VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Info on Takara bikes? posted by: JD on 6/12/2006 at 2:24:39 AM
I've recently picked up one of these and am trying to get more info on it. No model name on it, just "Takara" on the downtube and (real)headbadge. It's purple with gold outlined lugs, chromed fork tips, Dia-Compe center pulls, Suntour Barcons, Suntour derailers, Sugino crank (52/40), 27" Araya aluminum rims with 14-32(I think) 5 speed freewheel, 2 bolt SR seatpost and a Selle Italia saddle that'd been nice until it got multiple cuts. It does have the adapter claw to mount the derailer, so that brings it down a bit. Tubing sticker says "Guaranteed Special Takara Tubes, Forks & Stays" which sounds like straight guage tubing, maybe Miyata? Old enough that the derailer cables were routed over the bottom bracket. In any event, it's worth the $5.00 I paid for it i think.

The odd part is that the last owner fitted it with straight bars, had the barcons stuck in a piece of pipe and taped them to the bars. Want to treat it right and put on drops but A) The bar clap diameter of the curent Dia-Compe stem seems to be 25.4 -- my 3TTT (26.0) won't go, and; B)The quill appears to be of a smaller-than-standard diameter for a 1" threaded steerer (my other stems won't work here). What can I do here?

Thanks in advance for any help you can shed.

JD
by: 172.145.175.63


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Info on Takara bikes? posted by Gralyn on 6/12/2006 at 12:39:05 PM
I have a black Takara....some type of touring model....It's dis-assembled, all cleaned up and polished up, waiting to be re-assembled. I'm thinking it's a late 70s/early 80's model. I think it has 20-30 tubing, something like that....whatever the high tensile stuff is....it's not ChroMo, or double butted, etc. But, it does have forged drop-outs with integrated derailler hanger. I think maybe a Tange headset, it has all the alloy components. I believe it came with bolt-on down-tube shifters. It has Dia-compe stem - I bet it's the same diameter as yours.
by: 198.175.154.213

   Takara posted by John E on 6/12/2006 at 3:25:14 PM
With 5 speeds and top-side cable routing, I am thinking mid-to-late 1970s. Takara was a decent Japanese brand, about on par with Nishiki, but sold in much lower volumes in the western U.S.

Check SheldonBrown.com for some ideas regarding stem and handlebar diameters; you should be able to come up with something pretty economically.
by: 66.185.168.82






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   recalled riding characteritics posted by: frisbeetom on 6/11/2006 at 5:41:00 AM
oops, wrong board. wanted friction early slack-angled ATB ... buuut converted to urban assault . i was lucky to have had a 200ish # teledyne titan from hunting ton beach and a 72 raliegh pro from ralph carnevale in oc ca. rjde em til 88 and 01 respectively. any body with cool info or opinions
by: 24.165.163.18







AGE / VALUE:   Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by: Darryl on 6/10/2006 at 7:25:47 PM
I have owned an English made Raliegh Comp GS for years. I bought it new in the early 80's. The movers have not completely destroyed it so I am wondering if it is worth repairing and riding. I don't know if it is too old/low tech. The brakes have been damaged and the saddle is in bad shape but the important parts including the frame and all of the Campy equipment have survived.

Fix it, or pitch it? I welcome all advice.
by: 70.234.239.205


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by Randy on 6/10/2006 at 10:55:42 PM
Keep the Raleigh and ride it. I have owned an almost mint 1977 Competition GS for a few years and the bike is very well made and a good ride, in my opinion. I also believe that they are appreciating in value(again, my opinion). Take the time to completely rebuild the bicycle(doesn't really cost all that much, install a good quality set of tires(this does cost a bit but quality tires are a big plus when it comes to the ride) and enjoy. However, if you do want to pitch it, do so on Ebay a pass it on to someone who will appreciate the bicycle while making yourself a few bucks in the process(good condition currently fetches about three hundred plus dollars).
by: 70.73.28.189

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by Darryl on 6/11/2006 at 12:31:21 PM
When you say "rebuild", does that mean that I should not use parts that did not come on the bike as original equipment?

