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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







MISC:   Beacon LW posted by: Bryant on 8/27/2004 at 5:07:33 PM
Stopped by the local thrift yesterday and saw an interesting bike. It was a Beacon, and had a headbadge in the shape of an arrow. It had half chromed stays and forks, brake releases, some no-name centerpulls, winged nuts in the front, regular in the back, cotter SR cranks, and Suntour derailleurs and shifters. No markings saying where it was made. I didn't pick it up, got a Hercules 3 speed instead. Anyone know of this brand??
by: 198.26.122.13


   RE:MISC:   Beacon LW posted by Bryant on 8/27/2004 at 5:17:13 PM
Oh yeah, I also rememebr it had chromed lugs in the front. Nothing real fancy, but fancier than I've seen at this thrift before.
by: 198.26.122.12






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Peugeot UNS40 / DA40 posted by: T-Mar on 8/26/2004 at 4:56:06 PM
Regarding the earlier post on the 22" wheel Peugeot bicycles, I've just returned from my vacation and had a chance to review my reference materials. There were two distinct models in the early '70s. The UNS40 (also referred to as a NS40 or UN40) was a non-folding model. As Rob suggested, the NS stood for Nouveau Style according to the distributor catalogue. The "take-apart" (Peugeot's terminology) or folding model was the DA40. So what JONathan has would appear to be a DA40, as opposed to a UNS40. An associated curiousity that Peugeot marketed was a folding, home trainer trainer stand, designed to bolt onto the rear end of the DA40. The stand consisted of a base with roller and adjustable handlebars.

Curiously, Peugeot appears to have been one of the few (only?) brands to opt for the 22" wheel. Comparable models for this era from Gitane, Iverson, Motebecane, Raleigh and Steyr all spec 20" wheels, which are popular to this day. The 22" versus 20" wheel size appears to have been bicycling's version of the Beta verus VHS, videoptape wars. However, at the time the Peugeot models appear to have been fully supported, as my catalogue indicates the availability of 22" wheels, rims and 3 models of tires.

Another possible source for replacement rims may be wheelchair dealers. I know 22" rims are popular in that industry, but am not sure if the rim sidewall/bead configuration is compatible, as most wheelchairs use solid, rubber tires and do not require a flat sidewall for brakes.
by: 64.235.199.48


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Peugeot UNS40 / DA40 posted by JONathan on 8/26/2004 at 6:50:58 PM
Thanks, Tom. I have visited folder sites which are amazing. Our "Nouvous Style" duo are anything but "new". The evolution in folders is very interesting to me in the focus being functionality over extreme performance. While performance is enhanced by lighter frames and components, probably approaching that of a good road bike, the designs are engineering marvels. Stepping back to our "NS" bikes, I am made quite aware of the changes. These run well enough to get the job done. As an experienced rider used to taking on anything that rolls, I find the ride is just barely "OK"; which implies that an inexperienced or occasional rider is going to be disenchanted with the results. The steering is very busy, the frame transmits power inefficiently and the ease of folding and deploying back is somewhat unfriendly. But, as you have indicated in earlier posts, a bike is a good bike if it meets its level of performance that it was designed to achieve. At least that's what I absorbed and I use that concept whenever quality issues come to bear. It is a good working hypothesis for "quality".
So, the "NS" does its job..as designed, so it is a good quality bike. My Raleigh "twenty", which is 1969 (first year?), performs much better than the "NS", IMHO. The frame transmits power quite like a regular rigid framed bike. I acn surprise some on regular bikes with how fast it gets going off the mark. I still have yet to try taking the "NS" onboard the trains regular coach. There is quite a demand for space in the bike coach, so the folders have appeal. My wife likes her Raleigh "sports" which has stable temperment throughout its handling. Tires for the 22-inch wheels are avaolable, here. Some performance wheelchairs have aired-tires. That is a good suggestion to explore. Thanks for the info.
JONathan
by: 67.118.246.239

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Peugeot UNS40 / DA40 posted by Patrick on 8/31/2004 at 7:39:08 PM
You may also find 22" wheels that may fit yours on a few years of Schwinn Enduro which was somewhat of a cross between a BMX and a MTB. I believe they were made in the early 80's and I recently traded mine off since I could no longer get tires from area bike collectors.
by: 64.109.30.11






