VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   1976 or so Holdsworth Super Mistral posted by: Alan on 7/8/2006 at 2:34:13 PM
Orange and blue with chrome slope crown fork, 23" 58cm, campy record hi flange hubs with sew ups, record pedals, record F&R derails with campy bar-cons, stronglight 93 cranks, owned by me since new, teardown/rebuild every five years. No more room in Phila or NYCity for it any more. Ridden but not abused. Anybody interested?
by: 70.23.87.59







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh International tubing ? posted by: Andy on 7/8/2006 at 11:20:24 AM
The 531 decal is unreadable on my circa 1970 International....Does this frame have double butted 531 tubs and 531 forks & stays, or are only the frame tubes non-butted tubing ? In other words, is it a top shelf frame. It does have chrome Nervex lugs and unusual wrap around seat stays, a very nice looking frame.
by: 68.160.1.113


    Raleigh International tubing ? posted by John E on 7/8/2006 at 3:52:35 PM
I believe the International has the full butted top-of-the-line 531 tubeset, and came with an appropriately diagonally-printed "531" on the Reynolds sticker.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE: Raleigh International tubing ? posted by jack on 7/9/2006 at 11:26:39 PM
John E is absolutely correct. In addition, rumour has it that many Internationals were stripped of their Campy components during the bike boom. This, no doubt in part, because the components were race-designed/suitable whereas the frame was tour/sport-tour and no longer fashionable. Nowadays, everybodys favorite and clean originals are cherished indeed, probably even more than the Professional which was 70's Raleigh top-of-the-line (excluding delicious Pro track).
by: 207.200.116.14

    Raleigh International posted by John E on 7/10/2006 at 3:03:38 PM
Jack is right -- there is nothing like a classic high-end steel lugged frame with a slightly relaxed geometry. With a period-correct Stronglight, Nervar, or TA crankset, one can gear a 1970s road classic 48-38 / 13-26 (5-speed or 6-speed "ultra") and keep the original Campagnolo "racing" derailleurs while obtaining a practical gear range of 40 to 100 gear-inches.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh International tubing ? posted by Shaun on 7/10/2006 at 10:20:24 PM
I have a 1972 International and it is indeed ALL Reynolds 531. Chrome lugs, tapered chainstays (no indentations), Campy equipped other than the brakes.
by: 66.78.71.105

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh International tubing ? posted by Andy on 7/10/2006 at 11:03:11 PM
Thanks to all for the info...the bike is a pleasure to ride, and gets noticed when parked downtown at the coffee shop. Has 25" frame, bronze paint with oval anniversary headbadge. PS...there's a nice one one ebay right now.
by: 141.157.186.200

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Raleigh International tubing ? posted by jack on 7/11/2006 at 5:01:25 AM
Internationals are definitely keepers. Unfortunately the word is out so ebay is the last place I'd buy one unless you have deeeep pockets. John E has great idea to meld flashy english sport tourer with french porteur practicality.
by: 207.200.116.14

    Raleigh International posted by John E on 7/12/2006 at 2:12:34 PM
Enjoy the International, Andy. I had fun riding my 1959 Capo to the start of RAAM 2006, where it did get noticed by a few folks, and I plan to ride it during the Coast Highways 101 Rods and Woodies Cruise Night next Thursday. It is always a pleasure to have a bike which looks as great as it rides.
by: 66.185.168.82

   RE: Raleigh International posted by Eddie on 7/29/2006 at 4:10:19 AM
I rode my 1974 copper Raleigh International from Williamsburg VA to Astoria OR in the 1976 Bikecentennial. I used a Campy Rally rear derailleur with a 34t large freewheel gear and a 36t front chainring. It was a great ride and a great summer. I still have the frame - the components are on my wife's Mercian.
by: 72.177.27.167

   RE: Raleigh International posted by Eddie on 7/29/2006 at 4:11:22 AM
I rode my 1974 copper Raleigh International from Williamsburg VA to Astoria OR in the 1976 Bikecentennial. I used a Campy Rally rear derailleur with a 34t large freewheel gear and a 36t front chainring. It was a great ride and a great summer. I still have the frame - the components are on my wife's Mercian.
by: 72.177.27.167






AGE / VALUE:   western flyer english lightweight posted by: Ron on 7/8/2006 at 2:06:34 AM
i have been looking for the value of a bike I have in very good condition which I noticed was just described in a post yesterday. That post said (might as well save myself some typing)..

