Discussion - Custom Bicycles

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Subject: So, you've got all these extra parts laying around..
Entered on: Jul 18, 1997 08:44
Entered by: Menotomy Vintage Bicycles

Message:
So, you've got all these extra parts laying around, and you know you could make a really cool custom bike. What are you going to build? What features do YOU think are ultra-kool?




Subject: 24" lowrider tricycle customizer needs help!!!
Entered on: Jul 18, 1997 13:32
Entered by: Miguel

Message:
I need help. Anyone that has any information about how to customize a 24" trike. Please contact me with any information on how to do it.I need a some parts that are really hard to find in the area I live in. The bike is a 24" beach cruiser tricycle. I am trying to find where I can get some wheels for the bike. The bike is bad, it is puerl red and I had the body extended, so it is very long and it is bondo-ed. I also need to get some gold plated parts for the bike. I put together a design for my bicycle and I need gold plated parts for the (gooseneck-sprocket- chain- spinners for the wheels- mirrors- & spokes for the wheels.) I also need to know were I can find some velour covers for the (seat, mirrors, pedels, grips, and cover for a basket on the back of my bike.Any resonce that will help me out with this project will be more then pleasing. Thank You != Miguel




Subject: We don't stock it, but..
Entered on: Jul 23, 1997 08:02
Entered by: Menotomy VIntage Bicycles

Message:
Miguel - we don;t stock any 'gold' parts, but if you email us a list of what you want, we can quote you a price and order the stuff. -Vin




Subject: Pee Wee's bike
Entered on: Jul 28, 1997 13:12
Entered by: Gary

Message:
Does anyone know the make/etc. the bike Pee Wee Herman rode in the move "Pee Wee's Big Adventure? I would love to Build one!




Subject: trike wheel alinment
Entered on: Jul 31, 1997 04:41
Entered by: jamie

Message:
I have a lowrider trike that keeps wearing out tyres, does anyone know the correct wheel alinment for a (single driven wheel)tricycle?




Subject: trike wheel alinment
Entered on: Jul 31, 1997 04:42
Entered by: jamie

Message:
I have a lowrider trike that keeps wearing out tyres, does anyone know the correct wheel alinment for a (single driven wheel)tricycle?




Subject: RE: Pee Wee Herman bike
Entered on: Jul 31, 1997 09:24
Entered by: jj

Message:
Pee Wee's bike could be considered a custom. It was a conglomeration of parts from various bikes.Start hitting the swap meets and build a cool head-turning rider!




Subject: RE: Trike Wheel alignment
Entered on: Jul 31, 1997 09:26
Entered by: jj

Message:
Was your trike completely home built? Was it originally manufacturedas a 3-wheeler? Did you add one of those 3-wheel lowrider kits to a regular bike? (need more info)




Subject: Help! Schwinn/Rolling Rock Phanton Bike
Entered on: Aug 1, 1997 20:38
Entered by: Kathy

Message:
Hi, Need to find approx. value of a Schwinn/Rolling Rock limited edition Phantom Bike? 1997 Special Edition between Rolling Rock and Schwinn. Any idea?




Subject: Re:trike wheel alignment
Entered on: Aug 2, 1997 18:42
Entered by: jim

Message:
I built a Apple-Krate 3-wheeler,and i have the one wheel drive.Theres no alignment,you just have to keep the wheels straight and tight.




Subject: Your ultimate custom
Entered on: Aug 8, 1997 13:48
Entered by: jj

Message:
If money was no object, what type of custom would you build? A cruiser? Musclebike? I'd build a multi-speed muscle with a loooong springer fork and a 6 foot sissy bar. Top tube stick-shift, or course!




Subject: Ultimate Custom
Entered on: Aug 13, 1997 07:34
Entered by: rider

Message:
Nahhh, not a musclebike. It would have to be a cruiser. Something with a 7-speed Nexus rear and a drum brake on the front. Springer, flared fenders, horntank, etc. Big leather cruiser saddle. Style...




Subject: Ultimate Kustom
Entered on: Aug 14, 1997 01:04
Entered by: Jim

Message:
The Ultimate Kustom would start with a 26" Schwinn cantilever frame,and extended springer fork with a 20" wheel with a drum brake.Cruiser bars,flared fenders,torpedo grips.Krate pedals,long cranks and a MAG sprocket.with a 5spd rear,and stick-shift.A leather solo-polo seat.And the frame painted white with yellow to orange flames.And quite possibly a disc brake in the rear.




Subject: RE: 'Ultimate Kustom'
Entered on: Aug 14, 1997 07:56
Entered by: jj

Message:
I'm a Musclebike fella, myself, but that bike sounds pretty cool. Where would you get a leather polo saddle? And would you run it 'lowrider style' or like a musclebike?




Subject: Re:`Ultimate Kustom`
Entered on: Aug 21, 1997 01:30
Entered by: Jim

Message:
I saw a leather one at a vintage bike shop,and it would be a muscle-bike,and not a "low rider".Now,if i can only find a 26" slik!




Subject: lowrider
Entered on: Aug 27, 1997 12:32
Entered by: Dane Murphy

Message:
Where can I get velvet For the mirriorsthe grips and the sissy bar yhe color Iwant is black




Subject: lowrider
Entered on: Aug 27, 1997 12:42
Entered by: Dane Murphy

Message:
Where can I get velvet For the mirriorsthe grips and the sissy bar yhe color Iwant is black




Subject: stero
Entered on: Aug 27, 1997 12:44
Entered by: dane

Message:
How would you put a stero on a lowrider does anyone have any ideas




Subject: lowrider
Entered on: Aug 27, 1997 20:38
Entered by: Alesa Carey

Message:
Where can I get really cheap good spring bent fork




Subject: RE: Velvet
Entered on: Aug 28, 1997 09:04
Entered by: jj

Message:
Go to a local fabric shop for velvet.




Subject: RE: Bent fork springer
Entered on: Aug 28, 1997 09:07
Entered by: jj

Message:
Menotomy (this web site) has them on their parts page http://users.aol.com/menotomy/parts.htm I've bought a couple of them and they are the good ones (they have a fender hanger bolt in the bottom of the fork.) Watch out for the cheapo ones that don't have the fender hanger bolt. They are thinner metal and I've seen dudes wipe out when they break.




Subject: Chopper building in Finland
Entered on: Sep 2, 1997 01:56
Entered by: Martin

Message:
For description about custom chopper building in Finland you can try the address below. Beware of the language used. It´s not the best kind of school English. http://www.tf.hut.fi./~ath/english/chopper/index.html




Subject: Super Rex - Cabri
Entered on: Sep 2, 1997 08:53
Entered by: Erik

Message:
Hi, I hav bought this beuatiful old bike from 1958, called super Rex from the german company "Cabri"It says "special for Cuba".I find it wery hard to find any information about my bike! I need to see a photo af an original, because the seat and the sterring is not original. If anybody can help me find information i would be wery gratefull.




Subject: Bent springer fork
Entered on: Sep 5, 1997 11:55
Entered by: mike

Message:
for Alesa Carey. I have a bent springer fork in my garage. Ithas a 16 in. drum brake wheel/tire attached, missing a spoke or two.Can't remember where it is bent. I recall the spring area was a littletweaked, but the fork struts are good shape, can't readily see bend.It believe it is from a Schwinn Krate of some kind. E-mail if interested.




Subject: RE: Potential Schwinn Krate springer & drum brake
Entered on: Sep 8, 1997 08:26
Entered by: jj

Message:
Mike, Krate springers with a front wheel, tire and drum brake go for around $250! If it is from a Schwinn Krate, you should know it is worth a lot!




Subject: Krate springer and drum brake
Entered on: Sep 15, 1997 21:01
Entered by: mike

Message:
Say, does anybody out there want this thing. Will sell/trade to good home.Rim is S-7 tubular, with cracked Schwinn tire, chrome is OK to not great. Goodheadset and strut areas. Willing to trade for cruiser parts such as white rimswith balck pinstriping, clover leaf 44 t chainwheel, etc. Let me know.




Subject: Kustom bike....
Entered on: Sep 26, 1997 23:21
Entered by: Russ

Message:
Just 'cause I'm wierd, the ultimate custom goodie for me starts with an old English frameset from a nice Roadster that's too far gone for a regular restoration...next we mount some funky old steel dropped bars and a pointy-looking stem and a Brooks B-17 saddle..short, 165 mm cottered cranks with smallish rattraps and clips...sewup wheels with a fixed, flip-flop, or single-speed freewheel...and go hardcore '20's racer retro!




Subject: extended forks (chopper forks )
Entered on: Sep 28, 1997 15:24
Entered by: joel

Message:
i'm looking for a long chopper fork and i cant seem to find anything like it . i 'm wondering if i have to build it or if there is someplace i could ordrer such a thing or does such a thig even exist .... HELP!!!




Subject: Russ..
Entered on: Sep 29, 1997 11:32
Entered by: Shamus

Message:
The only other thing you'd need for your 20's retro-racer would be a buddy with a 'teens Indian motorcycle to be your pacer.




Subject: springer fork and velvet stuff
Entered on: Oct 4, 1997 03:58
Entered by: Steven

Message:
There's a good place to get both of these things for the best price I've ever seen. I have ordered a couple springers from there they havent let me down yet. You can get a strait springer for 23.99! And a bent lowrider style for 31.99! They also sell velvet everything grips mirror borders handlebar pedal sissy bar steering wheel cover. If they dont have it in the catalog they'll make it for you. There phone # is 1-888-mega-low




Subject: sad day
Entered on: Oct 4, 1997 04:25
Entered by: Steven

Message:
Today I came home from school and right as I set down my bag the mail guy pulls up in my drive gos to the back of his jeep and pulls out a box, yes,they were finally here(my new 140spoke20"rs). I raced to open the box they were perfect. As I was puttin them on my freshly webbed painted frame I was watching the weather channel,The report said its going to snow tomorrow! Today wuold be the last time I get to ride my bike for 8 months! Today was truely a sad day. But thats ok I had a whole summer that was spent ridingand pulling wheelies on my cotton picker wanna be 'ray junior. does anyone share this pain of having to stare at your ride all winter long while it snows outside?




Subject: My Custom
Entered on: Oct 5, 1997 18:58
Entered by: john

Message:
I just finished building my ultimate hot rod bike. I found an old balloon tire "peerless frame at a yard sale for $5.I had my local bike shop lace up a set of mountain bike aluminum rims to a Nexus 7-speed roller brake hub in the rear and an el cheapo hub up front.I bought a straight springer fork and nice fat whitewalls from Memory Lane The fork lower crown is drilled to take a sidepull brake, so i put a bmx caliper on.The handlebars are a combination bar/stem from an 80s mtn bike. theyre wide chrome and they were free! grips are bmx flanged type.the cranks and bottom bracket are also bmx stuff-- Odyssey Black Widows -- expensive but so cool looking with the Wald teardrop sprocket! I almost forgot, I painted the frame a dark emerald green metalflake with tan head tube and darts outlined with red pinstripes. I built this bike for railtrails and buffed singletrack , and it rides great! This is the only bike I own thats not for sale!