MISC:   Cranky creaks posted by: David on 8/26/2004 at 4:34:11 PM
I greased and adjusted my BB and now the crank creaks when I pedal. It's a Campy BB and crank. The inexact torque I applied was the max I could do with one hand squeezing the peanut butter wrench and crankarm together. What should I do to make it quiet?
by: 66.30.200.82


   RE:MISC:   Cranky creaks posted by Derek Coghill on 8/30/2004 at 6:12:16 PM
Are the pedals tight? Quite a common cause of BB sounding creaks.
by: 62.7.165.161






FOR SALE:   Motobecane Super Mirage posted by: gmain on 8/26/2004 at 10:13:20 AM
have a black tall frame MotoBecane Super Mirage. Alloy wheels, Suntour driveline, interesting molded one peice grip, lever cover, and bar cover is all one peice, almost looks like it was molded on bars after brakes were installed, its top notch job and is in perfect shape no tears or gouges. paint scratched up, but i am going to scrub and wax it, most of the markings appear to be latex paint and as such will come right off. has ratcheting suntour levers on downtube. alloy seatpost and stem, quick release front and rear. high quality caliper brakes cant remember the name. it looks all the way original, but who knows. if anyone can use it let me know, before i convert it to 700c wheels and keep it. would take $100 and shipping for it. current models are over $600. am guessing late 70s.
by: 24.231.151.68


   RE:FOR SALE:   Motobecane Super Mirage posted by JONathan on 8/26/2004 at 6:14:27 PM
I have a "Super Mirage" with some Japanese (SunTour) components and European alloy wheels and brakes. The Weinmanns have molded lever covers which have an extension around a rearview mirror on the left cover. I picked it up for $5 at a neighbor's GS. The bike rides like a dream, too. I have read posts indicating that the Motos were the first major brand to switch to Japanese componentry. To think a MTB would be a "step up" is beyond my comprehension. That is for street riding, of course. Unlike other neighborhood gets, I can't bring myself to stop by to show him the bike, after its rework. Well, the frame was a tad big for him, so I feel better about it. Another guy was eying the bike at the GS when I got there late in the morning...fortunately for me, the guy did not spring for it. I had my fiver in hand and nursed it home with that one arm tow we are experts at doing. Motos are great rides.
JONathan
by: 67.118.246.239

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Motobecane Super Mirage posted by gary m on 8/31/2004 at 5:02:27 AM
i sold almost every bike in the shop last saturday. thank god. i will go through what i have left, and build the 3 road bikes i kept, this being one and install every high end part i own, and pitch the rest. i like this bike already. i stripped an MTB Univega for this bike, and am glad i did.
by: 24.231.151.68






MISC:   Identifying fenders posted by: Kurt K on 8/26/2004 at 12:37:38 AM
I just aquired a pair of very rusty older lightweight (or could they be middleweight?) fenders from a local bike repairman.

I can't seem to identify what brand of bike they are from, so I thought I'd show you all a couple of photos of them:

http://www.jaysmarine.com/fender_1.jpg
http://www.jaysmarine.com/fender_2.jpg

They have bent steel rod braces, which fit onto brackets on the fender, which are held in with two rivets. The rear fender has what looks to be a Wald fender bridge clip mounted on it.

The front fender has a chrome fender tip, similar to some Raleigh models, but twice as long as the Raleigh/Sturmey Archer type.

By the way, below that crackling light green house paint is a coat of dark blue or black with what appears to be a formerly-white stripe.

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Take care,

Kurt


by: 64.12.116.211



   RE:MISC:   Identifying fenders posted by JONathan on 8/26/2004 at 5:49:38 PM
I like those fenders! Looks like a 26 inch size. Wondering if they are Columbia fenders. I can look at a set that came off a Columbia "SpaceLiner" ( I think that's the model) 3 speed. If they look like those that would be interesting. I would clean those up just enough to stop the rust. They have definite cool factor...on the right bike. Nice find!
Good rides,
JONathan
by: 67.118.246.239

   RE:RE:MISC:   Identifying fenders posted by Kurt K on 8/28/2004 at 1:32:19 AM
Hello Jonathan,

I don't think they are Columbia - did a check in the Oldroads picture database, and nothing matched.

