AGE / VALUE:   shelbyflyer posted by: cory on 12/1/2005 at 6:37:08 PM
i've just about have woman's shelby flyer finished(late 30's-early 40's)and am looking for decals.i also have a brampton speedy switch overseas pat.H-M-l with compleat cabale.what bike might it be off of and do's anyone have a need? i have an older free spirit 3 wheel,three speed and free spirit stingray look alike both in good condition,complete.are they worth persuing.dye hard schwinn guy having hard time with off brands i call them
by: 207.200.116.195







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage French Bike? posted by: Mike on 11/30/2005 at 9:53:52 PM
I'm interested in learning more about vintage French bikes, as I might be interested in buying one in the future. I saw Sheldon's page and it was helpful. Does anyone here have thoughts on the old French bikes? I figured Gitane, Motobecane, and Peugeot would be the ones that could be found.
by: 147.9.151.49


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Vintage French Bike? posted by jack on 12/1/2005 at 8:27:55 AM
I love french bikes, in spite of their obvious shortcomings such as french-threaded BB and french HS and stems. Once you get by these hurdles, a medium to high-end model of most any maker is a fine bike, as good (if not better) as most of the era. Although the good ones are getting scarce and/or expensive, you can still on occasion find bike boom models relatively cheap. I find the low-end models with regularity but I've moved-on from those. Try and get the higher-end bike for the full thrill of riding a fine french filly.
by: 207.200.116.137

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage French Bike? posted by Bruce Robbins on 12/1/2005 at 1:47:50 PM
I wouldn't dismiss the lower end bikes entirely. I picked up a 1950 605B-shod Manufrance bike near Paris in the summer for not a lot of cash. It has Manufrance-branded saddle, derailleur, cranks and brakes. It's not a sporty ride and the brakes are interesting but akward to set up. However, it has "character", something I think is pretty essential in a bike. It's probably somewhere between a lightweight and a roadster in terms of weight. I found it on ebay and collected it while on holiday. Bikes like this can be found all over France for just a few pounds or Euros.
Bruce
by: 80.194.147.17

      Vintage French Bike? posted by John E on 12/1/2005 at 3:04:27 PM
If you can find French-thread BB cups (or Swiss-thread, for early 1980s Peugeots and late-1970s and later Motobecanes), go for it. I get alot of good use out of my heavily upgraded early 1970s UO-8 and my 1980 PKN-10. The frames are much better than the derailleurs and hubs. French aluminum cranks (Nervar, Stronglight, or TA) tend to be quite good, provided that you can find replacement chainrings with proprietary BCDs. I like the Nervar Star crank, whose 128mm spider will accept road standard 130mm chainrings whose mounting holes have been elongated inward by 1mm (VERY easy surgery). Sheldon is, of course, one of the prime sources of information on classic French bikes.

Be on guard for French pedal threading (14mm x 1.25mm/thread), versus BSA/ISO (9/16"=14.3mm x 20TPI= 1.27mm/thread). If you insert a French-threaded pedal into an ISO crank, it may seem to fit, albeit loosely, but you will eventually strip the crank's pedal threads.

With a little judicious sanding, I have adapted ISO 7/8"=22.2mm handlebar stems to fit into 22mm French steerer tubes.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:   Vintage French Bike? posted by JB on 12/1/2005 at 8:01:25 PM
I concure with the smooth, but tempermentally tough at times French rides. I have several older bike boom rides, but find the early 80's Vitus framed rides with French components to be immeasurably swifter due to the weight. So while my old reliables hang, my vitus ride gets all the ride time...French rides are sweet
by: 165.138.141.15

   RE:   Vintage French Bike? posted by JB on 12/1/2005 at 8:01:37 PM
I concure with the smooth, but tempermentally tough at times French rides. I have several older bike boom rides, but find the early 80's Vitus framed rides with French components to be immeasurably swifter due to the weight. So while my old reliables hang, my vitus ride gets all the ride time...French rides are sweet
by: 165.138.141.15

