MISC:   Broken crank puller posted by: David on 9/17/2005 at 12:35:17 PM
Has anyone experienced this before? I was removing the very tight cranks from a Taiwan-built MTB I was going to throw out. The first one came off with a lot of effort and the second one snapped off the threaded portion of my Campy puller. I would have guessed the aluminum threads would strip first, but... What should I do to get an arm off when it was installed so tight?
by: 66.30.200.82


   RE:MISC:   Broken crank puller posted by Douglas on 9/17/2005 at 8:25:55 PM
After stripping the threads of one or five cranks I've developed a medical condition known as strippedcrankaphobia.
If I suspect I'm going to have any difficulty at all, I prepare a surgical extraction. That consists of a liberal application of penetrating oil, the cleaning and lubing the threads of both crank and tool followed with the magical power of a heat gun (to convince the thing I mean business).
If that fails and one crank is already off, I remove the cups thus enabling the removal of the partially assembled crank. This then is moved to the bench where with the gentle persuasion of a several pound sledgehammer the offending parts are teasingly drifted apart.
by: 24.72.49.104

   RE:MISC: Broken crank puller posted by jack on 9/18/2005 at 5:20:16 AM
When you say broken threaded portion, do you mean the one that thread into crankarm or the threads that you turn during extraction? Also, I agree with Doug.
by: 207.200.116.137

   RE:MISC:   Broken crank puller posted by David on 9/18/2005 at 12:45:28 PM
The threaded portion that engages the crankarm popped right off. There's a beautiful shiny snapped-off ridge around the edge of it. Obviously, there was no way to remove the crankarm from the bike OR the remains of the tool from the crankarm!
by: 66.30.200.82

   RE:MISC:   Broken crank puller posted by David on 9/18/2005 at 12:46:30 PM
The threaded portion that engages the crankarm popped right off. There's a beautiful shiny snapped-off ridge around the edge of it. Obviously, there was no way to remove the crankarm from the bike OR the remains of the tool from the crankarm!
by: 66.30.200.82






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Ken Bird - vintage english? posted by: Adam on 9/17/2005 at 6:07:26 AM
I have an old Ken Bird custom bicycle in an orangy red color - has anyone heard of this maker?

It's a beautiful frame and a pleasure to ride
by: 69.236.163.135


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Ken Bird - vintage english? posted by Simon Bird on 8/22/2006 at 11:55:37 AM
He was my dad who sadly passed away last year. He was a tour mechanic on the 1967 Tour De France with Tommy Simpson when he passed away on Mt Ventoux.

Funnily enough all I have from him is an old Orange framed bike given to me by a kind ex colleage of mine.
by: 161.51.11.2






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Bianchi bike question posted by: Shannon on 9/17/2005 at 12:03:50 AM
I recently saw a bike on the street that was a Bianchi but it looked like a 24". It looked like a vintage cruiser of some sort. It may have been an old children's bike yet it looked a little large for that. I loved it but I have never seen another like it and don't know where to find one. If anyone knows what I am talking about please help me out. I want to know where to find one and what you would call one. Thanks!
by: 69.148.169.209


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Bianchi bike question posted by Warren` on 9/18/2005 at 3:35:46 AM
Could have been a modern Bianchi Milano or the like. Or maybe a real Bianchi vintage roadster with rod brakes. They made some beautiful town bikes, fenders, etc. Need more info!
by: 70.51.145.103






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by: Barb on 9/16/2005 at 5:50:51 PM
I just saw a Woman's Columbia Tourister with a good Sturmey-Archer 3-speed at a a garage sale for $5.00. It's in generally good condition but needs a front brake cable and a kickstand. I'm absolutely new at this and am looking for something that will be pleasant to ride for relatively short distances (>5 miles). Any opinions would be appreciated!
by: 128.205.248.241


   :   Columbia tourister posted by John E on 9/16/2005 at 9:17:02 PM
Welcome to the forum, Barb. For short, casual rides, there is nothing wrong with the Columbia, and lots of folks really like S-A 3-speed hubs. For safety, install new brake pads, preferably KoolStops.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Joe M on 9/17/2005 at 3:27:56 AM
Columbia Tourist models were quite common and pretty decent quality bikes, they were American made and rode nice, they used one piece cranks, all but the last models had Sturmey Archer hubs, and most had painted or chrome steel fenders.
I have a 1968 mens model that I've had for about 25 years or so, I put at least 5000 miles or more on it on a newspaper route, and I got it with the route, and it had been through several hands before me, and thats hard use. I restored it years ago, after it was replaced as a paper route bike. It still looks new today, and gets an occasional blast around the neighbor hood. It still has the original everything, ecept the rims, which were badly worn and peeling, and a set of new tires, but all else is still 1968. I did upgrade the brake claipers back then to Shimano, but that was to clear the baskets I had on it then. The biggest thing I changed on mine was the color, I couldn't stand the pale yellow color, and was painting a car for a friend, and it was apart and became the test panel for the Black metalic pearl paint. I used later style decals, since that was all that was available then, but anything was better than the worn yellow paint.
by: 64.136.26.226

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Bryant on 9/17/2005 at 1:12:19 PM
I picked up a Columbia 3 speed some time ago. I fixed it up and gave it to my neighbor's daughter for local riding. She absolutely loves it. The SA hub will last a good long time and will perform like a champ. For $5 and a little love, you will have a very nice rider
by: 71.248.0.83

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Barb on 9/17/2005 at 8:29:01 PM
THANKS everyone! It came home with me today. It's blue with chrome fenders that look like they'll polish well. I de-gunked the hub enough to read the date: 73 9. Thanks again for the advice and sharing your experience - and yes, I will definitely replace the brake pads! :)
by: 128.205.249.184

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Kurt K. on 9/17/2005 at 10:28:39 PM
Sounds like you have a very similar bike (if not identical) to a '73 that so happens to be part of my roster. One of my favorite American 3 speeds.