By the way, if you like those fenders, I am willing to sell them. Make me an offer if you are interested.

Take care,

Kurt
by: 205.188.116.204

   RE:MISC:   Identifying fenders posted by johnny on 8/30/2004 at 3:58:29 AM
i use to have a 1960s columbia thunderbolt ladies bike with seems to be same fenders
by: 64.12.117.19






FOR SALE:   Old bicycles taking up space posted by: Howard on 8/26/2004 at 12:18:42 AM
I have 20 or more old skinny tired bikes that are taking up space that I need for my motor scooter collection. Several Schwinns. Will sell by the truck load or trade for motor scooters, mini bikes, moped, or motor bikes. I don't need any dirt bikes. Can't ship, so bring a pickup or trailer. I live in Tennessee.
by: 68.211.254.22







FOR SALE:   Old bicycles taking up space posted by: Howard on 8/26/2004 at 12:18:42 AM
I have 20 or more old skinny tired bikes that are taking up space that I need for my motor scooter collection. Several Schwinns. Will sell by the truck load or trade for motor scooters, mini bikes, moped, or motor bikes. I don't need any dirt bikes. Can't ship, so bring a pickup or trailer. I live in Tennessee.
by: 68.211.254.22







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old touring frame - kind of weird posted by: Tim on 8/25/2004 at 8:15:43 PM
I picked up (for free) this interesting lugged steel frame (for 27" wheels) that has internal wiring for a generator, no derailleur mounting hole and a kickstand. There is some Germanic labeling near the BB but otherwise no name or other labels. The oddest thing is the rear brake bridge - it's a large, flat piece of metal with thee holes in it. I suppose it's to mount a custom rack AND the brake, but I am befuddled as to how the brake would mount. Has anyone seen something like this? How would one mount a brake? Does it require a specific brake? I want to build it up for an errand bike/winter trainer. I'm wondering of this was a three-speed model...
by: 130.76.32.16


     Old touring frame - kind of weird posted by John E on 8/26/2004 at 2:19:50 PM
I have seen the 3-hole flat plate brake bridges before, typically on low-end European frames. Are not the three holes in a triangular formation, two on top and one on the bottom? The bottom hole accepts a standard centerpull or sidepull caliper, with flat, rather than conventional concave, washer/spacers. The two upper holes have precisely the same spacing as a Pletscher "mousetrap" rear rack.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old touring frame - kind of weird posted by Tim on 8/26/2004 at 2:22:30 PM
John - yes, you have the configuration exactly right - two on top and one on the bottom.
by: 130.76.32.15

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old touring frame - kind of weird posted by JONathan on 8/26/2004 at 10:00:50 PM
Ever heard of DBS bicycles? I saw a DBS, which is a Norwegian make, at a thrift store, awhile back. It sported that same "plate" you reference in post above. The BB was a 1-piece with an unusual bearing setup. The whole bearing race was in rotation, not just the spindle! At first, I thought something was off, but it worked fine. This would be the outer race that rotated with the spindle. The rear dro[outs were also a very large plate-like stamped steel entity. The head-tube had some sort of fixture that looked more than just a pump holder. Maybe the "German" is actually Swedish or Norwegian, perhaps? Sounds like an interesting bike for around these parts, N. Ca..
The bike was only $25 and it looked like a tough built machine for utility in all-weather conditions.
JONathan
by: 67.118.246.144

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old touring frame - kind of weird posted by David on 8/26/2004 at 10:47:31 PM
Most of the commuting/utility bikes you see in continental Europe have such mounts for racks, generators, kickstands, etc. No squashed stays or scratched paint!
by: 66.30.200.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old touring frame - kind of weird posted by sam on 8/27/2004 at 12:32:43 PM
The ever present and cheap,Mafac racer brakes will fit this bridge---sam
by: 69.148.174.241

   Old touring frame - kind of weird posted by John E on 8/27/2004 at 2:08:23 PM
I have seen the kind of BB bearing setup described above on Crescents and other low-end European bikes. The setup is somewhat similar to Schwinn's heavy-but-bulletproof one-piece Ashtabula crank. Instead of going head-to-head against Schwinn, European manufacturers tended to export lighter-weight models with 3-piece cottered (later, cotterless) cranksets.
by: 66.185.168.82






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Just picked up a Nishiki Semi-Pro posted by: Hong on 8/25/2004 at 4:43:32 PM
Hi folks,

Just found this frame sitting in a trash pile on my commute home last night. Was interesting trying to ride the rest of the way one handed!

