RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   paint posted by: Jason Nethmith on 3/11/2003 at 10:07:50 AM
I have this old frame that has been painted with this realy
dumb paint. I was wondering how I could get it off without
damaging the origanal coat.







RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   chrome scratches posted by: isaac ray on 3/7/2003 at 3:56:52 PM
i was wondering what is the best way to remove tiny scratches from my handle bars, fenders, etc. there are no deep or major ones, just those little ones you see when polishing that just get on your nerves. thanks, in advance, for any responses.

isaac ray


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   chrome scratches posted by Kim on 3/11/2003 at 2:45:49 PM
Those scratches probably came from somebody using steel wool on the chrome.
DO NOT USE STEEL WOOL. Use brass wool like they sell in the kit here.
Sorry Isaac but there is no way to remove that spidering. Yoou'll have to re-chrome.

   RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   chrome scratches posted by JimW. on 3/19/2003 at 3:01:59 PM
Here's something you might try, since the chrome's not any good at this point. Steel wool comes in many grades, including ultra-fine. Start out with a grade only slightly finer than the current scratches. Go over the whole thing, until the even finer scratches are consistent. Then go to the next finer grade and repeat. Then go finer still. By the time you get finished with ultra-fine, if you haven't gone through the chrome into the copper underplate, the piece is ready to polish. A cloth polishing wheel used with white polishing rouge, will polish the piece back to bright finish, without the obvious scratches the piece now has.

This is the procedure I use to end up with a chrome-like finish on aluminum pieces, and it works. In my opinion, the problem with steel wool isn't that it's inherently bad. The problem is that people don't use it properly. For polishing light rust off chrome handlebars, bronze wool or aluminum foil is better, because it's softer than the chrome, and it won't be as likely to scratch it, but the idea behind abrasives is to make scratches. So working with that idea, and applying ever-finer scratches to a surface will let you end up with a very smooth surface. All metal polishing works that way. Polishing is just an even finer grade of scratches.






RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   Tandem Columbia Playbike posted by: Jim on 3/7/2003 at 2:47:34 PM
I have a tandem Columbia Playbike, half of the bike is one color green the other half another color green. Back half that is bright shiny green needs to have the bananna seat replaced. Any idea on where to get a seat like this or any idea the worth of this bike? I have not seen this bike or its serial number 9597572 on any websites.







RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   question posted by: matt on 3/6/2003 at 5:57:08 PM
I would like to know what schwinns would be the best to restore for profit right now. thanks


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   question posted by Stacey on 3/7/2003 at 10:52:35 AM
If you gotta ask, you shouldn't do it.

You'll take a bath.

   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   question posted by MNSmith on 3/9/2003 at 9:49:31 AM
An Aerocycle comes to mind. Sure winner.

www.bunchobikes.com






RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   schwinn flamboyant red paint? posted by: Danno on 3/4/2003 at 2:19:09 AM
Does anyone have a paint code and manufacturer to replicate schwinn flamboyant red? I am trying to do a couple of restorations low budget and cant seem to find a match. Schwinn made all kinds of bikes in this color for probably 35 years or so. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance! Sincerely, Danno







RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cant tell what kind it is! posted by: Allison on 3/2/2003 at 1:02:36 AM
I bought a bike today at a thrift store and I cant find anything about it. All it says is "BMA/6 CERTIFIED" and a little about it tested by BMA/6 and for america. Anyhoo, plz help, email me. :) thanx.


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cant tell what kind it is! posted by Ron on 3/2/2003 at 1:32:40 PM
The BMA sticker only means that the bike had all the necessary reflectors and safety equipment to meet the Bicycle Manufacturers Association standards. Almost every bike sold has the same sticker. BMA/6 was issued in the early 1970s.






RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   boys sears bike posted by: rich on 3/1/2003 at 11:17:33 PM
i have a20 in. boys bike made by sears that resembles a stingray type bicycle other than alittle rust in very good shape. any value too this?


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   boys sears bike posted by sam on 3/2/2003 at 1:44:31 AM
Most sears bikes were made by Murray. not a lot of value but a good bike should make a good rider,have fun with it.






RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   boys sears bike posted by: rich on 3/1/2003 at 11:17:33 PM
i have a20 in. boys bike made by sears that resembles a stingray type bicycle other than alittle rust in very good shape. any value too this?







RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Western Flyer posted by: TJ on 2/28/2003 at 2:26:34 AM
I'm trying to restore a W/F(Buzz Bike) that had a 3 speed shifter on it.Not sure the year. Looks to be early 70's.
Where can I find some parts


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Western Flyer posted by sam on 3/1/2003 at 1:09:22 AM
This bike might be the same as AMF,or texas ranger,and others by AMF. The 3 speed most likely is a 333.Ebay would be the best source for parts.These bikes are not as pricy as Schwinn,so it's a good starter bike.






RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   upholstery posted by: isaac ray on 2/23/2003 at 5:39:08 PM
im trying to upholster a traler with some the same material as most lowrider seats are made of. my problem is how to cut the material so that there are no lines showing where the material has been cut. i want it to look like it is covered in one piece of material. any tips and advice would be greatly appreciated.