Subject: Your Custom
Entered on: Oct 6, 1997 09:11
Entered by: ChrisE

Message:
John, that sounds so kool! How about posting a picture of it somewhere?




Subject: ChrisE
Entered on: Oct 6, 1997 10:18
Entered by: john

Message:
I wish I could, but I'm a little short on hardware here.




Subject: Need some advice
Entered on: Oct 7, 1997 09:49
Entered by: JimB

Message:
I have a 1936 girls Elgin I want to restore for my daughter. The frame, chain guard, and fenders are really cool. It even has a "dress guard" on the rear wheel. I will have those parts repainted, re-pinstriped, and re-trimmed this winter. What I need help with is the wheels. The wheels that are on the bike are totally shot. The only possible part that could be salvaged is the Morrow rear hub and that would need rechroming. I want to keep it as a balloon tire bike, but I want to go to multiple gears because of the hills where I live. I also want to keep the brakes within the hub(s). Yesterday, I checked and the Nexus 7 speed hub is $160 (ouch). I plan to build the wheels myself. What do you recommend I do?




Subject: JimB's project
Entered on: Oct 7, 1997 16:00
Entered by: john

Message:
Jim, sounds neat, but remember it's not a restoration, but a custom as soon as you start adding things like Nexus hubs. I love my nexus. Yes they are expensive, but you're getting a hub, seven gears, a brake, a shifter and cables [mine did not come with a brake lever, though any standard lever will work.] for $150. See Shimanos page for gear ratios and cog choices. you may be able to run the original front sprocket if you get a large rear sprocket. With the standard 21 tooth rear on mine , I had to go to a 40 tooth front to get the gearing as low as I wanted it. All the specs are on Shimano's page. Whoops I just assumed you have a 1/2' pitch chain. DEfinetley choose the roller brake! S is making a matching front hub that accepts their roller brake. When building your wheels, take the width of the hub + brake + nut to keep things centered. One more thing the black toggly tipe shifter is kind of cheesy plastic .Benefit from my mistakes - GOOD LUCK!!




Subject: JimB's even bigger project
Entered on: Oct 7, 1997 18:38
Entered by: john

Message:
I just got off the bike and realized I had left a few details out of my nexus retrofit how to diatribe. So, even more stuff... Youll have to spread the frame to get the hub on the rear. I used an old LONG axle, 4 washers and 4 nuts. Stretchit all the way to the ends of the axle, steel springs back. Yes, It feels like diamond cutting as you are turning the nuts,waiting for something to snap! 2 watch the chainline-- I used spacers on a modern bmx cranckset, but if youwant to keep it looking as old as it is you'll probably want to keep the original cranks. The rear cog can be flipped to adjust chainline, it's dished. 3...If you have rear facing droupouts, you'll have to get the "other' non-turn washer for the drive side of the axle. It's gold and marked "2". That will allow you to run the shift cable under the chainstays. speaking of cables, try to find teflon coated ones, since you dont have any housing stops. Diacompe makes sweet, retro-looking chrome clamps that tighten with a small screw. Theyre not cheap. Anyway, goodluck. Its not as bad as I make it sound. Letme know how it comes out if you go for it or e-mail me with any problems.




Subject: RE: JimB's project
Entered on: Oct 8, 1997 08:20
Entered by: JimB

Message:
Thanks for all the suggestions. I forgot to add that this bike currently has a skiptooth chain (1 inch pitch). I guess that means swapping the crank unless the Nexus comes with a skiptooth cog option.




Subject: JimB's Project
Entered on: Oct 8, 1997 17:01
Entered by: WillIiam

Message:
hey guysI too would like to build a custom crusier. I like the Nexus system. Where do I start? I have the American Bicycle Book with all the cool pics. I don't need a black phantom with lots of chrome, just a nice frame. I don't want to restore it just update it and ride it.First.....how old is too old. I see bikes in the paper from the 30's. steel quality and frame quality count.Second..... will modern bottom brackets and cranks work on the old frames?Third....will modern head sets fit the head tube? I wish to use a modern from shock.




Subject: Williams Project
Entered on: Oct 8, 1997 18:11
Entered by: john

Message:
Will, the main thing to look for in an old frame is condition. Rust is your enemy! Dents are no fun either, But small ones are OK. Bottom brackets are still the same, at least on cheap US market bikes and almost all BMX bikes. Headsets are the same story. just look for a US type 1" headset. Dont think a modern mountain bike headset will work O.D. is different. Buy your fok now, 1" suspesion forks are becoming white elephants! good luck . let us know how it is going




Subject: RE: Kustom bike....
Entered on: Oct 9, 1997 09:22
Entered by: JimB

Message:
A few messages back, Russ was telling us he would like to take a frame from an old English roadster and build a 1920's custom retro racer. I have done just that and hope to complete the project this weekend. The bike started as a candy apple red metallic Dunelt with gold leaf trim I bought from Menotomy (this site). The bike was in quite bad shape and the only thing salvageable was the frame, fork, crank, seat post and brakes. I used a 1964 Sturmey Archer 4-speed hub and laced up modern 26 X 1 3/8 inch alloy racing rims from Belguim. To these I added a pair of 26 X 1 3/8 NOS wide whitewall English tires from the 1950's (they still had the cellophane wrappers on them). The handlebars are "Jack Lauterwasser style" English racing drop bars from the 1950's that look like they are from around 1920. The fenders are little 8 inch long aluminum alloy 1960's racing fenders from Switzerland. The saddle is a California reproduction of a 1920 hairpin saddle. Although I visualized the bike before starting, yesterday evening was the first time I actually saw the bike assembled. Even though the Dunelt frame is a 1969, the bike looks like it rolled off the assembley line prior to World War I. The wide whitewall tires really pull the whole retro look together well. I can't wait to ride it before the snow flies.




Subject: 36 Elgin
Entered on: Oct 9, 1997 11:17
Entered by: Bill

Message:
Hey JimB, just a few things you might consider on your daughters custom. I ride 1" skip tooth on many of my bikes but the more modern roller chains are much smoother. She might appreciate it. An alternative to the Nexus if cash is tight could be a scrounged Sturmey Archer 3 speed coaster brake hub. Early models had problems but newer models held up pretty well. Your biggest problem will be finding a 36 hole hub to match your balloon rim, I see a lot of 40's but 36's are out there. Did you get to the Limey swap meet in Sullivan Square?




Subject: Retro-custom beast
Entered on: Oct 9, 1997 11:44
Entered by: Russ

Message:
Greetings, all! I went and built the beast I mentioned above, and here's the description; A 50's Raleigh Lenton frameset that someone painted dark blue, 165mm steel Nervar cranks with a 49T chainring from a 70's Raleigh Record, a set of late 60's sewup wheels set up with an 18T rear cog, GB alloy bars and stem, a battered Brooks B-17 saddle and Mafac Racer centerpulls. At the moment, I'm still playing with the concept of fixed gear, but I suspect this one will get the full custom treatment, complete with a refit of some parts as I find more period ones. Sooner or later I hope to scrounge up some Weinmann Jr. sidepulls and some Lyotard 23 platform pedals. I may yet decide to go with a flipflop rear hub, and a paintjob is not out of the question. Best of all - the actual cost of parts has run about $50, due to careful and selective rummaging through parts bins, etc. I heartily recommend this project! This is the lightest, most responsive machine I've ever had, and a stroll through the listings from the auctions-on-line listing of vintage British goodies for sale a little over a year ago will turn up several specimens from this that are similar.Unfortunately, I have not yet found a pacer. Let me get my legs up to that first!JimB's Dunelt sounds pretty cool, too. I wish my steel, ancient and pointy stem and bars fit this one's steerer tube after reading his description!




Subject: Bill's note
Entered on: Oct 9, 1997 13:03
Entered by: JimB

Message:
Thanks for the pointer on the chain and the 3-speed Sturmey Archer hub. I have a box of those hubs, but they are all 40 hole. I'm going to try to shop the sales this winter to pick up a Nexus at a good price. If I can't get the Nexus, I will restore and lace the Morrow that the bike came with. As for the swap meet, I was booked up that weekend and couldn't make it. I had to take the family hiking and mountain biking in northern New England before the snow.




Subject: chrisE
Entered on: Oct 9, 1997 14:31
Entered by: john

Message:
Chris, if you want to see what my peerless cruiser looks like, check out konaworld.com Look for the a'ha cruiser. Now, just add a springer fork, amore tastefull paint job, acouple of whitewalls and youre there!




Subject: My Kustom!
Entered on: Oct 18, 1997 12:58
Entered by: Jim

Message:
I`m just about finished with my Kustom.It`s a red 1963 26" Schwinn American.I replaced the fenders,wheels,tires,seat,and handlebars,and it`s still all Schwinn.I replaced the seat with a Sting-Ray one with a 3ft sissy bar.I also added hi-rise handlebars and a battery opperated NOS tail-light.I plan to install a 26" springer fork and possibly a 24" front wheel with drum brake.I just used it in a parade this morning and everybody loved it!It kinda looks like giant Sting-Ray.I`m kinda getting too big for the 20" Sting-Rays,so this is perfect.




Subject: RE: "My Kustom"
Entered on: Oct 21, 1997 13:57
Entered by: jj

Message:
Is that the one you just rode in a parade? (mentioned in another section of this discussion area)? Does it have any speeds?




Subject: Re:My Kustom
Entered on: Oct 21, 1997 17:32
Entered by: Jim

Message:
Yes it is the same bike,and i hope to get pics of it on here soon.No speeds yet,but i have a 5spd setup off of another Schwinn that i`d like to install.I swa the response about tires in one of the other areas,the tires on it are NOS Typhoons,I wish they had a 26" Slik and a flared rear fender to fit it!




Subject: My Next Creation
Entered on: Oct 21, 1997 23:23
Entered by: JohnB

Message:
I just finished reading Sheldon Brown's web page. It's Amazing! If you like bicycles enough to be reading this, you owe it to yourself to check out his piece of work.He's inspired me. That old Sachs/Sears road frame hanging in the shed will soon become a single speed, no freewheel blacktop burner! I know, I'm nuts--I'm the kind of guy who puts seven speed hubs on a vintage ballooner, and takes the gears off perfectly good euro road bikes.Just wait til I tell you all aboutr the project I started today--BEWARE CHOPASAURUS REX .[see C.H.U.N.K.666




Subject: RE: JimB's custom retro 20's racer
Entered on: Oct 23, 1997 11:13
Entered by: JimB

Message:
I completed the project last night with the exception of the 4-speed Sturmey Archer shifter. I have a 1930's 4-speed shifter and cable for the top tube on order. I took the bike out last night and rode it for the first time. Other than not being able to get it out of fourth gear (high), it rode great. The new English brake pads on the new alloy rims will need some breaking in. This is one strange looking beast that looks like it's straight out of the 1920's.




