AGE / VALUE:   70's Vintage Peugeot Road Bike(Pearlescent Paint' posted by: Flavio Figliola on 7/26/2005 at 5:21:53 AM
Hi, Everyone in BikeLand including myself, well i Had Started a new job at Monmouth University here in jersey as a custodian after a couple of months working there I was taking at the trash bin in the building that i working in and what do you know there it was on top of trash. one of the students had thrown it away because it could not be fixed.the frame and fork were in great shape paint minor dirt some small scratches that rubbed out with compound, some parts were missing but i had put a set of brake levers on it shimano RX 100, 12 spd suntour cyclone derailer shimano 500 brakes(vintage)shimano index down tube shift levers. shimano sealed hubs and shimano front deraileur. well i thought the frame and fork are vintage let me keep a vintage look on it.
by: 68.44.74.136







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   another World Traveller posted by: Scott on 7/26/2005 at 1:31:35 AM
well I found another World Traveller. it's at a thrift store here for $25.00 the paint is pretty good (pale green) even the decals are nice. I'm just not sure I need two. it does need some work though. one of the shifters is broken off, and I don't think they are right anyway. stuff like that. are these worth more than a regular varsity type? I'm also looking at a Malvern Star 5 Star Club Racer from the '50s. are these worth while? it looks cool. fancy lugs. I think it would look really cool fixed up nice.
by: 71.105.150.80







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   I need help! posted by: claes on 7/25/2005 at 4:54:23 PM
Hi, I am about to buy a vintage lightweight but I am mostly a mountainbiker so I have no idea about road bikes and especially about old ones. I have found two which I can have for more or less nothing but I have no idea if they are vintage lightweights or just junk. The first one is a mirage (well that's the only thing written on the frame (which can be seen in the attached picture). it's 12 speed, it says shimano on the frame but on the gears it says DNP-as and on the brakes it says Pro-star 500. The bottom bracket is fine but the crank can be moved a bit and is a bit "wobbly" on one side.

I saw a bike in a shop today (through the window as it was closed). It was a dutch bike at least I think it was as it said holland and Union on the small sign in front. Have they ever produced any good bikes?? The shop opens after I start my work and close before I finish so if they only produced junk I wont bother to take time of from work to go there. Well sorry for this long message (and in horrible english too!) but any advice would be much appreciated.

Cheers,

Claes


by: 82.182.121.27



   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: I need help! posted by Claes again on 7/25/2005 at 5:13:44 PM
Well the point of buying one is to use it as a roadbike i.e. to train on it. I cannot afford to buy a newer one and once I can afford a more modern roadbike (unless I fall in love with this the vintage lightweight) I'll buy one and turn the vintage into a singlespeed.

/Claes
by: 82.182.121.27

   Mirage posted by John E on 7/25/2005 at 5:17:49 PM
Motobecane made a "Mirage," which was their basic entry-level road bike. You have found either a 1980s Mirage or someone else's knock-off immitation of one. It looks like a decent enough first road bike, assuming the crank merely needs retorquing. (Extended riding on a loose aluminum crank will irreparably erode its mounting hole, so that it can never again be seated securely and properly.) I would not invest much money in it; for example, the "Pro-star 500" brakeset is not synonymous with quality.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: I need help! posted by Claes again on 7/25/2005 at 6:15:30 PM
Well I am also bidding on a swedish made bike from the 1980-something. Lugged steelframe with 531 reynold's in the fork (about the rest of the frame I don't know). Everything on it is shimano 600. I think it will cost me significantly more than the others and will probably streach my budget to it's maximum (probably around 200 $ including transport). Could it be worth it??


by: 82.182.121.27


   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: I need help! posted by Gralyn on 7/25/2005 at 7:49:52 PM
If you have a Reynolds 531 frame and Shimano 600 group....for around $200 - I don't think you can go wrong. It would most likely be a much better ride than the old Motobecane Mirage. I have a Mirage - but it has steel wheels, high tensile steel frame, steel cottered crankset, etc.
by: 198.137.214.36

