VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old Freespirit posted by: Ron Fitz on 9/12/2005 at 8:23:33 PM
I have an old Sears Freespirit 10 speed that was made in Austria by Steyr-Puch. It has a 23" double-butted Reynolds 531 frame with Simplex alloy fork tips. It has a Shimano Crane rear derailleur, Titlist front, and Weinmann center-pull brakes. The original wheels are long gone as is the plastic saddle I replaced the crank with a Suntour
Cyclone but still have the original SR Silver cotterless crank.

Does this bike have any collector's value or is it just another old bike. I still ride the bike 5 days a week and love it. But my older body seems to become increasingly fond of my hybrid's upright riding position.


by: 68.237.135.230


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: old Freespirit posted by Warren on 9/12/2005 at 9:56:39 PM
A fabulous find...one of those department store brands that were mentioned earlier.

Not a huge monetary value but certainly a good rider with decent frame and components. Maybe it would make 3 to 4 hundred on a good day on ebay...maybe not. Steyer-Puch made some nice framesets like the Vente Noir. Sell it to someone you like and give it a good home.
by: 70.51.141.230

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old Freespirit posted by Dick in FL on 9/13/2005 at 5:59:22 AM
If you are familiar with Clark Howard (The "consumer warrior"), you know that he fairly drips disdain on what he calls "Mr. Namebrand Man". Functionally and at the molecular level your S-D-P is the equivalent of better-known brands. My plan for such a bike would be to replace the handlebars with some uprights (I actually found some alloy "North Road" style bars on a perfect $.95 Nishiki.) and replace the seat too because upright posture shifts my weight. This conversion also requires replacement of the brake controls and cables. We can then continue our love affairs with our bicycles right up to the point where our children commit us to nursing homes.
by: 172.140.96.122

   :   old Freespirit posted by John E on 9/13/2005 at 2:51:28 PM
First, as regular readers know, I think Austrian bikes are great. (I have a ca. 1959 Capo "Modell Campagnolo.")

Second, before changing the handlebars, consider raising their height and possibly installing a shorter-reach stem. The net effect is to bring the bars up and back, toward you, while still affording you at least 5 different hand positions. At age 55, I still prefer traditional drops precisely because I can vary my hand position and because they offer four positions with a natural neutral "handshake" rotation of the forearm (palm vertical and facing inward). I added climbing extension to the ends of the bars on my mountain bike to capture at least some of this benefit on it, as well, because my hands got very tingly otherwise.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old Freespirit posted by Ron Brubaker on 9/13/2005 at 8:45:49 PM
My wife and I have a matching pair of Schwinn Free Spirit bikes. We each got our own before we met, but coincidentally, they are the same color. I've often wondered if there was any value to having a matching pair (one male, one female). It always seemed to me that Sears played a big part in raising peoples interest with their Free Spirit line. If anybody has any interest in restoring them, let me know. I'd probably give them away.
by: 12.4.195.100

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old Freespirit posted by Ron on 9/14/2005 at 2:51:18 PM
Thank you all for your comments. The bike seems to be worth keeping just for the enjoyment, and not worth "preserving" as a classic. I've ordered flat handlebars and Shimano BR-R600 (Ultegra) side pulls to use with some Shimano GS100 levers from my hybrid.

I'll just ride it 'til it (or I) fall apart.
by: 68.237.135.230






AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour posted by: brandt on 9/10/2005 at 9:32:20 PM
Just recently acquired a Schwinn Super LeTour 12.2 I am looking for info on this bike since I've never really paid that much attention to the "newer" Schwinns. It's in bad shape and has no wheels. Is made in Japan; frame is double butted 4130. Serial # on bottom of bottom bracket is L526678 The frame reminds me of a Sekai. Can anyone tell me more about this bike?
by: 207.199.226.200


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour posted by Bob Hufford on 9/12/2005 at 4:38:54 PM
Sounds like it could be a '76 model built in November of '75. More info here: http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/detail7579.html#1976superletour
by: 12.14.224.126

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour posted by Ken on 9/12/2005 at 5:57:13 PM
Is there frame damage? This is a real nice frame, just a couple down from the top of Schwinn's list.
by: 209.7.184.147






AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour posted by: brandt on 9/10/2005 at 9:32:20 PM
Just recently acquired a Schwinn Super LeTour 12.2 I am looking for info on this bike since I've never really paid that much attention to the "newer" Schwinns. It's in bad shape and has no wheels. Is made in Japan; frame is double butted 4130. Serial # on bottom of bottom bracket is L526678 The frame reminds me of a Sekai. Can anyone tell me more about this bike?
by: 207.199.226.200







WANTED:   974 Schwinn Paramount posted by: Scott Thompson on 9/10/2005 at 4:38:28 PM
Red 30"-31" stand-over height with OEM parts. Send pictures to email address if possible.
by: 199.8.210.55







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frejus posted by: jack on 9/9/2005 at 6:03:31 AM
At our used LBS, they have a Frejus Tour De France. Its a low to middle 70's bike with cottered crank, Campy derail (the lowend plunger models) universal c-pulls and in fairly decent shape. Only chrome is on fork crown. I know the high-end Frejus are pricey but this one isn't even my size. But at $60, should I get it just to flip? Are low-end Frejus desirable?
by: 207.200.116.195


   :   Frejus posted by John E on 9/9/2005 at 5:21:48 PM
If it isn't your size, I would pass at $60, unless it were in beautiful (as opposed to "fairly decent") condition. Derailleurs sound like Valentinos.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:: Frejus posted by jack on 9/10/2005 at 12:56:23 AM
Thanks for the advice John, and I couldn't think of their name, yes Valentino.
by: 207.200.116.137

   RE:RE:: Frejus posted by marc on 9/10/2005 at 5:00:26 PM
since it has valentino derailleurs it's not what I'm talking about but remember that the older higher end frejus bikes had cottered cranks. I had one in the legano green color, campagnolo gran sport derailleurs, columbus tubing, and magistroni cottered crank.
by: 68.20.19.40

    Frejus posted by John E on 9/10/2005 at 9:00:41 PM
Marc is correct that, well into the early 1960s, many high-end bicycles did have cottered steel cranks. I think Campagnolo's aluminum cotterless cranks came out circa 1958; Stronglight and TA introduced theirs somewhat earlier.

Cotterless aluminum cranks did not filter down to midlevel bicycles until the 1970s; my $150 1971 Nishiki Competition had them, but the somewhat less expensive Raleigh Super Course and Peugeot UO-8 did not.
by: 66.185.168.82