Subject: JohnB and fixed gear
Entered on: Oct 24, 1997 17:36
Entered by: Russ

Message:
Sheldon Brown's pages are amazing, and I currently have an old Raleigh Lenton set up as a road fixed gear bike. I did it the cheap way, which was to redish an old derailleur wheel, then put on a fixed gear cog and the bottom bracket lock ring from an old Raleigh as a locknut. Let me echo S Brown's warnings about the dangers of fixes, however. I just finished reading Hearts of Lions, about American bike racing. The author, Peter Nye, notes that many of the old veteran racers were often missing bits of fingers from getting too close to the chainline while adjusting toestraps, etc. Having said that, my Lenton is a sweetie to ride, and I believe I posted a description earlier.I also must commend JimB on his retro Dunelt. I may yet have to do a proper restoration on my '62 Dawes after reading his comments.




Subject: My Next Kustom
Entered on: Oct 26, 1997 13:42
Entered by: Jim

Message:
Ok,anybody ever see those gas powered snowblowers with the 2cycle 2hp engines? Well,for my next Kustom,i`m going to use one of these and a Sting-Ray look-a-like frame,to built the Ultimate Chopper!I can`t find any cheap mopeds and there all 1hp and under,so this would have to do about 35-45mph! So it`s kinda going to be like a Whizzer.




Subject: JimB's 1936 Elgin Project
Entered on: Oct 29, 1997 08:16
Entered by: JimB

Message:
I started taking apart the 1936 girl's Elgin last weekend and to do it the way I want will cost me more than I want to spend. In spite of being an interesting bike, I scrapped the project and gave the bike to Menotomy. Instead, I am considering buying a brand new reproduction Schwinn Classic Cruiser in blue/cream for $249.95 and re-lacing the rear wheel with my Nexus 7-speed hub. I couldn't even have the 1936 Elgin painted for $250, much less buy all the new parts I needed. What are your thoughts on going this route? I will probably void the warranty by re-lacing the rear wheel, but that's a risk I am willing to take.




Subject: JimB's Cruiser Project
Entered on: Oct 29, 1997 10:12
Entered by: johnB

Message:
Jim, Why don't you just get a Schwinn Cruiser Seven instead? It has everything you're looking for for $450 It's great looking, too. You won't have to rebuild the wheel-It's got a Nexus hub already. "Assembled, Adjusted, And Ready to Ride"




Subject: RE: JimB's Cruiser Project
Entered on: Oct 29, 1997 12:32
Entered by: JimB

Message:
I have investigated that option as well. The problem is $200 is a lot of extra money to spend for a bicycle that is identical except for the seven speed rear hub. I already have a brand new Nexus-7 hub and I know how to build wheels. The real problems comes about when you already have a number of bikes and you ask your wife if she would mind if you spent $250 on another one. She looks at the picture and really likes it (you tell he she can borrow it anytime), so she says "go ahead". Now you go back and say "Uhhh, you know that $250 bike I was going to get? Well it's really $450 when you add in everything I want on it." Now you get the picture.




Subject: RE: JimB's Cruiser Project
Entered on: Oct 29, 1997 14:21
Entered by: JimB

Message:
I ust got off the phone with the Schwinn Technical Support line and the guy said that legally, I would void my frame warranty if I added a Nexus-7 rear hub. When I asked how many claims Schwinn receives on cruiser frames, he told me he has never heard of a single one to date. He went on to say that he is required by the legal department to explain the warranty void. In reality, he helped a friend convert his cruiser to a Nexus 7 this past weekend. It took two strong men to pull the frame apart enough to get the rear wheel installed. Overall, he said the Nexus 7 version is a blast to ride and if he didn't work for Schwinn, he would strongly recommend going ahead with the project.




Subject: JimB's Cruiser
Entered on: Oct 29, 1997 15:04
Entered by: johnB

Message:
Oh, I didn't know you had already purchased a Nexus hub. See one of my earlier posts for my frame stretching tecnique; It keeps the droupouts paralell. Good luck.




Subject: Frame Stretching
Entered on: Oct 30, 1997 07:14
Entered by: jj

Message:
What does it do to the paint? Won't it make it crack?




Subject: Frame stretching
Entered on: Oct 30, 1997 09:44
Entered by: johnB

Message:
It didn't hurt the paint on my bike, and I had just recently lacquered it.I was more worried I would break a weld. I was working with an old bike of unknown quality and condition, so I was a little nervous.If I could do it over, I would stretch the frame before I did anything else---First Thing--! That way if something does go POP You wont have wasted much time and energy.




Subject: Fork spread
Entered on: Oct 31, 1997 09:42
Entered by: jj

Message:
For JimB, I'd guess that popping a weld would most likely void that warranty, eh? And how wide are these Nexus hubs?




Subject: How Wide Should My Rear Be?
Entered on: Oct 31, 1997 12:19
Entered by: johnB

Message:
If you want to widen your rear, just sit around, watch TV and drink beer. I f you are putting a Nexus hub on a bike designed for a coaster brake, well, that's a different matter. I used a axle that was 160mm long, netting a strech of about 150mm, and it's still a struggle to install my rear wheel [Nexus hubs are130mm]. Since steel is springy, you have to stretch the dropouts well past 130mm to compensate for the spring-back. FYI a New Departure Model D is 110mm and a 1970's Bendix is 115mm




Subject: Old customs
Entered on: Nov 7, 1997 09:53
Entered by: Philsh

Message:
The customs we used to build in the 1950's were mostly based on ballooners. That is what we had plenty of. There were also a lot of lightweight bikes to use for projects but they were not as "in" as the balloon stuff. Most of our projects involved welding (my Dad had an auto repair shop). Our favorite projects involved welding 3 or 4 bikes together to make one long super "tandum" (trium? quardrum?). We'd alternate boys and girls frames. The bikes were curvey and we were popular!




Subject: Really cool cruiser
Entered on: Nov 11, 1997 02:10
Entered by: steve

Message:
I was surprised to find this site. I've just begun to have an interest in old bikes. I have chosen the custom cruiser area because of their killer looks and the freedom from pusuing ultimate originality. Currently I'm building a cruiser with a Schwinn cantalever frame. It has a Monarch dual spring fork( similar looking to a 40's era harley), and a drum front brake. It uses a Pearsons spring leather saddle. a bobbed & scooped rear fender from a Schwinn "hevi-duty" (no front fender...looks cooler). It has a repro Phantom tank, ball- end Weinman levers,and a 3-speed rear hub with a twist grip style gear changer. Tires are huge white walls. The whole thing is stainless hardware, chrome tank & fender, everything else is black(including rims). It also wears a black painted bullet headlight. The only thing I can't decide on is whether to use "Krate-like" ape hangers or wide sand cruser bars to get the "line" just right.




Subject: Really cool cruiser
Entered on: Nov 11, 1997 01:57
Entered by: steve

Message:
I was surprised to find this site. I've just begun to have an interest in old bikes. I have chosen the custom cruiser area because of their killer looks and the freedom from pusuing ultimate originality. Currently I'm building a cruiser with a Schwinn cantalever frame. It has a Monarch dual spring fork( similar looking to a 40's era harley), and a drum front brake. It uses a Pearsons spring leather saddle. a bobbed & scooped rear fender from a Schwinn "hevi-duty" (no front fender...looks cooler). It has a repro Phantom tank, ball- end Weinman levers,and a 3-speed rear hub with a twist grip style gear changer. Tires are huge white walls. The whole thing is stainless hardware, chrome tank & fender, everything else is black(including rims). It also wears a black painted bullet headlight. The only thing I can't decide on is whether to use "Krate-like" ape hangers or wide sand cruser bars to get the "line" just right.




Subject: I'd say...
Entered on: Nov 11, 1997 08:52
Entered by: Philsh

Message:
I'd say don't use the ape hangers on a cruiser. Stick with cruiser style handle bars. (just one old f*rt's opinion).




Subject: Custom Cruiser Bars
Entered on: Nov 11, 1997 16:17
Entered by: johnB

Message:
steve, I used early mountain bike bars on my hot rod bike. They look kinda moto, but not too choppery, They're also better riding than either of the options youre looking at.




Subject: Winter Project
Entered on: Nov 24, 1997 09:13
Entered by: CarlC

Message:
I've got a number of parts bikes and I'm planning on building a custom overthe winter. Should I build a 26" cruiser or a 20" muscle bike (or lowrider??). The bike will be used for short rides on a rail trail and beach boardwalk in the spring and summer. So, what do y'all think is cooler?




Subject: One Vote
Entered on: Nov 28, 1997 19:57
Entered by: johnB

Message:
If you actually want to ride this bike, You've got to go with the Cruiser.




Subject: Winter Project by: Carl C
Entered on: Dec 1, 1997 17:38
Entered by: Scott

Message:
I'll have to agree with JohnB. The cruiser will probably offer more smiles per mile over a lowrider. Certainly I feel that you should build "whatever blows your skirt up", but if you're built like Reggie White of the Green Bay Packers, the lowrider is almost out of the question!




Subject: CarlC - go Muscle!
Entered on: Dec 2, 1997 12:45
Entered by: Manix

Message:
Go with the Muscle Style. That is NOT a lowrider. (a lowrider really is too low to ride). But Schwinn Fastbacks and Stingrays are fine for real riding. Just put the seat up way high.




Subject: Back to the Nexus topic...
Entered on: Dec 2, 1997 13:23
Entered by: Manix

Message:
If you are worried about the spacing on a Nexus 4 or Nexus 7 being too wide, go with a Sturmey-Archer ST-5. These are internally geared 5-speed hubs with either a built in drum brake or built in coaster brake. And they are only 122 mm wide. We had Menotomy build us a 'Krate-like' custom around this hub and it is nice!!! Looks like an Apple Krate. At 5'11 and 190 lbs, it moves me around just fine. And is coooooler than a cruiser in my opinion. Go for the Muscle, Carl!




Subject: '68
Entered on: Dec 15, 1997 20:55
Entered by: Tommy

Message:
I have a pretty cool '68 Porsche Red stingray. Anyway this bike most likely will Be complete a Reissue chrome Speedometer if anyone can tell me where can find one for I would appreiciate it Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!




Subject: 3 speed hub to Varsity rim - spoke length?
Entered on: Dec 18, 1997 13:19
Entered by: Dan

Message:
I am planning to lace a 3 speed hub thatcame from a 24" wheel to a Varsity rim.I need help determining the spoke length.




Subject: Spoke length calulators
Entered on: Dec 19, 1997 13:24
Entered by: Philsh

Message:
There are several free spoke length caluculators on the web. Go into Yahoo and search for "Spoke Length" and you should be able to find them. You can run them right from your browser.




