AGE / VALUE:   Monson Swap posted by: Bryan on 2/7/2006 at 10:43:31 PM
Anyone going to the Monson Swap in Massachusetts this weekend?
by: 146.145.49.238







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Headbadge Rivets posted by: Dick in L.A. on 2/7/2006 at 1:29:40 AM
I just got home from the automotive shop where I had a pint of paint specially mixed to match the original emerald green on my Raleigh Super Course Mk II. The original paint on the bike has surface rust specks showing through all over. I've already masked off, primed and painted all of the white areas except for the head tube. I don't know what to do about the headbadge. I've just spent the past 1/2 hour searching the archives for help on riveting headbadges back on that have been removed. All I could find was something about using tiny sheet metal screws (I'm not opposed to it) but nothing about how to do it with revits. The revits that are currently holding the badge on have little holes in the center of the heads making them look a little like "pop revits". Are they? The revits on my earlier Super Courses have smooth solid heads on them. Any suggestions on how to replace the headbadge? Or should I just mask the badge and repaint with it in place?
BTW: The paint shop did an excellent job of matching the paint. I took the fork in so they could use their fancy machine to decode the color. They told me that they needed at least a 5 inch square of relative flat surface to use the machine. So they had to do it the old fashion way. Eyeball! The minimum amount of paint they would mix was one pint. That filled three aeresol cans. The cost was $50.25 plus tax. I tried it out on an old throw-away frame. It is a very close match. The frame I tried it out on was painted a dark green. I just sprayed right over it. the result was a little darker than the fork. But the fork had a light grey primer under it (it was visible on the neck of the fork). I might experiment with a white or silver undercoat.
Dick in L.A.
by: 69.237.26.168


      Headbadge Rivets posted by John E on 2/7/2006 at 4:03:38 PM
I simply drill out the rivets (very easy, since they're so soft) and replace them with very small sheet metal screws, but most frame refinishing shops, such as CyclArt, do offer re-riveting.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Headbadge Rivets posted by dave in SF on 2/7/2006 at 4:39:47 PM
You can get a pop-riveter at any hardware, or buy regular rivets and set them against a metal bar inserted in the headtube to serve as an anvil.
by: 64.161.154.235

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Headbadge Rivets posted by JONathan on 2/8/2006 at 4:48:38 AM
Those sheet metal screws seem like the easiest fix, but since you have gone to some lengths to restore to original condition...$50 for paint, plus lots of workup...I would try the pop-rivets. I have had satisfactory results using the pop-rivets for fender repairs. THe trick is to practice on a scrap to get the right tension going for the task. Stainless steel rivets are considerably more cost, but they are very strong. I have used several riveter tools and most were OK, but the best, and last one that I bought, is a Stanley. It cost more, but what is the cost of a new headbadge anyway? Probably more than the difference in price between a junky riveter and a pro model. Good luck.
by: 67.118.246.64

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Headbadge Rivets posted by Dick in L.A. on 2/9/2006 at 12:29:01 PM
Thanks All for your replies. JONathan, since the existing rivets appear to be pop-rivets, I think that will produce the closest to original appearance. I agree that the stainless provide great strength, but we're talking headbadge here. Not a lot of strength required. The original rivets look to be copper or brass. I've located copper on the net, but I'll have to buy 100 of them. I'll have plenty to practice with!
Dick in L.A.
by: 69.232.33.45

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Headbadge Rivets posted by JONathan on 2/10/2006 at 1:09:46 AM
Right you are! I thought about it afterward and the copper/brass alloy would be the best choice. I use washers
to spread the load so as to not bust through the Al or plastic fender material. On a headbadge, that would look goofy having to use a washer. Softer rivets are the best bet.
Good luck. I was ready to toss the rivet tool out until I practiced a bunch. When I got fairly proficient using the cheapo rivet tools, it was then that I picked up a real nice one. Some kind of reverse logic?
by: 67.118.246.85