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   upholstery posted by sam on 2/23/2003 at 11:48:28 PM
Well Isaac,Not seein the project puts me at quite a disadvantage! Sew lines can be hid using cording.Some things are vinyl covered using a heat and vaccum process,like car dash boards.You can heat vinyl and strech it around foam to cover say a seat bottom with no lines.Use cheep vinyl if you plan on heatin it cause cheep vinyl works best for this.---sam

   RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   upholstery posted by JimW. on 2/24/2003 at 12:28:05 AM
In most upholstery, the edges are hemmed. That means that the material is turned under at the edge. Normally, the edges are sewed together, with the overlap on the back side.
This gives a clean edge. You can do it without sewing, by using contact cement. You coat the material from an inch in from the edge, on the back side. When it gets tacky, fold the edge over with a 1/2" hem. This will give a cleaner edge, even when you use welting. With a sewed seam, the welting would be sewed at the same time, but you can glue the welting, also.






RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   RUST ON WHEELS posted by: ANDREW CHEMERS on 2/22/2003 at 4:14:24 AM
HELP!
I HAVE MAJOR RUST ON BOTH WHEELS OF MY SCHWINN STING-RAY.

HOW DO I GET RID OF IT?!?

HELP!

EMAIL ME: SIMPSONSCRAYZ@MAIL.COM


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   RUST ON WHEELS posted by Skip on 2/25/2003 at 3:03:35 PM
Get the kit they sell on this site. It's on the top of this page.






RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Ross Paragon Decals posted by: Rich McCarthy on 2/20/2003 at 2:10:15 PM
Need help..Removed (almost unreadable)Paragon script decals and 024 frame tube decals from bike.Apparently,restorer cannot duplicate. Does anyone know of the whereabouts of one of these rare road bikes that's still in decent shape/where I might be able to pick up a set of the paragon script decals and 024 tubing decal? Even photos of the script decal would help. Bike bead blasted and ready for respray..need the decals!







RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What kind of paint posted by: Justin on 2/18/2003 at 7:26:00 PM
I was looking at repainting a bike of mine. I was wondering what kind of paint should you use when you repaint a bike. Thanks

Justin


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What kind of paint posted by Skip on 2/25/2003 at 3:06:02 PM
Somebody wrote a good description of how to use regular Krylon spray paint here. Click on "More Messages" at the bottom of this page and keep reading until you find it.

I think there's also a way to search the articles here and that would be an easier way to find it.






RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by: Denise or Dave on 2/12/2003 at 2:24:59 PM
Hi!,
Is there anybody out there that can HELP ME??? I have recently acquired a rather "SAD" Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. The two rear wheels are buckled. I am looking for replacement wheels or some advice on how to straighten them,

Many thanks!
Denise.


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by sam on 2/14/2003 at 11:39:23 PM
contact Al Petri,And send photos of the wheels.If they can be repaired this is the person to do it.email is petribike@hotmail.com this is the Al Petri bike shop in Lincoln park Mi.good luck--sam

   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by Denise on 2/17/2003 at 8:32:55 PM
Hi Sam,

Thanks for your reply, it's much appreciated, guess what had some great luck, managed to pick a second "Sunbeam Winkie" tricycle up today, at a Flea Market, wheels are good, and I might just get some extra parts of it also. I will keep the E.mail address of Al Petri, incase I need any extra bits!

Thanks once again,
Regards,
Denise.

   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by Denise on 2/17/2003 at 8:33:04 PM
Hi Sam,

Thanks for your reply, it's much appreciated, guess what had some great luck, managed to pick a second "Sunbeam Winkie" tricycle up today, at a Flea Market, wheels are good, and I might just get some extra parts of it also. I will keep the E.mail address of Al Petri, incase I need any extra bits!

Thanks once again,
Regards,
Denise.

   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by Denise on 2/17/2003 at 8:33:05 PM
Hi Sam,

Thanks for your reply, it's much appreciated, guess what had some great luck, managed to pick a second "Sunbeam Winkie" tricycle up today, at a Flea Market, wheels are good, and I might just get some extra parts of it also. I will keep the E.mail address of Al Petri, incase I need any extra bits!

Thanks once again,
Regards,
Denise.






RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Polishing aluminum posted by: Gralyn on 2/10/2003 at 8:30:11 PM
I polish the aluminum components (brakes, levers, stems, cranks, etc.) with aluminum polish (like Mother's Aluminum Polish) - stuff like that. It makes the parts shine like new. But after a while - especially in high moisture environment - they will oxidize again. I was wondering - could you spray the components with clear-coat after polishing them? Would this be a detrimental thing to do? Or, would it help protect the metal? I dont' know - but before I try something like that - I thought I would ask.


   RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Polishing aluminum posted by Jeff R on 2/11/2003 at 12:50:21 PM
It will work for a while. Eventualy the clear coat will chip and the aluminum will oxidize and spread under the chip. Then you have to remove the clear coat, which requires a lot of polishing, and start over. I prefer to just keep polishing the aluminum when it needs it.

   RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Polishing aluminum posted by JimW. on 2/24/2003 at 12:37:02 AM
I use Cape Cod metal polishing cloths to keep polished aluminum oxide free. It comes two cloths in a foil pouch.
Just wipe the cloth over the aluminum, then wipe the residue off with a clean dry cloth when it dries. This isn't as good as Mother's, Simichrome or other real polishing compounds, but it's easy and great for cleaning an already polished surface when it gets oxidized again.
It smells really good, too- kind of like bubble gum. Probably a bad idea for it to smell so yummy. I can just visualize some toddler sucking the polish out of the cloth.
I get it at my local hardware store.