MISC:   Clean-up posted by: RobA on 3/8/2005 at 7:54:10 PM
Well, I finally 'bit the bullet', and started dramatically 'thinning the herd'. In mid-January I had 100+ (probably closer to 110)...my last count on Sunday night...it's down to 47!!! And I'm happy!!! My target for now is to get it down to around 25. I'm keeping my good to really good, Italian-style 'racer' bikes; several for commuting; a few with high sentimental value (ie the 1972/73 Super Course that started the 'madness'; Gitane TdF); and two cro-moly MTB's. Slightly more than half, whole and partial bikes, I have given to a non-profit second-hand bike shop, the saleable ones I'm taking to a consignment store, close to a large university. (During one of my conversations with guys operating the consignment store, they told that there are around 4,000 bike thefts a year at the university...student population is around 25,000, I guess ...a lot of the students opt for cheap, 'invisible' transportation...).

I've sold about 15 so far, with another 9, either on the floor or in stock, pending serial number checks... The old MTB's in reasonable good shape are selling for around CDN$100 (US$80)...the road bikes are selling briskly and for much higher prices than I ever expected... a small-frame Nishiki International sold almost the day it hit the floor for CDN$99, a 1971 Super Course, took a couple of weeks, but sold for CDN$72....my start price was CDN$102... and so on ....the guys in the store tell me alloy wheels are critical...though a nice circa 1970 Phillips 10 speed, Huret Allvit, steel wheels quickly sold for CDN$70...I even sent it out with zip ties holding the rear brake cable to the top tube...I couldn't find the cable clamps, though I found them about a week later...:)

I think a big part of it is the time of year...it's spring here in the Northwest... One bike a low end Gitane, I bought a couple of years ago for CDN$30, sold for CDN$63; a steel-wheeled Norco Monashee (kind of a Peugeot UO-8 knock-off), I bought it in the offseason for CDN$18 and it sold fairly quickly for CDN$40...
by: 142.52.194.12


   RE:MISC:   Clean-up posted by Gralyn on 3/8/2005 at 10:16:58 PM
I need to do the same thing. I'm hoping I can thin the herd this spring. I had advertized several in a local paper - but it being Winter and all - not much of a demand for bikes. Hopefully this Spring - folks will get the desire to ride more.
I must have the remainder of all the old 10-speeds.....because I sure don't see them much at all anymore. I never see them on the road....and I very, very rarely see one in a thrift store. So I figure - I must have them all.
by: 12.26.84.120

   RE:RE:MISC:   Clean-up posted by JONathan on 3/9/2005 at 8:29:22 AM
I have not reached the "reduction point" in my collection of bike-boom 10's and 12's, yet just as I have suspended any new purchases, my collection continues to grow with donations from friends and relatives. Strange thing it seems when the less I try to find bikes, the more frequently they pop up for grabs. Thinning the herd is hard.
Even when I give a bike away, I feel as though they think they are doing me a favor. What would they think about having to pay anything for one? Probably it would be like a charity jesture. Helping the poor fella out, I suppose. That is due to several factors. First, most who appreciate the vintage lightweights know about bikes, so they simply get one and fix it up for themselves. Secondly, most people think that a new bike (no matter how cheaply built) is still better than a well re-conditioned, lugged steel chro-mo framed bike that was built three decades ago by skilled craftsman. Thirdly, the vintage lightweights require some skill to ride meaning their benefits are realized after some devoted learning and practice. Where were MTB's when I was a kid? They weren't. Fourthly, the vintage lightweights require some mechanical aptitude to keep running smoothly, which means that either they work on the bike or they have to pay a bunch of bucks to keep it adjusted...hopefully by someone who knows how to work on vintage bikes. However, despite all this, there is definitely an increase in the number showing up on the commuter circuits around here. I see quite a few large-framed vintage lightweights on the roads. These are always fitted with racks, fenders and light sets. Just my 2.
JONathan
by: 67.118.246.9