It looked to be in decent shape, decent lugs, some cool looking cranks and horizontal dropouts, which will work great for a single/fixed commuter to replace my current MTB single. Decent silver paint and chromed stays/fork and the eagle badge still pinned on.

Found this site when I Googled "Nishiki Semi-Pro" and I think I've got something more valuable than I initially thought.

Is it really Ishiwata tubing? The sticker says double butted chromo. It also says "made in Japan" near the BB. And it has the Kxxxx serial number.

I was going to chop off the braze-ons and spray it flat black. Now I'm thinking I should treat my new ride a bit better.

Any opinions or new information about this frame would be much appreciated!

Thanks in advance.

-Hong
by: 66.54.159.146


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Just picked up a Nishiki Semi-Pro posted by John S on 8/25/2004 at 5:51:37 PM
The older vintage Nishiki's I've run across have a smaller than standard stem quill diameter, may be hard to find. Diameter is .833 I believe.

Nevertheless, the Semi Pro was top or near top of the line at the time (probably early 70's). John E has said in previous postings that the ride of these frames is comparatively dead.

My opinion is to build it, ride it, judge from there what the best use is.
by: 66.214.64.203

   Nishiki Semi-Pro posted by John E on 8/26/2004 at 12:39:16 AM
I bought mine in March 1971; S/N was KS78091. My head badge said "American Eagle," rather than "Nishiki," which came the following year. The main triangle was Ishiwata db CrMo; forks were probably plain carbon steel. Frame weight was about the same as that of a Peugeot UO-8, and, yes, the ride quality was somewhat "dead" or "leaden," perhaps the result of the very long chainstays. Frame angles were a very reasonable 73 degrees. Top tube was so short that I bought a long-reach stem. I got about 40K miles / 65K km out of mine, until the BB shell failed at the seat tube lug. The Semi-Pro was the top-of-the-line when I bought mine; the Road Compe came out the following year.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Just picked up a Nishiki Semi-Pro posted by Hong on 8/26/2004 at 3:31:51 PM
So I guess I have a '72 Ishiwata DB chromoly frame! And to think I passed it up the previous two or three rides home.

Thanks for the info guys. I'm going to build myself a "new" commuter next month.

-Hong
by: 66.54.159.146

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Just picked up a Nishiki Semi-Pro posted by Larry P on 8/26/2004 at 4:31:01 PM
I just commuted to work for the first time (12 miles each way) on a 1977 Raleigh Super Course that I resurrected from my parent's barn last year. It is in immaculate working condition, however the frame is very faded and a lot of the decals are scratched up. What a pleasure it was to ride! Original brooks saddle. Although it isn't up to the level of my aluminum wonder bike, it has a very relaxed and pleasant ride. I noticed the primary difference with my new bike was going up hills. It has fenders and a rack, so on rainy days like today it is excellent. My new bike doesn't have clearance for fenders with its ultracompact frame.
by: 64.50.6.51

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Just picked up a Nishiki Semi-Pro posted by T-Mar on 8/26/2004 at 4:41:49 PM
I suspect you have a 1973 model, if it states Nishiki. My research indicates 1972 models were still being marketed under the American Eagle brand. The Nishiki brand appeared on the 1973 models.
by: 64.235.199.48

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Just picked up a Nishiki Semi-Pro posted by Marko on 8/26/2004 at 6:51:34 PM
Hong,
I had one years ago, and I recall it was a nice bike. Mine came with a Japanese copy of a Brooks saddle, but I can't remember the brand name. It probably IS Ishiwata Tubing, mine had that and butted too. I was only 15 though, and things wern't as important to me then.
Good luck!
by: 144.223.55.38