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: I need help! posted by claes again on 7/25/2005 at 9:23:18 PM
well I won the bidding on the bike with reynold 531 frame and shimano 600 (100 $ + shipping). I'll be eating nudles for quite some time but that will only make me lightre and faster up the hills.
by: 82.182.121.27

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   I need help! posted by Michael Saladee on 7/25/2005 at 11:48:20 PM
From what I've learnd VINTAGE is just like the wine. How many produced, how manny in circulation and demand = Value. One mans trash is anether mans treasure. My Schwinn Corvett came to me in a Milk crate. Can any one tell me How mwnny where made or send me some forks?

by: 66.81.167.202

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: I need help! posted by JONathan on 7/26/2005 at 12:08:33 AM
You made the correct choice (although it is academic at this point) in my opinion. Although the "Mirage" would be very smooth running with the relaxed geometry, especially the forks' trail. I have a "Super Mirage" that is only different in the componentry being slightly higher in quality. The cottered cranks appeal to me from a collector's standpoint. Riding and servicing are another thing; cotterless is the way to ride and it only takes one attempt at working on a cottered crank to see what I mean.
the "Cresent"? looks like it comes with Rigida alloy rims. THe geometry looks like a road-racer; making it excellent as a "training bike". The "Mirage" would be an excellent choice for a commuter bike with some effort and expense..most of which is labor. If you do the work yourself, the Moto would be worth the effort and expense to switch to cotterless French (Nervar or Stronglight) cranks.
Under $200 (U.S.) for the road-bike is definitely a good deal....provided the frame is sound. I always look at a bike in person and even then, I find something to fix after I buy it. Good luck.
by: 67.118.246.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   I need help! posted by scott on 7/26/2005 at 1:30:33 AM
I think you did well also. Shimano 600 is pretty good stuff! You can always do like me and upgrade parts as you go. modern pedals are a big plus,good wheels, also a good seat. later you can decide if you like the bike or want to get something newer. I didn't see the bike, does it have the shifters clamped to the frame or are they part of the frame? mine were part of the frame so it was easy to upgrade to STI shifters
by: 71.105.150.80

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: I need help! posted by claes on 7/27/2005 at 9:33:36 PM
hi, I have tried out the bike for the fisrst time now. Great feeling flying along a smooth road with view of the sea. I tried fitting the bike with my old spd-pedals I removed from my mountainbike but it wouldn't fit. Is there a possibility to buy pedals fitting for such an old bike (preferable look-pedals but any clip-less will do)? If not, what should I do if I am determined to fit clip-less on it?

Thanks for a great site!

Cheers,

Claes

Ps. Scott, my shifters are clamped to the frame.
by: 82.182.121.27

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   I need help! posted by Hans Krieken on 7/28/2005 at 2:58:42 PM
I think you have got yourself a Crescent from mid seventies. The Wheels seeems to be Campagnolo Gran Sport, and I wonder if the brakes are marked MCB, (housebrand of Crescent). I like those old 531 frames, no fancy welding, just put togeteher fairly straight. Major toe overlap with the front wheel but it rides nicely. I had one whith early black Dura Ace parts that some moron stole, I had even put on it a C-record rear derailleur ! Now I have a somewhat small frame whith the same wheels/brakes you seem to have that I will make a fixie out of. Enjoy your bike ! Are you shure you tried the pedals on the correct pedalarm ? They should fit.

by: 62.179.100.101

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: I need help! posted by scott on 7/31/2005 at 1:48:13 AM
there are three basic sizes of pedals. the larger size used on most modern stuff (mountain bikes road bikes etc.) the middle size used on most older size stuff, and the smallest size used on kids bikes. you aparently have the middle size on the cranks and the larger size on the pedals. depending on how handy you are and the tools available to you you have a few options. first and easiest is change the crank set this is also the best idea. second drill and re-tap the existing crank to fit the pedals you want to use. third is actually the easiest, take it to the local bike shop and tell them "fix it!" this however is not the cheapest option. I advise the first option. good luck and enjoy, Scott
by: 71.105.150.80