   RE:MISC:   Clean-up posted by Jon in Desmoines on 3/9/2005 at 9:22:12 AM
craiglist http://seattle.craigslist.org/bik/ is picking up here in Seattle, response time can be quite fast,or slow,
but it is a free listing, I have already thinned out a few
"projects" that never got started,check it out. jon in D
by: 152.163.100.199

   RE:RE:MISC:   Clean-up posted by Ken on 3/9/2005 at 6:39:37 PM
Spring cleaning fever must have hit us all at once... I was just about to post a list of the ones I could live without, and I will be doing so on the for sale page. Last year I ebay'ed a few including a Giant mtb, a Schwinn Corvette and a Continental, and like Rob I did better than I expected, but packing and shipping are an enormous pain so I'm going to try local alternatives first.
Jon in D, I was thinking we were neighbors until the Seattle reference sent me to the atlas - Ken in northern Illinois
by: 209.7.184.147

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Clean-up posted by Gralyn on 3/9/2005 at 11:44:43 PM
Yes, I have quite a few I'm getting ready to list on e-bay.....will probably list a few this weekend. But, I dread the packaging and shipping! Sometimes I have been lucky and the buyer was nearby - and thus, saved me the trouble of packing it up......but most times it does mean packaging. I still have several boxes (I think....I had better check on that). I also have a hard time finding boxes that are big enough....like for an old 24" or 25" frame.
I'm hoping I can sell some of them in a local sale paper.....I think when Spring hits...
by: 12.26.84.120






AGE / VALUE:   free Peugeot catalog 1983 Canadian posted by: humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 3/8/2005 at 2:47:22 PM
Free, before I throw it out. Peugeot 1983 Catalog Canadian, color fold out. Original
e- mail
humberchristopher28@hotmail.com
Include your name and address and it's yours.
only one.
by: 68.41.204.197


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   free Peugeot catalog 1983 Canadian posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 3/8/2005 at 2:56:24 PM
Another one, this one is French, and from 1974
e- mail your name and address and it's free.
humberchristopher28@hotmail.com
by: 68.41.204.197

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   free Peugeot catalog 1983 Canadian posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 3/8/2005 at 9:43:03 PM
The 1982 catalog is gone, leaving the 1974 Catalog left.Ohh, the PX 10 E is shown!
First come, first serve. I'll sit and scan the whole book. Who wants the last origianl book?
humberchristopher28@hotmail.com
by: 68.41.204.197

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   free Peugeot catalog 1983 Canadian posted by Ken on 3/9/2005 at 6:48:27 PM
ooh- ooh- that's me- I've got a Peugeot of that era (74) which T-Mar helped me identify- Simplex, Stronglight, Mafac.
by: 209.7.184.147






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Parts bin quandary for the Varsity: Helicomatic, Sachs or Schwinn? posted by: Kurt K. on 3/8/2005 at 2:19:02 AM
Recently acquired a rusty orange contraption made of water pipe called a Schwinn Varsity a few days ago for $5, from one of my backyard bike mechanic suppliers.

The actual frame and equipment isn't that bad, and for the price, well, "what the heck" - I bought it.

It wasn't worth it! I completely forgot to remove the right pedal, and made a decent punch in the trunk of the car...but I digress here, let me continue to my actual question:

The original S-7s were thrown in to sweeten the deal, although all I can say about these rims is that they would look great in the trash - dual walled or not, they are rusted beyond safe usage. I've had an unpleasent experience with my '70 Raleigh's rim giving out, and I'm sure these S-7s would fail me long earlier then that S-A Endrick rim did.

Now, when it comes down to available parts, I don't have much of anything in the 27" size save for a very nice Weinmann alloy rim laced into the unmentionable Mallard Helicomatic. Other then that, all I have are the terrible Schwinn rims.

I thought of lacing the old Schwinn hub into the Weinmann rim, and use a Sachs 5 speed freewheel that I have sitting on a pair of 26" cruiser wheels that I found on a department-store Murray (how the Sachs freewheel got on it is beyond me).

I'm no fast rider, and I don't intend to race with this Varsity (is there any sane person who would?), and I don't particularly care to re-lace the whole kitten kaboodle in the first place, considering the quality of the components and the actual bike in the first place. (The Campy equipped German roadbike I spotted at a sale for $15 sounds better and better every second).