   Nishiki / American Eagle posted by John E on 8/27/2004 at 2:16:52 PM
Hi T-Mar,

I am trying to recall when Kawamura changed the brand name for its U.S. exports; it may have been sometime during 1972. The Road Compe came out in early 1972, and I think it was always a "Nishiki," rather than an "American Eagle," although it still bore the eagle-shaped head badge. The eagle lasted a few more years, to be replaced eventually by Kawamura's other symbol, the simple square with the diagonal slash.
by: 66.185.168.82






WANTED:   J.C. Higgins posted by: Lindell Blackford on 8/24/2004 at 8:12:42 PM
Searching for picture of or a real life example of my first real bike, bought new by my dad and delivered by Santa when I was about 10 or so, in the late 1950's. It was a late 1950's J.C. Higgins 3-speed racer, red and chrome, with a rear rack which had a metal tool kit on each side containing a cloth bag of tools on each side. Don't remember the model. Does this sound familiar to anyone?
by: 216.124.207.130


   RE:WANTED:   J.C. Higgins posted by schwinnderella on 8/25/2004 at 12:05:14 AM
I believe there is a picture of this bike in the book Collectible Elgin,JC Higgins and Hawthorne bicycles by Hurd and Gordon.
by: 4.158.171.195

   RE:WANTED:   J.C. Higgins posted by sam on 8/25/2004 at 1:39:02 AM
I have the instruction & parts list for the 1958 J.C.Higgins european lightweight bicycles. These are the ones built by Steyr Deimler Puch of Graz Austria.--sam
by: 69.148.174.241






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Regency, Made in France posted by: Gralyn on 8/24/2004 at 5:02:44 PM
I spotted a new kid on the block today at my favorite thrift store (the store where no new bikes have shown up for a month or so). This was a Regency - I believe I remember correctly. It is made in France, has Mafac Racer center pull brakes, Mafac levers with hoods and safety levers. Rigida Chromolux rims with QR front and rear, steel cottered crankset, (I can't even remember about the shifters - they must have been stem-mounted. It has those foil-looking decals - just like what you find on an old Gitane or Jeunet. It looks to be early 70's - so far as frame and equipment.....except that the bars have that old foam rubber grip - like was popular early-to-mid 80's. It looks and feels to be 1020 frame material (no frame sticker). General appearance is that it is lower-end....probably not quite the bottom....but close to it. The price was less than $10. I didn't buy it -

Has anyone heard of this brand of French bike?
by: 208.239.159.254


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Regency, Made in France posted by Gralyn on 8/25/2004 at 5:49:17 PM
Sorry, my brain just doesn't work sometimes. I remember once posting about a Schwinn Superbe.....when all the while, it was a Schwinn Superior.

Well, this was a Regina, made in France.....not a Regency. I do recognize "Regina"....as in rear cogsets, chains, etc.

It did have Hurret downtube shifters, QR axles, Mafac Racer brakes. For $8 - I went ahead and got it.

by: 208.239.159.254






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Unusual Sighting-- A "Pennine" posted by: RobA on 8/23/2004 at 10:04:52 PM
FWIW... While out for a run at lunchtime on the streets of downtown Vancouver, I spotted, locked to a parking meter, a rather dirty and beat-up VLW, but its lines and elegance, if you like, still showed through very strongly....a 'diamond-in-the-rough'. I stopped and took a good look...I noticed immediately the 531 sticker with word "RESPRAY", the downtube decals were rather scratched up and hard to make out, but on the head tube the name, "Pennine", could be clearly read. I quickly figured I was looking at an English VLW, which 'Classic Rendezvous' confirmed...made in Bradford, UK. The crankset is Superb Pro...with a late 80s look; I couldn't read the name on the front der., but it had the lines of a late '80s Suntour, and the rear der. again I couldn't read, but it looked like a late '80s Shimano. A nice color scheme... sort of a dark red (heading toward burgundy, but not quite there) and white, torn red handlebar tape. So it's likely a late 80s frame...which was restored once, and by its appearance, well into its second life... The first "Pennine" I've seen, and I'll probably never see another one again...:)
by: 142.52.194.1







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by: Gralyn on 8/23/2004 at 3:12:57 PM
Someone came to the house Saturday to look at a wiring job on my house. He asked about my bikes - and was interested in having me to fix him up with a bike.

