VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleighs posted by: David on 6/29/2006 at 4:18:17 AM
Do the Nottingham-built Raleigh 10-speeds, the Record and Gran Prix, have 26 tpi headsets and bottom brackets? Do the late-70s versions (with Suntour components) also use the Raleigh threading?
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    Raleighs posted by John E on 6/29/2006 at 5:26:27 PM
By 1970, I believe the Raleigh 10-speeds used standard 24 TPI threading. If not, you MAY be able to rethread 26 TPI to the old Swiss standard mm (25.4 TPI) threading.
by: 66.185.168.82






AGE / VALUE:   Legge posted by: Stuart on 6/28/2006 at 9:50:25 PM
Hello,
I recently came accross a Legge. Full Suntour superbe, Sugino aero mighty cranks, Nitto duraluminum aerobars. I cannot find any information on the frame or the bars. Can anyone help me with this priblem.
by: 24.7.66.162


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Legge posted by TimW on 6/28/2006 at 11:34:15 PM
Hi there Stuart. Are you in Vancouver? I almost bought a used Legge frame once, and I think I was told that's a local Vancouver area frame maker (no longer in business?). The one I looked at was a nicely made Reynolds 531c frame. I don't know much else.
by: 216.113.204.2






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Pie plate spoke protectors posted by: David on 6/28/2006 at 5:11:24 PM
I'm cleaning up an old Schwinn Sports Tourer. Like the Varsinentals, it has a HUGE spoke protector. Does anyone have a clue why they used such enormous ones? I'd think that one slightly larger than the biggest cog would accomplish the job equally well.
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   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Pie plate spoke protectors posted by Gralyn on 6/29/2006 at 2:27:54 AM
I'll bet it had more to do with style than actually protecting the spokes. Kind of like those huge tail fins on cars from the late 50s.....they served no purpose - but rather had a certain "look". So, maybe that's why the spoke protectors were so huge....and chrome.....

I haven't decided when I re-do my Sports Tourer - whether I will leave the spoke protector off or not. I'm leaning toward leaving it off. I will also leave off the huge stem shifters - and replace with barcons....so it would make sense to leave the spoke protector off. I will of course, save those pieces and label them and put them up. I think everything else will be original....maybe I'll use different bar tape, too.
by: 205.188.117.66

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Pie plate spoke protectors posted by JONathan on 6/29/2006 at 2:49:07 AM
Maybe they help keep the rear derailer jockey-wheel from interfering with the spokes, such as it could possibly do so, I don't know. Maybe if it was bent from a collision and then could get pulled right into the spokes while shifting to the largest cog.
I suspect it was for optical enhancement, like so many other features.
by: 71.135.97.198

    Pie plate spoke protectors posted by John E on 6/29/2006 at 2:11:13 PM
The "spoke protector" is the first thing I remove when I buy any bicycle that has one.
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   RE: Pie plate spoke protectors posted by Gralyn on 6/29/2006 at 5:53:47 PM
I remove them on all my bikes, too.
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   RE:RE: Pie plate spoke protectors posted by TimW on 6/30/2006 at 6:06:16 PM
I remove the big chrome pie plates, along with any reflectors, from all my bikes - I'm saving them all to make a funky mosaic on my garage door.
by: 216.113.204.120

   RE:RE:RE: Pie plate spoke protectors posted by Gralyn on 7/2/2006 at 5:46:04 PM
I remove the pie plates and the reflectors, too. I have wondered what I should do with all those reflectors and spoke protectors........
Sometimes when I sell a bike - if they ask about reflectors - I'll just give them a bag full of them.
by: 205.188.117.66






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Super Gran Prix posted by: LRudolph on 6/27/2006 at 1:25:30 AM
I purchased a Raleigh Super Gran Prix in the early 80's from a dealer in Paducah KY. It was made in England and is light blue in color. The shift controls are in the end of the handle bars. I haven't seen any other bikes with the gear shift in at the end of the handle bars. Is this unusual? I recently had the cables replaced, new tires put on,the seat replaced, new tape on the handle bars and some maintenance which cost $150. It rides beautifully. Anyone with information about this bike? I can't make out the serial number on the frame. How much would it be worth if I wanted to sell? I did keep the original seat in case anyone would be interested in purchasing as original. Thanks
by: 67.141.16.139


