AGE / VALUE:   benotto 3000 posted by: Wallace Porter on 10/20/2005 at 4:15:41 AM
Does anyone know how much weight a benotto 3000 frame size 53 cm?
Thanks
by: 200.56.67.18


   RE:AGE / VALUE: benotto 3000 posted by sam on 10/24/2005 at 3:11:13 AM
19&1/2 lbs.
http://www.bulgier.net/pics/bike/Catalogs/benotto2/5.jpg
sam
by: 68.91.252.235






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by: Daniel on 10/20/2005 at 12:11:57 AM
I have 2 Raleigh Grand Prix bicycles. One from the late 1960s/early 70s – with cottered cranks, 10-speed Simplex Prestige gears, Weinmann alloy centre pull brakes – and the other from the late 1970s - with Raleigh/Sun Tour gears, Weinmann centre pull alloy brakes, Raleigh/SR alloy cotterless cranks.

The frames are both the same condition. The earlier frame is Sky Blue/Black, the later frame is Bronze. Both have chrome fork ends.

I am thinking about combining the parts from both bikes, and putting the best on the Sky Blue frame. Putting aside the question whether I should be messing about with the bikes rather than keeping them original, can anyone tell me whether the parts on the later model were better or worse than the earlier model. The Simplex Prestige front derailleur for example has a kind of boss that moves the chain-shifter whereas the Sun Tour front derailleur is of the parallelogram type. The brakes look the same on both models. It would be nice to have cotterless cranks.

I guess I am aksing whether I should put the parts from the newer model on the older frame.

by: 157.128.83.161


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by Gralyn on 10/20/2005 at 1:35:42 AM
Feel free to swap components around. The Grand Prix wasn't like a top-of-the-line model - and it isn't really collectable. The thing about it is - even if you swap around components - you can keep the components and identify them - and you can always put it back original if you want to.
I had 3 Grand Prix's - early 70's. One of then, a white / black......I rebuilt all original. A red / black one - original, too. A blue / black one - I replaced the old cottered cranks with an alloy cotterless, replaced the gearing, ders, etc. It rode great - it felt really light, and the shifting and braking were much better than on the original ones.

Take all the best parts and put them on the best frame.....I do it all the time......make yourself one really nice bike.
by: 205.188.117.71

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by Gralyn on 10/20/2005 at 1:38:53 AM
I didn't really get at the point......for the most part - components gradually got better and better......considering the same level, or model of a particular brand of bike....but over the years....components just kept getting better.....especially when the Japanese components took off.
by: 205.188.117.71

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by JONathan on 10/20/2005 at 8:02:01 AM
I have the same set of GP's. The late '70's has the Japanese setup, while the early '70's has all European stuff, including the cottered (Nervar) cranks. The later model has a tighter geometry, which equates to more sport handling ride, while the early has longer wheelbase and more relaxed geometry, which equates to more comfort, but less sporting in ride. Personally, I prefer the earlier GP's and the cottered cranks are no big deal. I kept mine as original, except those brakes will benefit immensely by swapping for KoolStop salmon-colored pads. They work great even on those steel rims. If you plan riding any distances or hills, alloy wheels will do wonders...more than cotterless cranks...to improve the ride in all aspects, but especially for braking under wet conditions. The earlier model has smooth steel rims, while the later one has the dimpled rims. The latter make a buzzing noise whilst braking, which annoys me somewhat, but that's just individual preference. I setup the '70 GP with SunTour "V", which is a great derailer, IMHO. The front is Huret, which is decent.
by: 67.118.246.204

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by Bryant on 10/20/2005 at 10:20:50 AM
I've worked on both types of GP's and personally I really don't care for the cottered cranks. They're a pain in the butt to remove when you want to overhaul the bottom bracket. I would also swap the Simplex front derailleur. I've never had problems with a Suntour front der. I've had several Simplex front ders break on me while I was palcing them back on the bike. I agree with JONathon, Swap out the wheels for an alloy set, and go with Koolstop brakes if you want to stop.
by: 130.114.43.224

      Raleigh Grand Prix posted by John E on 10/20/2005 at 4:22:10 PM
First, choose your frame according to your personal tastes and needs. For commuting and general transportation, I prefer an old-fashioned frame with somewhat long wheelbase and generous wheel clearances. I strongly recommend GOOD cotterless cranks over cottered, aluminum seatposts over steel, and, above all else, aluminum rims over steel and KoolStop salmon pads above all others.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by David on 10/21/2005 at 12:20:16 PM
With the right tool, cottered cranks are no trouble at all! Their main problem is their ability to catch a cuff if you're not kitted out in cycling clothes.
by: 66.30.200.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by Shaun on 10/29/2005 at 5:01:26 PM
While it's not a Grand Prix, I updated an early 70's Super Course with later model Raleigh branded parts from Japan, as the original components were in sad shape, including the Stronglight cottered crankset. I believe the alloy crankset is an SR, while the derailleurs are Suntour. Even the hubs are stamped Raleigh (they may be Sunshine?) laced to Araya alloy rims. Threw on some alloy upright handlebars on a Nitto stem and some Esge fenders. It now looks darn close to a 1976 Raleigh Super Tourer which was the goal. It looks and rides excellent!

Bottom line is, original is nice for some collectibles, but these are just bikes...play with them, improve them, and above all else, enjoy them. Do whatever pleases you, and like Gralyn said, you can always change it back if want to.
by: 64.60.73.3






AGE / VALUE:   Serial Number posted by: Morgan Hughes on 10/19/2005 at 1:43:11 AM
I have a collegiate Sport 10 in almost show room condition, but I have been unable to find out what this serial number (F0561257) means. Help if you can because when I find out it will be for sale.
by: 66.42.106.100


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Serial Number posted by Bryant on 10/19/2005 at 10:29:04 AM
Check the serial number again. Schwinn didn't use an O as the second letter in the serial numbers because it could be confused with the number 0. The serial number could be FQ561257 in which case it was born in June 1979. You can check the specifics at the Schwinn Lightweight databook. See posting below for the URL.
by: 130.114.43.224






AGE / VALUE:   Serial Number posted by: Morgan Hughes on 10/19/2005 at 1:43:11 AM
I have a collegiate Sport 10 in almost show room condition, but I have been unable to find out what this serial number (F0561257) means. Help if you can because when I find out it will be for sale.
by: 66.42.106.100







AGE / VALUE:   act fast: join the exclusive Capo owners' club posted by: John E on 10/18/2005 at 2:03:52 PM
Los-Angeles based seller has a complete-except-tyres/tubes 1960 30th anniversary Capo Modell Campagnolo. eBay bidding closes today, item number 7189868331.

Join Club Capo, one of the world's most exclusive bicycle collectors' clubs. :)
by: 66.185.168.82


     act fast: join the exclusive Capo owners' club posted by John E on 10/19/2005 at 2:33:00 PM
$260, reserve not met. I suspect the bad condition of the chrome and decals put buyers off. I wonder whether All American Hero's next step will be to part it out (I hope not).
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   act fast: join the exclusive Capo owners' club posted by Steven on 10/22/2005 at 10:56:23 PM
Strike one: All-American hero has a very bad reputation and many people stay away from him like the plague.
Strike two: Capo is an unknown and why spend money on an unknown when you can get a recognized name for the same money.
Strike three: the condition of the bike is not great.
by: 68.36.142.111