Subject: Spoke length calulators
Entered on: Dec 19, 1997 14:39
Entered by: Dan

Message:
Yes, I have seen those calculators. They work pretty well, theproblem I have is in determining the rimdiameter. I don't know the right way to measurethe rim. BTW, the Varsity has 27" rims.Do you know the Schwinn designation for them. Is it S-7?




Subject: Dan's Rims
Entered on: Dec 19, 1997 15:18
Entered by: johnB

Message:
Dan, Sheldon Brown has a great rim chart at his site, with dimentions. see______www.sheldonbrown.com




Subject: Phantom Phenders?
Entered on: Dec 23, 1997 00:32
Entered by: Ken (kensmith@freenet.columbus.oh.us)

Message:
Does anyone know if Memory Lane (oe somewhere else?) has Schwinn Phantom-style front fenders w/light?How much do they cost?




Subject: Phantom Phenders
Entered on: Dec 23, 1997 12:23
Entered by: johnB (johnburt@mailexcite.com)

Message:
Yes, Ken they (Memory Lane) have them. A paltry $85.00 a pop. 419 874 4501




Subject: Choppers
Entered on: Dec 23, 1997 12:33
Entered by: johnB (johnburt@mailexcite.com)

Message:
First, a new gang I found; Second , Chopasaurus Rex Is done. Anyone interested in a bike with a 6' wheelbase? Take an old Westfield Compax Sport Traveler two-piece pack bike. Remove the front part of the frame, and flip it over. This yields some massive headtube rake. Weld two forks together ala CHUNK 666 for the true chopper feel (instability). Add a 16" front wheel, a banana seat with sissy bar (tall), a pair of apehangers and away you go! Whoops, don't forget the short cranks, so the pedals dont hit the ground! Try not to kill yourself. {8^)




Subject: Chopper Gang URL
Entered on: Dec 23, 1997 12:36
Entered by: johnB ()

Message:
I guess HTML doesn't work here, so start typing.....www.geocities.com/Pipeline/1367/dbb.htm




Subject: CHOPPER
Entered on: Dec 30, 1997 09:02
Entered by: Chuck ()

Message:
Who says there's not a good use for an old grey ghost--turn it into a chopper! Anyone can restore one, it takes a real man to chop one up. See www.geocities.com/MotorCity/9057/CHOP.JPG




Subject: looking for advise on purchasing a custom bike.
Entered on: Jan 8, 1998 21:53
Entered by: Krista (kohler@icom.ca)

Message:
I plan on purchasing a custom made bike within the year. I am 24yr old 5'4", 125 lb female who just got into road cycling about 2 years ago. Any suggestions on what, when, where, who to buy? I live in Ontario near TO, Hamilton...I would appreciate any advise on the subject.




Subject: What style do you like?
Entered on: Jan 9, 1998 09:29
Entered by: PW (longtruck@hotmail.com)

Message:
What style? Muscle bike (Sting-Ray style) or cruiser? Is it for 'around town cruises' or longer distance riding?




Subject: Recumbant bicycles
Entered on: Jan 10, 1998 12:31
Entered by: Troy (hanestat@willmar.k12.mn.us)

Message:
I am attempting to get a prototype designed of a recumbant bike to be used by individuals with disabilities. I am looking at a three wheel design. I am interested in the recubant style because of it's stability, comfort, and the fact that it is supposed to be much better for your back. If you could give me any names of custom designers who may be interested in such a project I would appreciate your help greatly.




Subject: Shelbys--Supreme ($250) Flying Cloud ($200)
Entered on: Jan 11, 1998 17:34
Entered by: Bob Siegel, VA (703)569-5240 (kbsiegel@juno.com)

Message:
Shelbys For SaleThese must go!Supreme $250+shippingFlying cloud $200+shipping(703) 569-5240 VABob, email kbsiegel@juno.com




Subject: Recumbants
Entered on: Jan 16, 1998 08:56
Entered by: jj ()

Message:
There are some great Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) web sites. Get on to a web search engine like Altavista (www.altavista.digtial.com) or Yahoo (www.yahoo.com) and enter "HPV"




Subject: Anyone got?
Entered on: Jan 23, 1998 09:07
Entered by: jj ()

Message:
Anyone got any projects they are getting ready for spring? I've got a couple: a 20" 10-speed musclebike with double stick shifts and a 5 speed cruiser. Wrench on!




Subject: Custom Bike for a seven year old with a disability
Entered on: Jan 26, 1998 15:49
Entered by: Melissa (somemom@mailexcite.com)

Message:
I have a 7 year old son with Down Syndrome who loves to ride my stationary bike and loves to ride his tricycle. He has some coordination and balance problems and so does not feel or look stable on a typical two wheeler with training wheeels. He knows however that riding his little "big wheel" style tricycle is not "cool any more. I am currently looking to see if someone in the San Fran to Santa Cruz area would be interested in making a "cooler" looking tricycle maybe with big nobby tires or something.




Subject: Trike for 7 year old
Entered on: Jan 27, 1998 16:40
Entered by: Todd (tphunt@muscanet.com)

Message:
Melissa, If you find no local talent- let me know- I can build your trike. Also- take a look at Walmart- they sell a 20" wheeled trike for about $275. Either way, you'll make the neighbor hood kids envious! My seven year old has a Schwinn trike converted to 20" wheels, and when he takes it out everyone gets a test ride.




Subject: SCHWINN THREE WHEELER FOR SALE
Entered on: Feb 4, 1998 16:19
Entered by: Schwinn MAN (Joseph.Savage@mail.prostar.com)

Message:
I have a 1970 Schwinn three wheeler for sale in rough condiion 24" $200.00 bucks




Subject: Custom three-wheeler
Entered on: Feb 6, 1998 02:55
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
One of the strangest custom bikes I've built is a 26" ATB 3-wheeler. Someone had given me a schwinn breeze - 24", with a chrome 3-wheel adapter on it. I tossed the wheels, and fork. Put on a springer repo fork, 26" S-2 rims on the front and back, laced with 105 guage spokes. 26 X 2.2" knobbies all the way around. Union drum brake in front, bendix yellow band kickback in rear. ATB handlebars, spring saddle. It originally had a cheesy wire bascket on the rear, this was replaced with a home made wooden stake bed with wrought iron supports underneath. Rode it in the saint pats day parade here in chicago back in '92. (had a problem with drunks jumping in the back trying to hitch a ride). It's been hanging in my garage ever since. The only drawback is, it weighs upwards of 75 pounds.




Subject: 1970 SCHWINN THREE WHEELER FOR SALE $199.99
Entered on: Feb 9, 1998 18:24
Entered by: Schwinn MAN (Joseph.Savage@mail.prostar.com)

Message:
ONE ORIGANAL RIM ROUGH CONDITION PLEASE BUY IT $199.99




Subject:
Entered on: Feb 26, 1998 17:25
Entered by: nniwhcS NAM ()

Message:
People Need To Start Talking In This Room




Subject: Maybe no one is into building customs?
Entered on: Feb 27, 1998 08:08
Entered by: jj ()

Message:
No adventurous souls out there? Is everyone trying to keep their vintage bikes original? What about left over parts from parts bikes? Doesn't anyone put 'em together to make something entirely different? I've got a number of project bikes going, but nothing is roadworthy yet!




Subject: NLCB
Entered on: Feb 27, 1998 13:33
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Well maby we need to get them into custom bikes




Subject: 3-speed/coasters
Entered on: Feb 28, 1998 14:00
Entered by: Kevin (adrsg@net-nerds.com)

Message:
As far as custom bikes go, I find myself lacing three sped coaster brakes into non-traditional biles. I've done a light weight 70's era ten speed (27" alloy wheels) and a fifty s era Schwinn for my daughter at college. The current effort is a 26" motocross type frame (26" alloy wheels, balloon tyres). Thank God for those ladies frame coaster break 3 speeds that keed showing up at the thrift stores and swap meets. I may get around a built a traditional English three speeds with one of my hubs someday.




Subject: Custom Projects
Entered on: Mar 3, 1998 11:49
Entered by: Dave ()

Message:
Ok, heres my Frankensteins in work: I have a 50's Schwinn 20" straightbar frame that I am going to put a 3 speed coaster (if I can find one), painted fenders, springer, and high rise bars. Have added a bigger sprocket also. Paint scheme is black w/ turquoise accents, red pinstripe on the frame, turquoise/ ivory w/red pinstripe on the chainguard. My other monster is a 40's Monarch aluminum frame which I will build to be as light as possible cruiser: alum rims, hb stem, 3 speed coaster,etc. Probably no fenders. Looking for original alum forks. Anyone got one?




Subject: 3 speed coasters
Entered on: Mar 4, 1998 00:17
Entered by: Kevin (adrsg@net-nerds.com)

Message:
Sounds liek my kind of bike. I have had a lot of luck finding three speed coaster brake bikes at thrift shops in Phoenix and Las Vegas. I picked up a Schwinn Breeze a couple weeks ago for $14 and a couple Huffy/Murrey types for $7-$8. I turned down another for for less than ten because I would rather focus on S/A rather than Shimano. They are all women's frames but they provide the hub and sometime a bunch of other parts to play with.




Subject: cruiser- five speed
Entered on: Mar 6, 1998 11:38
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
I started out with a heavy-duty frame I had found. One of the joints had seperated, so I had it brazed. I found a springer - minus the struts. (made two struts out of a trashed stingray sissy-bar). Laced a couple of aluminum rims with a set of SA hubs. Internal 5 spd / drum brake in the back, drum brake in the front. Added some late model cruiser bars, a 46 tooth 4-hole sprocket (which I had to replace with a 39T). Threw on some whitewalls and tossed the thumbshifter with some stem shifters and some dia-compe ss-5 levers, and painted the whole thing black. I was originally going to make a 5 spd with a derailleur, but said forget it when I realized that I would have to use calipers. Te brakes work pretty good, and the machined alloy hubs don't look too shabby either. About two weeks after this one was done, I found another cruiser - late 70's single speed, with springer - for $4 in a local second-hand store. I painted that one to match mine, and gave it to my wife. She's not too big on swithching gears, so it worked out nice.




Subject: Question for the group
Entered on: Mar 6, 1998 11:46
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
Was the demise of ten-speeds due to their wheels? I worked in a shop for ten years, and replaced hundred's of tacoed 27" rear wheels. But I know that if you build then right for the rider, this shouldn't happen. I know that if I put a set of racing wheels on my bike, they would be trashed. Instead I opted for a set of campy c-record large flange hubs. 40h rear and 36h front. Used 14g. stainless spokes - non butted, and bought some Sun tandem rims. I weigh 250 pounds, and am anything but gentle while riding, but rarely have to true my wheels. Is this due more to my riding style? or the wheels? How did this affect the average consumer into buying a mountain bike over a ten-speed? Comments?




