressive racing geometry. I was also able to pick up a 1959 Bianchi tricycle while there, which I still have.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Jim on 9/18/2003 at 7:32:36 PM
I was the team mechanic for United Dairy Farmers, and we used to have at least one of those Campy pivot rings go in every race. We switched to Mavic in a hurry.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Heather on 9/18/2003 at 7:34:36 PM
My aunt just gave me her Woolworth 3-speed bike. I don't know anything about bikes and I was wondering what it's worth.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Rob on 9/18/2003 at 7:38:43 PM
Hey, this thread is getting interesting...It reminds me of that rare collector's item, the "Elicoidali Speziali", fully Campy Super Record and Columbus SLX tubing...apparently it would turn on a dime at 80kph, any faster and you ran the risk of the seat tube corkscrewing and ripping itself right out of the BB...quite a mess actually. They are rare...only a few of them made it out of Italy to North America. Apparently the Reagan Administration viewed them as some kind of conspiracy...no doubt Dunkin Donuts and Ollie North were behind it all...I understand that properly ridden they were perfectly safe... :)...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by gnarfleuall on 9/18/2003 at 8:11:09 PM
am quite sure it was a conspiracy. due to a number of regulations, the warning labels were required to be 3ft square, and blocked all view of the path. The Woolworth conversion reduced the size of the label to a useable size, but must be displayed at all times on the main quillshaft.
similar conversions reulted in a full Campy Super Dura Record cro-moly flush mounted warning label. Deregulation has furter resulted in a tapered spline mounted tag. i am sure my venturi housing uses whitworth threads in a counter camber pitch. i will try to find a vauum release lever that will also work in a blue frame. i am quite sure the Campy units cannot withstand the undulating crank throws common to this model.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Dave on 9/18/2003 at 8:53:55 PM
The operative phrase here is "cranks",(plural)!

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Essex Tri-Directional Mountain trike posted by Lynn on 9/19/2003 at 1:00:26 AM
The vacuum release lever malady is quickly remedied by total saturation of the gudgeon pin retaining in blue steam super heated to 525 f with an omni directional rocky mountian smoke wrench. A word of caution, DO NOT over torque the offset poppet alignment dowel, using a click stop Arkansas caliper apply a three stage torquing sequence to achive a final torque value of .25 inch ounces






AGE / VALUE:   Viscount Update + advice needed posted by: Gralyn on 9/17/2003 at 1:27:11 PM
I've been working on the Viscount the past couple days (Actually, my next project was to be the Nishiki Olympic - but as this Viscount is a little different from most of the other bikes - I coudn't wait - so I jumped right in). A couple things I have encountered: The bike is very lightweight. The frame is very lightweight. But, the chainring seems extra heavy. It is ironic that they made such a lighweight frame - then made up for the light weight by putting such a heavy chainring on it. Initially, I'm leaning toward making it fixed-gear. So, I thought I would try a different chainring on it.....but they won't fit. The square-ends of the spindle are too large for all the crank arms I have. So, now, I'm looking at swapping out the spindle. I do plan on keeping all the original components - so that I can build it back all original if I decide to....but it just bugs me that some of the components are so heavy. Also, the rear wheel - it is heavy, too. I'm thinking it's maybe a Samir...something like that...maybe made in France? It has those textured rim edges like the old Rigida's. But it's heavy.
OK, the real problem I encountered - and where I need some advice - the 1/2 chrome fork.....one side wasn't too bad - and polished up pretty good. But, the other side....a different story! The back-side of the fork polished up OK. The front side - was rusted really badly (all surface). After the polishing....there is no chrome-plating on it at all. When the rust comes off - there is only bare steel left - no chrome. I kind of doubt I will want to try getting it re-chromed. I bet it will cost a lot - and I generally don't like to put too much money into these bikes. I don't know if I can have just the fork-ends chromed...or would they have to do the whole thing? Well, I'm not completely ruling it out. I thought of maybe painting the bottom of the forks to match the rest of the bike....but I doubt I would be able to match the colors. I thought of maybe painting the bottom of the forks ...maybe white? Or silver? Or should I leave it bare metal?
I thought of another idea....I have a full-chrome fork that I believe may fit....I could put that on it. What should I do?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Viscount Update + advice needed posted by Dave on 9/17/2003 at 5:49:01 PM
I have a simular problem with my '64 Varsity commuter bike. Since the problem isn't getting worse I'm leaving the rust there. I saw a blurb on the Restoration Tips discussion site about a guy who primered then painted the rust spots with chrome paint and it came out looking like new. I also have a brand new chrome fork I could use also. Since the original "Death Fork" is long gone you could go either way on this.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Viscount Update + advice needed posted by Oscar on 9/17/2003 at 7:08:34 PM
When I was working on my Viscount, I had a similar problem with the crank. I swapped in a lighter one, but I had to change the spindle. Then, the spindle fit too loosely into the bb cups, so I had to change them too.

At the auto parts store, I see chrome spraypaint like Dave mentioned. I don't think it would look like real chrome, but it would look better than rust.

    Viscount BB posted by John E on 9/17/2003 at 8:40:11 PM
Since the BB is ISO/British, why not substitute a sealed bearing BB cartridge along with a new crankset?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Viscount Update + advice needed posted by Walter on 9/17/2003 at 11:12:07 PM
Most Viscounts had a proprietary pressed in BB and replacing is problematic as replacement parts are not available.

