AGE / VALUE:   Vintage SR post posted by: Kevin K on 3/2/2006 at 7:15:13 PM
Hi all. Did SR ever make a seat post in 25.8, 25.10 or in 26.0 diameter? I need an SR post to complete my LeTour project. Thanks, Kevin

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   RE:AGE / VALUE: Vintage SR post posted by Warren on 3/2/2006 at 11:40:50 PM
Which size do you need?
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   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Vintage SR post posted by Kevin K on 3/3/2006 at 3:26:39 PM
Hi Warren. A 26.0 should work as well as a 25.10 if it was ever made. Do you have one? Thanks, Kevin
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   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Vintage SR post posted by Kevin K on 3/3/2006 at 3:26:47 PM
Hi Warren. A 26.0 should work as well as a 25.10 if it was ever made. Do you have one? Thanks, Kevin
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   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Vintage SR post posted by Gralyn on 3/4/2006 at 11:53:38 AM
I believe my LeTour came with one of those thin metal sleeves around the seat post - I suppose so a smaller diameter seat post could be used with the seat tube size they happened to be using at the time.
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   RE:AGE / VALUE: Vintage SR post posted by Warren on 3/5/2006 at 3:46:39 AM
Kevin, I'm sure SR made them in just about every size and in different qualities. But I don't have a 26.

And Gralyn may be right that you are considering a sleeve because that is the only way a 25.1 will substitute for a 26. Yes? Because otherwise, faggedabowdit.
by: 70.51.148.231

   seatpost diameter posted by John E on 3/6/2006 at 3:00:47 PM
One has to match the seatpost diameter to the application very closely. Shims can be used (and were, by the factory, on all of the early 1970s Peugeot A/UO-8s), but they can stress the frame's seatpost clamp itself, in the same way an overextended seatpost does.

25.10 is pretty small for a frame designed for a 26.00; it probably can be shimmed, but if it were my bike, I would be looking for a 26.00, or perhaps a 25.90.
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VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   30-40's Bike Help posted by: Mike on 3/2/2006 at 2:48:51 PM
My Grandfather back inthe late 30's early 40's bought a lightweight bike and I was trying to figure out what the name of it could be. I know when I see it I will recoginize it. I know the name had Light weight in it. Any help would be awesome. He was living in Califronia at that time if that helps and rode with some big name stars also. Thank you for any help you can give .
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VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   BB spindles posted by: David on 2/28/2006 at 12:34:49 PM
I'm looking for a Campy track BB spindle for 68mm shell. Most of the ones I've seen on Ebay are marked 70. Am I correct in thinking I should be looking for one marked 68 and about 111mm long? Do Italian frames typically use the 70mm shells?
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     BB spindles posted by John E on 2/28/2006 at 3:16:12 PM
Yes, MOST Italian BB shells are 70mm wide. I'll bet you can use a 70mm spindle if you slip a 1mm spacer under the flange of the fixed cup. The adjustable cup will end up 1mm further outboard, as well, keeping everything symmetrical.
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   BB spindles posted by David on 3/2/2006 at 4:09:10 PM
I'll follow up my own post w/another Q. The spindles of cartridge bottom brackets seem to be somewhat shorter than the spindles of old-style loose bearing BBs for similar applications (track, two-chainwheels, three-). Can someone explain?
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   :   BB spindles posted by John E on 3/3/2006 at 3:05:34 PM
I don't know about Shimano, but Campag. started using shorter spindles several years ago, compensating in the geometry of the cranks. This makes a slightly weaker, but also slightly lighter, crankset.

When I put a road double Campag. cartridge in my 1959 Capo, I found that a mid-1990s Veloce crank seated just far enough outboard to accommodate 3 chainrings instead of 2. I need to countersink my 39T inner ring to make sure the chainring nuts don't strike the frame under severe loads/flex.
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VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Coated cables posted by: Gralyn on 2/26/2006 at 11:07:54 PM
I was browsing a local bike shop and I see these gear cables - coated.....maybe with teflon or something. It seems like they were maybe around $5 or so. I've been buying old-school steel cables - and coating them with grease. So, I'm thinking - especially for the gear cables - this should be much better - because you woudn't have to have it coated in grease to keep them from rusting - and thus, it would be less messy so far as getting grease on whatever touches then. I don't know - maybe these have been around for years and years - but I have never had a bike to have them.

Does anyone have any experience with these? Or are they for a totally different application - like a mountain bike gear cable?
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Coated cables posted by ken on 2/27/2006 at 3:52:23 PM
The high-tech ones have a Teflon liner in the housing. I bought a set from Nashbar, not the $40 ones but more than plain cost, to try to solve an indexing problem that wouldn't go away on a mountain bike. I don't think it made much difference, and in the case of a vintage lightweight, which only requires about a foot of housing entering the derailleur, I see no reason for it. Like you, I think it helps to coat them with something to keep the moisture out. I use a drop of teflon lube (like Finish Line X-Country) and an extra drop in the housing and at the bottom bracket.
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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Coated cables posted by Gralyn on 2/27/2006 at 9:03:33 PM
These were just the inner cables - no housing. They were coated. I thought they should work great for down-tube shifters. They shouldn't rust - and they wouldn't have to be coated with grease to keep them from rusting. Plus, the coating works as lube - so, the lube needed at the contact points would be less.
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   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Coated cables posted by Ken on 2/28/2006 at 7:49:59 PM
I'm not saying they're not cool- just that I'm too stingy. No doubt the coated wires would retain their efficiency with less attention, but I don't think they are significantly more efficient.
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Coated cables posted by Wayne on 3/3/2006 at 4:32:00 PM
These coated cable have been available in this area for quite a while. The bike shop that has them told me when to use them.
The latest generation of sheathing has an interior lining of teflon. If you use this type of sheathing, do not use coated cables.
If you use non-lined sheathing, use the coated cables, but you are not supposed to use both at the same time.
The idea was that this eliminated having to grease the cables, which allowed dirt to stick to the grease and contaminate everything.
I hope this helps.

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   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Coated cables posted by Randy on 3/4/2006 at 6:21:03 PM
I have been using these coated cables for some time now and with excellent results. I started using them with my Bar Con equipped bikes. The smooth surface does, indeed, reduce drag on the cable. Go for it.
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Coated cables posted by Paul on 3/5/2006 at 5:07:31 PM
You can certainly use coated cables with lined housing. I don't think you can get unlined der housing these days anyway. If you have unlined der housing, throw it away, and use modern housing. A teflon coated cable and lined housing was the only fix for my tandem with Suntour indexing. It now works perfectly. If you don't like the look of coated cables, get stainless cables. Why screw around with grease on your cables? It makes for a dirty mess on your bike. In my opinion, stainless cables are the only way to go for any application. Especially bikes used for commuting.
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VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Peugeot identification from serial number posted by: Adam on 2/25/2006 at 11:58:58 PM
Does anyone know how to ID a Peugeot from the serial number? I've got an old frame (painted over) serial number
R 0038039 or RO 038039. Can anyone tell me anything about this bike?
thanks!
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     Peugeot identification from serial number posted by John E on 2/27/2006 at 2:59:01 PM
IF I recall correctly, 7 digits indicates 1970s or later. The leading 0 indicates 1970 (if the bottom bracket is French-threaded) or 1980 (Swiss-threaded).
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