I still have a soft spot in my heart for this bike. I fell in love with it when I first saw it hanging on the wall of a bike shop in Arizona. I just think that now is the time to fix it, or send it on to someone else.
by: 70.234.239.205

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by Randy on 6/11/2006 at 1:11:03 PM
In my mind a rebuild includes: disassemble, clean, lubricate, assemble and adjust the bottom bracket, head set and wheel bearings(replace what is worn or damaged, as required). Clean and lubricate brakes calipers and derailleurs(replace components as required with correct parts, as required). Clean and/or replace brake and transmission cables, ensuring that they are lubricated to allow for smooth operation. True up the wheels, check the dish and adjust as required. Ensure that your spokes are solid(I replace corroded or questionable spokes but only in sets when implementing a full rebuild). More on spokes - if they are not stainless, I replace the full set(I build my bicycles to ride and prefer stainless spokes - if I were ever to build a show bike I would replace spokes with correct ones). If one or more of the spokes are broken or bent, I replace the whole set(the theory is if one is weak, so are the rest). Chain and sprockets issues are a bit of a judgement call. I try to go with the original stuff if possible, ensuring that everything is very well cleaned and lubricated(this is discussed in more depth on my web site, in case you are interested). Replace the tires, with good quality ones, if your's are showing signs signs of wear or deterioration. Clean the frame and forks thoroughly, when the bicycle is apart. You can also do a bit of paint touch up at this time, if it is required(take the frame to a good automotive paint shop and ask them to mix you up a small can of matching color). Give the whole works a good coat of wax protection(ensure that you give the paint touch-up a good oportunity to dry first). Assemble the bicycle and tune it up. Double check everything regarding assemble and take the bicycle out for a test ride. After a bit of riding, go over the bicycle to ensure that nothing has loosened off. If you are satisfied with the positioning of the brake levers, tape the handlebars. This entire procedure is a "rebuild" and I charge $75.00 USD for the service even though it is probably worth more). A restoration is all of this with full attention paid to repainting and redecaling(painting is a last resort and this again is duscussed in more detail on my web site). I hope this is a help and I plan to put a complete "How-To" section about this on my web site soon.


by: 70.73.28.189


   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by Randy on 6/11/2006 at 1:12:00 PM
In my mind a rebuild includes: disassemble, clean, lubricate, assemble and adjust the bottom bracket, head set and wheel bearings(replace what is worn or damaged, as required). Clean and lubricate brakes calipers and derailleurs(replace components as required with correct parts, as required). Clean and/or replace brake and transmission cables, ensuring that they are lubricated to allow for smooth operation. True up the wheels, check the dish and adjust as required. Ensure that your spokes are solid(I replace corroded or questionable spokes but only in sets when implementing a full rebuild). More on spokes - if they are not stainless, I replace the full set(I build my bicycles to ride and prefer stainless spokes - if I were ever to build a show bike I would replace spokes with correct ones). If one or more of the spokes are broken or bent, I replace the whole set(the theory is if one is weak, so are the rest). Chain and sprockets issues are a bit of a judgement call. I try to go with the original stuff if possible, ensuring that everything is very well cleaned and lubricated(this is discussed in more depth on my web site, in case you are interested). Replace the tires, with good quality ones, if your's are showing signs signs of wear or deterioration. Clean the frame and forks thoroughly, when the bicycle is apart. You can also do a bit of paint touch up at this time, if it is required(take the frame to a good automotive paint shop and ask them to mix you up a small can of matching color). Give the whole works a good coat of wax protection(ensure that you give the paint touch-up a good oportunity to dry first). Assemble the bicycle and tune it up. Double check everything regarding assemble and take the bicycle out for a test ride. After a bit of riding, go over the bicycle to ensure that nothing has loosened off. If you are satisfied with the positioning of the brake levers, tape the handlebars. This entire procedure is a "rebuild" and I charge $75.00 USD for the service even though it is probably worth more). A restoration is all of this with full attention paid to repainting and redecaling(painting is a last resort and this again is duscussed in more detail on my web site). I hope this is a help and I plan to put a complete "How-To" section about this on my web site soon.


by: 70.73.28.189


   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by JONathan on 6/11/2006 at 7:15:25 PM
Randy, I got a lot out of reading your articles on your bicycle site. It is very useful to me, as I have lots of project-bikes that qualify under your "Vintage Life Cycle"
criteria. I try to keep the original cable housings, as the new housings just don't look as cool. I used to throw housings away! $75 seems like a low number. I spend that much, almost, on two tires and tubes and liners. Then you add $22 for KoolStops, handlebar tape, etc. and it gets over the century mark real fast. Note: the tires are the most important investment, as they really effect the ride directly. Of course the brakes are critical, but pads and cables are low expense items, compared to tires and seats. Get a good seat! Thanks, again.
by: 67.118.246.23