   RE:RE:   Vintage French Bike? posted by JONathan on 12/2/2005 at 9:23:19 AM
The prescribed component upgrades are well worth it, IMHO. As an everyday, multipurpose rider, the French frames are the best compromise of performance and comfort, IMHO. $100 of upgrades gets you running real sweet. Think about it and it all makes perfect sense. You can get a super-clean UO-8 for the price of a dinner at a burger joint. Swap out a few of those crummy components and cruise all day long. My French collection includes the usual Peugeot AO/UO/UE types; Motobecanes; Gitane; Bertin; Jeunet; Roold and a "Nouvous Sport" (Peugeot folder). A lot of fun for little money. You'll pass the city bikes, MTB's whatever. I see these bikes with sloping top-tubes and dinky rear triangles and I wonder how this happened. Still, it is no matter if you want to keep it real, the parts are still around to fix the vintage French bikes, including the light 27" wheel sets. Well worth it. These buggers fly. Good luck.
by: 67.118.246.12

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage French Bike? posted by Gary Keyes on 12/25/2005 at 8:46:41 PM
Have a 630 Jeunet in very good shape that does not fit and looking to sell it---any indications on where best to sell or just try E-bay? Thanks
by: 24.177.124.198






AGE / VALUE:   CENTERHUMP SYNDROME posted by: rod on 11/30/2005 at 8:14:15 PM
I have a pair of S-6 'centerhump' rims from a '63 Schwinn Corvette that I had to remove all the thick rust burying the chrome; I'm rebuilding the Bendix coaster brake rear hub and I'd like to know what price range these type of Schwinn rims will sell for? I haven't decided to sell them yet, so any response to this topic is appreciated.
by: 199.179.238.25


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   CENTERHUMP SYNDROME posted by Patrick on 1/6/2006 at 2:17:31 AM
Schwinn used these rims for several years on everything from single speeds to 3 speeds to 5 and 10 speed models. I do not believe they are highly collectible or rare just yet, but really good original tires to fit these may be worth more than the rims. Even though they are 26", Schwinn in its marketing wisdom made them a slightly larger diameter so you had to get your tires from Schwinn or Raliegh since some of their tires also fit. I have a few of these rims in my garage right now, one with a Bendix yellow band 2 speed.
by: 70.226.130.202






AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Corbier posted by: Corey on 11/30/2005 at 6:50:44 PM
Quick questions about the details of a Peugeot Corbier. Were the wheels bolt-on or quick release? Alloy hubs/rims or alloy hub/steel rim? Certainly 27"? Five or six speed? It has French parts and stem mounted shifters. The tubing is Carbolite and paint scheme is white with checkerboard decals. Approximate vintage? It's basically a beater that I'm putting wheels back on to... well, I don't know why except it was in the back room of the shop I'm helping out at and it was cluttering up the place!

Corey

by: 4.226.222.5







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Lightweight v roadster wheels posted by: Bruce Robbins on 11/30/2005 at 12:17:07 PM
I'm having difficulty locating a pair of 26 x 1 1/4 rims for a pre-war lightweight bike I'm renovating. I have a pair of stainless 26 x 1 3/8 roadster rims and was thinking of using these. I'm not expecting the roadster wheels to perform exactly as the lightweight ones but can anyone say if there will be a noticeable difference in the way the bikes rides and handles. In other words, would these roadster wheels be acceptable on a lightweight?

Thanks,
Bruce

by: 80.194.147.17


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Lightweight v roadster wheels posted by Ken on 11/30/2005 at 3:35:05 PM
I suggest you review
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cribsheet-tires.html
and be sure you know which ISO you're replacing. If you're going from 597 to 590, it won't make a noticable difference.
by: 209.7.184.147

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Lightweight v roadster wheels posted by Warren on 12/1/2005 at 2:36:42 AM
Sorry Kurt but I disagree on this one. Good tires on a EA1 rim will make a noticeable difference if you want a sporting ride. Higher pressure, narrow, quicker and livelier. Size matters!
Since you live on the other side of the pond Bruce, I suggest you hold out for these rims and get some schwalbes from John St Cycle. Alloy weinmanns appear on ebay a couple of times a year.
by: 70.51.157.41

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Lightweight v roadster wheels posted by Ken on 12/1/2005 at 7:43:21 PM
I agree that weight will make a noticable difference; I didn't consider the possibility of going to alloy rims, which is ALWAYS a good idea if you're not trying to match OE. It's also true IMO that changing tires can make an enormous difference even in the same bead size.
Note to OP: Warren's advice is always sound.
by: 209.7.184.147

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Lightweight v roadster wheels posted by Warren on 12/1/2005 at 10:37:50 PM
Sound advice? A nice thought but try telling that to Elizabeth.
by: 70.51.124.173