Gazing over the garage and workshop.....at about 50 - 60 bikes - he asks me "Which one is yours? Which is the one that you particularly ride all the time?" Well, I didn't really have a particular. I told him that I do have several that I ride most.....but not really one in particular.

Maybe my Bianchi is my favorite.

Do any of you have one particular bike that you ride most - or is your favorite.....or if you're going to hop on a bike and go.....what's the first bike you grab?
by: 208.239.159.254


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by Fred A on 8/23/2004 at 5:14:46 PM
Tough question.....but I guess my CILO SPORT......or Motobecane Le Champion....Shogun Samurai......Schwinn Sports Tourer.....

Well, you get the picture. It's really depending upon my mood. One of a few dozen is what I choose from, and there's no real rhyme or reason as to my choice for that particular day. I'm sure there aqre a LOT of people out there that do the same. Ah, bike crazies.......we're all in a group to ourselves!!

Fred A
by: 167.206.46.68

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by Eric Amlie on 8/23/2004 at 5:17:27 PM
For me, it has to be my early seventies Gitane Tour de France. In the queue for buildup this winter is a similar vintage Peugeot PX-10E which may give the Gitane some serious competition though.
by: 168.236.254.1

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by T-Mar on 8/23/2004 at 8:52:13 PM
I guess it all depends on the mood I'm in. Do I want something domestic, Japanese, Italian, or French? Do I feel like something retro or modern? Do I feel like a specific ride such as a tour, time trial, road race, commute or ATB?

I've pretty much narrowed the stable to a single bicycle for each of my specific needs. Usually, my preference is high end, modern, domestic models. However, since this site is concerned primarily with vintage lightweights, my favourite in that category was my 1975 Scapin SL. Unfortunately, the seat tube gave out in 1990 after about 150,000 km and could not be repaired to rideable condition as the BB was also damaged. I have yet to find a VLW that compares to my recollection of this machine. Given, the way that one's memory tends to enhance postive experiences, I doubt I ever will.
by: 64.12.117.19

      What's your favorite? posted by John E on 8/23/2004 at 10:48:11 PM
I concur with T-Mar, in the sense that I appreciate the unique positive qualities of each of my steeds.

For sheer fun in good weather on a good road, with nothing to carry and no security concerns at my destination, I'll take my brown 1981 Bianchi "Italian stallion," which can climb, maneuver, and accelerate better than any other bicycle I have ever owned. The fast steering response also makes it my least relaxing bike.

My Peugeots (upgraded 1972 UO-8 and 1980 PKN-10E) are my light-to-moderate-duty, theft-resistant workhorses, and my usual choices for general transportation cycling. They represent near-ideal all-round compromises among speed, safety, comfort, fun, and practicality.

For heavier duty hauling, all offroad riding, and riding on substandard roads or in the rain, I use my only mountain bike, a 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10, which has a bike bag atop a Blackburn MTN Rack. Its patriotic Team USA red-white-and-blue paint scheme also makes it fun in parades and on national holidays.

For sheer beauty, class, and workmanship, the obvious choice is my red-and-white 1959 Capo. It is also perfect for long slow distance training.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by RobA on 8/23/2004 at 11:09:50 PM
I definitely have my favorites....but they do change around periodically....I'm fickle I guess...:) Right now, my favorite, by far, is my commuter, a mid-70's Gitane TdF...I rode it for a bit last summer, then put it away for the dirty weather...I started riding it again in early July....It is just such a beautiful ride, I couldn't believe I had ignored it for about eight months!!! Just prior to that I was commuting on my circa 1983 Norco Triathlon (aka Nishiki)... It's a great ride too, but just not quite as good as the Gitane... For casual neighborhood rides...it's my late 80s Campy equipped/tubular tired Cramerotti (Columbus SLX tubing), beautiful ride. Another favorite is my circa 72/73 Raleigh Super Course...haven't ridden it since last fall. I have lots of bikes that I like but hardly ever ride...some I'm sure just might replace the current favorites...mid 80s Marinoni, 600EX group, Cromor tubing; early "aero" Benotto (model unknown), which looks to have started out all-Shimano 600, but now has Superb Pro hubs and a Dura-Ace freewheel; ...I could go on and on, and then there's the MTB side of my life...haven't done much of that this summer...early 90s Norco Bush Pilot (I don't know what that might be equivalent to in the US)...Shimano set-up...grip shifters; a late 80s Trek 820 "Antelope", with Suntour XC set-up; mid 80s Ritchey of average quality,...and several others...

