AGE / VALUE:   Roberts posted by: alan shind on 7/20/2005 at 1:30:55 AM
Hi everyone
I had been thinking about my old bikes that I have stored since the late 80s. Reading the posts on the site for the last few weeks finaly motivated me to bring them back to good ridable condition.
I started with my Roberts that I bought new in 1974 Getting new wheels built as the old sew ups will not do anymore. It should be ready in a week or so. I cant wait to ride it again after 20 plus years of storage.
Its as exciting as when I had it built up new.

Alan
by: 67.38.247.122


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Roberts posted by Scott on 7/20/2005 at 2:41:27 AM
good for you!!!
by: 71.105.150.80






AGE / VALUE:   1968-1969 Schwinn Varsity posted by: Brian Collins on 7/19/2005 at 2:33:39 PM
Hello all,
I'm inquiring on behalf of a friend. She is the original owner of a Man's yellow Schwinn Varsity from 1968-1969. Her Mom paid $125 for it at the time (supposedly).

It's a 10 speed. I don't know much else, except that it's in mint condition. Any idea what it's worth?

I'd appreciate any help in this area.

Regards,
Brian Collins
by: 63.150.227.63


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1968-1969 Schwinn Varsity posted by Scott on 7/20/2005 at 2:51:22 AM
varsities have to be pretty nice to interest anyone though if you read the posts that is changing. I find the best way to find the value is to look at completed auctions on ebay for a similar condition bike. remember shipping is part of what people are willing to pay
by: 71.105.150.80

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1968-1969 Schwinn Varsity posted by JONathan on 7/21/2005 at 7:20:14 AM
Near mint! That makes for considerable increase in value. A relative dropped a near-mint '71 on my deck...been in the dry desert air for 30+ years and absolutely zero rust. I fixed it up just to experience the original ride...quite acceptable as it were. Just can't see how they stopped making them, when nothing comes close to their dependability and big-ride feel. Fast they are not, but they can get you there easy enough and after a couple weeks worth of pushing all that iron, you'll be an animal on that 20 pounder. This one is worth $300 to get it away from me...if I was to sell it. Just a wild guess, but the difference between near-mint and beater-class is night and day. Just my 2.
JONathan
BTW, they lend well with a nice set of Araya alloy hp wheels and "conti's"; which are still available in 27" size.

by: 67.118.246.177

   1968-1969 Schwinn Varsity posted by John E on 7/21/2005 at 2:42:41 PM
You really want a Super Sport of that vintage. Convert the crankset to cotterless aluminum, get a nice pair of vintage road quill or platform pedals, replace the TwinStiks with barcons, replace the padded vinyl saddle with a Brooks, switch to a 6-speed "ultra" freewheel, and you have a very respectable ride.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1968-1969 Schwinn Varsity posted by scott on 7/22/2005 at 12:07:03 AM
you know, when I used to work in an old Schwinn shop they tiol me that Schwinn was going to make varsities out of cast iron until they found something heavier. don't know if its true but I just thought i'd pass it along!!!
by: 71.105.150.80

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1968-1969 Schwinn Varsity posted by Ken on 7/22/2005 at 7:08:08 PM
Mom's memory went the way all of ours did about that time... the 69 Varsity was 79.95 with either drop bars or tourist bars, plus five bucks if you wanted fenders. My respects to JONathan, but the value is what you can get for it. It's not light, not rare, not sought after unless it's the cleanest example out there- market value, probably less than the cost of shipping. I like J's idea though- sell it to Lance as a bodybuilding device. Then on his Madone he'd go up those mountains like a rocket.
by: 209.7.184.147






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World Traveller posted by: Scott on 7/19/2005 at 7:41:01 AM
Ok, first, I'm kinda a balloon tire bike sort of guy. I love the old long tank Daytons, but recently I came across this Schwinn World Traveller. I guess they're rare in a way. I paid $12.00 at the dreaded local thrift store (I've had my problems there before too). It looked horrible so I figured I'd paint it, maybe someone would want it (I have a modern road bike). It just happens to be my size which is unusual since I ride a 60cm bike (usually I find much smaller bikes). I painted it black with red lugs. I found a seat that looks to be an old Japanese knockoff of a brooks saddle in a box of stuff that usually yeilds only cruiser parts. This seemed appropriate enough since this was a 1973 Japanese Schwinn supposedly the first time Schwinn tried a Japanese bike. well after I painted it, and repacked the hubs, headset, and bottom bracket, reassembled, and tuned it up, I gave it a spin around the block. I can't begin to tell you how much I loved it! this bike is great! I have even been considering getting rid of the modern road bike. You know, it was only a middle of the road bike even when new. I think it has had a few upgrades long ago, nicer cranks, better wheels, etc. I think I have found something that satisfies my love of the old and the convenience of the new. I guess the moral of the story is even if you can't get hold of the exotic brands there are bikes out there that anyone can afford and they are interesting, fun, and beautiful. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise, just give them a chance they'll grow on you!!!

enjoy your bikes, Scott
by: 71.105.150.80


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World Traveller posted by Randy on 7/19/2005 at 2:18:15 PM
An interesting story that caught my attention. I have owned quite a few vintage and not so vintage road bicycles in the past several years, the newest of which was an early to mid ninties Bianchi "Torfeo" with all the modern stuff attached. I sold that bicycle because it just never seemed to feel right to me. Generally, I like the feel and ride offered by the older bicycles.