   : Raleigh Super Gran Prix posted by John E on 6/27/2006 at 2:40:19 PM
Those bar-end shifters, often called "barcons," are great for those who do not want to remove a hand from the bars for gear changes. I really like the old SunTour ratchet units I put on my Peugeot UO-8 daily commuter. Campagnolo and Simplex made barcons as early as the 1950s, but they remained rare for many years, as did shift cables long enough to accommodate them. The Japanese, notably Nishiki and SunTour, popularized barcons in the early 1970s.
by: 66.185.168.82






AGE / VALUE:   need help identifying frame posted by: john on 6/24/2006 at 4:42:23 PM
I bought a bike about 10 years ago. It is painted green and purple with no markings except a serial number. I has shimano 600 7 speed freewheel complete groupo with mavic gel 280 rims. The serial number is apyd5367?? the last 2 digits are painted in could be 6 or 8 or maybe 3. It has a 1 inch steer tube. a 27.2 seatpost. sew up tires. the rear seat stays are flattened to about half the last two inches or so before ataching to the seat. It is lugged steel with no cutout in the bottom bracket or marks on the lugs. unmarked dropouts or painted in letters. Any help would be great. email if you need a picture.
by: 71.34.3.47


    need help identifying frame posted by John E on 6/27/2006 at 2:43:55 PM
Assuming it is original, the 7-speed freewheel indicates mid-to-late 1980s production, just before the general changeover to freehubs. Italian bottom bracket threading (36mm diameter instead of 1.375") would PROBABLY indicate Italian manufacture; the rest of the world was essentially on English/ISO by then.
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   RE: need help identifying frame posted by JONathan on 6/29/2006 at 12:35:58 AM
One way that I can tell if it is Italian frame is by measuring the axial length of the bottom-bracket. Most were 68mm (edge-edge), but Italian were 70mm....However, I believe this has some holes in it, as some of the older British bikes may also have 70mm. If it is pretty lightweight AND 70mm WITH the thread pattern John E. decribed, then it would be a very good guess that it is Italian. You could also look at the stamp on the spindle, if it is S-5-S, then it was for Italian BB's.
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   correction posted by JONathan on 6/29/2006 at 12:39:12 AM
The S-5-S would be for a Sugino crank spindle. I got the bike confused with another one posted, sorry.
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   RE:correction posted by JONathan on 6/29/2006 at 12:42:47 AM
My Bottecchia has SN on the seat-tube, not BB or rear-drops. Not many bikes I have seen have SN's on seat-tube. Good luck.
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   RE:AGE / VALUE:   need help identifying frame posted by john on 6/29/2006 at 2:11:59 AM
thanks for the replies, it is a 68mm bottom bracket. the bottom bracket is odd in that it does not touch the treads but is held in by 2 beveled lock rings. the serial number is across the bottom of the bottom bracket
by: 71.34.3.47

   S/N on seat tube posted by John E on 6/29/2006 at 2:14:25 PM
"Not many bikes I have seen have SN's on seat-tube."

True. I have seen several serial numbers on the seat lug, as on my 1981 Bianchi, but I have seen the SN on the seat tube itself only on Capos and a few Allegros.
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   RE:S/N on seat tube posted by JONathan on 6/30/2006 at 2:13:43 AM
Well, I guess my Bottecchia is in rare company. The SN is stamped on the seat-tube just below the rather ornate seat lug. This big fella stands out , as it is different in many ways. I think the Italian bikes have high degree of individuality...in fact I might use that as a criterion for makes. They also ride different from French makes. Maybe it is my imagination, but they feel faster on road.
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   Italian vs French posted by John E on 6/30/2006 at 2:11:43 PM
At the risk of overgeneralizing, I did observe that 1970s Italian road bikes TENDED to have tighter, more upright, "racier" geometries than their French cousins, which looked and felt more like fine touring machines.
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