MISC:   Retro Raleighs Lenton Feature posted by: P.C. Kohler on 4/23/2005 at 1:18:16 AM
Sheldon Brown has added my article on the Raleigh Lenton series to his Retro Raleighs site:

http://retroraleighs.com/lenton

P.C. Kohler
by: 66.44.103.123


   RE:MISC: Retro Raleighs Lenton Feature posted by jack on 4/23/2005 at 8:38:14 AM
Highly recommended reading. PC did a fine job.
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   RE:RE:MISC: Retro Raleighs Lenton Feature posted by Kurt K. on 4/23/2005 at 1:49:24 PM
Agreed. This is the way Raleighs (or any other specific cycle) history should be covered.

Let's hear a round of applause for PC and his latest article!

-Kurt
by: 64.12.116.199

    Retro Raleighs Lenton Feature posted by John E on 4/25/2005 at 2:41:40 PM
Nice work, PC! I have seen very few comparable histories, usually in spreadsheet form only, without the narrative (Schwinn lightweights, Peugeot PX-10s, and Schwinn mountain bikes come to mind). There may be enough cumulative knowledge in this forum to create a Bianchi or a Nishiki history.
by: 66.185.168.82






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Wanted: A Machine Of Reynolds 531 posted by: Kurt K. on 4/22/2005 at 1:29:42 AM
Wanted:

A bare frame (and fork, if possible) of Reynolds 531 tubing.

Would prefer a 21-23" frame, or even better, a 22". A Raleigh/Carlton frame would be especially nice. Condition doesn't matter, just so long as it is in one structural piece.

By the way, I once saw an all-chrome 531 fork on an older Peugeot. Not sure which model the bike was, but I would love to build this machine up with one of these particular all-chrome 531 forks.

Let me know if any of you fellows happen to have something for sale - simply drop me a line at cudak888@aol.com.

Take care,

Kurt
by: 205.188.117.68


    Wanted: A Machine Of Reynolds 531 posted by John E on 4/22/2005 at 2:38:56 PM
The all-chrome Peugeot Reynolds 531 fork was probably from a late 1970s or early 1980s PX-10 Super Competition.

If you are willing to compromise on a mixed-tube frameset, you can save alot of money and greatly increase your chances of finding something, without significantly compromising ride quality or weight.

I have one full Reynolds 531 framest (1959 Capo) and two mixed-tube framesets (1980 Peugeot PKN-10E, butted Reynolds 531 main triangle; 1981 Bianchi Campione d'Italia, butted Columbus CrMo main triangle), and I am delighted with all 3 bikes.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Wanted: A Machine Of Reynolds 531 posted by sam on 4/24/2005 at 9:04:49 PM
What's you budget for a 531 frame?(I don't have one to sell)but the range is quite great.The best deal I got on one is a great 1952 Claud Butler --frame and fork only cost $35 but shipping(from UK) was $80.---maybe you'll run across something locally for less---sam
by: 69.150.212.189

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Wanted: A Machine Of Reynolds 531 posted by sam on 4/25/2005 at 1:47:11 AM
bid-$2--shipping may cost big$$$
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=22679&item=7150939489&rd=1
sam
by: 69.150.212.189

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Wanted: A Machine Of Reynolds 531 posted by Kurt K. on 4/25/2005 at 2:00:26 AM
Hello Sam,

I'd put my limit at $80, although seeing how much these things go for on eBay, I'd probably just plunge right to $100 and let it be.

Anything in the U.K. is off limits far as I'm concerned. The shipping prices within the States are bad enough.

Actually, there's nothing I would like better to find one locally - not only so I save the shipping costs, I may be able to find one complete. I've found out that local prices are commonly dirt cheap too, if you know where to look.

P.S., I did see an '80s Gazelle w/531 at one of the local shops set up as a lightweight tourer, complete with alloy North Road bars and lightweight plastic touring mudguards. Was a repair though. Frame was straight, but it looked well abused.

Take care,

Kurt
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Wanted: A Machine Of Reynolds 531 posted by Kurt K. on 4/26/2005 at 1:13:33 AM
Heh - also too big a frame for me - already got two "ball-busters" already, the Nishiki Prestiege & my Raleigh Technium...neither of which I fit on, and that's just when standing over the top tube!