Subject: Demise of 10-speeds
Entered on: Mar 9, 1998 11:09
Entered by: PeterW (longtruck@hotmail.com)

Message:
I don't think is was a reliability issue. I'd say it is purely a marketing thing. Just as 4-wheel drive vehicles are popular, the idea of a ready-for-anything mountain bike sucked in a lot of people. Most riding is done on roads and people are having tom work a lot harder to push their heavy-lugged big-tire mountain bikes up smooth paved streets. Also Greg.... Your cruiser projects sound KOOL!!!




Subject: Demise of 10-speeds
Entered on: Mar 9, 1998 12:14
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
How long do you think it will be before people's memories catch up with them, and realize that pedaling a 10-speed was easier and mountain bikes become a dead fad like 10-speeds are today? And better yet, what's the next fad going to be? We've had balloon tires, middleweights, lightweights, 10-speeds, recumbants, mountain bikes, cross bikes (hybrids). I'd like to see Sturmey Archer make a come back. If nothing else- to aggravate a certain "extreme sports" bike mechanic I know.




Subject: Next Fad
Entered on: Mar 9, 1998 21:17
Entered by: Kevin (adrsg@net-nerds.com)

Message:
I would rather not see Sturmey Archer become the next fad. I enjoy playing with them and would like to see the prices remain farely low so that I can play that much more.




Subject: Cruiser & Classic Bike Show & Swap Meet
Entered on: Mar 10, 1998 00:48
Entered by: colin (coltrain2)

Message:
Magic cycles of Boone and Lenoir NC is holding a classic bike and cruiser bike show the weekend of march 2nd & 3rd for details and more information call (704) 265-2211 or (704) 273-0004




Subject: another custom bike
Entered on: Mar 10, 1998 13:21
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
Back in the good old days working at the bike shop, I had a counterpart named "X" (short for Xavier). We would call him the mad inventor. One of his creations was a 22" schwinn continental four speed. What first caught your eye with this bike was the crank. He installed a 65T chainring off of a schwinn DX-7 exercise bike on it, looked like a big silver serving platter. Because the DX-7 used a coaster-brake chain, he had to respace the cog to accept the wider links. It was one of the stranger things I've seen. I think he put a 17,19,21,24T cog on the back. I remember he only rode it once, said it was too hard to get it moving. It kind of reminded me of "Mile-a -minute Murphy's" bike.




Subject: need some info
Entered on: Mar 13, 1998 23:22
Entered by: Karl (frontside50@hotmail.com)

Message:
I'm 16 years old and I'm interested in building a lowrider bicycle. I'm completely new on the subject. You see in Buffalo there's no much to do here but do a lot of skating. Can someone please send me some info. on building a lowrider bicycle?




Subject: 26" in. springer fork conversion.
Entered on: Mar 16, 1998 00:42
Entered by: steve (steve@tastyfish.com)

Message:
I am thinking of installing a springer fork on a 26" mountain bike/cruiser. The main problem is the headtube is 3.5 in. and the steerer tube on a 26in springer is 6.75 in. If I cut the steerer or get a shorter tube the curved fork legs will not align correctly. As I am new to all of this I would appreciate any info. I am also thinking of using a headtube reducer and a 1" quill stem. If anyone can forsee any problems with this set-up please inform me by e-mail or respond on this site.




Subject: Springer Forks
Entered on: Mar 16, 1998 16:29
Entered by: johnB (johnburt@mailexcite.com)

Message:
Steve, I ran into the same problem with my Peerless. The Spring Bracket must sit x number of inches above the Yoke for everything to line up properly. Just go to the local bike shop and get a few 1" headtube spacers and use them to make up the height difference.




Subject: clown's bike or "Humpy bicycle"
Entered on: Mar 17, 1998 11:26
Entered by: Rosie From Texas (rosie@mission.lib.tx.us)

Message:
I work in a library and a patron is looking for directions (or instructions on how to make what they call a "Clown's Bicycle or a "Humpy bicycle" she believe's that the plans for making such a bike came out between 1961-65 in a magazine such as popular mechanics,populatr science or mechanics illustrated. Anybody ever heard of this bike Thanks Rosie from Texas




Subject: 1970 custom lowrider schwinn tri-wheeler
Entered on: Mar 18, 1998 09:09
Entered by: abraham (violentj1@collegeclub.com)

Message:
i need help on bulding a good sound system for my schwinn,$$$offered thanks.




Subject: TriWheel Lowrider
Entered on: Mar 18, 1998 12:46
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Money Offered Hmmm.....!




Subject: Lowrider info
Entered on: Mar 19, 1998 12:49
Entered by: dq ()

Message:
For info on building a lowrider, check with the sites that sell the parts. A good one is: www.hiwheel.com. They sell everything. Also check the Lowrider bike mag for ideas and other retailers. Regarding the 3 wheeler soud system, why not build/attach a cd boom box to it? That way, you can secure it and also carry it with you .




Subject: Three wheel bike you can pedal with hands
Entered on: Mar 27, 1998 23:16
Entered by: Dick (dbikes@localnet.com)

Message:
I own a bike shop I have customer with only one leg looking for three wheel trike you can pedal with hands




Subject: 3-whl. hand cycle
Entered on: Mar 28, 1998 13:43
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
I dont know if this would be any help. there is an add in a Washington BUY&SELL a man is selling one used, for $600 his phone# is (360)579-3768 Good luck finding one




Subject: Schwinn Trike
Entered on: Mar 30, 1998 15:54
Entered by: Jim (oli@seattleu.edu)

Message:
I just purchased a a'72 Town and Country trike with a three speed Sturmey Archer, coaster brake hub. The bike's in pretty good shape but a couple weeks ago I picked up a nice '62 mens Skipper frame. I'm thinking that a nice mens cantilever trike would be sweet. I'd like to replace the 27X1 3/8 rims with something like the S-7 rims the skipper came with originally. Does anybody know where I can get S-7 rims in good shape? I'd like one with a Sturmey Archer three or four speed. I've read the above information about retrofitting springer forks and I'm definetely going that route. Cruiser handle bars are mandated. Anybody have any ideas for replacing the wire basket. I'm thinking some kind of trunk. I'll paint the whole think black. What do you guys think about a bullet headlight? I kind of like the idea of a tank. Does anybody know where I can get one cheap? A friend has car stereo and speakers which he runs off of a deep cycle marine battery like the type someone would use for a trolling motor. It's good for about six hours. At the end of the day he throws it on the trickle charger and it's ready for the next day. The 50W stereo and 6X9 speakers put out enough sound to get a noise violation at the local waterfront. It should complement my trike nicely. I think I'll put an antenna and a faux fox tail. Comments or ideas would be appreciated.




Subject: Trike
Entered on: Mar 30, 1998 17:09
Entered by: Dave (dqami@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hi Jim, if you are handy at woodowork, how about building a trunk out of oak plywood with a high gloss varathane finish, like on a Criscraft boat? Or if you are not, maybe look for one of those trunks that you see on those big goldwing motorcycles. Add a subwoofer to your soundsystem for full effect. If you need a canti tank, I have a non Schwinn metal one in ex. shape I will sell for $30 +ship. Email if interested and good luck!




Subject: Trike
Entered on: Mar 30, 1998 17:12
Entered by: Dave (dqami@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hi Jim, if you are handy at woodowork, how about building a trunk out of oak plywood with a high gloss varathane finish, like on a Criscraft boat? Or if you are not, maybe look for one of those trunks that you see on those big goldwing motorcycles. Add a subwoofer to your soundsystem for full effect. If you need a canti tank, I have a non Schwinn metal one in ex. shape I will sell for $30 +ship. Email if interested and good luck!




Subject: 3-wheeler
Entered on: Mar 31, 1998 10:18
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
I love it. You might want to go with s-2 rims rather than s-7, more variety. I built a stake bed for the back of mine, with ATB tires, it looks pretty cool. Definately go with black, it makes the chrome look that much better. Send me a picture when it's done, I'd love to see it. greg




Subject: TRI-WHEELER
Entered on: Mar 31, 1998 13:59
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
My freind has a custom tri wheeler and he has an ice box on the back and he was talking about making it an ice cream three wheeler. You think about it, it would probably work prety good hook up a little batt. with a horn??????????




Subject: Steak bed
Entered on: Mar 31, 1998 14:01
Entered by: Jim ()

Message:
Whats a Steak bed?




Subject: STAKE bed
Entered on: Mar 31, 1998 15:57
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
Linke a pick-up bed, but instead of the sides being solid, they are made of wooden stakes. Kind of like the sides on dodge's little red truck (circa '78?). I'll have to get a picture and post it somewheres.




Subject: Stake bed
Entered on: Apr 1, 1998 13:57
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Hey Greg, That STAKE BED sounds prety dam cool you mind if I use your idea??




Subject: Stake bed
Entered on: Apr 1, 1998 13:58
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Hey Greg, That STAKE BED sounds prety dam cool!! you mind if I use your idea??




Subject: STAKE BED
Entered on: Apr 1, 1998 14:01
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Hey Greg, That STAKE BED sounds prety dam cool!! You mind if i use your idea??




Subject: STAKE BED
Entered on: Apr 1, 1998 14:02
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Hey Greg, That STAKE BED sounds prety darn cool!! You mind if i use your idea??




Subject: Sorry
Entered on: Apr 1, 1998 17:49
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Sorry About that




Subject: Stake bed
Entered on: Apr 2, 1998 12:45
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
Not at all, I have to warn you, when you start adding plywood to a bike, the weight goes up considerably. I used a small sheet of 3/4" for the floor, 2 X 2's for the uprights and 1 X 4's for the slats. The other problem I ran into was a support for the "bed". I bought a couple of wrought iron shlef brackets, they're a pice of metal welded to look like a "L" with a wrought iron "S" welded to the inside of the "L", and attatched them to the rear axle with u-bolts. I thought it came out looking pretty nice. I did this project before the onslaught of "lowriders" so I don't know if there is anything available that might be better suited for this pupose.




Subject: Stake bed
Entered on: Apr 2, 1998 17:55
Entered by: jim (oli@seattleu.edu)

Message:
I like the sound of a stake bed. I think tongue and groove 1/2" thick wood with one by one supports underneath would be attractive, functional and light. Because of the frame configuration where the basket goes there will be a space between the frame and bed. I'm thinking that this 4"+ deep area would be nice for storage. Perhaps the bed, or a portion of it can be hinged to allow sort of a trunk that can be locked. I like Dave's idea of a high gloss varathane finish. Maybe a subwoofer would fit nicely under the bed with some room to spare. Dave, I'll write you back about the canti tank later. I'm kind of busy and very broke.