In the years that I have been collecting and riding vintage road bicycles, I have noticed a change in situation. At one time, it was easy to find an old lightweight, for next to nothing. This has changed. Vintage road bicycles are becoming harder to find and more expensive to buy and I see one primary reason for this change. I speak now of the supposed law of "supply and demand".

The supply of vintage road bicycles is, at best constant, while demand is increasing. More and more people, like myself, are becoming interested in collecting and/or simply riding the old iron. There is hardly a day that goes by, during riding season, that I do not see at least one vintage road bike being pumped around town. These sightings usually reveal low to entry level and/or department store rides. A couple of years ago, I rarely saw even a single vintage bike during my around town travels. The point is, bicycles such as these are now being used rather than disposed of.

On the rural sideroads, where I like to ride the most, I frequently see really nice vintage road bicycles. Everything from a Team Miyata to an unusual Sardoni with a full Rino grouppo. I always try to stop and chat with my fellow riders, no matter what they are riding, and the story I get is almost always the same.

Their old lightweight had been hanging and/or stored in the shed/garage/basement for years and they finally decided to dust it off and take it out for a spin. Most of these riders are middle to senior aged, like myself, and most purchased their bicycles new. Most have tried riding mountain bikes and most have little good to say for that experience. It is riders, such as these who are making finding quality old bicycles difficult. Rather than giving their bikes to a local thrift shop or dumping them at the local landfill site, these guys are keeping and riding them. Supply, again constant, impacted by incresed demand of the original owner.

Then there are the collectors! Again, guys like myself, who have discovered that collecting vintage lightweight bicycles is fun, easy to do and not too expensive. Unfortunately, the "not too expensive" aspect is changing rapidly(my opinion, of course).

Ebay, the largest and greatest "Yard Sale" on earth, is primarily responsible for driving the prices of vintage road bicycles and components up. Items, be they components or complete bicycles, are going for very high prices, these days and I do not believe that the situation will ever revearse itself. In fact, I believe that more and more people will join the collecting/riding hobby which will, as expected, drive prices even higher. They will discover, as Scott did, that these old bicycles are really quite nice to ride.

In days gone by, I loved to find, restore and ride vintage motorcycles. Indians, Harleys, Triumphs and Nortons were favorite picks. At one time, motorcycles such as those just mentioned, could be had for a song or even less("sure kid, just get the darn thing out of my yard"). Today, the Harleys and Triumphs, that were once so plentiful, will cost VERY BIG BUCKS! And this is the direction that our beloved vintage road bicycles are going.

I am, indeed, fortunate to live in an area where the vintage road bicycle is still plentiful. This weekend past saw $20.00 cover the cost of a mid sixties Bottecchia and a late seventies Carlton "Criterium". I bought both bicycles home and stuffed(almost literally) them into the shed. I am not sure what I will do with either one. The price was, simply, right. The point here is, I am adding to the problem by hoarding bicycles. I must have roughly a hundred bikes by now and only twelve are considered to be keepers.

Last night, I got a phone call, out of the blue, and half an hour later I was dragging an early fifties CCM "Cleveland"(a 28" wheel roadster with a double top bar) home.

But the "wow, I got lucky again", thing is deminishing. Hang on to the bikes you like most. They will be tough to replace tomorrow.
by: 216.211.46.188

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World Traveller posted by Gralyn on 7/20/2005 at 12:49:31 AM
I often theorize of why there aren't any old lightweights to be found. Well, my family would say - it's because I have them all! Well, I don't exactly have them all - but I do have quite a few.

I can remember seeing a plentiful supply of those old bike - but it's been several years back. Maybe it was just the right amount of time for the old bike boom bikes to be donated. Then, I remember there was a period after that - of mountain bikes. Mountain bikes, and cross bikes, and comfort bikes......and during this mountain bike period - only the serious cyclists had lightweights. .....and so deeper into my theory - is that the folks that were serious about cycling and had the decent bikes - typically wouldn't donate them to a thrift store. And so now - you just don't see any old lightweights.