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Creaky noises - careful! posted by: David on 7/24/2005 at 7:19:38 PM
A friend was just telling me how his Cannondale aluminum frame developed a chainstay crack where he had dinged it. It manifested itself as a sort of creaking as he pedaled and he thought it must be associated with the crank or pedals. This was just what had been baffling me with my old Raleigh Competition. I checked the seatstays and both were cracked at the top, where the tubing is beveled off at the lug. Yikes! A new project to move the components to another frame will be started; I'm glad I'm here to do it.
by: 66.30.200.82


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Creaky noises - careful! posted by marc on 7/25/2005 at 4:45:15 PM
don't give up on that frame! the same thing happened to a raleigh super course I had in the same spot. Since it's in an area that doesn't involve straightening the frame or the sort you could just take it to a welding shop. The place I took it to charged me 20.00 and drilled and brazed the crack with not much paint damage.
by: 68.252.72.147






AGE / VALUE:   Women's Iverson posted by: Zee on 7/23/2005 at 3:59:49 PM
I seem to keep coming up with bikes I can't date.

I just picked up this nice-looking Iverson "Grand Touring" three-speed (Shimano) women's bike at a yard sale for five bucks. I'd never heard of Iverson bikes before, and apparently they're not one of the top brands (haha), but I really like the style and look of it. Now I'd like to know how old it is and some info in Iversons, other than the muscle bikes. Web links would be great.

I believe everything on it is original (including the seat), except maybe the grips (black bike, black seat, sparkley-pink grips lol). The serial number (a chart link would be nice!) is #7753552, on the rear dropout (could it be a '77, or am I just guessing there?). The tires are "Safe-Tee" (off brand maybe?), size 26" x 1-3/8". Has caliper brakes. I've added a photo.

Thanks ahead of time to any who reply! =0)

-Zee


by: 206.148.108.169



   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Women's Iverson posted by Gralyn on 7/23/2005 at 7:35:10 PM
Not bad for five bucks! ...a pretty cool-looking old bike. I had an Iverson. I picked it up just because I had never seen one - and I had no idea how old it was, etc. Well, the thing weighed about 50 lbs. It was probably from the early 70's. I got it in running condition and donated it.
by: 205.188.117.71

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Women's Iverson posted by JONathan on 7/24/2005 at 3:57:43 AM
Agree with Gralyn on the bike's condition. A real find. Typical for me is the men's bikes are run down both in mechanical and cosmetic shape. They got a lot rougher use.
I would let air out of those tires and realign the tube stems before riding it. Iversons are to me a typical of bikes that were sold in department stores, but their origin goes way back to a "Golden era" of cycling. My Raleigh 3 speeds have a more refined construction than my Columbia, Schwinn and Huffy 3's. My guess is the "Sports" were for serious riding while the N.A. brands were directed toward a kid's market...during the baby-boomer period. Of course there are many exceptions, but look at the makers in just G.B. alone. I have Dunelt, Raleigh and at one time a Hercules 3-speed. There are a lot of makers from that period. Bikes were a way of life, not just a toy. It shows in the construction. But, history is interesting and that Iverson is a definite keeper, IMHO.
by: 67.118.246.5

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Women's Iverson posted by Dick in FL on 7/25/2005 at 4:13:25 AM
Jonathan>>> "Bikes were a way of life, not just a toy."

In a finite world, they will be once again. Google "Peak Oil".
by: 172.168.187.245

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Women's Iverson posted by kim on 7/25/2005 at 11:27:32 AM
In addition to oil problems I also think of terrorism. I'm riding more and taking the subway only when it rains.
by: 204.14.66.46