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by Randy on 6/12/2006 at 4:34:32 AM
Oops! I must qualify my comment about charging $75.00 for a complete rebuild. Other than inner cables which cost me $1.00 each, I pass the cost of new parts on to my customers. A full rebuild takes me a good five hours, or even more, to complete and I feel that the price I charge for my labor is more than fair. I also offer one tune up during the riding season, after a full rebuild, as part of the deal(this also applies to bicycles that I sell locally). I agree with you when you comment on the price of a set of tires. That alone will eat up the $75.00. I also use the original outer cables, if they are in presentable condition. I am sorry for the confusion and do hope that no one thinks that my intention was to mislead. By the way, I am now retired and my son-in-law is desigining a new web site for me. I will finally make a serious effort at sharing more of what little I know with those who are seeking advice on the intricies of vintage lightweight bicycle ownership and maintenance. I will continue to focus on Canadian made lightweight road bicycles. European and Asian mounts will also be featured along with how to articles that I feel have not been adequately addressed elsewhere on the web. I do hope that some of you fellows will tune in, from time to time, to see what I have to offer. I am in Calgary, Alberta as I write this, and I have been bike hunting all across Canada, time and opportunity permitting. So far I have stumbled across and purchased a very nice Pinarello "Trevisio" with full campy(tikety-boo shifters and all), a very nice early eighties Mikado(Canadian made), a Coventry Eagle, a middle of the line Miele, a really clean Nishiki Olympic Tri-A, and a Holdsworth Equipe, in pretty good condition. I am starting my return journey in two days but my truck is full. I'm not sure how I will get everything home. Life is tough...
by: 70.73.28.189

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by JONathan on 6/12/2006 at 8:22:22 AM
That is some deal. I saw a list of repair/service prices in a LBS. I think it is $50 for BB overhaul on a cotterless crank. It takes me about 45 minutes. Your price for everything is a GREAT deal. I have a Sekine "2500" road bike, which is really very well crafted for a mass produced bike. I have a Kuwahara MTB touring bike which has toured Labrador coastline. Good luck making it back.
by: 67.118.246.158

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Raliegh Comp GS - Worth Fixing? posted by Gralyn on 6/12/2006 at 5:12:59 PM
Folks will occasionally ask me what I would charge to tune up their bike, etc. - I never have a clue what to charge them - as I don't usually do stuff like that for the general public.....just for myself. I have seen where a complete re-build, including waxing the frame - was $200. I think I could re-build them for folks, replace the gear and brake cables.....for maybe $75. Of course, I would have to charge them for new tires, bar tape, etc. - as depending on what you get - could really be expensive.
by: 198.175.154.213






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   serial number identification posted by: Tom on 6/10/2006 at 7:19:57 PM
Any help would be appreciated in deciphering the serial number imprinted on the bottom of the frame between the cranks of a scavenged Raleigh (Cycle Company of America)Capri which reads as follows:

6E00607
M

If you know any details about such a bike, I'd be interested to hear what you know. Thank you.
by: 216.190.12.88







FOR SALE:   Brown Bros vintage lightweight catalogues on CD posted by: Bruce Robbins on 6/9/2006 at 6:36:43 PM
Hello everybody,

I'm just doing a batch of these CDs for people on the CR list and thought I'd let you all know so that you can get your orders in now :-)

Brown Brothers was a massive wholesale cycling concern in the UK during the last century and these CDs contain their 1939 and 1952 catalogues.

There's more than 700 pages between the two catalogues all packed with great information about all the old lightweight component manufacturers. Simplex, Harden, GB, Bluemels, Brooks, Resilion, Airlite, Chater Lea, Williams-they're all there and lots more to boot.

There's far too much to go into here so the best thing to do is visit my Scottish framebuilders website: http://www.framebuilders.toucansurf.com/Brown-Bros.htm (Have a look at the rest of the website, too!)

The CDs are £10 each plus postage and are worth every penny. Please feel free to ask questions.

Regards,
Bruce


by: 212.1.142.5