    Headbadge Rivets posted by John E on 2/10/2006 at 3:42:09 PM
The OEM rivets on my 1960 Capo were EXTREMELY soft; could they have been aluminum?
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE: Headbadge Rivets posted by JONathan on 2/10/2006 at 11:09:56 PM
Some aluminum rivet flanges are very ductile. They are good for use on brittle base material (some plastic and carbon fiber come to mind). They are less likely to crush the material during application. Bronze perhaps? That was used as rivets for centuries and it is pretty soft (Cu and Sn.
There is no structural strain on the headbadge so it makes sense to use a more decorative metal there. I have seen some headbadges held in place with split-rivets. This makes sense where you might want a smooth rivet dome for outside appearance. Downside is it not real solid and it could fret loose and fall off.
by: 67.118.246.124






AGE / VALUE:   Posting pics posted by: Terry Smith on 2/6/2006 at 12:41:02 AM
I've got some pics of my Motobecane to post. How do I do that? Also the thread that I started on my Le Champion is about a month old. Should I continue to post replies there or start a new thread?

Thanks.
by: 71.246.232.162


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Posting pics posted by Ken on 2/13/2006 at 8:42:22 PM
After you click on Picture Database on the home page, you'll come to Add a Picture... The only preparation to make is to be sure your photo is less than 100KB. Not many Motobecanes on the database now, and no Le Champions.
by: 209.7.184.147






MISC:   My new Beater posted by: Bryant on 2/5/2006 at 9:43:53 PM
I fixed up a very clean Raleigh Sprite 27 awhile ago and started riding it when I just wanted to stay local: You know about 10-20 miles. What a fun bike to ride. I just put on my helmet, and a rubber band around my right pants leg and I'm off. Shifts well, takes hills fine and it just looks like a classic. I offered it to my son-in-law and he road it around a bit and said he liked it, but he hasn't picked it up yet. I may not remind him. Guess I'll sell the old Varsity
by: 71.255.205.78


     My new Beater posted by John E on 2/6/2006 at 3:03:48 PM
Other folks appear to be learning what we oldroads VLW regulars have long known, i.e., that the lugged steel bicycles of old have many endearing qualities, including practicality and the "fun" factor.

This year, I am celebrating W.A.Mozart's 250th birthday by riding Viennese bicycles (updated/repainted 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo and all-original/project-in-progress 1960 Capo Sieger).
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by David on 2/6/2006 at 8:08:10 PM
I have no doubt that Mozart would have ridden a Capo if he hadn't died so darn young.
by: 65.78.2.207

   RE:RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by JONathan on 2/6/2006 at 10:59:56 PM
The Raleigh "Sprite" was very popular, but most folks I talk with have only heard of the "Record". I fixed up one that was nearly new, only the assembly had been very sloppy, so I needed to redo all the running gear adjustments, including the loose chainring (screws were not torqued). The Huret "Allvit" rear derailer is not very good, especially the tension adjustment barrel which will break off easily. I got this bike going and used it for a few weeks in winter-conditions (rain only) and it was very comfortable to run. Not a fast mover, but it holds the road real nice. My same '70's vintage "Record" is lighter handling, but the "Sprite" seems to be more of a touring-style, although I have not compared the WB or rakes to see if this might explain it. The tube-type stickers are "2030" steel. The "Sprite" seems to have evolved over a long period.
My earlier version has a 3-sp. SA hub. Another is a 5-speed and two have 10-speed gearing. They must have been punching these out during the bikeboom as the componentry is prettyy crude, low-end stuff...but they work OK. Interestingly, the "records" that I have are all pretty used while the "sprites" are practically new! What gives with that? Maybe a random result from a small number of bikes. Still, the chances of random sampling (it was random) ending with my observed results seems remote. My "Sprite"s all have roadster bars, unlike the "records" with their drop-bars. Maybe that has something to do with it.
by: 67.118.246.234

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by Dick in FL on 2/7/2006 at 1:44:41 AM
My Raleigh Sprite sampling duplicates yours. I have 3 of them .... all in showroom condition. Two of them still have the original Raleigh embossed tires. One of them was so badly assembled it was virtually unrideable, and it came with a dynohub light kit which I learned from an authority was a European-only option for 27" wheels. (She was certain that the bike was shipped to US by a private party.) Take a closer look at the handlebars on your Sprite; they are distinct from the Northroad bars on the Sports/Roadsters. The were called AllRounders and were flatter, narrower, and straighter. The highly desirable Raleigh Super Tourer came with an alloy version of these bars.

by: 172.145.117.164

   RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by Kurt K. on 2/8/2006 at 3:28:58 PM
>Take a closer look at the handlebars on your Sprite; they are distinct from the Northroad bars on the Sports/Roadsters.