I seem to be gravitating more and more to the faster, 'elegant', high or higher-end, racing bikes...
by: 142.52.194.1

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by JONathan on 8/24/2004 at 1:39:14 AM
My pre-bikeboom Bottecchia touring bicycle is my favorite. It has taken a lot of miles in its day, too. The next set of cranks that goes on it will be Stronglight "TS" alloys. Even with cottered cranks (new spindle and bearings) and 52/46 chainrings it climbs real nice when I get out of the saddle. Flats are nothing to sweat either at a clip that keeps up with anything out there, new or vintage. I'm not counting pros who ride the same expressway. Now, off-road, it needs those 630-38's to make a good showing, but that's why I keep three sets of wheels ready to go for whatever the job.
This big fella ain't no "lightweight", but neither am I coming onboard at 220#. I'm saying it is my favorite bike, not my "best" bike. It definitely has a noble, VLW look about it. Can't beat that! A bit of a beast, too. I think the fact it has personality is good. It takes a few hundred miles to get tuned to its unique temperment and handling. It is not a beginner's mount, to be sure.
Good rides,
JONathan
by: 67.118.246.20

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by ollo_ollo on 8/24/2004 at 4:20:03 AM
I have 3 favorites this Summer: Bianchi Trofeo, Motobecane Grand Jubile, & a 1984 Specialized Expedition Touring. I mounted a set of 700x20 Continental 3000 GT on the Expedition for Summer commuting. If I had to choose one, it would be the Moto. Don
by: 24.17.139.12

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by Gralyn on 8/24/2004 at 2:29:07 PM
I guess for me - it does have to do with the mood I'm in. My best time to ride is Saturday mornings.....Friday night - I start thinking about it....and I try to decide which bike I would like to ride. I have such a difficult time trying to decide which one. The Bianchi, maybe my favorite, but it's pure racing.......and maybe I want to ride something more touring? Or maybe something old? Or maybe something I haven't ridden in a long time? It's so hard to decide.

I will be gone this weekend on a camping trip....in the mountains.....I'm taking a mountain bike for the trails.....but I will certainly take a road bike. But which one? Maybe one of the Schwinn Travelers with the triple chainring?
by: 208.239.159.254

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by John S on 8/24/2004 at 5:31:03 PM
With many bikes, as others have pointed out, mood and purpose seem to drive the choice. State of repair is also key as, like some of you, I always seem to have several works in progress.

I've become acutely aware of the difficulty in making these choices as I've hatched a plan to reduce the stable to raise cash for an all-time collector (Alex Singer, Rene Hearse or super British touring model). It's hard to decide which bikes should go, I figure around 10 have to be sold.

I've gravitated towards touring bikes in the last three years which can be very light and handle great, but without the harshness and excitable handling of racing models. Must be a sign of my age...

My current favorites are a circa 1971 Mondia set up as a commuter with 700 x 35c tyres and triple crank. Another is a 1983 Specialized Expedition which rides so smoothly and is very secure in the twisties.

My "modern" bike is called an EBISU, frame designed by a Japanese bike shop owner in Berkeley, CA and built in limited quantity by a Japanese frame builder. Can check these out (my EBISU is one of the featured customer bikes) at the shop's web site, search for "Jitensha Studio". A lightweight touring-style bike, room for racks, fenders, fat tyres, but designed for light touring with more responsiveness than a true tourer. Sorry, if this sounds like a sales pitch, not my intent.

by: 66.214.64.203

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's your favorite? posted by sam on 8/24/2004 at 6:28:42 PM
A favorite bike must be a product of your ride style and place.At least I think it is for me.Balloon cruzers kinda go with loose sand and M.Bs with rocky trails.But on of my favorite rides is on a lightweight coaster brake murray that cost $29 retail.I use this bike to ride around Kingsville Tx when I stay their because of work.Kingsville is the flatest place on earth,and I use it just around town.No need for fancy gears,no cables to adjust,and no worry it will be stolen if I go into a store.---sam
by: 69.148.174.241