P.S.: Always looking for the elusive all-chrome men's frame Columbia Tourist...

-Kurt


by: 205.188.117.5


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Barb on 9/18/2005 at 3:54:29 PM
That's the bike - or a perfect version of it! The only differences are in the saddle and handgrips. The handgrips on mine are molded and small diameter and the seat is wider and more padded. Thanks for the picture of what to aim for!
by: 128.205.249.38

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Kurt K. on 9/18/2005 at 7:47:37 PM
Before you go looking off for those parts, I think I should let you know that neither the saddle nor grips are original. Handlebar is aftermarket as well - the original Columbia bars are a bit flatter.

Correct saddle should be a white mattress style, I believe, and the grips should be smooth, hard rubber.

Here's an all-original '71 that a fellow from the English Roadster forum owns:

http://www.schwinnbike.com/heritage/attachment.php?attachmentid=26157

As for my own, it was used as a themed parade bike before I got it, with minature figurenes siliconed to the frame. The figurines were gone when I got it, but it still had all of the dried silicone over the frame...here's a few pictures (not for the faint of heart):

http://www.schwinnbike.com/heritage/attachment.php?attachmentid=26126

http://www.schwinnbike.com/heritage/attachment.php?attachmentid=26127

Take care,

-Kurt
by: 64.12.116.199

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Barb on 9/19/2005 at 3:16:42 AM
I'm even more impressed by your Columbia. It looks now like it has always been cherished. All that silicone...and I thought a little rust and scratched decals were going to be a challenge. :)
I checked my handlebars, and I missed that before. Mine are flatter, so probably original. The grips are hard molded rubber, but black. The seat is also black, but I don't think it's original, judging from the '71.
As I get into the appearance aspects of this bike, I'd like to stay as close to the "look" it should have as possible/practical.
Hmmm... I started out just looking for something to ride, but I've got a feeling that this will become addictive very quickly.
Thank you again for the great information and pictures!!!
by: 128.205.249.170

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Columbia tourister posted by Miguel on 9/20/2005 at 1:27:54 PM
I'm also looking for the elusive chrome Columbia tourist, Kurt. lol. Yeah it's me, hehe. HD from schwinnbike. That's my green 71. Mine is a twist grip Shimano 333 hub. For ease of adjustment I prefer the Shimanos, but it's just a matter of personal taste. Mine has small diameter hard rubber grips, with longways ridges. The ends of the grips say 333 to match the hub. The chrome Tourist that was in the family had the twist grip also, and the same grips. I keep hoping I'll find that chrome one at a garage sale in my old neighborhood. It was stolen many years ago, so it's "hot" status is probably long since forgotten, lol. I believe it was nickelplated actually, as it had that goldish dull patina, and never seemed to rust? Good luck with the Tourist Barb, sounds like a nice one!,,, Miguel

Oh by the way!! I do have some closeups of the decals and other odds and ends. Shoot me an email, and I can send you some. click on the blue highlighted name:-)
by: 4.154.15.94

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Barb on 9/21/2005 at 2:33:16 AM
Miguel - Clicked on your name, which took me to my email...but no address. Maybe a peculiarity of hotmail? Your decals look far more elaborate than the ones on my '73, but I'd love to see the closeups if clicking on my name works for your email. Thanks!
by: 128.205.249.80

   RE::   Columbia tourister posted by Paul Manning on 6/3/2007 at 11:06:20 AM
some asswipe stole the seat off my columbia tourister, and I was wondering if anyone had any ideas about how I can put a new seat on mine or acquire an original part (the problem is that the seat is non-standard in size, the shaft is).
Any helpful knowledge on this would be greatly appreciated.
by: 207.115.65.17

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by J.C. on 6/17/2007 at 5:10:14 AM
I have a 1968 Men's Columbia Bike for Sale. It has been stored in my aunt's garage and all parts are original. I am asking $170. Please e-mail for pictures. Thanks.
by: 66.182.197.147

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Paul on 3/5/2008 at 12:50:34 PM
I just got a vintage Columbia Tourist. It's black w/ the white striping. Westfield plate. Trying to figure out what the year is though. It looks alot lke the blue one Kurt put on the forum.
by: 64.30.13.139

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbia tourister posted by Paul on 3/5/2008 at 12:51:01 PM
I just got a vintage Columbia Tourist. It's black w/ the white striping. Westfield plate. Trying to figure out what the year is though. It looks alot lke the blue one Kurt put on the forum.
by: 64.30.13.139






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Main D'Or posted by: Robert on 9/15/2005 at 1:03:31 AM
I wonder if anyone has information about the Main D'Or bicycle, made my Kessels in Belgium. Mine was imported during the mid 70s, is made from Reynolds 531 and has beautiful lugwork, campy dropouts, and came equipped with a Nuovo Record gruppo. In many years of riding, I've only seen 1 other on the road, and one on the web, advertised by CyclArt. Anyone info, literature, or pics welcome.
by: 137.207.106.39