Add to this - that folks are buying them up like crazy. I have even seen halfway decent straight high tensile steel framed bikes....which I passed on......are almost always gone the very next day. Folks are buying them up! All of them.....even the Varsities - they will last about a day.

One thing is for sure though: It's a great hobby! And very inexpensive!!!! Riding bikes and working on bikes and restoring bikes to their former glory! You can ride all you want.....and when you're not riding - you can be tinkering with one......or re-building/restoring one....and when you're finished.....you can ride it! It just doesn't get any better than that!

by: 205.188.117.71

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World Traveller posted by jason on 7/22/2005 at 4:58:27 AM
thought I would throw this into the ring, for the last few years, once people saw me on a different bike every few days, they would end up giving me some old bike that they had laying about. I would generaly oil up the murrays and huffys and give them away again, keeping the nicer bikes to tinker with.
in the last year this trend has reversed. seems lots of people I know and some i don't are wanting to know if I can fix thier bike or sell one of mine. I often advise going to the bike shop for a new one, but some just want something cheap.
my parents talk about the bike boom of the seventys. when they had to wait a month for a couple of varsitys to come into the bike shop. Thier response to the gas crunch.
I think that this helps explain why folks are loath to get rid of them recently. In fact, one or two people have asked where the bikes they gave me are now, and can they have them back, two years after they gave them to me!
the guys at my local bike shop report an increase in commuter quality bikes, purchased mostly by mountain bikers who are sick of trying to pull city duty out of thier knobby machines.
this is the way it seems to be here in the ozarks, don't know about everywere else.




by: 70.241.37.208

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World Traveller posted by Michael Saladee on 7/26/2005 at 12:06:29 AM
I have an older one TRAVELER,when I found it, it was a missing bike to a his and hers set. I wouldn't have painted it if it was in half way good condition. Made the same mistake before, different bike. Sounds neat I'd love to see a picture of it.
by: 66.81.167.202






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World Traveller posted by: Scott on 7/19/2005 at 7:41:01 AM
Ok, first, I'm kinda a balloon tire bike sort of guy. I love the old long tank Daytons, but recently I came across this Schwinn World Traveller. I guess they're rare in a way. I paid $12.00 at the dreaded local thrift store (I've had my problems there before too). It looked horrible so I figured I'd paint it, maybe someone would want it (I have a modern road bike). It just happens to be my size which is unusual since I ride a 60cm bike (usually I find much smaller bikes). I painted it black with red lugs. I found a seat that looks to be an old Japanese knockoff of a brooks saddle in a box of stuff that usually yeilds only cruiser parts. This seemed appropriate enough since this was a 1973 Japanese Schwinn supposedly the first time Schwinn tried a Japanese bike. well after I painted it, and repacked the hubs, headset, and bottom bracket, reassembled, and tuned it up, I gave it a spin around the block. I can't begin to tell you how much I loved it! this bike is great! I have even been considering getting rid of the modern road bike. You know, it was only a middle of the road bike even when new. I think it has had a few upgrades long ago, nicer cranks, better wheels, etc. I think I have found something that satisfies my love of the old and the convenience of the new. I guess the moral of the story is even if you can't get hold of the exotic brands there are bikes out there that anyone can afford and they are interesting, fun, and beautiful. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise, just give them a chance they'll grow on you!!!

enjoy your bikes, Scott
by: 71.105.150.80







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World Traveller posted by: Scott on 7/19/2005 at 7:41:01 AM
Ok, first, I'm kinda a balloon tire bike sort of guy. I love the old long tank Daytons, but recently I came across this Schwinn World Traveller. I guess they're rare in a way. I paid $12.00 at the dreaded local thrift store (I've had my problems there before too). It looked horrible so I figured I'd paint it, maybe someone would want it (I have a modern road bike). It just happens to be my size which is unusual since I ride a 60cm bike (usually I find much smaller bikes). I painted it black with red lugs. I found a seat that looks to be an old Japanese knockoff of a brooks saddle in a box of stuff that usually yeilds only cruiser parts. This seemed appropriate enough since this was a 1973 Japanese Schwinn supposedly the first time Schwinn tried a Japanese bike. well after I painted it, and repacked the hubs, headset, and bottom bracket, reassembled, and tuned it up, I gave it a spin around the block. I can't begin to tell you how much I loved it! this bike is great! I have even been considering getting rid of the modern road bike. You know, it was only a middle of the road bike even when new. I think it has had a few upgrades long ago, nicer cranks, better wheels, etc. I think I have found something that satisfies my love of the old and the convenience of the new. I guess the moral of the story is even if you can't get hold of the exotic brands there are bikes out there that anyone can afford and they are interesting, fun, and beautiful. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise, just give them a chance they'll grow on you!!!

enjoy your bikes, Scott
by: 71.105.150.80