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: What's your favorite? posted by James Mahon on 8/24/2004 at 7:13:49 PM
Depending on the ride, I decide based on the trust I have and the task at hand. Trust in my ride is based on its feel and my intimacy with the bike (ie: I built the wheels, broke down to frame over winter and overhauled everything and know every millimeter of the bike). I need to get to know new acquisitions before I will take it on any long rides. Familiarity with it's ride feel, saddle comfort, brake reach, gear range that is only developed with time. My '74 AO-8 just reached that level of trust last weekend but suddenly turned on me breaking 2 spokes in the original rear Ridgida during the last 10 miles of 50 (wobble wobble). fast short rides have me pull my '84 Faggin criterium bike off the wall. It has a harsher but predictable ride with quick steering. Alternatively, for harsh weather commuting, my fave is an '88 Schwinn Collegiate 3 speed fitted with a rack and a flat bar. My all time favorite is my '86 Schwinn Passage, a stable, comfortable double century-able triple-chainring sport tourer. Bought new, it is my primary commuter, tourer and weekend century ride. I don't know how all of you with dozens of bikes can choose. I only have 6 but still stand in the garage Friday night staring, trying to decide what to take on Saturday's long ride.
by: 148.141.31.195

    What's your favorite? posted by John E on 8/25/2004 at 2:32:56 PM
Amid the diversity of viewpoints expressed in this thread, frequent endorsement of traditional 1970s sports touring "10-speeds" emerges. These have the fun-yet-practical aspects of today's popular sports sedans; bicycling was way ahead of the auto industry in this sense. Indeed, if I could own only one bike, it would probably have 28mm tyres, 72- or 73-degree head and seat tube angles, a moderate fork rake, at least 14 gears, and moderate-length chainstays, with a butted moly steel main triangle. My 1959 Capo is a very comfortable all-rounder, but it is too soft and whippy for loaded touring or intense climbing or sprinting. My 1980 Peugeot PKN-10E probably comes closest to the practical, best-compromise touring bike ideal, but it is unfortunately my least favorite bike in terms of workmanship. It also accommodates 700Cx28mm tyres only if the rear is fully deflated for installation and removal. (In past threads, I have mentioned the seams on the backs of the fork blades and the brazing voids where the rear dropouts meet the chainstays.)
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE: What's your favorite? posted by Gralyn on 8/25/2004 at 2:38:00 PM
What if you could design and build your own bike - just the way you want it? I guess for the $ - you could have one custom built - with the exact angles, workmanship, etc.
by: 208.239.159.254






AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Dean on 8/23/2004 at 3:05:12 PM
Just picked up an old light weight, markings are Carnevale USA on the frame, Campy dropouts, shimano 600 full groupo, bio-pace of course, does anyone know anything about this brank, thanks in advance
by: 66.122.150.234







MISC:   SWAP IS THIS COMING WEEKEND! (AUGUST 29th) posted by: VVVintage Vintage Bicycles, Inc. at OldRoads.com on 8/23/2004 at 11:48:26 AM
This Sunday is the date of the Northeast Bicycle Swap Meet.
We have registered vendors coming from all 6 New England states as well as New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. There will be original Schwinn Sting-Rays, Krates, balloon tire bicycles from the 1930s, 40s and 50s, track bikes, a turn-of-the-century board track racer, English roadsters and GOOD USED Mountain and Road bikes.

FREE Admission to the swap meet
- AND -
FREE admission to the New England Musclebike Museum!

There is no official bicycle show with judging and awards, but if you've got a cycle you're proud of, then bring it a long!

Click on the banner above for details and directions to the swap.

Vin - VVVintage Vintage Bicycles, Inc.
http://OldRoads.com

by: 172.161.164.156


   RE:MISC:   SWAP IS THIS COMING WEEKEND! (AUGUST 29th) posted by VVVintage Vintage Bicycles, Inc. at OldRoads.com on 8/24/2004 at 12:41:45 PM
If there's anything in particular you want us to bring to the swap, let us know.
For example, we have a bunch of 1970s to 1980s lightweights in the $20 to $40 range.

VVVintage Vintage Bicycles, Inc
http://OldRoads.com
by: 172.129.161.237