Now, my question is - would anyone recommennd simply using the Helicomatic, as-is, on the Varsity? Or would it be safer in the long run to use the Sachs/Schwinn App. setup?

I would appriciate any opinions that anyone may be able to give me.

Take care,

Kurt
by: 205.188.116.203


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Parts bin quandary for the Varsity: Helicomatic, Sachs or Schwinn? posted by JONathan on 3/8/2005 at 5:44:47 AM
I agree with wanting better rims, but the S-7 rims can clean up suprisingly well. The chrome on those won't peel off. The nickel plating might show through a bit where the chrome gets worn off, but the Endricks I have were a complete wash out. The rims with rust on the inside are definitely gone. Unfortunately, a lot of rims that have flat tires attached will be gone from rust on the inside right where they have sat with water trapped inside for years. The solution for me was to get Araya alloy 27 inch wheels that are easy to find on Japanese bikes from the bike-boom. The Japanese bikes that I have found are usually a better ride than the Varsity which makes the swap very questionable at best. However, I have Varsities just to ride for fun and the alloys will keep the mass below tolerance limits and braking is much safer. Kool-Stop salmon color pads will improve the braking even more. Now you'd have a bike that is maybe around 38 pounds (assuming the forged forks are on it) that is a solid commuter on level roads. The Arayas will most likely have a hooked-bead which permits a modern high pressure tire. The steel rims are limited to low pressure tires which also means cheap, ponderous gum-walls, too. I would use a Shimano or SunTour derailer (friction type). If the Helicomatic is fitted on Rigida alloy rim, I would use it. Check for hooked bead on it. They are really sturdy rims that make up for the design weakness of the hub spoking. Good luck,
JONathan
by: 67.118.246.216

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Parts bin quandary for the Varsity: Helicomatic, Sachs or Schwinn? posted by sam on 3/8/2005 at 2:54:23 PM
A Varsity is one of the best bicycles you can ride for certain things--like short trips around town.They are bomb proof.Cheap.And easy to fix.Lots of Japan/atom parts in the bins to chose from.Keep it cheap.---sam
by: 69.151.98.53

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Parts bin quandary for the Varsity: Helicomatic, Sachs or Schwinn? posted by Kurt K. on 3/8/2005 at 5:22:16 PM
Not that I wouldn't use the S-7s if I had a chance - but these are rusted beyond belief on the inside, and clear around the whole circumference - worse then your average flat-tire/rainwater deal.

If the alloy hooked rims allow for higher-pressure tires, as you say, I'm sold on 'em. I've been fighting for months now with the 26 1-3/8" deal on my '71 Raleigh - being just a bit under 225 pounds, those 55-60 PSI tubes don't cut it - it always feels like I'm riding on a flat tire (and it looks it too).

The alloy rim I have is a Weinmann, not a Rigida, but should come up to the similar specs, as I've heard rather positive reviews about these rims from the Helicomatic posts.

I thank you for all your help...now it's just a matter of finding a matching front rim. I was given a useless 26 1-1/4" as the matching front to the Weinmann...

Take care,

Kurt
by: 64.12.116.199

   Varsity posted by John E on 3/9/2005 at 10:20:36 PM
The best upgrade you can possibly perform on a Varsity is to replace those S-7s with nice hook-beaded aluminum rims, either 700C or 27". (OK, maybe the best upgrade is KoolStop brake pads, but the rims are equally important for braking, and improve performance, as well.)
by: 66.185.168.82






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Campy 165mm posted by: Brian on 3/8/2005 at 12:27:51 AM
Any interest out there in a hard to locate Campagnolo Super Record Crankset in the 165mm size? Possible trade.
by: 70.57.106.242







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Kvalite posted by: Gralyn on 3/7/2005 at 2:44:44 AM
I've heard of Valite tubing on a bike frame.......but what about Kvalite? The Daneleigh bike I posted about previously....has the remnants of a decal on the seat tube....I could make out "KVALITE".....but that's about all.
by: 152.163.100.5