Take care,

Kurt


by: 205.188.117.13

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Wanted: A Machine Of Reynolds 531 posted by jack on 4/30/2005 at 12:49:15 AM
Kurt, I have a Raleigh Super Course 21.5", original green paint and decals (nice), anniversary (oval) headbadge, lined nervex, chrome socks, etc. Let me know if interested and I will send pics.
by: 207.200.116.137






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by: DC Wilson on 4/20/2005 at 3:50:18 AM
Please comment on a Dawes Imperial 14-speed (531c butted tubes, forks and stays)? Racing geometry, not a Galaxy tourer. This seems a pretty fine frame with plain lugs, Cinelli stem, Kranz head set, Maillard 600 sealed hubs (never heard of 600s), Weinmann 405 side pulls (amazingly not too bad) and Rigida Score grey annodized 700c rims (never heard of a Rigida Score either)with Hutchison tires. Other components are Japanese: Sakae SA cranks with two rings, Suntour Cyclone Mk 2 derailleurs and down tube shifters; la prade seat post. Vintage maybe early 80s. Seven cogs. Cryptic decal on seat tube says "Dawes Hand Built B.S. 6102, Parts 1&2." What is that about? Archives have nothing. Google turns up nothing useful. You guys are may last best hope. Is it some model sold in England that wasn't retailed in USA?
by: 4.43.160.40


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by Derek Coghill on 4/20/2005 at 9:55:20 PM
BS 6102 is the quality standard relating to bicycles. There are different parts, different years and we have to fit stickers to bikes that come from the factory without them. New legislation about reflectors and bells means that the sticker has to be different. Grrrrrrrr....... Don't know when BS (stands for British Standard) came in, but I'd guess at early 1990s sometime?
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Dawes Imperial ? posted by D.C. Wilson on 4/21/2005 at 4:33:52 AM
Thanks for that clarification of the decal. You sound like a UK bike retailer perhaps. Was a Dawes Imperial considered a fine frame, or just ordinary? In the USA, these components would likely be found on a fairly modest frame, but, again, I find this frame pretty impressive. Regardless, thanks for the response.
by: 4.43.160.40

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Dawes Imperial ? posted by Derek Coghill on 4/24/2005 at 11:06:40 PM
I work for a bike shop in Edinburgh. I don't know the Imperial; Dawes are best known for their touring bikes, although they make all sorts. They are owned by Falcon. I'll see what I can find out, if you like.
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by T-Mar on 4/25/2005 at 12:39:52 AM
Your Imperial model is circa 1986, based on the component mix. The 1986 Imperial was marketed in the USA and sold for $569 US. You are correct in stating that it was a racing model, as opposed to touring or sport touring.

Dawes approach to bicycles was opposite to that of many of the large volume builders. They put the emphasis and the bulk of the value into the frame, which establishes the ride characteristics. Most of the large volume manufacturers lured buyers with the emphasis on the components. Given that components are easier and less expensive to upgrade than a frame, Dawes approach was appealing the knowledgeable cyclist. The approach was not unique to Dawes, but it certainly wasn't mainstream. Congratulations on a nice acquisition.
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by JONathan on 4/26/2005 at 8:45:28 PM
I have two Dawes bikes. The "Galaxy" and "Realm Rider". The "RealmRider" is probably a bike-boom offering, with the "Galaxy" as a fine touring bike for its day. I like the "Realm Rider" for the vintage ride characteristics and very upscale workmanship for a low-end fitted machine...as Tom indicated why this may be the case with some makes.


by: 67.118.246.138


   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by Gordon Eady on 3/30/2008 at 3:27:24 PM
Hi
I agree, whilst Dawes have become known for the Galaxy range touring bikes the 'Imperial' featured in the early to mid eighties catelogue and was their top of the range sports/racing bike. You have done well to aquire a handbuilt Dawes frame which you could hang off any high end components and have yourself a very nice machine for commuting of day riding.


by: 86.133.161.195

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by lee hughes. on 7/5/2008 at 8:06:42 AM
Hi, ive picked up a dawes response handbuilt lightweight cycle (racer/road bike) can anybody give me any information, or an indication of age/quality etc. thanks.
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by charlie on 7/21/2008 at 7:12:58 PM
I was just given a imperial bicycle that was in dry storage for who knows how long.Where is the serial number located and how can I find the age of the bicycle. This bike is in near perfect shape with front and rear lights,what appears to be a lock on the rear,bell and what looks to be perfect paint .Any help would be appreciated.
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by fran turner on 9/8/2008 at 1:48:59 PM
My husband has a Dawes Tartan Club bicycle. When he bought it in the late 60's or early 70's, he was told that it was one of a matching pair (the other being a woman's bike) and that it was approximately a 1949 model. It was made in Edinburgh, England according to a label on it. It has Tartan decals and is in pretty good shape except for the bottom of the fork which was repainted due to an accident. Everything on it is original. It is very lightweight with racing tires. I would like to have some information on it as to its real age, value, etc. My husband rode it as late as last year.
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Dawes Imperial ? posted by fran turner on 9/8/2008 at 1:49:00 PM
My husband has a Dawes Tartan Club bicycle. When he bought it in the late 60's or early 70's, he was told that it was one of a matching pair (the other being a woman's bike) and that it was approximately a 1949 model. It was made in Edinburgh, England according to a label on it. It has Tartan decals and is in pretty good shape except for the bottom of the fork which was repainted due to an accident. Everything on it is original. It is very lightweight with racing tires. I would like to have some information on it as to its real age, value, etc. My husband rode it as late as last year.
by: 4.245.22.132






