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Discussion - English Roadsters

Archived discussions: July 17, 1997 through Sep. 17, 1997
Archived discussions: September 17, 1997 through Nov. 17, 1997
Archived discussions: Nov. 17, 1997 through March 19, 1998
Archived discussions: March 19, 1998 through June 8, 1998
Archived discussions: June 8, 1998 through August 8, 1998
Archived discussions: August 8, 1998 through October 28, 1998
Archived discussions: October 28, 1998 through January 5, 1999
Archived discussions: January 5, 1999 through March 27, 1999
Archived discussions: March 27, 1999 through June 30, 1999
Archived discussions: June 30, 1999 through July 27, 1999
Archived discussions: July 27, 1999 through September 9, 1999

Raleigh date codes based on serial number

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Messages:




Subject: re-leather saddles
Entered on: Sep 6, 1999 11:38
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
I have an old Brooks B-66 saddle that needs new leather. Does anyone have any idea where I can get a replacement? The hardware is in very good shape, and I'd like to re-use it. I had the thought of removing the leather from an older B-72, and using that, but I would rather not canabalize a good saddle if i can avoid it. Any help would be appreciated.




Subject: Height (or lack of)
Entered on: Sep 6, 1999 12:19
Entered by: Bob (vonomis@nep.net)

Message:
Paul M: I quite sympathise with your comments regarding frame size. Being only 5'7" myself, I took a 1960 Raleigh Gazelle and a 1962 Phillips and restored them for road use. They both have 26" wheels and curved top tube frames for easier (and less painful) traffic stops. I would have rather used a DL-1, but the top tube height is too high for comfort. My grandfather had a DL-1 which he used until he was 78 years old. Being the same height as myself, he showed remarkable coordination in mounting and dismounting. As Sheldon tells us in his website, for many years frames weren't sized, so shorter riders had to fend for themselves. Even though a DL-1 is preferable, a 26" wheel Robin Hood/Gazelle type might be easier to use, depending on your height. Good luck with it.




Subject: British luggage rack?
Entered on: Sep 6, 1999 12:36
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Yesterday I made the longest ride on my DL-1, a 62-odd mile round trip from Rio Vista to Freeport (just south of Sacramento). Although it was quite an adventure, my hands are still numb. I've realized that the main limitation of the DL-1 for long rides for me, is the inability to adjust the rake of the handlebars--they need to slope down quite a bit so that the pressure on my palms will be evenly distributed. I'll plan to get a Sports for the longer rides, and save the DL-1 for errands into town. To this end, I'd like to put a luggage rack on the back. I never was too impressed with the pressed-steel racks that I've seen on British 3-speeds, and would like to braze up a nice rack out of stainless steel tubing. Is there such a thing as a traditional British luggage/pannier rack design? I've seen nice racks on a Rene' Herse touring bike, but as long as I'll be going through the effort, would like to do it "right" (Hey, man, what's that French rack doing on your DL-1?) :-)




Subject: Re-leather saddles--MARK
Entered on: Sep 6, 1999 13:25
Entered by: Kevin C. (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
I once recovered an early English saddle that was completely dried out and falling to pieces. I first took the old leather off, got it wet and flattened it out. It became the pattern I used to cut the new seat out of a piece of sole leather that I bought from a local shoe repair shop. The leather cost me $20 (not cheap) but it was first quality. After tracing the old pattern, I cut the thick leather with a hook-shaped blade (notched, really) that goes into a Stanley knife and is made for cutting linoleum. I didn't have a way to put crimped rivets in so I used bicycle fender-brace bolts that look identical from the outside, but have a nut underneath. Split rivets also would work. After the leather was on the seat, I soaked it in rubbing alcohol and went for a ride on the wet seat. It moulded into shape surprisingly well and I was able to retain a 60-70 year-old seat and the interesting frame and springs that add so much to the look of the bicycle. This may not be the best way to do it but it worked real well for me. Kevin C.




Subject: AW dating clue
Entered on: Sep 6, 1999 13:31
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
The 1954 S-A parts manual says that in 1940, they changed from a square axle key to a round one. I just pulled apart my two earlist AW's (both without date codes, and marked "PATENT APPLIED FOR" and "PATENT") and, alas, both have round axle keys, although both have the eight splines inside the gear ring. The "PATENT APPLIED FOR" hub does have a "0" or "O" stamped inside the triangle next to the "AW", so I can fondly hope this is a 1940 hub made just after the axle key change (or that it is an earlier hub that has had a newer axle and key retrofitted during a servicing or repair).




Subject: Kevin's saddle idea
Entered on: Sep 6, 1999 15:01
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Kevin, A great idea! And we have a place around here where I can get some good leather! Gonna try it, thanks!




Subject: Re: re-leather saddles
Entered on: Sep 7, 1999 01:38
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Mark, I was once tempted to do a B72 to B66 leather transplant myself, but on closer observation, the rivet placement was different.




Subject: Re: British luggage rack?
Entered on: Sep 7, 1999 01:42
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (meagain@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Randy asked: "Is there such a thing as a traditional British luggage/pannier rack design?" Generally, no, though Claud Butler did make some sporty ones. In the three-speed era, the usual British approach was to use a "touring bag" that attached to the loops at the back of the saddle. Some of these were quite large. Brooks used to make a skillion models of 'em, but the only manufacturer still at it now is Carradice.




Subject: Lack of height
Entered on: Sep 7, 1999 08:34
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
Oops! My sixteen year old son discovered what a great bike my DL-1 is. He thought it was cool with its rod brakes and being English and all. He wasn't even bothered by the step through frame. I hope I won't have to hide it! On lack of height the only thing I can figure is that in the old days if one could straddle a DL-1 one could then be an officer, policeman or in the air corps.




Subject: Rites of Passage
Entered on: Sep 7, 1999 10:11
Entered by: phil (phil.renner@snet.net)

Message:
Several times this summer I've asked both my 10 year old daughter and eight year old son if they'd like to try one of my "old" bikes. Finally yesterday they said OK. My daughter indicated she'd try a 66 Schwinn (sorry) Breeze (she said no to the 62 Raleigh step through) and off she went. My son, who is much shorter, needed help getting up on small frame 63 Raleigh Sports. He couldn't quite keep his feet on the pedals at the bottom of the stroke, but he managed to get up and down the driveway. I remembered to him that when I was young, I used to have to find a curb or a large rock to start off and stop. He loved it.




Subject: height problem
Entered on: Sep 7, 1999 12:41
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
perhaps you could use kiddie cranks from a tandem if your rod-braker has a really tall frame. It would sure beat riding under the top tube like the kids mentioned in Columbia earlier.




Subject: CCM Monster
Entered on: Sep 7, 1999 14:14
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
While traveling over the holiday weekend I came across an odd 3-speed: a Canadian-made "CCM." It was like a monster hybrid of a Schwinn and a Raleigh. The frame is lugged, sort of. The head tube is one piece with lugs for the top and down tubes. The bottom bracket shell is lugged, but it's the oversize American style. The seat stays bolt at the top using the seatpost binder, like a DL-1, and are pinned at the dropouts, like my Forever. The chainring is a lovely "CCM" cutout pattern, but the cranks are one-piece American style. The rear hub is a SA AW, date stamped 1967. The shifter is the real kicker -- a long, knob-ended Schwinn Orange Krate-style thing that looks like it belongs in a 60s muscle car. Beautiful big heavy-gauge chromed chain guard that's strong enough to stand on. Not a very attractive bike overall, but interesting how it picked up elements of both English and U.S. made bikes of the period. Anyone else come across these? No, I didn't buy it.




Subject: Robin Hood 3 speed in Chrome??
Entered on: Sep 7, 1999 23:11
Entered by: Tony (marchitto.slotcars@myna.com)

Message:
I have a Mens 26" Robin Hood bicycle in All Chrome frame,chain guard and fenders?? 3 speed Sturmey Archer stick shifter mounted on the top frame like the old Schwinn muscle bikes. The hub is dated "67" in Excellent condition. Does anyone know of approximate value? any info would be Very appreciated.




Subject: re: CCM
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 00:11
Entered by: Ernie at Bikes on Boundary (bikesbdy@bc.sympatico.ca)

Message:
Keith: I come across C.C.M's all the time as they are quite common around here in British Columbia. The shifter on the bike kyou saw, myk guess is, it's aftermarket as all the ones I have seen had the usual Sturmey trigger shifter. Perhaps it came from a CCM "Mustang". They are a sort of Schwinn style kids bike made in the 60's-70's.




Subject: Brake Performance
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 10:42
Entered by: Steve (hodgess@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
Would anyone like to comment on the performance of rod brakes vs. cable/caliper? I'm considering purchasing a bike w/ the former, but I'd like to know if these brakes are going to stop sufficiently. I'm not going to be bombing through traffic, but I may hook up my daughter's bicycle trailer, and I certainly need some control over that!




Subject: Rod-Operated Stirrup Brakes
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 11:06
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Steve has raised a very important question that deserves an absolutely unflichingly honest answer. In my opinion, rod brakes are not mechanically capable of providing the stopping power of good calipers. I've hauled both of my children on a Trail-a-Bike, and would never hitch it to my DL-1 or Forever. That being said, however, there are a number of true experts in this group who talk about adjusting rod brakes to obtain "maximum mechanical advantage." Randy, Clarence, and the rest, how do you weigh in on this?




Subject: Wheel-Building booklet online!
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 13:17
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
I'm pleased to announce that the Raleigh Wheel-Building Instructions transcription is online, along with the spoke chart. I received permission from Raleigh this morning. It's on my website at http://www.rickadee.net/~zephyrus . In the interim, I've reformatted it a little to more accurately reflect the "look and feel" of the original. Enjoy!