Subject: Stake bed
Entered on: Apr 3, 1998 14:05
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Im trying to decide weather i should use the stake bed to make a trailor for my lowrider or my 24" three wheeler. I have a huffy three wheeler thats a little different than schwinn three wheelers and there would be ALOT!! of math involved witch Im no good at




Subject: 3-wheeler
Entered on: Apr 6, 1998 15:02
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
The reason why I was able to do this "conversion" was that the three-wheeler wasn't completely schwinn. The frame is an old breeze (was 24" inch, now 26"). But the axle is from a company that I never heard of that apparently made a kit that bolted to the back of a bike. All thats there is an axle. The schwinns had this frame for a drop in basket that's thankfully missing from mine. I would have been hard pressed to cut the frame on any bike in decent shape. (




Subject: Relaced Wheel
Entered on: Apr 15, 1998 13:12
Entered by: Dave (dqami@hotmail.com)

Message:
I've got a Sturmey 3 speed coaster which I am going to adapt to my 20" straightbar cruiser. I picked up a 36 hole rim at the swap meet and will have the Sturmey laced for the rim. Any idea what a fair price is to do this? Can the old spokes be reused or is it easier to use new ones? Thanks.




Subject: re: Relaced Wheel
Entered on: Apr 16, 1998 17:43
Entered by: greg (ggroth9@xsite.net)

Message:
I would definately get new spokes. I would also reccomend using stainless steel over zinc plated. It may cost a little more, but will be worth it five years from now when they still shine. As far as prices I would imagine you will spend in the area of 30 to 40 bucks on labor and 20 bucks on the spokes.




Subject: Rex's Custom Lo-rider
Entered on: Apr 18, 1998 20:32
Entered by: Scott (Rex1982@aol.com)

Message:
I am in the process of customizing an older girls bike. I got the bike for free, and in pretty good shape, but I wasn't satisfied with it. I couldn't just ride around on with all the original parts, so I started around my neighborhood and then my junkyard for parts I could use. I kept the original handlebars and grips, banana seat, chain, body, fork, and other smaller parts. The back rim had some damage, so I traded both rims for those plastic four spoke type rims. The bike still had the original whitewall tires, and they were dryrotted so those were changed for used tires my friends had. the pedals were starting to look bad too, so I changed them for newer ones. I kept the mud-gaurds that were on there too. Then I decided that I did not want the purple-white paint job so I painted the bike and seat with black paint. Amazingly, I converted an O.K. bike into an awesome bike without spending more than $30 so far. I dont mind that the frame is still a girls style, because the bike now has an all-man feel and overall appearance.




Subject: Rexs' Custom
Entered on: Apr 20, 1998 10:54
Entered by: Dave ()

Message:
Sounds like a nice ride, Rex. Just my observation, but I think it's more a male ego thing that causes the problem b/w a boys vs. girls frame bike. But, seems to me, you would get more comments/looks from the females, which in my book, is definately a plus since I don't look like Tom Cruise or Leonardo. Any you females out there like to comment on this theory?




Subject:
Entered on: Apr 20, 1998 15:54
Entered by: Schwinn MAN ()

Message:
Ohh No rex your in for it now!!!!!!! HA HA




Subject: Sidecars-The Other 3-Wheeled Meat
Entered on: Apr 28, 1998 09:13
Entered by: Jim W. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
Nice to see so much trike activity. I've been thinking maybe it's time to get into building Kustom sidecar rigs. Still bike- based, so kinda cheap, but more possibilities for cool bodywork. Anybody wanna see some of my stuff? Click on: http://www.reed.edu/~karl/chunk/meet/outside/index.html http://www.lovelylowrider.com/ClubMembers.html http://www.stevproj.com/BBBPage2.html




Subject: Did you build that one?? - WOW!
Entered on: Apr 29, 1998 08:58
Entered by: Matt ()

Message:
Jim, did you build that gold one with the covered fenders et al? That is Sooo Coool! How did you di it?




Subject: Specialized Kustom
Entered on: Apr 30, 1998 08:54
Entered by: Jim W. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
Matt, No, that's a Specialized Kustom. I sent the picture to Lovely Lowrider, with a suggestion that they add a link to the Specialized design page. I'm embarrassed that they way they just stuck it out there with no explanation leads to confusion. The chrome hot-rod on the same page is mine. I do have tricks for achieving that sort of swoopy bodywork fairly easily. It's the method I used for the CatBike on the Chunk 666 site. It uses foamcore, spandex, and fiberglass. I'll be putting up a page in a couple of months, in which I show how it's done. I love the Specialized Kustoms. Unfortunately, their current site redesign doesn't seem to have that page, although I may just have not looked in the right place. There's an article in the current MudSluts, covering Interbike'97. There are photos of 2 current Specialized Kustoms; check 'em out.




Subject: More Specialized
Entered on: Apr 30, 1998 11:11
Entered by: Jim W. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
I checked my floppy files and found about six photos I'd saved off the Specialized Design page while it was still up. Anyone who's interested can E-mail me directly, and I'll send a zipped bundle. For those unfamiliar with Specialized, they turn their designers loose to do one-off Kustoms. They use them in their show displays, such as at Interbike. It's a great idea, I'm surprised more bike mfgs. don't do it. It's an excellent way to keep designers happy.




Subject: Jim W. Custom
Entered on: May 3, 1998 12:32
Entered by: charlie (charlie@tuna.net)

Message:
Jim, in your technique for bodywork, (foamcore, spandex, fibergalss), do you make a skeletal grid of foamcore ( al la balsa wood glider), skin it with spandex, and use that as a form for the fiberglass? Or if not, would that work? What about resin in the spandex? Tell us your secrets. I'm trying to build a custom tank for my 24" musclebike. Hmmm, maybe a Habi-trail fairing, or a Sea Monkey tank! BTW, are you in NYC? I thought you mentioned that on the Chunk site. I'd love to see the cat - car in service. Very cool work!




Subject: Jim W. Custom
Entered on: May 6, 1998 15:46
Entered by: Jim W. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
It's not exactly a skeleton, as foamcore's not that strong in skinny sections. It's glued together in flat sections which define the main contours. If a curved flat section is needed, it's achieved my making slits through one of the paper layers, into the foam core. The foamcore can then be bent away from the slit side. The spandex will cover the resulting gaps, and will form a minimal-surface compound-curved membrane between other edges. Once the form looks the way you like, the spandex is saturated with epoxy resin. This gives a rigid surface that can be reinforced with further layers of fiberglass cloth. That's the process as used for the CatBike. Lately, I've been working with a new Dupont material, called Wearforce (TM), which is a combination of spandex and kevlar. In most cases, it needs no reinforcement, as it's nearly indestructible. I'm currently exploring the process with the new material, in conjunction with Dupont. I'm working on a book on Minimal-surface composites; one chapter of which will be about making a full-frame Wearforce/Epoxy shroud on a bike. In a month or so, I'll have a web page up, which fully depicts making the CatBike, with lots of photos. All will be revealed.




Subject: Wearforce/catbike
Entered on: May 7, 1998 10:32
Entered by: Charlie (charlie@tuna.net)

Message:
Whoa. That is so cool. Is That wearforce a commercial product? Where can I get it?




Subject: Wearforce (TM)
Entered on: May 7, 1998 22:32
Entered by: Jim W. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
Here is the URL for Dupont's Wearforce (TM): http://www.dupont.com/wearforce/index.html Be aware, though, that they're not prepared to sell small quantities for composite construction applications. For that matter, the material itself isn't quite right for achieving the kind of surface finish required for automotive and bicycle. I've developed a workaround, and I'm providing input to Dupont as to product modification to make the process really simple. I'm preparing a couple of projects which will have slick surfaces; one of which will be a bike body. Once I have the project completed, and documented, I'll post that chapter. In the meantime, normal Lycra Spandex may be bought at fabric stores.




Subject: those bikes that you pedal sitting down
Entered on: May 15, 1998 23:46
Entered by: elaine ()

Message:
Has anybody seen bikes were you sit in a chair -like seat and you pedal with you feet in front of you




Subject:
Entered on: May 16, 1998 21:45
Entered by: me ()

Message:
yes




Subject: RE: those bikes that you pedal sitting down
Entered on: May 20, 1998 09:47
Entered by: kath ()

Message:
Yes, they are called "recumbents". --kath




Subject: Ultimate Roadstar
Entered on: May 30, 1998 01:31
Entered by: Weslee ()

Message:
Howdy From Oklahoma! I couldn't help but join in. My idea of the ultimate custom would be to take a 28x1 1/2" rod-brake roadstar, paint it a glossy black with gold and blue pinstripes(like on old Edison Phono's) Have a Sturmey 4-speed in the rear, dyno hub in the front, a cool bullet-style headlight, chrome accents every where, and to top it all off, the biggest saddle Brooks makes! Am I crazy or do I need to get a tweed suit? Any way, keep a ridin'




Subject: What other features could I use?
Entered on: Jun 2, 1998 17:45
Entered by: Buck ()

Message:
I have a customized (low-budget) 1971 Schwinn Varsity 27" 10-speed. It has a three-speed stick for the front derailleur, a Shimano Eagle on the back (with the protective arm included), an older cantilever brake (Weinmann 610), the original front wheel, orig. sprocket setup & guard, a Suntour front derailleur, 10-inch high rise handlebars, Shimano SIS indexed control lever for the rear, and it has a new coat of black lacquer. I am wondering what other add-ons I could install (provided that the parts are fairly inexpensive and easily attainable). I don't want to spend over $30 on the next few customizations.




Subject: It needs...
Entered on: Jun 3, 1998 09:07
Entered by: Marco ()

Message:
Put a banana seat on it! It'll fit your budget and will complete the (odd) look.




Subject: try this too!
Entered on: Jun 3, 1998 19:09
Entered by: Weslee ()

Message:
If you'r sticking a banana seat on it, you might be able to get a 26" (they'll work!) straight springer fork used. I've found them for less than a couple bucks locally. Now that would be a sight!




Subject: Seeking 24" wheel w. Sturmey Hub
Entered on: Jun 21, 1998 14:15
Entered by: JimW. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
I'm gearing up to build a couple of Kustom 24"s (a Hawthorne boy's and a Monark girl's. One will have a sidecar). I'm in the market for a couple of Sturmey 5-speed rears, preferably in clean shape. Anybody got some? My web site's up now:http://pw1.netcom.com/~wilsnetc/index.html Not much bike stuff yet, but I hope to post an article on spandex bodywork, after I get back from CA, in about a month.




Subject: Custom Bike
Entered on: Jul 4, 1998 23:47
Entered by: Cucharras martin (Cucharra@swbell.net)

Message:
I'm extremely new to this. Does anyone have any information on a Japaneses Bike Takara?




Subject: Custom Bike
Entered on: Jul 4, 1998 23:51
Entered by: Cucharras (Cucharra@swbell.net)

Message:
I'm extremely new to this. Does anyone have any information on a Japanese Bike Takara?




Subject: Generic Muscle Bike Frames
Entered on: Jul 12, 1998 02:26
Entered by: Dan (Danny@1stnetusa.com)

Message:
Would anyone have any info on buying the repro muscle bike(lowriders) frames at a wholesale cost.