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by: Gralyn on 4/19/2005 at 11:36:56 AM
Does anyone know what the frame material was for a Fuji Special Road Racer? This would be like an early 70's bike: Nitto alloy bars and stem, Maxy alloy cranks, Belt leather saddle. Mine didn't have a frame sticker when I got it - and I haven't been able to identify the frame material from pics of other Special Road Racers, or from any literature. It's either high tensile or Chro-Mo. It almost seem light enough to be Chro-Mo.....but I suspect it's high tensile steel.
Does anyone know for sure?
by: 12.26.84.120


     Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by John E on 4/19/2005 at 3:51:23 PM
The Sugino Maxy cranks generally indicate a lower-to-mid level bike. The Nishiki Competition and Road Compe had double-butted Ishiwata CrMo frames and Sugino Mighty Compe cranksets, whereas the Kokusai/International had straight-gauge CrMo main tubes and Maxy cranks. If the Fuji lineup is similar, I would bet on straight gauge CrMO, but it's just an educated guess with no strong supporting evidence.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by jack on 4/20/2005 at 5:56:01 AM
Gralyn, I have a Club Fuji (I think its late-70's, early-80's). Ser#K(C?)402902, forged no-name horizontal dropouts, brazed-on shifter bosses, water and top brake cable guides, metal Mt.Fuji headplate. Says "Fuji Valite Tubing" on each side of toptube near headtube and "FUJI VALite QUAD-BUTTED STEEL TUBING 1769" decal on seatube just below toptube. Wasn't Fuji also Panasonic? I suspect that as part of huge industrial conglomerate, they had ability to make their own tubing and dropouts.
by: 207.200.116.137

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by Gralyn on 4/20/2005 at 11:37:09 AM
I had other Fuji's with Valite tubing - but they were newer bikes. I think this Special Road Racer is more early 70's .....and I suspect it's straight gage Chro-Mo. However, it could be just high tensile steel. I'm hoping something will turn up in some literature or something to positively identify it.
by: 12.26.84.120

    Fuji Special Road Racer posted by John E on 4/20/2005 at 2:20:12 PM
Fuji makes Subaru automobiles, but I do not know whether they made Matsushita/National/Technics/Panasonic's bike frames as well.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:  Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by Dick in FL on 4/23/2005 at 12:48:05 AM
John
I just returned from the Florida Bicycle Safari so I am late responding to your post. I was planning to ride this event on the Nishiki Competition that I acquired at a garage sale a couple months ago. But I was skeptical about the narrow spread of gear ratios. Did I miss a good ride? It came from the original owner who thought he purchased it in 1972 (I think 1974!) When I pointed out that the handlebar tape appeared to have been replaced, he replied "Many times." He added that *everything* had been replaced, and when I saw the Dura-Ace branding and SunTour bar end shifters, I gave him the asked-for $10. The bike came with an underseat tool bag filled with bicycle tools, a Zefal hi-pressure frame pump, an unused camping tent, and three pairs of trousers thrown in. (It was the end of the day for the garage sale.) All this bike needed from me was a paint job. I have yet to really try it out ..... that small low gear discourages me. The seller said that the Competition was quite high in the Nishiki lineup ... perhaps 2nd from the top.

Dick in FL
by: 172.164.136.97

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by T-Mar on 4/24/2005 at 8:32:51 PM
Almost certainly hi-tensile steel. The better, early 1970s Fuji had a seat tube decal comprised of a laurel wreath and the wording "CHROME MOLYBDENUM STEEL TUBING" or "DOUBLE BUTTED CHROME MOLYBDENUM STEEL TUBING". It sounds like you have a model S10-S.
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by Tim Fricker on 5/18/2005 at 8:25:06 PM
The Special Road Racer was also called the S-10S. I don't know when exactly they dropped the longer name in favor of just S-10S, but it was sometime before 1977. Up through the '76 model year, they had straight gauge hi-tensile steel tubing, not cro-moly. The '77 had double butted hi-tensile (the only bike I can name that had such a thing), and the 78 and later had double butted cro-moly. All of them were decent bikes, but the earlier ones were really more of a "my first 10 speed" sort of bike... a bit nicer than the low end Peugeots and Raleighs in that they had more alloy parts, but the basic frame was pretty pedestrian.