Subject: Rod brakes
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 15:14
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Now I'm at the top of the list of "true experts". That'll larn me to open my mouth too often... :-) :-) For me, the key to adjusting the rod brakes is symmetry. Unlike caliper brakes, the rod brakes have no self-centering capability, so their performance is entirely dependent on careful setup. The stirrups themselves are flexible laterally, so the stirrup guides are a key part of the system. As you apply the brakes, the stirrup guide rods ramp the brake pads inwards. Adjust the stirrup guides so that they position the brake pads far enough inboards so that they contact the "flat" part of the braking surface. Make sure that the stirrups themselves are not twisted (take the brake tube nut and bolt and brake shoes off and put the stirrup on a flat surface to check), or the brake pads will be skewed as they touch the rim. If the pads are already worn unevenly, don't be afraid to trim a little off one pad so they both hit at the same time. Otherwise, you'll only flex the rim to the side and not get good braking at all. The pull of the rods must also be as symmetrical as possible with respect to the pivots--the best leverage is when a line through the pivot and rod anchor screw is at right angles to the rod itself. Take the slack out of the system--the brake pads should be almost touching the rims before you apply the brakes. Put a drop of oil on all the contact points-- pivots of bellcranks, levers and rod ends and the stirrup guide rods. As the last step in the adjustment, I loosen the brake pad mounting nuts a little, apply the brakes, and tighten the nuts carefully while the pads are in contact with the rim. On later bikes, the front brake pads are offset from the stirrup by a roughly triangular metal plate. This (I've just learned from a photocopy of an old Raleigh trading card) anti-vibration plate was a Raleigh patent, and should be placed so that the pads are behind the stirrup (as has been mentioned here before). The brake pads will actually overlap the fork blades, but the friction of the pad against the rim will actually tend to force it tighter against the rim. That's all I can think of right now. I'll mention again that I've placed a scan of the rod brake page from a 1970's Raleigh bike manual on my DL-1 page at http://www.rickadee.net/~zephyrus. Now I'll shut up and let the real experts speak. :-)




Subject: Comments on tall bikes and alchohol
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 15:56
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
To Paul M., Bob & Sheldon: I found your comments on tall bikes and vertically challenged people interesting. When I was 12 I had a tall Victory bike whose top bar came to my waist. I don't remember being unduly hindered by the disparity in our heights but I was known to assume some interesting positions while pedaling. My crowd would often pedal as Sheldon described i.e., with one leg through the triangle. We also doubled up with one person on each side. That made for some interesting responses from onlookers seeing two kids popping up and down on a bike. To Kevin: I marvel at the use of alchohol anywhere near one's nether region. In my mis=guided youth I once applied some to that area and was in mortal agony for some time. And thanks for sending the pumps although I have not seen them due to being closer to you than the pumps.




Subject: Rod Brakes
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 16:29
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
The stopping power of reasonably well set up rod brakes should be more than enough for almost any situation. My DL-1 stops just fine even on hills. My Forever stops very well, comparable to caliper brakes( the regular steel ones on Raleigh "Sports" and such, not those modern ones found on Road racing bikes, you could stop a car with those!!)However, the rear rod brakes on the Indian bikes like the Roadmaster can be down right dangerous! There is insufficient leverage from the lever caused by BAD placement of the rod anchor on the cam. I found them to be awful! I wouldn't hesitate to pull my kids around behind my DL-1 though, of course not flying down hills, none of these bikes was designed for that use anyway.




Subject: Rod Brakes
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 16:40
Entered by: Steve (hodgess@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
Thanks for the feedback re: rod brakes. No doubt an arcane subject, but a valuable one for those of us who prefer effective brakes. I guess it wasn't liability suits that put Raleigh et al. out of the business of rod brake bikes (was it the CSPC?). The point on hauling children, our most precious cargo, is well taken. However, I don't think anybody's kids are going to be flying down any hill on any bike trailer behind momma or dadda anytime soon! (Reminds me of a certain hill in a small Texas town I used to roll down as a kid in the classic red wagon. Looking back on it, it was no doubt extraordinarily dangerous--if you lost control of the steering, you could find yourself flung out of the wagon and onto the tarmac sans helmet and leathers. Just try explaining THAT to your mom!)




Subject: Re: British luggage rack?
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 17:07
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Thanks for the reply, Sheldon. I fairly wore out a big Brooks saddle bag in my Hercules days, and still have the clip-on bag support that clips on the seatstays. I even brought a kitten home once in it. But there were times I wished for a "real" rack to strap big things on. I'll try to find a picture of a Claud Butler rack.




Subject: Rod Brakes
Entered on: Sep 8, 1999 22:06
Entered by: Paul R. (britbikes@mailexcite.com)

Message:
Steve, I haul my kids around the the neihborhood in a bike trailer behind my DL-1 at a pretty casual pace and feel that the stopping power is very adequate. You will find that the typical clamp on attach fitting on wal-mart quality bike trailers are not an ideal fit on the thick DL-1 chainstay. I think well adjusted rod brakes are about as effective as typical Raleigh sidepulls. Before I had my first rod braked bike I thought that they would be real tire screachers with the rod actuation eliminating cable stretch along with overall beefy construction. I have yet to obtain this tire screaching performance but I have achieved vast improvements with careful adjustment and new brake pads(once bedded in). I agree with Randy's recomendation of loosening the pads and allowing them to align themselves with the rim before final tightening. What you are after is 100% contact for both pads, at the same time. It does appear that my 1964 Superbe with the dull finish (satin chrome?) rims stops a little better than my 1978 DL-1 with the shiney chrome rims.




Subject: Brakes
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 01:23
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Last year I bought a DL-1 and in the processs of cleaning it, I replaced the petrified original brake pads with a Taiwan replacement. I didn't spend a lot of time adjusting and the result is pretty weak stopping power. I intend to improve the adjustment but I don't think the pads I have will allow me to achieve good brakes. I have found that pad quality affects the stopping potential to a greater degree than does a perfect adjustment of an average quality pad. On my better road bikes I have found that I need to spend at least $10 a wheel to get brakes that will lock up with a good pull on the lever. I used Kool Stop Reds on my latest project bike which has aluminum rims. With proper adjustment, the flatness and material of the rim, and the quality of the pads all combine to make for excellent brakes.




Subject: Brakes
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 09:48
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
To exit my neighborhood I must ride down a short steep hill with a one-way stop sign at the very bottom. My rod brake pads engage at the same time as others have described above, but I would still not trust them completely in the condition I've just described while hauling a child. But, if you're NOT going to encounter that kind of condition, then yes, I suppose the stopping power is adequate. I also prefer calipers for heavy traffic riding. Imagine the driver side car door openning 20 feet directly in front of you while you're riding 12mph or so. Wanna be on your DL-1 for that one???!!! I truly love these bikes, and ride mine all the time, but I think we need to be frank about their limitations. I'd like to hear some response to this idea: I ride my rod-brake bikes with about the same caution I use riding a good road bike with wet rims, i.e., you give yourself more room to stop. Also, those of you who've perfected your rod brakes -- can you lock the wheel and skid to a stop? Mine won't do that. Most decent caliper brake-equiped bikes I have will if they're adjusted properly and I clamp down with enough force (especially if the rims are aluminum).




Subject: Brakes
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 10:17
Entered by: Steve (hodgess@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
It should be obvious that English 3-speed roadsters/sports bikes are not really high-performance bikes in the vein of what most LBS's stock these days. Although these are tough bikes, most people wouldn't normally use a balloon tire bomber (especially a classic) or lightweight 10-speed for mountain bike trails--a good mountain bike is a better choice, w/ its high BB, canti or other brakes, etc. (Of course, I used these kinds of bikes on all kinds of trails before MTBs became widespread!) Since rod brake bikes were largely used as working class bikes and commuters, their performance limitations were adequate. I think the gist of what's been posted is that rod brakes are adequate for casual riding, assuming they're carefully adjusted and the pads and rims are in good shape. As far as car doors go, I stay away from them even on dry days.




Subject: Brakes
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 11:31
Entered by: phil (phil.renner@snet.net)

Message:
I think we all agree that brakes need to be properly adjusted to be reasonably safe. The brakes on my bikes are fairly well adjusted, but not perfect. But I'm always aware of their limitations. A problem happens when a rider who is used to a current mountain or road bike jumps on one of our "antiques" for a spin. They need to be warned. Recenty my son (8), who is used to his mountain bike took out a little Hawthorne 24" with coaster brakes. Result: dent in bike's front fender and dent in grandmother's Volvo; son just fine.




Subject: One word for brakes-Aqua-Stops
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 12:12
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
That's right, Weimann Aqua stop shoes. I've been installing them on all my old caliper-equiped Raleigh's and Rudge's. Wet or dry they work very well. and, if you carefully prise out the rubber on rod brake shoes and work an Aqua-Stop shoe in things seem to change dramatically. Anyways, cheers!




Subject: Origonal Adams trail bike NIGHTMARE!!
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 12:15
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I paid $250.00 for an origonal Adams Trail Bike and after spending $25.00 more for an extra hitch, I thought we were all set. I was out with my son when this ill made, piece of crap came apart on us. It broke! and down to the pavement he went. This could very well have been fatal. Lucky that we were going slowly. (Think of how fast some of you go with these in tow)My son got hurt! skinned knees, elbows, arm, and a torn shirt.The worst thing aside from the blood was the horror the child experienced with having this happen. How would you like your bike frame come apart leaving you hurt on the ground? An investigation into Adams discovered that they had gone out of business and that there had been other reports of hitch problems. The area jobber only said that "It must have been the childs fault, that he did something to the cotter pin. HE DID NOT! The local shop did not offer any kind of explanation only to say that it must of been our fault. We stood there showing them the injury and the broken Trail bike. It was plain to see that they were only interested in covering their own butts. They still continued to sell the same model in the front window for a long time.A few other companies have redesigned their hitches since. I remember one brand had a recall effort and signs up in the shops. Not Adams! who was selling these everywhere. I drive by and see this old model hitch, tandem Trail Bike in the window that they are still intending to sell. The yellow paint is faded and I hope that nobody will buy it. The company went out of business leaving the dealers stuck with them.Also, you just try to sue a Canadian company after they went out of business! This is a shop that is struggling to stay in business and they overcharge in the first place. If you have two kids on the back you put more stress on the hitch part.These are made to swivel around and they can break right off. I think that the tandem model is especially unsafe. Adams Trail -a -bike is back, having been bought by Norco Products and they have introduced new models with slightly different hitches. Good Luck! If you have an older model trail bike type child trailer, get rid of it, and get a newer one or get the child onto a bike of their own when they are ready. You would think twice about using one of these if you had seen what happened to us that afternoon.




Subject: old style baby seats
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 12:30
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
While I am on the subject, I witnessed a baby fall in an intersection (in her baby seat) This was an old seat, with a plastic seat shell bolted onto a tubular support that fixed onto the axle. The plastic broke and the seat came off of the platform. This must have been the last point of attachment because the child fell to the pavement still strapped to the seat. I saw this 2 years ago and now when I see old baby seats at garage sales I buy them and throw them away. If you have a child, go and get the very best that you can buy. The latest one I saw has the child float along on springs! I wonder if the baby gets sick after riding on this model? The newer ones fit into a rear rack that comes with it.They cost 100.00 or more now, but safety is priceless.When you have weight bouncing along on something like metal or plastic that can get fatigued, WATCH OUT!