Subject: Information on Takara bicycles
Entered on: Jul 17, 1998 23:42
Entered by: Winchester (da_bomb_of_girard@yahoo.com)

Message:
I have seen a disassembled Takara bicycle up close. It has alloy cranks, Shimano Altus derailleurs, 27 X 1 1/4 rims, and it is one of the earliest that I know to require alan wrenches on some nuts, like the crank and the steering column. The paint is extremely good on the majority of Takaras; the disassembled one had set behind a friend's house for a few years (in direct sunlight), but the metallic brown was still very glossy, very rich in color. I think it's lacquer. Most Takara components will readily interchange with Schwinn parts w/o difficulty. The gearing is the same as that of the Schwinn: 52-tooth front high gear, 14 rear high. The nice thing about Takara bicycles is that their parts are more easily found than Schwinn parts, sometimes cheaper. I just wish that I could've had the one that was taken apart, because that would have been excellent racing material, perhaps even good on the market.




Subject: Need Ideas
Entered on: Jul 28, 1998 16:26
Entered by: Daryl (Cyd@Sherbtel.net)

Message:
I'm 24 and rediscovering the joy of bicycling(lost DL).First bike was a older sting-ray ,lost to car wreck.I lived,bike didn't.Recently I found a Raleigh Chopper in landlords shed.Ruff shape paint wore off most of rear, decals good.Seat 2 small tears,handelbars scrached,front wheel orig. but bald+flat, rear wheel/chaingard? no such creature,crank bent.My thoughtKUSTOME!Ditched stock fork for 26" w/20"wheel.$10 parts bike got me 20/2.125 rear (+sissybar, bannaseat, highbars)$4 for a new chain.Crank from 10 spd (top gear only).Looks TUFF.Goes like a raped ape.Want girter front and decal set, NEEDS repaint!Visiting local used/junk bike guy I bought old WARDS 3 wheel bike.Added 26" fork w/ the narrowest wheel/tire I could find (hows 1/2 inch) bannaseat and TALL sissy bar.Did they come w/ posie traction? Mine dose.Where do you buy wheeliebars. Need them(ouch*&^%$#!)!Iplan to lower seat and put it back above axle Send me pictures of chopper trikes




Subject: Mountain Trike
Entered on: Jul 28, 1998 17:36
Entered by: Daryl Jungroth (Cyd@Sherbtel.net)

Message:
I'm new w/ computers too.This is the first site I've explored.Two thumbs up! I'm starting a hunting and camping store. If someone will buy them I would like to build custom bikes.I plan to display my rides. if someone likes them I'd be happy to build one.I need catalogs,(customes& moutian bikes).Store should be open sometime in August.Sugestions & coments welcome! SHOOT IT AGIAN SPORTS,Elk River MN (612)241-1928(home office) Thanks




Subject: Mountain Hot Rod
Entered on: Jul 29, 1998 23:54
Entered by: Jim W. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
I guess the MTB craze has reached saturation point. I was riding to work during my recent trip to Santa Monica, on a borrowed 10-speed. Passed a yard sale, and spotted a bike out of the corner of my eye. Did a 360 and went back to look. It was a Jap Sintesi 15-speed MTB, minus handlebars. The price was $20, with a spare set of wheels. I've never bought into the MTB thing, but it was too good to pass up. Naturally, I'm going to build it into a hot rod. Anybody know if there's such a thing as a 26" slik? If not, I'll mount a 2.125" street-tread blackwall on the rear. Front will be 26 X 1 3/8", maybe with a lightweight fork. I plan on using an MTB handlebar with 5" rise. I'm leaning toward a banana saddle with 48" sissi bar. Seriously considering a spandex membrane filling the front triangle, with fitted niches for a complete tool set with a lockable hinged transparent lexan cover. Paint will be blue metalflake, with matching saddle upholstery. I'm toying with the idea of a pair of stick-shifters mounted on the top tube, to control the front and rear derailleurs. Never tried that before, but I suppose it'll work. Any input on the feasibility of the shifter idea?




Subject: Custom Head Badges
Entered on: Jul 30, 1998 02:02
Entered by: Jim W. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
Once you've customized a bike, it's no longer a Schwinn, or whatever, it's a (your name here). Why not have a custom head badge to announce it? Photo-engraving can be done inexpensively from your artwork. Modern photo-engraving is etched out of magnesium stock, which is available in thicknesses from 1/16 to 1/4". Magnesium may be polished to a chrome-like shine, and the low areas may be filled with paint. An example of the process may be seen on the bike page of my web site: http://pw1.netcom.com/~wilsnetc/index.html I use Esquire Photo Engraving, here in NYC, but the service may be found in most cities. Cost of a typical head badge-sized engraving on thin stock would probably run about $10. An important thing to remember: when you hand them your artwork, be sure to tell them that you want the engraving to be "right-reading", as the usual application (foil-stamping, etc.)is backwards.




Subject:
Entered on: Aug 13, 1998 17:15
Entered by: Charlie (shaggz3762)

Message:
I REALLY WOULD LIKE TO BULD A LOW RIDER BUT I DON'T KNOW HOW AND WHERE TO START SO PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!




Subject: Lowrider Info
Entered on: Aug 17, 1998 11:56
Entered by: JimW. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
Charlie, and all others who've asked the same question. There is a magazine called Lowrider Bicycle. Their website is not currently up; but their address is PO box# 648, Walnut Creek, CA91788-0648. Get a subscription, if you can't find the mag at your local newsstand. It gives articles on building them. They have the kind of info that can't be conveyed in a discussion list. Good luck.




Subject: sears and roebuck 3 wheeler
Entered on: Aug 28, 1998 09:31
Entered by: james (Jamessn2aol.com)

Message:
i found a sears and roebuck 3 wheel bike for 10.00 and want to find out what it might be worth and how longs it been since sears has made them please e mail me if you have ideas thanks




Subject: sears and roebuck 3 wheeler
Entered on: Aug 28, 1998 09:37
Entered by: james (jamessn@aol.com)

Message:
i found a sears and roebuck 3 wheel bike for 10.00 and want to find out what it might be worth and how longs it been since sears has made them please e mail me if you have ideas thanks oh its also a fhree speed




Subject: Sears 3-Wheeler
Entered on: Aug 29, 1998 00:50
Entered by: JimW. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
James, You could probably easily double your investment if you sell it now. Or, you could put some work and creativity into it, and it'd be worth about a million bucks (at least to yourself). It's not some kind of priceless collectible-customize the sucker :-) I saw a TV commercial recently, featuring a kid pedalling a 3-wheeler with a little sidecar mounted where the basket normally goes. It was probably built by a film model-maker(like me). The kid's dog was riding in the sidecar. It was really cute. That would be an excellent use for your trike; fun to build, also.




Subject: problems
Entered on: Sep 6, 1998 21:26
Entered by: cody (cody315)

Message:
I WANT TO BUILD A MUSCLE BIKE BUT I DONT KNOW HOWI WHANT TO NOW YOUR IDEAS OR ANY HELP I KNOW I WHANT A 69 STING-RAY FRAME AND 140 SPOKE WHEELS SO PLEASE HELP ME!




Subject: Problems
Entered on: Sep 6, 1998 22:52
Entered by: JimW. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
Cody etc, Menoteny can supply you with probably everything you need in the muscle bike line. Vin isn't known as "Mr. MuscleBike" for nothing. Menoteny's links page also has sources for parts. 140-spoke wheels can probably be found at www://http.hiwheel.com Lowrider bikes and musclebikes are pretty much made up of the same components, including the frames. The biggest difference is that Lowriders are considerably more baroque in their detailing and posture. I get most of my musclebike parts through Menoteny or RBR (hiwheel). Have fun!




Subject: Nexus 7 speed Hub
Entered on: Sep 8, 1998 23:37
Entered by: Fred (redl944@aol.com)

Message:
I wrote a message sometime back about my project to upgrade my custom 3 speed cruiser to a 7 speed by installing a Nexus hub. The frame mods were easily accomplished using a spreader I made. Building the new wheel was also fairly easy as was installing the hub and shifter. The onl;y sticky part was attaching the shift cable to the hub pulley. They really should redesign that area. You need tiny fingers and 3 hands. Now came the test ride. 4 out of the 7 gears did not work properly. I went over every thing very carefully and even went to a shop and looked at a new bike with the same hub. I concluded that I did every thing right but the hub was defective. I sent it off to Shimano for warrenty repair and after 3 weeks learned that they did not receive the package-they said. A check on the internet yielded a copy of the shipping report which stated the time and date received and a signiture. ! week after faxing the shipping report I still have no word of the status. A call resulted in the interminable on hold situation. In spite of all this I would not hesitate to recommend the project. I think I just had bad luck. I will report again when I get the hub and have a working bike again.




Subject: Bad Shimano Nexus hubs
Entered on: Sep 9, 1998 09:17
Entered by: BikeTuna ()

Message:
We've sent a few back, too, though they never claimed they didn't receive ours. Shimano is usually pretty good and pretty quick about resolving problems. But maybe that's 'cause we're a fairly big shop down here in the panhandle. If you're a little guy, maybe Shimano don't care so much. Once you do get a good hub from Shimano, who's gonna pay you for your time when you re-lace it????




Subject: Nexus 7 speed Hub
Entered on: Sep 9, 1998 22:17
Entered by: JimW. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
Fred, Did you document the modifications to your bike with photographs? I'm gearing-up to launch a site called "BikeRod&Kustom. It would be great to have an illustrated piece on this particular subject. Lots of people, including myself, would like to see what goes into this mod. Everyone else: when you do something out of the ordinary, do yourself, and all of us, a favor; document it, then share it. Thanks.




Subject: Nexus hub project
Entered on: Sep 10, 1998 21:37
Entered by: Fred (redl944@aol.com)

Message:
Jim W. & Bike Tuna et. al.: I may be the victim of some big bike show coming up. Seems as if everyone is working hard getting ready for it. I called Shimano again today and they used that as an excuse. Still no status on my warranty situation. I am a privateer working on my own bikes so I will relace my wheel and call it fun. I like to build wheels but not the same one more than once. Also, I have 3 other wheels to build and am ready to paint the frame and forks for a 6 speed I am building. I don't have a photographic record of my project sad to say. I usually have the subject bike all apart before I think of it. To anxious to get on with it I suppose. I do take pictures of the final result though. I should add that these bikes I am building were thrown out and in bad shape for the most part. I have many bikes that I will leave shabby rather than destroy the original decals etc. On another subject-I was digging through a box of componentts I had stripped from discarded bikes and found a nice old Shimano push-pull derallier operated by a simple twist grip shifter. Now I'm trying to think of a trick application for it. I have another item similar to it but it is an early index system. Can't remember what make and the bike has no identification on it. I don't know why that type of shifter is not used more often. I am not impressed with having to work against a spring to shift gears.