...The bar under the handle bars has a label that says, Guarenteed genuine English Lightweight. On the handle bar is the 3speed gear shift. It reads "Sturmey Archer", England 3speed,...
this is black in color with chrome fenders and in very good condition. Please email me if you know it's value. I think it's a 1961 or 62 and I want to sell it. Thanks for your time.
by: 68.126.178.185


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   western flyer english lightweight posted by David on 7/9/2006 at 6:11:59 PM
Probably Raleigh-built (if the fender attaches BEHIND the rear axle) and imported by Western Auto chain of auto supply stores in the 60s. Even if in almost perfect condition, you're unlikely to get $100 for it. See the post below about the $5 garage sale find. Keep it and ride it; you've got a good bike.
by: 65.78.2.207

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   western flyer english lightweight posted by Dave on 7/12/2006 at 1:49:28 AM
I just got the exact same bike at a neighbors house - it was laying in the grass for years. Cleaned it up, removed [with a drill sometimes] the old components, and have almost finished making it into a single speed. Nice looking bike. 1962 if it has a non-curving top tube.
by: 67.72.98.46






MISC:   Trek 2000 posted by: tugboat on 7/7/2006 at 5:21:40 PM
I have a Trek 2000 Aluminum with a 6-digit serial number starting with 361***
I'm trying to figure out what year it is, but vintage-trek doesn't say anything about them...
by: 63.85.149.251


   RE:MISC: Trek 2000 posted by Warren on 7/8/2006 at 1:26:54 AM
Cuz it ain't vintage...they still made a Trek 2000 just a few years ago.
The components may date it easier or contact Trek themselves.
by: 70.51.137.81

   RE:MISC:   Trek 2000 posted by Keith on 7/10/2006 at 3:12:06 PM
I think your bike is late 1988. But check out the web of Vintage Trek - there is a comprehensive chart of serial numbers and dates for these bikes. All the best KC
by: 70.186.116.104






AGE / VALUE:   Huffy Proffesional Concours posted by: Porscha on 7/6/2006 at 2:25:32 PM
Hello,
I came across a Huffy proffesioanl Councours ten speed with a fully lugged frame. It is an extreamly nice bike and extreamly light. I would like to put it up for sale (I am a collage student) but I don't know the year. I have been trying to find out what year the bike is. I have tacken it to local bike shops, and they are dumb founded. They have never seen a Huffy like it. I was wondering if anyone new a good place to regarding it's age and possible value. It is a good bike, I more of an off road biker.
by: 67.48.233.193


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Huffy Proffesional Concours posted by Gralyn on 7/7/2006 at 11:58:11 AM
I may have something similar. I picked it up at a thrift store - because (if I recall correctly) it had a nice set of pedals on it - and the pedals were worth way more than they were asking for the whole bike - so I bought it. It seems it may also be a "professional concours" - but I do recall one of the features, and it say it somewhere on the bike.....is the "fully lugged frame". But in vintage lightweight terms - a "fully lugged frame" isn't much of a feature to boast about. From what I recall: it had typical Japanese componentry....DiaCompe brakes / levers (levers with safety lever extensions), possibly an alloy crank set, however, I believe it had steel handlebars and steel seat post and steel rims. It looked typical bike boom-equipped.....but for Huffy, was certainly a step up from the typical gas pipe frame, 1-piece steel crank, etc. department store type bike.
If it's what I'm thinking - maybe in good running condition.....could be worth maybe $30 - $40.
by: 198.175.154.213

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Huffy Proffesional Concours posted by David on 7/9/2006 at 6:18:18 PM
Didn't Huffy import Carltons under the Huffy name for a couple of years? It could be a fairly good bike. Return with it to a bike shop that has been around for a while and ask them to evaluate it on the basis of its components and construction (and IGNORE the nameplate).
by: 65.78.2.207

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Huffy Proffesional Concours posted by chuck on 8/1/2006 at 4:22:57 PM
$30-$40. much more. Huffy sponsored the US Olympic team and found they could not make bikes to specs. So (maybe Carlton) they contracted with some other company to make the Huffy Concours Olympic Special 10 Speed Limited Product bike.
by: 68.249.30.218