Subject: Trail a Bike
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 12:38
Entered by: phil (phil.renner@snet.net)

Message:
Clarence, that is a true horror story. I hope your son has overcome this trauma and is comfortable with bikes again. I have a "Tag-a-Long" kid attachment for my 4 year old. It seems reliable enough so far, but your story gives me cause to rethink. Has anyone else had problems similair to Clarence's? Clarence, exactly where/how did the hitch fail?




Subject: Aqua-Stop brake shoes for Rod-Brake.They work awesome
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 12:48
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
"Clarence, everyone is going to lunch," What are you making now? Another crazy bike project is it? Do these homemade shoes work for you? " Oh yes sir! They work great! I take out the rubber and measure it and cut new shoes and slide them into the old holder and I can stop on a dime with my Sunbeam and Raleighs!!" Where are you getting the rubber?" From the bike shop!" Although I have figured out how to get it wholesale!!"




Subject: Trial-A-Bike horrors
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 14:33
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Clarence, I'm truly sorry you and your son had such a bad cycling experience. I feel especially bad since I recently advised someone who frequents this page to choose the Adams over the knock-offs. Both of my kids have ridden on an Adams for a little over three years, and I've never had a problem. The universal joint seems well-designed and heavy enough to stand up -- in contrast to the ones on I've seen on the Toys-R-Us knockoffs. But Adams did have a recall which affected my kids' Trail-A-Bike. The weld for the handlebar bracket was found to be defective in some tests, so they sent a notice and then a heavy clamp to replace it. I was actually kind of impressed with the way they handled it. I hope the problem you encountered is a fluke. The idea (old, based on pictures I've seen) is fabulous. They really provide kids with riding experience they could not have on their own, and they allow the child to coast while you pedal (although I know they make coaster chainrings for tandem stokers now). But your story makes me wonder whether I should put the Trail-A-Bike away and fit the tandem for children. And other reports of defects, first hand or anecdotal??




Subject: RE: old style baby seats
Entered on: Sep 9, 1999 14:56
Entered by: Philip (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
Clarence, I appreciate what you're saying about old kid seats but I did exactly what you say we shouldn't do. That is: I found one in the garbage and re-used it. The common plastic seats (like the one I had) usually last a lot longer than the cheap metal frame/racks that they come with so I strapped this old seat to a good Blackburn rack that was properly attached to a touring-mountain bike. I used very strong metal strapping (that had been used to raise my house!!!) to hold the seat to the rack. That said, the single most important thing I did, however, was to CHECK THE SEAT before every single ride. This is the kind of pre-ride inspection that I learned as a young motorcyclist. I think it's right to dissuade casual riders from using dubious equipment but if one is prudent and knowledgeable, you can often make use of old plastic kid seats. Cheers, Philip.




Subject: Adams trailercycles
Entered on: Sep 10, 1999 00:28
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
I sell and recommend Adams trailercycles, which I consider to be the second best brand on the market (after Burley.) I'd be very interested in hearing exactly which part of this hitch broke.




Subject: Roadster Rims
Entered on: Sep 10, 1999 10:53
Entered by: Steve (hodgess@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
Does anyone know where replacement 28", 36-hole Westwood rims (Raleigh or otherwise) can be acquired, steel or aluminum? Or is rechroming of a flakey, pitted rim the best solution? This is for a late 1970s Raleigh DL-1.




Subject: Looking for mid-50's S-A Taillight
Entered on: Sep 11, 1999 20:12
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hey all! I am looking for one or two S-A taillights from about the mid 50's. You know, the ones with the metal ring around the lens. Thanks!!




Subject: Check out this really cool Raleigh tin sign on eBay
Entered on: Sep 12, 1999 18:03
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
(It's not mine, BTW) http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=163334275




Subject: re: Raleigh tin sign on eBay
Entered on: Sep 12, 1999 22:06
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
That's indeed a cool sign, Bob. For a little more affordable sign (repro) go to http://www.countrylane.com/gifts/signs/page1d.htm and do a search on "Raleigh". They have a 1950's "All Steel Bicycle" sign for $10.99 plus shipping. (This sign has shown up several times recently on eBay, with each seller carefully not saying it's a repro...)




Subject: Indian Roadster
Entered on: Sep 13, 1999 09:44
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Thanks to Steve of Bicyclearts for supplying me a free Indian roadster frame. over the weekend I built it up as a very simple fixed-gear roadster -- no chaincase, no mudguards, no rack, no kickstand, and the wheels are 27" with aluminum rims -- so it's much lighter than my DL-1 or Forever. The profile is very much like that of a late 1890's roadster like those shown in the various coffeetable books of recent years. The ride is great -- I know the weight is part of the "stately" feel, but the ultra-long wheelbase is a significant part. So the ride is quite smooth. And the acceleration and hill-climbing is easier due to lower weight. A good, primative, simple ride. Thanks again, Steve!




Subject: Is Steve still selling the rims?
Entered on: Sep 13, 1999 13:46
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Is Steve still selling rims, either 28 x 1-1/2 or 26 x 1-3/8? I'm having a lot of fun customizing the Forever that I purchased over the summer. I've loaded it up with 50's era English parts and making it into a kind of Forever Superbe. Right now, the front wheel is waiting for a dynohub, while I already have rounded up a S-A headlamp and taillight. It's going to be one decked out commuter for use here on campus. Interesting story: Late one night while I was working on an architecture project I got tired of waiting for the paint to dry, so I decided to go out and take my Forever for a spin in a parking lot adjacent to the Architecture bld'ng. I hadn't installed lights on it yet (I'm using a temporary battery unit)so I was just using reflectors. An OSU cop signalled me to stop and gave me a warning that there is a $90 fine in Oklahoma for riding a bicycle at night without a light that is not usually enforced. I'm actually glad he stopped me, that prompted me to rig in my temporary light, and I didn't know there was even such a fine! Bottom line- don't ride at night without a light. Cheers




Subject: Rims Reduxe
Entered on: Sep 13, 1999 14:40
Entered by: Steve (hodgess@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
Stephen at BicycleArts doesn't have any 28 x 1-1/2 Westwood-style rims in stock. (He does have 32 and 40 hole 26" rims.) I'm still looking for some, but they are exceedingly scarce in the land of the brave and the free. (No doubt I can go out during lunch and buy 37 varieties of alloy wheels for my car (a Volvo 740 SW). Although there are rumours (English spelling, 'natch) of 28" rod brake-style aluminum rims available in Italy (anyone going soon?), I'm afraid I'm going to have have my soon-to-arrive '78 DL-1 front rim rechromed. O God, I live in a town that doesn't have a decent place to have a bike frame repainted... On a related note, I tore down my wife's 1951 Dawes 3-speed this weekend in order to begin its second life. It's amazingly in good shape for a 48-year industrial product designed to live and work outdoors. Even the B-66 saddle is ridable, given several coatings of Proofide. It's got alloy fenders, and it'll clean up into a very nice old bike. I plan to use oxalic acid to clean up the rust; my next question is how to treat chrome afterwards that's been de-rusted. Any suggestions? (We live in a moist climate down here in the southland.) P.S. This board is a great resource.




Subject: Asian parts
Entered on: Sep 13, 1999 14:43
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Wes: Steve just Emailed me and said he's out of 28" rims, has 26" in stock, as well as some other parts, and can order chaincases. I will agree that the rims on the Forever are plenty sturdy -- I've ridden it really hard, including down numerous curbs, and the wheels have stayed true. Speaking of OSU, I rode through campus this morning, and once again saw the formerly clean red Austrian Sears 3-speed that's been U-locked to a bike rack since about May. It's now totally rusted. What a shame.




Subject: College Bikes
Entered on: Sep 13, 1999 14:51
Entered by: Steve (hodgess@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
Hey, if you see a nice old bike locked to a bike stand at a university or college that's been there for a few months, just take it. No doubt it's been abandoned, and the university building services folks will just eventually pop the lock and throw it in the dumpster. Your average college student uses a bike for a few years and then dumps it, gives it away, or pawns it. I brought home a nice old Motobecane w/o wheels that I walked by for a whole summer, and turned it into a nice bike. I'm not saying steal it, but is it more morally correct to save something valuable then to let it be destroyed by the elements just because it's "someone else's property?" Salvage rights ought to come into play here at some point, IMHO.




Subject: Rims
Entered on: Sep 13, 1999 17:38
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Thanks for the replies. I'm guessing that the 26" rims are Raleigh pattern rims, which is the type of rim I am looking for.




Subject: Indian roadsters, bikes at college
Entered on: Sep 13, 1999 23:27
Entered by: Robert (rbowen@uclink4.berkeley.edu)

Message:
I also just got an Indian roadster from Steve, but I got the whole bike. I love it! It is really heavy and the single speed doesn't help going up hills, but it has a nice solid feel to it and it looks great. This one is all green and gets lots of looks. It very quickly replaced my Apollo 26" roadster as main transport around campus and the town. Now that the 26" bike has a break i can see about building a new set of wheels for it and thinking about taking it apart for paint and chrome. I am cringing at the thought of getting all the rod-brake parts re-done. From past experience I know it is best to chrome everything or nothing, otherwise the new parts will make the others look MUCH worse. I don't know if it counts as a "roadster" or not, but I just picked up an original Moulton bicycle at a garage sale this last weekend. It is probably the strangest looking bike I have, but it does have the same "fit for it's purpose" look that the roadsters and sports bikes do. It has an astonishing 4 gears! (what will they think of next?)




Subject: Sturmey Archer DBU
Entered on: Sep 14, 1999 09:58
Entered by: Paul R. (britbikes@mailexcite.com)

Message:
Anybody have a spare DBU (dry battery unit) laying around that they would like to sell? It is the nifty 3-cell tubular unit that clipped to the seat tube (typically) of some of the early Raleigh Superbes tha allowed you to have lights when you came to a stop. I need one for my '64 britsh market Superbe. I realize that the chance is about zero since I have never seen one except in period catalogs (and a 1952 Rudge on ebay that sold for $405!!), but thought that I would ask anyway!