Not necessarily, depends on the year: The Sports adopted the flatter steel bars in 1974.

-Kurt
by: 152.163.100.10

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by JONathan on 2/8/2006 at 8:03:38 PM
That would explain the big difference that I notice comparing to the "Sports" handlebars, which tend to cramp my turns...knees hit the bars on tight turns! The big 'ol "Sprite" bars have adequate turn clearance along with greater stability. That explains it. Thanks. I never actually put the bars side-by-side, but it is quite noticeable on close observance.
by: 67.118.246.132

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by Kurt K. on 2/8/2006 at 11:58:32 PM
Funny, my preferences are exactly opposite to yours. I find the Sprite's head-to-seat distance (I believe that's A.K.A. C-C?) to be too short, and the large 27" tyres to be an obstacle to my feet while pedaling.

-Kurt
by: 152.163.100.10

   RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by Ralph on 2/9/2006 at 3:22:26 PM
I got one of those Sprites a couple of years ago. It's one of the School Bus yellow ones. Those Huret derailleurs are absolute trash. I recommend dumping it in favor of one of those old Sun Tour Honors. Just leave the Huret shift levers in place and you'll have a pretty clean shifting bike. I replaced the rusting steel rims with aluminum and I really like the resulting bike. I like the Dyno Hub idea mentioned by Dick. I might have to look into building one up like that.
by: 216.98.25.70

   RE:RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by Kurt K. on 2/9/2006 at 5:57:10 PM
Ralph, I have one Sprite myself (a Carmine Red model), and I can't agree with you more on the Huret Allvit.

I plan on converting mine over with a Shimano UG 6-speed rear freewheel, first-gen Shimano UG chain, and a long-cage Campy Triumphe rear derailer.

I figure that should take care of the original drivetrain problems sufficently!

-Kurt
by: 152.163.100.10

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   My new Beater posted by JONathan on 2/10/2006 at 7:02:08 AM
Seems that two Sprites have what look like "sports" style bars. The other two (3-sp. and a 10 sp.) have roadster-type, except for a more radical rise. This measures 4" vs. 3" ("Sports"). The handlegrips in same plane in both cases for comparison. This might explain why the bars have more side clearance on turns, but the longer stem probably makes for an even greater difference. The 27" tires (35C) have 1+7/8" minimum separation from the downtube, which is due to the long rake and track on the forks along with a relaxed geometry headtube. A lot like the Peugeot UO-8's, there is pretty decent foot clearance, which is a good thing for someone with size 12 shoes! I could not get to the bike for WB measurementas it is way back in the row. The two Sprites (5 and 10 sp.) with Sports type bars look like Sports. I cannot tell much difference except for the derailer replacing the closed hub.
by: 67.118.246.51






AGE / VALUE:   showing off posted by: jason on 2/5/2006 at 9:24:55 PM
thought I'd share this
got my raliegh put together, the first bike I have spent money on, and golly, it is awesome. shaves four minutes off my best time up THE MOUNTAIN that always gets me
old steel has that cool factor as well, with all alloy on it its about twenty one pounds including the rust
learned a good lesson today, new brake cables stretch fast in the ozark hills, and had to choose to dump it in the gravel or blast onto the highway, right after a bunch of girls said that a old bike was kind of sexy, still waiting for the blood to dry, bikes fine, prides bruised and the lessons learned. the girls were not impressed.
jason
by: 4.253.44.179


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   showing off posted by JB on 2/5/2006 at 9:50:21 PM
Ladies will always be a distraction, walking, riding, driving..makes no difference...the bike is ok though?
by: 65.141.132.147

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   showing off posted by jason on 2/6/2006 at 1:34:54 AM
the bikes a tank, wanted to repaint but liked the raliegh scroll work around the emblems to much, you can barely read the lettering, and after a minimal rubdown I just waxed it.
I just have to remember that its not a mountain bike. theres a lot of gravel around here, and I generaly walk a roadbike the two miles to pavement.
on a positive note, one of the ladies called me to see if I was ok and we have a date this sat. so for once, being a bit of a idiot payed off. jason
by: 4.253.41.130