Subject: Twist-Grip Shifters
Entered on: Sep 12, 1998 17:01
Entered by: JimW. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
I've been wondering about the same thing, lately. I'm gearing up to do a radical makeover on a 15-speed MTB with an incomplet thumblever shifter for one of the derailleurs. I was wondering about going to a twist-grip shifter for the rear. Does anybody know if this would work in this application. This would make for a nice piece for BikeRod&Kustom. Pictures would be nice, too. (Big Hint).




Subject: custom lowrider chopper
Entered on: Sep 13, 1998 23:30
Entered by: melissa ()

Message:
I have a chopper that I custom made. It has 32" front forks and an extreme rake to the frame. Its pretty killer. I might be intrested in selling it, but only to the right person. Anybody else out there with a similar bike?




Subject: custom lowrider chopper
Entered on: Sep 13, 1998 23:37
Entered by: melissa ()

Message:
I have a chopper that I custom made. It has 32" front forks and an extreme rake to the frame. Its pretty killer. I might be intrested in selling it, but only to the right person. Anybody else out there with a similar bike?




Subject: custom lowrider chopper in hawaii
Entered on: Sep 13, 1998 23:50
Entered by: MICHELLE ()

Message:
I made a chopper a few years ago and I live in Hawaii. The fad of lowrider bikes kinda went out for now so my bike is just sitting. Its been in a few shows and has placed only once. The color is berry red metallic with gold, red, and blue pearl, and gold flake. The front forks are 32 inches long with the Harley style gooseneck and also it has an extreme rake to the frame, which was extended 6 inches. It has ape hanger handlebars and bajitas tires with cool rims. I found the rims at the rubbish dump, and I don't know what kind they are, but, they are aluminum alloys with six spokes(kinda looks like star rims)and they are chrome plated to shine. It also has a custom made purple/magenta satin and velvet banana seat cover with 5 buttons. Its name is Violet Sunrise. I'd like to hear from someone who may be intrested in looking to buy it ...or atleast someone who may have another nice custom chopper. You can reach me at p.o.box 627 Volcano, HI 96785. Aloha!




Subject: Shifters, twist grip & otherwise
Entered on: Sep 14, 1998 19:57
Entered by: Fred (redl944@aol.com)

Message:
Jim w. et.al., I don't have much experience with twist grip shifters but I would think that any shifter with friction mode would work. I have gone to thumb shifters on several of my 10-12 speed road bikes and like them much better than stem or down tube shifters. I recently installed Shimano bar end shifters on my Fuji road bike and like them best of all. They are set in friction mode. The drawback is that they cost about $60. I have been told that there are other bar end shifters available but have no information on them. Anyone know of a source?




Subject: Bar End Shifter Source
Entered on: Sep 15, 1998 23:21
Entered by: JimW. (wilsnetc@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
J&B Importers has a pretty wide variety of them. Prices vary from $15 to over a hundred. Only drawback to J&B is you have to do a pretty good imitation of a retailer to order from them. Off-Topic: Since most of us still have decent weather going, this would be a good time to take good photos of your cool rides. BikeRod and Kustom is going to be launched on the web pretty soon. I'm working on the virtual trophy which will be awarded to the builders whose bikes make it into the gallery. It should be a really nice showplace. I've also been working on the FAQ for the site. I'm adding it to this post, for possible input by members of this list. All suggestions are welcome. Jim BikeRod&Kustom FAQ What is a BikeRod; what is a KustomBike A BikeRod is a bicycle which as been mechanically modified by its owner, to more fully perform a desired function. This function may not be necessarily related to higher performance. Some people are fascinated by machinery, to the extent that they want to play with it, and modify it to suit their own machine esthetic. This mechanical personalization is the core of the BikeRod. Another aspect of the BikeRod esthetic is a desire for perfection in construction and finish. A KustomBike is more conceptual, in a way. The Kustom builder is making an artistic statement, with sculptural and/or graphic media, grafted on to the machine esthetic. Mechanically, the bike is functional; but the true emphasis is heavily weighted toward the visual impact of the concept. A Kustom is more of a fun thing to the builder. Part of the fun, though, is in achieving the perfection of construction and finish equally prized by the BikeRodder. An absolutely flawless, interesting paint job requires serious dedication to achieve. Functionally, the powder-coat finish on a modern, out- of the box bike is far superior to mere paint. When you see a modern bike with a Kustom paint job, you are looking at serious art. How do Lowrider Bikes fit into this thing? We consider Lowrider Bikes to be an art form, albeit a type of beautifully-executed folk sculpture. At the extreme level of the show circuit, they are virtually non-functional pieces, built around the theme of the bicycle. They're fun to look at, and the builders are to be congratulated on their attention to detail and conception of theme. However there are many sites out there dedicated to this type of bike art, so there will not be much of a Lowrider presence in the pictorial choices of this one. That isn't chiselled in stone, however, but is merely an editorial direction. A killer ride is a killer ride, to a true bikehead. Send pictures. If it's really great, it will be shown, no matter what category it falls into. How do I get into this thing? Easy; you just get your hands on a bicycle. Then you take it apart and put it back together again. Once you have it apart, you may wish to replace a few worn or unsightly parts. As long as you have it apart, you might as well paint the thing. It's almost impossible to give a bike a nice paint job while it's all together, so the disassembly is half of the process of beautification. During the reassembly, you may decide that it would look cooler or work better if you change some of the bits and pieces. When you finish, you will be the proud owner of a BikeRod or Kustom. It's about that simple. The best way to learn bicycle mechanics is to hang around with people who work on bikes. These people are usually found in bike shops, or in bike clubs. Cultivate that friendly, helpful bike-shop guy, or club sprockethead. To learn about painting, find a local body shop which will let you hang around and watch, perhaps in exchange for making yourself useful. You will be more likely to gain entrée if you have your own organic-vapor respirator mask. The type of paints used on cars and bikes give off toxic fumes, which will kill you if you breathe enough of it. I've got a cool bike, how do I get its picture on BikeRod&Kustom? E-mail it here; if it's cool enough, it'll be shown here. It helps to have a good photograph. I find that a 4X6 color print from a decent 35mm camera, when scanned, will make for a good image on a web page. Various views are useful, and may help insure that one photo makes the cut. I'm about to start building a bike; should I take pictures while I'm doing it? Sure thing, especially if part of the process would be of interest to the kind of people interested In this type of thing. Anyone is invited to submit an article to BR&K. You won't be paid for its use on the web page, but you will retain copyright of the material for all other applications. If unsure about the potential of the subject, submit an E-mail here describing the subject. You will be given a Go/No Go answer. Here are some things that would be interesting: tools and methods you use, reviews of specific parts and parts suppliers, just about anything of interest to the non-stock bike fancier. Will I get answers, if I send in questions? Yes. Q&A will be continuously updated. If your editor can't answer a given question, it will be referred to someone who can. There may well be many answers to one question, very much like life itself. In the words of H.BikeRod Bitchin', "Sometimes, it takes a village to build a bike". You are invited to add your answers, as well. I would like to buy or sell a BikeRod or KustomBike, will BR&K run my ad? Yes, but only for complete, one-off bikes. Other sites and newsgroups are set up for buyers and sellers of stock bikes and bike parts; use them for that purpose. For-sale ads must be accompanied by a photograph of the bike and an E-mail address for the seller. Want-to-buy listings must have an E-mail address for the potential buyer. This site is not a brokerage, and will not be part of any transactions. I'm an auto painter looking for moonlighting work on bikes, can I be listed? And what about my brother-in-law, the welder? Skilled craftsmen looking for bicycle work are encouraged to be on our posted list. This site will make no assurances about anyone's work, and will not be part of any transaction. Our correspondents are encouraged to make recommendations, but this does not constitute an endorsement by BR&K itself. Caveat Emptor! Vendors of reproduction decals and the like are invited to be listed with restoration-oriented sites. We don't do stock here. There's a show circuit for Lowrider Bikes; is there anything like that for BikeRods And Kustoms? If there is, we don't know of it. Lowrider Bikes are sort of the youth auxiliary of Lowrider Car clubs. There is a show circuit for the cars, and the bikes are included. There is a Hot Rod and Kustom car circuit, but there doesn't seem to ber a bike auxiliary to that sort of car club. There probably should be, though. Most people who build their own cars are old enough to have offspring. Building one's own bike is a worthy endeavor for youth, and should be encouraged. If you know of a show that has a bicycle category, please inform BR&K, it will be listed. Starting your own club is one way of having a show to display your bike. Many cities have bike-related events, often in conjunction with parks departments. A Kustom bike show would be a good adjunct to any bike-fair sort of event. Ask around local bike clubs for a good idea of what's out there. Perhaps a local bike shop would be interested in sponsoring your club. BikeRodders certainly buy a lot of parts, so it's a natural connection. Many shops and suppliers offer club discounts; RBR (hiwheel.com) certainly does. So, the answer to the question is "not at the moment," but there will be if enough people want it to be. Is building your own bike very expensive? It depends on how much of the work you are willing or able to put into the project. It is possible to spend a great deal of money in building a bike. Or, you can do it cheaply and still end up with a cool ride. Painting and parts are the big expense, assuming you start out with a used bike. Anyone with patience and fortitude can develop painting and sanding skills; I have it on good authority that Harvard U. does not offer a degree in spray painting. Just get your hands on a bike and practice. Although bike parts can be expensive, you don't have to buy them all at once. Bikes are extremely modular. You can replace a less-than-perfect part later, allowing you to spread- out the overall expenditure. And you can ride it in the meantime. Compared to cars, though building your own bike is muy cheap; and the tools are a lot cheaper. How do I get my hands on the bike you've been telling me to get my hands on? Ideally, someone gives it to you, or you find it in the trash. If not, yard sales and thrift stores are next cheapest. Flea markets and swap meets are more expensive, as is the used bike area at a bike shop. Newspaper classifieds can be a good source of bargains. Winter is the best time to buy, so it pays to plan ahead. For this type of bike-building, almost any bike frame can be the basis for a project. In the stock-bike field, girl's bikes are less-desirable, and go for less money. For a KustomBike project, the wildly differing design solutions found on step-through frames can make the finished project much more interesting. The Bi in Bicycle means two wheels; is that a requirement of BikeRod&Kustom? No. Any number of wheels are fine, so long as the subject is still based on bicycle technology. If you combine a bicycle and some floatation to build a WaterBikeRod, it will be welcomed, so long as it's beautifully-made. Which would seem to let Kustom BikePlanes in, as well. We'd love to see some KustomWheelchairs, also. Motorized bikes, if one-off designs, would be interesting, also. Sidecar bicycles have a lot of interest around here, too; Granny'd better start locking up her three-wheeler.




Subject: Solution to a problem
Entered on: Sep 18, 1998 22:55
Entered by: SchwinnMAN (schwinn_elcamino@mypad.com)

Message:
I found a way to make an easy pair of wheelie bars for a schwinn Three wheeler back end all you have to do is get a set of training wheels for a 20"24"16" wheel depending on what size wheels you have on your three wheeler now all you have to do is flip them around and put them on the inside of the rear end and there you go