Subject: Single speed vs. SA 3-speed
Entered on: Sep 14, 1999 13:19
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Yesterday I rode my SA AW-equiped Sports to work. Today I rode my single speed Forever to work on the same route. Even though I had to muscle the Forever up some short, steep hills, my subjective impression is that overall it did not take any more effort to make the same trip in the same time on the heavier single-speed. I've read that epicyclic hubs waste a good deal of energy (the book I read said 50%), so I wonder whether the single-speed is significantly more efficient in the long haul due to the direct drive. By the way, the SA AW in question is, I believe, properly adjusted (i.e., VERY slight movement of indicator chain possible with shifter in first gear, minute play at rim in back wheel, regular doses of non-deterg motor oil in rear hub). Any thoughts on this one?




Subject: 50% loss in epicyc. hubs?
Entered on: Sep 14, 1999 20:33
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
I've also ridden my Forever and my Raleigh on subsequent days and the only thing I've really noticed is that the Forever may be a bit too highly geared, and that it seems a little too small. I don't think the single speed is terribly different to ride than the 3 speed, except on hills. I doubt that an epicyclic hub looses 50% of the energy put into it, although they are slightly less efficient(90%?), the sprocket/chain drive on bicycles is the most efficient mechanical machine transfer of power ever invented, and I can't see the epi. hub being too less efficient.




Subject: Speaking of DBU.....
Entered on: Sep 14, 1999 20:57
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
In my mid 1950's Raleigh catalog they show a DBU that takes three U2 cells and is also equiped with a strange device called an "Automatic Filter Switch". The catalog states that this switch automatically and progressively switches over from the batteries to the Dynohub as the Dynohub's power increases with speed, and vise versa. It shows this unit being supplied on the Superbe models only. I'm guessing that the catalog is a '54 or a '55, because there is an insert announcing the introduction of the TCW hub as a new option on that year's models. (?) Has anyone seen or worked on one of these DBU's with the switch. I would be very interested in finding out how one works. Cheers!!!




Subject: 50% loss? No way!
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 00:36
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Frank Rowland Whitt, quoted in "Bicycling Science", measured efficiencies of around 97%, 96%, 94%, 91% and 85% for direct drive, 33.3% rise, 10% drop, 25% drop and 33.3% drop respectively, at fairly low torque values. Three researchers reported in the British journal "Engineering" in 1956, similar numbers, but the efficiency increased as torque level increased.




Subject: DBU-ish stuff
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 00:44
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
There's a generator/regulator/battery circuit at http://www.nscl.msu.edu/~daniel/regulator.html, along with links to other bicycle lighting webpages. I've thought that, with modern technology, it should be possible to put a couple of small, high-energy-capacity batteries and a switching circuit in the back of a Dyno headlamp shell--just enough to keep the lights running at intersections etc.




Subject: Here's another generator page
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 00:47
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/brianh/bikegens.html




Subject: Have I really been spacing out...
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 00:49
Entered by: zephyrus@rickadee.net (Randy)

Message:
or did the list just suddenly acquire a lot of advertising at the top? I had to check to make sure I still had Java/Javascript turned off...




Subject: Epicyclic Efficiency (or lack thereof)
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 09:26
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Randy, thanks for responding re epicyclic efficiency. You obviously know your stuff. Unfortunately, I don't quite understand your entry on ther subject. I've seen similar figures for the direct drive (e.g., Perry's, "Bicycle Cult"), but do the numbers you list relate to EPICYCLIC hubs? Please help me understand! (By the way, from my own experience I don't think 50% could be correct, but a 10-20% loss drive of energy, compared to direct drive, might just be about right.)




Subject: Epicyclic efficiency (friction? we don't need no stinking friction!)
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 11:34
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Yes, they're for epicyclic gears, Keith. The "Engineering" article was titled "Efficiency of three-speed bicycle gears". I'll scan the chart in "Bicycling Science" and put it on my website later today. UC Berkeley engineering library has "Engineering", and I'll see if I can get down there soon and photocopy the article (I work less than 10 miles north of there).




Subject: More on friction (less is better...)
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 11:41
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
David Wilson writes in the conclusion to the gearing chapter in "Bicycling Science": "The efficiencies of present transmissions using chains and derailleurs or hub gears are in the high nineties, and any future improvements must be small." I don't think there's anything to worry about with the efficiency of a (well-maintained) hub gear. At one point, Sturmey-Archer tried ball-bearing planet gears, but dropped them because there wasn't any gain in efficiency over the plain-bearing pinions.




Subject: I'm relieved!
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 14:29
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Randy -- Thanks for the clarification. Now I feel even better about going epicyclic. The book I got the 50% figure from was a children's book I checked out for my kids. I should've known. Today I rode my yellow '72 Schwinn Collegiate to work, in honor of classes starting at OSU. It's a good commuting bike too, though everyone else who is serious about bikes hates 'em. I'm sorry guys, really sorry!! I'll put it away now, honest!




Subject: Epicyclic efficiency graph online
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 17:13
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
I scanned the graph from "Bicycling Science" at lunchtime and put it on the DL-1 page at my website http://www.rickadee.net~zephyrus.




Subject: Seeking left-hand ballcup
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 17:24
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
I'm looking for a threaded left-hand Sturmey-Archer ballcup, or shell with ballcup attached (AW, FW, S-5 etc.) It's identifiable by the wrench flats, as opposed to the later pressed-in cups, which were completely smooth. Please email me directly if you have one (or two) available. Thanks!




Subject: Keith's Schwinn Collegiate
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 18:03
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Hey I used to ride a baby blue 24" Schwinn Collegiate as a commuter, and although it wasn't English, I always thought it was a good riding bike! I miss it some times. If it had been black with a white fender tip, a lot of folks might not have even seen the difference.




Subject: Thanks, Randy!
Entered on: Sep 15, 1999 20:20
Entered by: Kevin C. (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Check out Randy's web page. Thanks to it, I now know how to adjust those confounded rod brakes. I was getting tired of dragging my foot on the ground.




Subject: Schwinns/Moonlighting
Entered on: Sep 16, 1999 09:56
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Mark, thanks for stepping forward to admit the Collegiate works well as a commuter. I sold a 3-speed Schwinn Racer this summer for $20, and kind off regret it. Certain aspects of the Schwinns are great for low maintenance -- no cotter pins to work loose, practically indestructable chainguards, etc. After reading "No Hands" and the Pridmore & Hurd Schwinn books, I get the impression that Frank Schwinn was pretty frustrated with making what were essentially kids' bike -- Ballooners, etc. -- and would really have rather sold bikes like Raleigh 3-speeds to American adults. I know he had the Paramount, and the various "World" models, but I guess these were never great sellers. But the Collegiate is part of that heritage, though the folks on the Ballooner/Middleweight page wouldn't touch them. I guess that's okay, so people like me can still buy them for $5. I visited my favorite bike shop yesterday, and several bike commuter people came in. One rides a Trek OCLV frame (he' broken two 2300 frames )on his commuter, another an Aluminum Cannondale, and another a mountain bike. My Collegiate, and the Brit 3-speeds are more comfortable and sturdy, and cost less a tire from any of the aforementioned commuters. ALSO, this Saturday I begin working part time at that favorite local bike shop!!!! I look forward to learning a lot more about bikes. I hope to go to the trade show in Chicago on Oct. 8-10. Any of you guys at shops going? We could team up and tell them the REAL hot trend is British 3-speeds.




Subject: Schwaleigh
Entered on: Sep 16, 1999 12:39
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile)

Message:
My current project for a bike to keep at my job is a '74 Schwinn Super Le Tour frame fitted with Raleigh pattern '26 wheels, 3-speed coaster hub, Raleigh fenders, chainguard, bars, mattress saddle and other stuff from a junked '73 Colt. I traded a Schwinn American middleweight with 2-speed thumb shift for my DL-1 and don't regret it for a second.




Subject: Schwinns
Entered on: Sep 16, 1999 14:15
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
This summer I got rid of 3 Schwinn middleweights, and sometimes have pangs of regret. One was a '63 American with 2-speed kickback, another '60 a 2-speed thumb-shift Jaguar Mark IV. Let 'em go cheap -- $75 a pop. But I agree -- I'd trade all three of them for another DL-1. Problem for me with Schwinn middleweights is that they are KIDS BIKES with 18" frames. Yea, you can put a bizzare, super long Stingray seatpost on (which could break), but the bike still isn't built to fit an adult. The DL-1 sure is. I have a NOS Le Tour De Luxe frame with braze-ons for MTB brakes -- it's currently a one-speed. My keep at work bike is my latest Dunelt one-speed coaster rear/caliper front brake. Great in traffic and will STOP when I need it to right now. By the way, what is that bear hugging on the Dunelt logo? Looks like an iceburg.




Subject: Brand X
Entered on: Sep 16, 1999 22:16
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
As I said in an earlier note; I find my Schwinn Suburban to be an excellent commuter bike. Its heavy at 35 pounds and is stable as the table. I haven't done a good comparison to my DL-1 yet but I can say I prefer the Schwinn steering characteristics. Maybe the DL-1 steering grows on you with experience. Riding qualities aside, I prefer the look of the Raleigh. I have ridden my first Sports a lot and it is a pleasure to look down on the very British bars/stem, peaked fender with the little crown of chrome, and most of all those lovely crowned axle nuts. My favorite bike of all though is the next one I choose to ride.




Subject: Nice rider
Entered on: Sep 17, 1999 09:25
Entered by: Kevin C. (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
I just read Keith's message about the middleweight frame sizing, and agree 100 percent. Although I love to ride my Sports and DL-1, I often opt for an old Schwinn lightweight that I made up. I took a tall, 1966 Varsity, removed the handbrakes, derailleur, large front sprocket, drop bars and racing seat, and added a nice big Persons seat, upright handlebars, and a coaster hub. It looks like an American roadster from about 1902, with its tiny front chainring and diamond frame, and it pedals effortlessly. Total investment: $10. I'm not getting rid of my Raleighs, though.




Subject: tiny front chainring
Entered on: Sep 18, 1999 09:52
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I have a tiny front chainring on one of my DL-1'S and I am very happy with the way it rides.




Subject: Armstrong 3-speed w/generator
Entered on: Sep 18, 1999 10:27
Entered by: Jose (jsantos@umich.edu)

Message:
Hi everyone. I must first congratulate you all on the level of the discussion here. I'm amazed to see that non-bicycle interests have been kept out. Now to my question...i just bought an Armstrong 3 speed w/ generator (light) at a police auction. Can any one give me any info on these bikes (armstrong?) It would be greatly appreciated! Enjoy...