Tim (used to own a 77, and might get it back after 25 years now!)
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by Luke on 8/22/2006 at 8:52:38 PM
I don't know if you ever got an answwer for your question - those things are for mounting a pump along the tube.
by: 75.33.140.21

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by Michael on 7/30/2005 at 9:55:46 PM
I have a Fuji VALite Tubing - Allegro bike and was wondering if it would be a good one for a triathelon? What does the VALite Tubing mean. I see all this stuff at the bike shops and on E-bay for carbonfiber is that stuff way lighter than this bike? If any one has any info or know where I can get info on this bike I would sure appreciate it. I am new to the sport of biking and I am training for a triathelon next summer. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by Scottie on 6/7/2006 at 1:16:26 PM
Here is a Fuji Special Road Racer I picked up last night. So am I correct in assuming this is a steel frame? Also, what are the pointed "things" on the top and bottom of the front down tube for?


by: 67.64.130.66


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by Karen on 5/18/2007 at 6:09:47 PM
I have a Fuji Special Road Racer. I bought it new....can't remember the exact year. It is in good condition, other than needing a rear tire. I would like to sell it and I am not sure what they are worth and where I might be able to sell it. Suggestions please....thanks.
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   RE: Fuji Special Road Racer posted by Davi on 6/5/2007 at 7:16:01 PM
In Japan, the name 'Fuji' is common: Like Acme here. Fuji cycling is now owned by a Taiwanese firm and has nothing to do with Subaru or Panasonic.
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by lusnasty on 2/26/2008 at 12:12:18 PM
has anyone heard of a janpanense windsor made by a company named tsunda has a cr-mo frame whatever that means and has champion engraved in handle bars lady said it was a vintage but dosent know the year if anyone can help thanks
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Special Road Racer Frame Material posted by Kaysen on 7/16/2008 at 11:31:25 PM
"Also, what are the pointed "things" on the top and bottom of the front down tube for?"- Bike came with a hand pump? That's my guess. It's similar to the length of a pump I have for my Celo Europa.
by: 68.4.22.165

   Allegro 10 Sp (circa 1977) Frame#281847 posted by Doug Williams on 7/20/2008 at 11:34:59 AM
Vintage allegro touring 10sp - Equip with SR bars, campy everything else. What is market value for this bike, I bought in 1979. Seldom ride, looking to trade for comfort bike.
by: 68.183.245.103






MISC:   Dented Tubes posted by: jack on 4/19/2005 at 4:06:44 AM
What are viable methods for removing moderate to severe dents in frame tubes? This Bertin I'm workin on has a nice big dent right on top of the top-tube. Paint is not damaged so to minimize paint damage I was either thinking of drilling to install a pull screw or having a stud spot-welded on (both methods then use a slide-hammer).
Any Suggestions?

by: 205.188.117.68


   RE:MISC: Dented Tubes posted by sam on 4/19/2005 at 5:29:50 PM
They sell at tool for this.It's a block of alum. with a hole almost the size of the frame tube drilled and the block is sawed in half.You clamp the block in a vise around the dent and rock the frame to re-size the tube and remove the dent.So I'm told!
Some have said you can make this tool out of hard wood.So I'm told!
As you have quessed I've never done this but I've seen the block.---sam (runes the paint--so I'm told!)
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   RE:RE:MISC: Dented Tubes posted by jack on 4/20/2005 at 5:34:33 AM
Sam, I've heard of the same device. However, this dent is too deep (almost 1/4") and no way it will pop out by this method. I will try one of the slide hammer methods and report back on how well it worked.
by: 207.200.116.137

   RE:RE:RE:MISC: Dented Tubes posted by sam on 4/20/2005 at 8:04:00 PM
Auto shops now use a pop-weld that sticks a welding rod to the dent.The dent is pulled(slide hammer) and the rod cut off.No hole drilled that way.Might have to use a torch to heat the dent ,also---I'd see if I could find a welder that might be able to do this--you might get lucky and only have to sand bare a small spot to stick the rod too---sam
by: 69.150.212.189

   RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC: Dented Tubes posted by jack on 4/23/2005 at 5:33:37 AM
After ruminating on this, I think the pressure vacuum method would cause the least damage. However, not having all the equipment necessary for this, I will try the "Gehtto" method of using batteries to spot weld a pull-rod. I'll let you know results.
by: 207.200.116.137

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC: Dented Tubes posted by jack on 4/23/2005 at 8:35:44 AM
Doing more brainstorming, found that the dented top tube is closed at the head tube and has a 1/4" hole at seat tube. I will rig-up some fittings and pressurize the oil-filled tube using hydraulics. I'll let you know how it goes, and yes, I will be very careful.
by: 207.200.116.137