Lambert/Viscount had a reputation for making alot of their own components including a distinctive looking, if heavy, chainwheel set. Later Viscounts, after the Yamaha purchase, had more "name" components as OEM and they may have even started threading the BB shell but I'm not sure.

Everyone knows of the "death fork" but the unique BB may be the biggest obstacle to collecting Viscounts. Forks are easily replaced.

      Viscount BB posted by John E on 9/17/2003 at 11:24:50 PM
OOps, I had forgotten about that little detail! Yes, Walter is correct. I wonder whether the inner diameter is close enough to standard to accommodate tapping to English or Italian. Also, I have seen threadless BB cartridge systems; I believe Sheldon may have them.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Viscount Update + advice needed posted by Rob on 9/17/2003 at 11:43:47 PM
Bike Tools, Etc. (Ashland, OR) sells YST Threadless BB cartridges 68x110 thru 127.5 for $16.95 US plus shipping...I've bought stuff from them, through their web site, on several occasions...fast and no problems...

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi?id=315234170682&nr=51&b=&c=Components&sc=Bottom%20Brackets&tc=Cartridge/Taper%20Spindle&q=&s=

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Viscount Update + advice needed posted by Gralyn on 9/18/2003 at 12:06:25 PM
The bottom bracket was interesting. Aside from the spindle squares being larger - it looked typical. It was threaded - and the threads were standard - in that most other cups I have will screw into it. The cup seemed pretty deep....kind of like the seat post....it just kept coming out! Again, I thought....another Candid Camera trick? After I got it out....interestingly, I found a piece of broken glass in there, too. Luckily, I didn't get cut on it. I wonder how that got in there. One difficulty I encountered was where all the tubes come together inside the bottom bracket....I had to do some manuevering to get the bearings in and out. I got a more standard spindle in - and put an alloy crank on it. I went ahead and set it up as a fixed gear. Amazingly lightweight!

    Viscount BB threading posted by John E on 9/18/2003 at 1:35:33 PM
Perhaps the various Viscount owners on this thread could post serial number and type of BB shell (threaded vs. pressed). If Walter is correct, the serial number should be a good predictor of the BB shell type. This could be very helpful information for anyone bidding on a used Viscount.

The link to the threadless BB source is good advice for anyone facing problems in this area, including those unable to find Swiss-threaded fixed cups.






FOR SALE:   some Dura Ace stuff. posted by: Gary Main on 9/17/2003 at 4:57:23 AM
have a nice Dura Ace rear derailleur, a weld on front high end shimano probably dura ace, minus mount, 3 DA freewheels, 2 are 21t and one is a 24t. a real old centerpull DA brake will include with this stuff.







AGE / VALUE:   1961 sears flightliner/mainliner? posted by: mychelle on 9/17/2003 at 3:00:56 AM
Let me start off by saying I know NOTHING about bikes...so I apoligize if I seem ignorant...recently a friend gave me his mothers bicycle for my move to Portland...it is a 1961/1962(I am going by what he told me!)Sears bicycle, after looking at the pictures here on the site how do I determine if its a Mainliner or a Flightliner? The bicycle has a headlight/tailight, luggage rack, and a front wire basket.. It needs to be cleaned terribly and a new set of tires...Can anyone give me a ballpark estimate of the value? Also I was warned I should be concerned with this bike being stolen in the Portland/California area (I am traveling for a while)any insight? Thanks...


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1961 sears flightliner/mainliner? posted by Dave on 9/17/2003 at 1:14:22 PM
I would go to the baloon tire/middle weights site. You could also check the links @oldroads like bikeicons.com or www.thecabe.com.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1961 sears flightliner/mainliner? posted by Ken on 9/19/2003 at 4:22:56 PM
There's a good set of Flightliner photos at http://nostalgic.net/arc/bicycles/
One difference that's likely to still be visible, regardless of condition etc., is the chainwheel. If you want to email a picture, I'll take a guess... (my opinion might be worth more than it costs- it's free...)
Don't be shy! Start reading http://www.sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html and see where it takes you.
Ballpark value? You have to offer it for sale to find out. Collectors are most concerned with condition, which includes the lights which are the hardest to find. Flightliners are interesting but not rare; and women's models command somewhat less. If you want something unlikely to be stolen, leave the basket, the old tires and the dirt in place, but don't forget to lock it up.






AGE / VALUE:   1961 sears flightliner/mainliner? posted by: mychelle on 9/17/2003 at 3:00:56 AM
Let me start off by saying I know NOTHING about bikes...so I apoligize if I seem ignorant...recently a friend gave me his mothers bicycle for my move to Portland...it is a 1961/1962(I am going by what he told me!)Sears bicycle, after looking at the pictures here on the site how do I determine if its a Mainliner or a Flightliner? The bicycle has a headlight/tailight, luggage rack, and a front wire basket.. It needs to be cleaned terribly and a new set of tires...Can anyone give me a ballpark estimate of the value? Also I was warned I should be concerned with this bike being stolen in the Portland/California area (I am traveling for a while)any insight? Thanks...







AGE / VALUE:   this room amazes me! posted by: Gary Main on 9/17/2003 at 1:23:20 AM
someone comes in with a Super Scrotum Six, and within minutes its got a full page of text, detailing its design, flaws, and color options. is why i love it so much!! Back at Ya!!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   this room amazes me! posted by Oscar on 9/18/2003 at 2:56:08 PM
The SSS that you mention was a private label of Dunkin Donuts and produced during the last year and a half of the Reagan Administration. It had a proprietary hump in the center of the saddle, hence the middle S in the name. I've seen them in both black and blue.