Subject: Already learning at the Bike Shop
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 08:49
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Now I've worked a whole day in a bike shop. Woo hoo! I went in Friday night, and all day Saturday, and on both occassions customers came in to get upright handlebars and wide seats for their old 10/12 speed road bikes. Does this sound familiar??? These people want an upright riding position. If I see this regularly, it will conform my conclusion that the market is ripe for the American Roadster/Modern roadster. I rode the Forever to a local French restaurant, and got comments and questions from three people. One woman wanted to know where she could get one, commenting that it was an elegent-looking bike. More confirmation? I think people are ready for something other than road/mountain/hybrid. Wonder if you could import the Chiltern, or if Raleigh U.S.A. has exclusive rights and could prevent it.




Subject: Re: American Roadsters
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 10:14
Entered by: Steve (hodgess@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
Although there is no doubt demand for a simple, sensible bicycle, let's don't reinvent the wheel (pun intended). Many major and minor bicycle manufacturers have included roadster-type bicycles in their offerings, and although these bikes get sold eventually, the mass market is still oriented towards mountain bikes, the flashier and more complicated, the better. That's where the advertising bucks have been spent. (Don't forget Bridgestone either. They produced some of the most well-thought out bikes in the last several decades, and they folded up shop in part because of mass consumer indifference.) Additionally, we all know what a nightmare road riding can be, and although they make poor road/city bikes, mountain bikes can be and are ridden everywhere. I've even seen full-suspension MTBs being ridden in the middle of downtown Washington, D.C. It's part of that tough, outdoorsy image currently in vogue. I think that you don't need another bike--you need a big advertising budget for roadster-type bikes, and you need decent places to ride, other than dirt trails that connect to nowhere. But keep riding your 3-speed, for sure. Maybe the message will get out.




Subject: Dynohub care and feeding
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 11:21
Entered by: Nick (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Any experience out there on care and feeding of dynohubs? I just got one and want to make sure I take care of it properly. Also, I notice that some people's dynos are on the right and some on the left of the front wheel; and that in a 1940 Raleigh catalogue, the pictures show them both ways. Any thoughts from our more learned brethren and sistren?




Subject: Rod brakes: right is rear or front?
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 11:24
Entered by: Nick (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Does your right hand roller lever work the rear or front rod brake? On my 1978 Tourist, right is rear; in my Raleigh care booklets, right is front; on my 1961 Tourist, right is crossed over to work rear when I think it was designed to work the front. Penny for your thoughts. Thanks! Nick




Subject: Dynohub orientation
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 13:59
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Nick, in the Northern Hemisphere the magnet must go on the left. The magnetic flux must circulate counterclockwise in the armature for the voltage regulation to work properly. The converse is true in the Southern hemisphere. No, just kidding! With the Raleigh front hubs without locknuts on the adjustable cone, the adjustable side must go on the left. That way, if the axle nut loosens, the cone will tend to unscrew rather than tightening and binding the wheel. But the Dyno has locknuts on both sides, so it really doesn't matter which side the magnet is on. I always see them on the left side. Sheldon Brown has a page on the Dyno at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/dynohubs.html on his extensive and very informative website.




Subject: Dyno orientation
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 14:06
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Or was that, I always see them on the right side...? Sorry, it's Monday. :-)




Subject: Rod brake orientation
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 14:12
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
On my 1973 DL-1/Tourist, RH lever is front brake. It's the only way it will work (otherwise, the pullrods would bind on each other). I'd like to see how the "crossover" was arranged, Nick. I wonder if there was a difference between "domestic" and "North American" market Tourists? Every once in a while at Mr. Bike (in Nebraska), we'd get a Tourist with a full chaincase by accident.




Subject: Roadster chaincases
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 17:10
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
I believe I heard somewhere that most DL-1's intended for the US had the hockey stick type of chain guard to save weight in an effort to avoid higher tariffs imposed on heavier bicycles. I sure wish they all had the full case. I have the hockey stick type and would much rather have the full.




Subject: Rod brakes & chain cases
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 22:38
Entered by: Kevin C. (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
My 1972 Tourist's right-hand rod brake activates the front brake. As for full-cover chaincases, I have one on my 1932 Raleigh Dl-1. It's fantastic to look at, but I would never ride the bike because I'm afraid I'd lose part of the case. There are several sections, held on by friction, and a good hard bump could easily knock one loose. Also, they're a real pain when you're trying to change a rear tube or get to the chain. For riding, I'll take the hockey stick version on the '72 any day.




Subject: The confusing bike scene
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 22:51
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I read with interest Keith and Steve's latest notes. I think they both make good points. I believe there is a segment of the population that wants a more comfortable bike as keith describes and there are some good bikes out there but they are not well advertised due to high ad costs. In addition most of the folks wanting this type of bike are casual, often infrequent riders and won't pay the price. Unfortunately in another segment of buyers we have an image problem - too many folks want only things with image. Need proof, just look at the walking billboards touting Tommy Hilfiger's clothing. Like many image items including bikes the product itself is mundane. The kids learn to covet image at an early age so they get a BMX bike which can only be ridden standing by anyone over the age of 9. Where do they ride? On the street and sidewalk. Then they graduate to ATB's and still stay on pavement for the most part. Another reason we don't have comfortable bikes is that adults don't ride bikes in sufficient numbers to drive the market. I don't know any adults outside of folks who have RV's or are snowbirds who ride. None of my family rides bikes nor do any of my non-snowbird friends ride. The market responds to numbers and the young or wanna-stay youngs outnumber the rest of us.




Subject: Evans Products/English Bike
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 23:16
Entered by: Tony (dziabuda@ismi.net)

Message:
Well, after scrolling through past messages, I think I've found the right place to ask this question: Does anyone have any info regarding bikes distributed by Evans Products of Plymouth, Mi? I bought a 3-speed, English-made bike at a yard sale(ten bucks).Everything appears original except the rear tire. Here's what I know: Sturmey-Archer hub"SA" 10-57; Dunlop rims front and rear; "Wright" saddle; Black w/pinstripes and a decorative decal on top tube; the word "Featherweight" on the seat tube and chain guard; black fender on front/ black w/ white tip on rear. I want to clean up this bike and ride it, but I'd like to get any info on it that I can. Thanks, Tony




Subject: Brake "handedness"
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 23:20
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Rod brake bikes can be set up either way. Some dissasembly is required to change it. It is customary to have the front brake on the right in countries that drive on the left, and vice versa. I believe this is due to the widespread superstitious fear of the front brake, and a desire to permit hand signals while still being able to reach the "important" brake. For this reason, my own bikes are set up the opposite way, i.e., right front even though I live in the U.S. There was no consensus on this in the U.S. until the early '70s, so older bikes were set up either way. See my article on Braking and Turning: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html




Subject: Dynohub orientation
Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 23:27
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Many British bikes had the headlight mounted on a special bracket on the right fork blade. This made a lot of sense for a country where they ride on the left. Dynohubs are designed to have the dynamo side on the right, so the wiring wouldn't have to loop over the top of the wheel. The instructions I have at http://sheldonbrown.com/dynohubs.html say that there was a change in 1952. Previous versions had a fixed right (dynamo side) cone, later ones were adjustable on both sides...if I read that correctly.




Subject: Rod brake crossover
Entered on: Sep 21, 1999 00:30
Entered by: Nick (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Randy asked how my crossover of rods was arranged. Beieve me, it ain't pretty. The rods are bent over each other in a clearly half fast way - certainly not what the factory intended - although they do work. I think Sheldon's response makes perfect sense - about left and right sides of the road and standardization coming in the 70's.




Subject: Brake orientation
Entered on: Sep 21, 1999 02:45
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Sheldon, "some disassembly" to change brake handedness is, I think, an understatement. Besides swapping the lever cranks (rollers?) left-for-right, you'd need to unrivet the pullrod mounts and swap *them* side-for-side on the cranks to keep the pullrods inboards. Or maybe I'm being too finicky--with rigid pullrods like the DL-1 has, I want to keep the pull in as straight a line as possible. But I'm a mechanical engineer and sometimes "correctness" still overcomes "expediency"... :-)




Subject: Dyno (GH6) orientation
Entered on: Sep 21, 1999 03:12
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
My three Dynohubs (all newer than 1952) have a shoulder on the axle on the offside (non-dyno) that the "fixed" cone butts against, as well as having a locknut to hold it there. The cone adjustment is on the dyno side. The 1954 service manual in the Service Notes says "Note that the GH6 Front Dynohub functions with the Dynamo on either the right or left hand side. It is essential to see that the cone locknuts are properly tightened in order to maintain correct cone adjustment. When securing cone adjustment by means of notched washer on Dyno side, it is important that the position of the armature terminals be careully located before cone locknut is firmly tightened. For GH.6 hubs and for all roadster models, the terminals should lie parallel with one of the flats on the end of the axle, but with forward drop-out rear lugs they should be turned 30deg clockwise from parallel with the flats." But, in the Assembly section, it says "Assemble dyno unit as describe on page 27 and adjust wheel bearings by means of left hand notched adjusting washer, secured by cone locknut." This would imply that they considered LH to be the default Dyno side at that time. I don't know why the 1956 instructions you quote contradict the 1954 shop manual, or whether they went back and forth. My newest Dyno is 1955...




Subject: Dyno orientation
Entered on: Sep 21, 1999 10:44
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Another take on the RH vs. LH dyno orientation I mentioned above could be that the technical writers at S-A wrote up the AW/FW (with their de facto LH cone adjustment) service instructions first, and then cribbed sections to make the similar GH6 instructions without carefully proofreading for content... That thought came only because I've *never, ever* been guilty of that myself... :-) :-)




Subject: Dynamo left or right?
Entered on: Sep 21, 1999 11:22
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
In my mid 50's Raleigh catalog, it shows the Dynamo unit being on the left hand side of the bicycle. When I put Dynos on my bikes I try to think of it like this: if it was a rear dyno then it would have to go on the left, opposite the side with the chain. So, I install front dynos with the Dynamo unit on the opposite side of the chain. There is only one model, I think it was the Lenton Tourist that had the GH6 mounted with the dyno on the right hand side. BTW: Randy, the hub I sent you will be your newest, if I remember right, it is dated Dec. 1957.




Subject: Oops...
Entered on: Sep 21, 1999 13:27
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
In my last message above, please read "AG/FG" for "AW/FW". Proofreading for content, indeed! :-)




Subject: Raleigh Triumph - Woman's 3-speed
Entered on: Sep 21, 1999 23:59
Entered by: Trudy (trudyth@aol.com)

Message:
I saw two earlier postings asking information about the Raleigh Triumpgh - Womans' 3-speed. I just bought one for $40. It's got all Sturmey Archer (SA) components. Brooks saddle. Would like some information as to what years Raleigh made the Triumph and any other information someone might have. I can't find any number on the rear hub even though it's SA.




