MISC:   index shifter with SunTour "VGT" posted by: JONathan on 5/12/2006 at 4:42:11 AM
Regarding the post (John E.) about index-shifter used successfully with a SunTour "VGT"; do you need to use index-shifter cable housing or will the regular cable housing work OK? Thanks in advance.
by: 67.118.246.29


   : index shifter with SunTour posted by John E on 5/12/2006 at 2:14:12 PM
They simply reused their old cable housing, which may have been non-compressive ("index"). I have to believe you will get more accurate shifting if the housing does not compress on downshifts.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:: index shifter with SunTour posted by JONathan on 5/13/2006 at 3:53:16 AM
Thanks, again. I am going to see if a MTB handlebar index/friction shifter will work on Fuji "Sports 12" with a flat bar or roadster bar. On the order of the "Frankenbike" concept, I suppose. I think it would be worth the expense of a new non-compressive shroud, as you suggest. I like the shifter because it will switch to friction mode, manually. I suppose friction mode will work with either cable housing type. I like the index for quicker shifts, but the friction is always reliable.
by: 71.135.117.203

   RE:RE:: index shifter with SunTour posted by Derek Coghill on 5/15/2006 at 7:56:18 PM
If you get some of the better thumbshifters, you can choose between friction and indexed.
by: 62.7.148.78






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Where was it made? posted by: Gary D. on 5/12/2006 at 2:01:46 AM
I have a Ross Aristocrat, 12 speed. All Shimano 600 parts. Made from Ishiwata tubing. Can anyone tell me where this bike was made?
Thanks
by: 64.12.116.8


   : Where was it made? posted by John E on 5/12/2006 at 2:16:54 PM
In the 1970s, Ishiwata tubing was made in Japan, and most Ishiwata-based frames were brazed in Japan, as well. By the 1980s, many frames were brazed in Taiwan, often by Giant, but I suspect, but don't know for sure, that the Ishiwata tubing itself was still made in Japan. The Tange Prestige II tubing in my 1988 Schwinn mountain bike was evidently rolled in Japan, then exported to the US for brazing in Greenville MS.
by: 66.185.168.82






AGE / VALUE:   Mercier Tour de France? posted by: Tim W on 5/11/2006 at 11:39:11 PM
Hi there. A professor friend of mine has asked me about reviving his childhood dream bike, which he just got back from his parents’ place. He got it new when he was fourteen (1970) with money from his first job. He’s interested in putting it back on the road as a fun ride for the City (Vancouver). I haven’t seen it yet, but he says its in beautiful shape and all original except the seat. I didn’t bother asking him lots of questions to understand its quality, as he’s going to bring it by my place soon to look over.

Does anyone know anything about this model? Doesn’t sound like it has any Campy parts, and its not made with Reynolds tubing. Also, I’m not familiar with rebuilding French bikes – provided all the parts are salvageable, will I need any special tools for a re-build?

by: 204.174.35.108


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Mercier Tour de France? posted by Warren on 5/12/2006 at 1:25:13 AM
A nice steel boom-era french ride, not unlike a Peugeot U08. You'll need 9mm french cotter pins if you rebuild the bottom bracket. Go here...http://harriscyclery.net/itemlist.cfm?category=60. Everything else should be straightforward and if it's not, refer back to Sheldons website for comprehensive info.
by: 70.51.120.202

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Mercier Tour de France? posted by JONathan on 5/12/2006 at 1:40:24 AM
First off, check Sheldon Brown's "French Bicycles" restoration article. The main thing would be bottom-bracket threads might be French specification, which poses a bit of a hunt for replacement parts. If the BB is OK, then great. Just be careful taking the right-side (fixed cup) off as it could be Right-Hand thread. If it is Swiss threading, you are R-L threads (correct), but removing the fixed cup means you need a new cup...at least that's the only time that I remove a fixed-cup. Now, the stem is important. AVA stems were on French bikes (and British, too), so you want to get that off pronto, replace with a safe replacement. Again, the article tells how to make a nifty swap using a Japanese stem (SR for example). The brakes are easy, as standard center-pulls will fit. Finding 27" alloy rims might take some time, but they are around. Make sure you get hooked-bead rims for the higher pressure tires. Good luck.
by: 71.135.136.185

    Mercier Tour de France? posted by John E on 5/12/2006 at 2:21:18 PM
Find out when the bike was made. Through the early 1970s, French manufacturers were still using RH-threaded fixed cups (boo, hiss!). Peugeot got it right (left) by 1980, Motobecane a few years earlier; I am not sure about Mercier.

36-hole 27" rims may be rare locally, but they are available on the Internet. However, assuming you have the requisite additional 4mm of brake arm reach, I strongly urge you to consider using 700C rims, for which you will have many tire options, with few concerns about chainstay and fork crown clearance.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE: Mercier Tour de France? posted by Mike on 6/8/2006 at 12:08:46 AM
Are there any markings on a Mercier that can be used for identification? Can't find any ...

by: 67.136.147.162






MISC:   Pilot bicycle, (c. 1959) posted by: Layne Burrus on 5/11/2006 at 7:28:22 PM
I had a Pilot 24" bike when I was a kid. Were these made by Seattle Bicycle Co.? Were they sold everywhere, or only through certain dealers, such as Western Auto? I would appreciate any information, maybe photos. Thanks for the help.
by: 216.107.127.121







AGE / VALUE:   Ross Signature posted by: Kevin T on 5/11/2006 at 5:17:23 PM
I have this forest green Ross Signature 12 speed racer w/Reynolds tubing and shimano 600 compoments the signature painted on the left chainstay appears to be Jim Redroy(sp?), any info on this? year etc also it is missing the seat stem and it appears to be an odd size, newer bikes confuse me, help, please.
by: 64.136.26.228


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross Signature posted by David on 5/11/2006 at 6:03:39 PM
I'm surprised that a Reynolds frame is not 27.2mm, but what do I know? If you have several seat posts of different sizes, you may be able to determine it by go/no-go methods. Otherwise, drag the frame to your LBS and ask them to check it with their seat tube sizer.
by: 65.78.2.207

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross Signature posted by Dickey on 5/13/2006 at 3:28:18 AM
The Signiture should have 531 db tubes, the seat tube may not be round,so a 27.2 acts like it won't fit. Most LBS have a tool that slids in the tube and is turned round and round and makes the hole round again! The name on the stay is Jim Redcay,one of the custom builders who went to Ross when they jumped into the $$$ being made off the Olympics. You should have an excellent bike. Dickey
by: 72.155.252.221