Subject: Brake 'handedness'
Entered on: Sep 22, 1999 07:48
Entered by: Pete (peter@fullers-pc.freeserve.co.uk)

Message:
Regarding the 'left or right hand front brake' discussion, my (UK) Raleigh care booklet (and my UK Superbe)has the right hand lever operating the front brake - the illustration in the booklet is the reverse of that on Randy's website, which shows a left hand front brake. I think this corresponds with Sheldon's note.




Subject:
Entered on: Sep 22, 1999 08:05
Entered by: Tony ()

Message:
Subject: Evans Products/English Bike Entered on: Sep 20, 1999 23:16 Entered by: Tony (dziabuda@ismi.net) Message:PLEASE HELP! Well, after scrolling through past messages, I think I've found the right place to ask this question: Does anyone have any info regarding bikes distributed by Evans Products of Plymouth, Mi? I bought a 3-speed, English-made bike at a yard sale(ten bucks).Everything appears original except the rear tire. Here's what I know: Sturmey-Archer hub"SA" 10-57; Dunlop rims front and rear; "Wright" saddle; Black w/pinstripes and a decorative decal on top tube; the word "Featherweight" on the seat tube and chain guard; black fender on front/ black w/ white tip on rear. I want to clean up this bike and ride it, but I'd like to get any info on it that I can. Thanks, Tony




Subject: Raleigh Triumph
Entered on: Sep 22, 1999 17:44
Entered by: Trudy (trudyth@aol.com)

Message:
I finally found the month and year on the AW Hub (with a bicycle light and a magnifying glass). It showed a 4 and 73 which I assume it was made in April 1973. Under the Brooks seat I found "A 73." I know that the Triumph is a low-end model that Raleigh made in the early 70's but can't find any other info. Does anyone out there have any more. Thanks.




Subject: Dynohub 'keepers'
Entered on: Sep 23, 1999 09:28
Entered by: Pete (peter@fullers-pc.freeserve.co.uk)

Message:
While we are on Dynohubs, I'd like to know more about the magnet 'keeper' without which one cannot dismantle a Dynohub. Has anyone got one? what do they look like? can I make one? was it a Sturmey Archer service tool? any advice appreciated. Pete.




Subject: Dismantaling w/out a keeper
Entered on: Sep 23, 1999 12:51
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Actually, you can dismantal a dynohub without a keeper. Just keep the amature and the magnet together. these two bits can be removed.from the hubshell together. See Sheldon's site on dynohubs for more details.




Subject: Dyno keeper
Entered on: Sep 23, 1999 12:59
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Pete, the Dyno keeper is a ring of mild steel that takes the place of the armature structure, to maintain the magnetic "flow path" when the magnet is removed. It is the same outside diameter as the armature, as thick as the magnet, and maybe 3/4" (2cm) wall thickness. You place it against the face of the armature, and slide the magnet from the armature to the keeper. That way, there is always steel inside the magnet. Newer magnets (NiB SmCo, etc.) would not need a keeper, but the older ceramic and early AlNiCo magnets do. Wheelsmith in Palo Alto, California have a custom-made remagnitizing unit (designed, I think, by an electrical engineer at Hewlett-Packard) for Dynos.




Subject: Shoe polish, anyone?
Entered on: Sep 23, 1999 15:06
Entered by: Kevin C. (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Has anyone else out there used black shoe polish (colored paste wax) to rub down the worst spots on a tired old Roadster? I tried it and it works. First get the bike as clean and smooth as you can. The shoe polish gets into the depressions and tones down those little rust spots much better than touch up paint ... in fact, the spots almost disappear. You can always wax over it, and, best of all it's reversible, unlike paint.




Subject: Free goodies
Entered on: Sep 23, 1999 16:52
Entered by: Mark R. (deenybeany@earthlink.net)

Message:
I have some English bike stuff I need to pass along to a needy person. I have two ladies Raleigh Sports frames, one complete, one minus the fork. Both have dismounted so-so, but quite usable fenders and misc parts on them. I have also an old, mens 21 in frame Robinhood sports frame-forks- fenders -etc......has a really cool crankset that has R-I-N spelled out in the chain ring(Raleigh Industries Nottingham).Also the fork has FORGED drop outs!!Makes ya' swoon don't it? The wheels are long gone, but I believe there is most of a complete bike there. This stuff can be had for the price of shipping which wouldn't be much. If you're interested please e-mail. I know this isn't neccessarily the right page for listing these, but they aren't FOR SALE so I know you don't mind. I have some other misc. stuff too, so if you need something let me know, and I'll give it to you if I have it. My better half is remodeling, and my "bike room" is gonna be used for something else, and I have to thin my herd. Thanks,Mark




Subject: Modified roadsters
Entered on: Sep 23, 1999 21:20
Entered by: Warren (warbetty@netcom.ca)

Message:
There's a co-op bike shop in Toronto that's dabbling in roadster restoration in a big way. They're taking their old English frames and rebuilding front and rear wheels with Shimano Nexus hubs with cable operated roller brakes. The three speed frames are often given new alloy wheels...either 26 inch mountain bike rims or 700c if the crank has enough ground clearance. Some of the roadster wheels are rebuilt using the original westwood 28s'. I took a roadster with a seven speed hub for a ride. It's perfect. Great gearing with incredible smooth stopping power. To top it off they give these bikes a 1 year parts and labour warranty...why not...the frames are bombproof if you know how to check for faults. The only downside is price, $500 to $800 cdn...most of that is hub/spoke/rim & labour costs.Its a great way to put that DL 1 frame without the rodbrakes back on the road and not worry about the steepness of the next hill going up OR down.




Subject: Tony's bike
Entered on: Sep 24, 1999 12:59
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Sheldon Brown has a very good webpage on British 3-speeds on his technical pages at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harart-oldbikes.html. Although it might not have information on your particular bike, after the mid-1950's, most British 3-speeds were OEM'ed by Raleigh.




Subject: Left - right brake orientation
Entered on: Sep 24, 1999 17:18
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
Another take on the right vs. left front brake orientation. When I bought my Ritchey MountainBike (horrors) in 1981, the bike was set up with a left-operated rear brake. The justification offered was that most people walk a bike from the left side. When a bike is loaded for touring (or has a live pig on the rack, whatever) and must be walked down a steep incline it makes more sense to be able to brake the rear tire from the left side so the load won't pivot around the braked front wheel and dump the bike. Since a DL-1 was originally conceived as a workman's bike, carrying a load on the back would be ordinary duty and a left-operated rear brake would make perfect ergonomic sense.




Subject: Right or left, which is right?
Entered on: Sep 24, 1999 22:40
Entered by: Fred (frerdhaj)

Message:
My only experience with handbrakes until 5 years back was from riding my English Triumph motorcycle in the 50's and 60's. The front brake lever and foot shifter were on the right. This suited me fine since my right hand and foot are dominant. As Asian motorcycles became popular I learned that the front brake and shift controls were on the left. Until 5 years ago I had not ridden a bicycle with handbrakes and was discomfitted to find the brake controls "backward", at least in my case. Consequently, I have changed all of my bikes with hand brakes to right hand, front brake operation. It is not a question of right or wrong or even better, but the fact is that whichever brake you consider the most important, that brake is more accurately operated with the dominant hand. Now I'm going to amend that statement with the following: I was taught to neck rein a horse with my left hand which assumes that the right hand is the better one to toss a lasso. In fact, I am as insecure in reining a horse right handed as I am applying my bicycles front brake with my left. Which only proves that you can learn to do something with the non-dominant hand, but once learned a habit is very hard to change. In the matter of the position of the front brake lever being determined by which side of the road one rides on, and consequently which hand should be free of the rear brake control for signaling purposes; I don't give it a thought. I use my left arm to signal left turns and my right arm to signal right turns. Arrange your brake levers which ever way works best for you. DL-1's perhaps excepted.




Subject: roadster mods
Entered on: Sep 25, 1999 12:20
Entered by: Warren (warbetty@netcom.ca)

Message:
A couple of people expressed interest in the shop doing the roadster rebuilds..it's "Bikes on Wheels" on Augusta Ave.in Kensington Market in Toronto.I'm sure they'd be happy to answer any questions you might have.




Subject: S-A anti-rotation washers
Entered on: Sep 27, 1999 03:04
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
S-A currently make two varieties of anti-rotation washers. HMW155 is for 7.9mm axle slot (traditional "3-speed"). HMW494 is for a 9.5mm axle slot ("derailer" hub). The AW .PDF file on S-A's website calls this out. Harris Cyclery does carry both washers, but I hadn't realized the significance (mostly because they're called out as "7.9mm" and "9.5mm" without the crucial word "slot"...) This will be a boon to anyone (like me) fitting an S-A hub to a lightweight frame (or an Asian DL-1 clone, Clyde!)




Subject: freebies to good folks
Entered on: Sep 27, 1999 22:06
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Hey! I was in the middle of trying to respond to some of you good folks who want to take me up on my offer of some of the bike stuff I have to pass on, when the stupid computer fried it self!!! I will make good on my offer, and will answer everyone who responds in about 5 to 14 days(!) the amount of time it'll take to get the computer fixed! If anyone wants to, they can e-mail at: mark.riendeau@lawsonmardon.com and I'll respond at that address for now. Sorry if you didn't get a responce. Oh and everyone should say WELCOME BACK!!! to Chris S. who just got back from a wonderful trip to England.Thanks guys!




Subject: Raleigh Clubman
Entered on: Sep 28, 1999 09:20
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Yesterday I had lunch with my friend who owns the 1950s Raleigh Clubman. He's the original owner. I asked him if he'd ever sell it, and he said, "No, this one's a keeper." I fully understand. He rode numerous centuries on it before getting a derailleur-equiped bike in the early 70s. He's going to have the Clubman fully restored -- repainted, etc. -- by some outfit out west (American Cyclery?). Good for him. This guy's an inspiration. As I mentioned before, he's ridden Paris-Brest-Paris, as has his son (who is my age, and rides a friction-shift 70s Raleigh Competition). As we talked, he made fun of bikes that look brand new (though he's restoring his). "Means they haven't been ridden."




Subject: 70's Raleigh Sport Robinhood
Entered on: Sep 28, 1999 11:09
Entered by: Steve, NH,USA ()

Message:
I am looking to rebuild my bike. I want to replace the wheels which have a heavy amount of rust with aluminum rims, change the rear 3 speed with either Shimano 7 speed or Sram 21 speed internal shifter, and find new brakes possibly internal brakes. Having trouble finding parts and anybody old enough to know where to get the parts. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.




Subject: Steve's Sports
Entered on: Sep 28, 1999 20:46
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Harris Cyclery (http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/) sells aluminum rims in the right size on their 3-speed parts page, and a wide range of epicyclic hubs (including hub-brake versions) on their hub gears page. Their webmaster and bike guru, Sheldon Brown, also has written many technical articles (also on the site) on maintaining and updating bikes.




Subject: Hub Malfunction Quiz
Entered on: Sep 30, 1999 14:54
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
About a month ago I drove from Columbus, OH to Cross River NY with my trusty '65 Dunelt lashed to the cheapo bike rack on the back of my car. While in new York, I took the Dunelt on several short ride of a few miles each. On the third such ride, while going down a hill in 3rd, the gears seized -- the rear wheel freewheeled forward, but the crank would not turn in either direction. Gadzooks! Got off, fiddled awhile, forced awhile (yikes!), and I was eventually able to pedal it, though it felt very rough. Drove to town and got some light oil. Oiled the hub with light oil, and it seemed to help, though it still felt somewhat rough. After I got home, I put the usual heavier oil in. Now the hub works fine. MY THEORY (and I'm skeptical about it): 900 miles of vibrating on the bike rack may have driven a lot of the oil out of the hub??? Maybe? I've always used non-detergent motor oil regularly -- about a teaspoon every couple of months. I've never taken it apart. I keep the indicator adjusted so that there is a hair of play in first gear. Cones are adjusted so there's a tiny bit of play at the rim. Any theories?




Subject: Keith's Quiz
Entered on: Sep 30, 1999 17:19
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Keith, I'd almost suspect that one of the balls in the driver bearing had a piece fracture off and temporarily wedge things up. When you're pedaling, the hub turns on the caged bearings at each end (LH ballcup and driver). When you are coasting, the hub turns on the LH ballcup bearings, and the loose bearings between the driver and RH cup. In High the sliding clutch "locks" together the driver and planet carrier, but there is some play (1/8 turn or so) to the driver because the clutch arms can move back and forth a bit between the adjacent pinion pin heads. Since you say the drive was locked up solid, that is why I suspect the driver bearing. If there was a fragment, it might have flushed out when you re-oiled the hub. Or, being about a month ago, your hub might have fallen prey to the 9/9/99 virus... :-)




Subject: S5 or FW wanted
Entered on: Sep 30, 1999 17:23
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
I'm still looking for one or two S5 (any variety, but original is most convenient) and/or FW hubs. Guts only is just fine. Partial guts (axle assembly, planet carrier assembly) is fine also.




Subject: Computer problems and shoe polish
Entered on: Sep 30, 1999 18:28
Entered by: Mark R. (temp. at: mark.riendeau@lawsonmardon.com)

Message:
Hey gang, I still don't have my PC back and everything is backed up. I'll contact everyone concerning the bike goodies as soon as possible. I tried the black shoe polish on my Raleigh and am very happy with the results. It really does take out all the little age flaws that time puts on a frame. I also learned a side benefit/problem: It removed a poorly done attempt at re pinstriping the frame! Thank God! But you may want to be careful if you have a GOOD pinstriping job on your bike as it could conceivably remove any new pinstriping! I believe the softening agents are the culprets/heros depending on your point of view. I myself like the idea of keeping as much of the original paint on even if it looks a little rough, and I think this really helps THANKS!




Subject: Hub Problem Quiz
Entered on: Oct 1, 1999 09:50
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Randy: Thanks very much for the diagnosis. Now I'm going to actually have to take one of these hubs apart for repair -- only done it once before, and that was just to look at it, not fix anything. Something breaking sounds very possible. I ride my '65 Dunelt VERY hard -- lots of miles, stand up pedaling, up and down curbs, and the like. Best $10 purchace I ever made. Would hard riding (even abuse) account for it, or does breakage just happen every so often?




Subject: 3-speed conversion
Entered on: Oct 1, 1999 14:49
Entered by: Clyde ()

Message:
Greetings fellow roadies, I finally finished the conversion of my Indian DL-1 clone to a 3-speed. It's great to have a lower gear to get going after a full stop. Currently the 44x20 sprocket combo gives "gears" of 46, 62 & 82. I may slap on a 22-tooth to have a high gear I can use around town. Keith, have fun re-building your hub, I've done two recently. You might want to have new pawl springs and clutch spring on hand BEFORE you disassemble it. You've probably seen the S-A Technical Information on their website with step by step instructions and exploded view (you're right Randy, the exploded view shows the serrated lockwasher in two different slot sizes). In one of my hub re-builds I had to replace the short axle on the 40-spoke S-A hub I laced into the 28-inch Westwood rim. The longer (163 mm) axle was needed to have room to bolt the rack, fender rails, and kick-stand on to the roadster clone. Bye y'all.




Subject: Re: hub quiz
Entered on: Oct 1, 1999 16:41
Entered by: Philip Hall (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
Keith, Randy might be right about the broken bearings but first make sure that the right-hand cone nut is tightened the prescribed amount. If this nut is not screwed in enough then the clutch can slip *off* the end of the driver and get jammed giving the same symptons that you described. I experienced this with the old Hercules hub that's on an old Mercury/Hercules we have. I believe I found the symptons on a troubleshooting list on the SA website techsheets followed by the reassembly instructions indicating exactly how many turns one should back-off the right-hand cone nut. If the SA tech sheets don't have this information then I must have got it from Sheldon's site. Sorry, I can't remember exactly where right now but I know that the prescribed solution worked for me. Cheers, Philip.




Subject: Adjusting the right cone on a Sturmey-Archer hub
Entered on: Oct 2, 1999 23:46
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
The correct adjustment for the right cone starts with the left cone slack. Tighten the right cone finger tight, then back it off by 1/2 turn, plus as much more as is needed to make the wrench flats line up with the tabs of the special washer. Secure it with the locknut, and make your bearing adjustment with the left cone. Sturmey-Archer hubs should be set so that there's slight play at the rim.




Subject: Will trade 5 3/4" FW Indicator and axle for one that is 61/4"
Entered on: Oct 3, 1999 15:45
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I know that asking for an obscure item like this is really stretching it, but it would really make my day!! This also stands as a word of caution to any one converting one of the Asian made roadsters to a 3 or 4 speed: Your going to need a long axle hub. I think a few people have already found this out. Does anybody know if it is possible to drill the rivet out on the seat stays on the Forever frames and replace them with bolts? I hear that is the way the old Raleigh frames were made. It would make more sense, the rear fender stays could be attached there also. Any Ideas?




Subject: FW Forever
Entered on: Oct 4, 1999 01:44
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Unfortunately, Wes, my FW also has a 5-3/4 axle, and my S5 has a 6" axle. You would not strictly need to replace the indicator if you were confident at adjusting it by feel. The FW did have 5-3/4 and 6-1/4 axles, and the original S5 had both lengths, along with the 6". The S5.1 had a 6-1/16 and 6-5/16 axles available, and either of those should work also. About the DL-1/Tourist chainstays: the fixing piece at the bottom was an internally-threaded, thinwall cylinder with a flange on the inner end, which was pushed through the hole in the "dropout". It extended outwards just enough to engage with the hole in the chainstay, and had a bolt inserted from the outside. A lot like the way chainwheels are attached to a modern alloy crank spider. If you would want to drill out your rivets, and tell me the resultant hole diameter and total thickness of the pieces involved, I'd be happy to make you a pair of the "nuts". On the DL-1, they are about .3"/7.5mm diameter, so a 1/4" bolt can thread into them (at least, I used 1/4-28 bolts in my first DL-1, the original bolts being long gone by a previous owner attaching a baby seat, and my not having the right BA bolt, so I retapped them to the new size). Anything you can do to reduce the stackup of parts on the axle will help in minimizing the length required. My DL-1 has, on each side: A/R washer, dropout, chain adjuster, fender stay, axle washer and axle nut. It helps somewhat that I'm using pretty thin, hardened washers for the axle washers. That would help in your case also (along with, as you say, mounting the fender stays somewhere else than on the axle).




Subject: RE: FW Forever
Entered on: Oct 4, 1999 02:32
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@ hotmail.com)

Message:
Randy, Thanks for the info about the DL-1 chainstay end. In all the pictures I have seen of Dl-1's, the fender stays have always appeared to be attached to the bottom fixing point on the seat stay. I'm sure that where the stays go can vary, but I'll bet that's the best place for them to go. Right now I've had to omit the chain adjusters to get enough thread into the nut on the indicator side of the axle so as not to damage the threads when it is tightened up. Interesting side note: I had also baught a parts bike around the same time I got the FW hub and the parts bike had an SW hub with its original nuts, the exact same nuts that are used on mid- 50's FW hubs. On the chainstays, I might first try drilling an hole through the center of the rivet and tapping it instead of drilling it out completely. The rivit is large enough that I can probably use a 1/4" bolt without weakening it any. Anyway, Cheers!!




Subject: DL-1 fender stays
Entered on: Oct 4, 1999 03:30
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Are the fender stays mounted with the seatstays the stamped sheet-metal kind, Wes? I know that Sheldon's Superbe roadster pic on his site is that way. My rear fender stays are just like the front--big wire stays with a large loop that goes around the axle. I suppose I could cut them short and braze on little metal plates that would mount on the seatstay bolts...




Subject: Forever brake parts
Entered on: Oct 4, 1999 17:31
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I took advantage of Stephen's offer of a 26 inch frame for the cost of shipping. The frame arrived today. There were some brakeparts attached which I will never use. If someone could use them I will send them for the cost of shipping.




Subject: Re: FW Forever
Entered on: Oct 4, 1999 21:24
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
If you use the axle adjusters (a.k.a. "banjo bolts") you don't need to get the right axle nut as tight as is normally required. On my OTB, when I stuck the 7-sprocket cluster onto the AW hub, I actually installed the right nut with no washers at all (though, in that case, I used countersinking to keep the axle from sliding forward. The chain adjuster would serve the same function of my countersinking.) You've gotta have anti-rotation washers _somewhere_, but it isn't absolutely necessary to have 'em on both sides. See http://sheldonbrown.com/otb.html




Subject: Triumph bicycle
Entered on: Oct 5, 1999 12:29
Entered by: Thomas Phillips (trphilip@uic.edu)

Message:
I have acquired a old Triump bike in great condition. I dont know how old it is, and I cant find a serial number. There is no model number, and I cant find anything on the internet to help. All it says is Triumph Genuine Enlgish light weight. Can someone please help me.




Subject: Annoying problem
Entered on: Oct 5, 1999 12:54
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
Here's a basic bike question. How do es one keep the rear wheel from moving against the left chainstay without tightening it up so much that something gets stripped? It happens when someone tries to start in top gear. Thanks




Subject: Three Sturmey-Archer patents online
Entered on: Oct 5, 1999 16:35
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
For those of you who are interested in such technical stuff, there are three fairly significant Sturmey-Archer patents available to view online. They are at the Canadian patent office website at http://Patents1.ic.gc.ca/intro-e.html The patents are #445155, which is the FW and S5 hub concept, #446038, which is the ASC hub, and #491915, which describes the operating concept of the trigger shifter. The cover page and abstract are unfortunately not online for any of them, but the claims, disclosures/descriptions and drawings are available to download as .PDF files. All three patents are the work of William Brown, one of the true luminaries at S-A. I imagine that these particular patents were filed in Canada because of their significance. It is fortunate for us, because only UK patents since 1996 are online so far. Enjoy!




Subject: Re: S-A patents
Entered on: Oct 5, 1999 19:03
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
To view the patents, use the Search Options/Number link and just type in the patent number. Not really much of a search, rather a lookup since you already know the number...




Subject: I'm back
Entered on: Oct 5, 1999 20:43
Entered by: Mark R. (deenybeany@earthlink.net)

Message:
Phew! Anyone who prviously e-mailed me about the frames etc...that I'd like to pass along can once more get in contact easily with me via my e-mail, as my PC is home again. I'd like to hear from you.




Subject: Raleigh Man
Entered on: Oct 5, 1999 21:19
Entered by: junebug (junebug@midcoast.com)

Message:
Greetings to all Limey bike owners out there! I have a few restorations ahead of me this winter, and I am wondering if anyone out there can help with the following items: Bluemels "Noweight" mudguards - white celluliod, front & back 1958 era Dyno hub Original hand pump from the 50's Source for "clubman" bars (the pista/track style) 1958 era chainguard, also metal "window" SA shifter with 3 or 4 spd stamp Thanks for the help. Check out one of the project bikes at www.ohtm.org/recordace (I work at a transportation museum so I get paid to tinker with this stuff - EAT YOUR HEARTS OUT!)




Subject: Re: Raleigh Man
Entered on: Oct 5, 1999 23:22
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Patrick: please, very carefully, remove the wingnuts from the Dynohub on the Record Ace and mail them to me for safekeeping. Don't worry--I'll send back a pair of nice, shiny hex nuts to take their place. :-) Seriously, those nuts might be the most valuable items on the bike. Tony Hadland, in his book _The Sturmey-Archer Story_, only says that Dyno wingnuts were rumored to have been produced... Since the axle diameter is smaller than the rear hubs, the nuts are unique to the Dyno (and possibly front drum brake).




Subject: Oh man--Superbe Roadster on eBay!
Entered on: Oct 5, 1999 23:59
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=174703329 No reserve, but it's in Hawaii...




Subject: Sachs 5-speed shifter woes.
Entered on: Oct 6, 1999 01:24
Entered by: Philip (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
Hi Folks, I've been quietly building a "modern ligthweight" out of a mid-grade Taiwanese sport bike. I'd love to tell everyone about it when it's running but I've hit a snag: I'm installing a used Sachs Pentasport hub but the shifter seems to be worn out. It doesn't shift properly and I want to try the same kind of work-around that is suggested for SA S5 hubs (ie: use a 3-speed shifter on the right, a derraileur lever on the left). Does anyone know what 3-speed shifter will work? I can get hold of either an SA trigger or a recent Shimano 3-speed shift. Sachs stuff is harder to find around here so I would have to buy a new 5-speed replacement if nothing else works. BTW, this is a 10-15 year old model (I think) with left- and right-hand cables that operate exactly like a SA S5. Thanks.




Subject: wingnuts
Entered on: Oct 6, 1999 20:13
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Sturmey-Archer Dynohub wingnuts-Been there, done that! (along with the charging board for the D.B.U.) These are very, very,rare!CONGRATULATIONS !!!!!!! ON A EXCELLENT FIND.Read the Hadland book!




Subject: Happy_Day
Entered on: Oct 6, 1999 20:20
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
The church rummage sale I wait all year for was not a disapointment. I opened the door to the courtyard and there were 60 bikes all kinds. I saw Raleigh's everywhere and said "All right", and rushed in.Did very well, because I was the first one in with cash in hand.I feel alive again, and my back ache from work vanished.




Subject: Steyr
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 01:31
Entered by: Red (dskelton@stkate.edu)

Message:
"Steyr". It isn't british. It isn't even S/A. It appears to be Austrian or German. They even made their own hub, but I don't like their shift trigger. Any clues (especially on how to date the little bugger) would be appreciated.




Subject: Sturmey-Archer Headlight
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 02:15
Entered by: Paul M. ()

Message:
Well, I finally bought a pretty nice Raleigh Sport from out-of-state and have been enjoying it. I had not ridden one in at least 37 years. It has a front Dynohub and a chrome headlight which says Sturmey-Archer on the lens. The Dynohub works, but the headlight doesnt. I tested the bulb with an ohm meter, and it is good. I also connected two wires to the bulb directly from the Dynohub, and it lit when I spun the front wheel. I have continuity from one of the wires which attach to the Dynohub through the switch and to the spring which touches the center contact on the back of the bulb. I also have continuity between the other wire and the rear part of the light housing, but not with the hinged part of the light which holds the lens, reflector and bulb. In other words, power is not reaching the threaded part of the base of the bulb. I guess that I will have to make some kind of jumper wire to complete the circuit. The headlight housing has a rotating 5-position switch on top of it. The center position seems to be off. Two clicks clockwise completes the circuit between one of the wires coming from the Dynohub and the spring which touches the contact on the rear of the bulb. Does anyone know what the other three switch positions are intended for? Do they have something to do with a tail light (which I do not have) or that dry battery unit which I dont have either?




Subject: Oil questions
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 02:46
Entered by: Paul M ()

Message:
What type of oil is best for a 1974 Sturmey-Archer AW hub? I have read a lot of conflicting information. Sheldon Brown says to use Phil Wood oil (I am not familiar with that) or medium weight motor oil. I take that to be regular SAE 30 oil like one would put in a car engine. Someone else recently said that he uses only non detergent oil. The Sturmey-Archer pamphlet on their web site says to add a few drops of light oil every two or three weeks. By light oil, do they mean SAE 10 or 20? Does anyone use multigrade motor oil like 10 w 30 or 20 w 40? Is there any consensus in this group about what is best?




Subject: Rechromers?
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 14:32
Entered by: Stephen (hodges@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
OK sports fans, I've conducted a "nationwide search" for replacement 28" chrome rims for my DL-1, which is sitting in a box in my dining room (and the wife ain't particularly happy 'bout that, you know), I've come up nada/zilch/nein/nothing. There are rumours of Italian-made aluminum rims, but so far they are just that. No doubt someone's holding a pair or more for poor fools like me, but w/o a replacement, steel or aluminum, the only choice is rechrome the suckers. Yeah, I could give myself arthritis rubbing the deep rust off w/ aluminum foil, toothpaste, brass brushes, etc., but this is friggin' Florida, and since it rains more than FIVE FEET A YEAR here, a good, competent rechroming job is the only real answer. And we all know rust never sleeps. So, anyone know of a competent, affordable, experienced (choose only two?) rechromer? Preferably someone in the lower 48? Name and address? Website even? BTW, there is a local rechromer who specializes in small car and motorcycle parts. Lucky me, although their vat won't accept a 28" wheel...




Subject: A very interesting find
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 18:17
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Greeting all! I have just recieved and assembled a bicycle that I had won off E-bay. It is very interesting. It is a ladies bike, with 26 x 1 3/8 WESTWOOD rimmed wheels. The rims are a little rusty where the brake shoes rub, and the center ridge is painted black. It looks like factory paint. Rod Brakes. The front brake stirrup is marked Phillips and is chromed, as well as the handlebars, brake hand levers, cranks and chainwheel, and the hubs. All other parts are finished in black enamel, and the paint is all very much intact and looks factory done. The front and rear hubs are both Super Club hubs made by S.S. Wile & Co. Ltd. It is single speed and the freewheel unit is marked BW in a circle with the words Trade Mark on each side of it. Every part on this machine is English made. The right f. fork blade has an adjustable lamp bracket on it. Pump pegs are brazed onto the down tube. White Dare handgrips look newer. The axle nuts both front and rear are large black enameled wingnuts. Flip-top lubricator on hubs and b.b. The head badge and decals all have a large K in a circle and the decals say The Standard Cycle Co., Ltd Birmingham. The head badge reads Standard Birmingham. Decal colours are blue and gold and white. I'll get some pics up of it soon. I'm guessing it to be from the 40's. Any Ideas??? Sheldon??




Subject: 28 in. rims for replacement
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 18:32
Entered by: Mark ()

Message:
I've been looking for some replacment 28 in rims for some time also. Can any of you Brits out there who sometimes read this page have a look around and see if there are anything available anywhere? Who makes the rims for the Italian Roadsters like the Umberto Dei's? What about the 28 in. bikes from Holland, who makes their rims? Help!!!We need 'um!




Subject: Hub oil
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 18:54
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
Paul, I use 5W30 Mobil 1 in the 1974 AW hub on my DL1 and it works fine. I think the main thing is to get some slippery stuff in there that won't gum up or evaporate quickly.




Subject: Wes K's Very Intersting Find
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 19:16
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Wes, that does sound quite cool. When parts that would normally be chromed turn up painted black, I generally conclude that the bike involved was made during WWII, when chromium was a tightly controlled strategic material. The wing nuts suggest a fairly sporty material. The "BW" freewheel is almost certainly "Baylis Wiley", a major maker of headsets and bottom brackets for non-Raleigh bikes.




Subject: Re: Hub Oil
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 19:22
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (in Chicago for the week, using my sister's computer) (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Here's what's bad: 3-in-One; WD40; salad oil. Any decent lubricating oil will do nicely. Very thick oil, such as sae 90 hypoid gear oil may make the pawls sluggish in cold weather. Very light oil will run out faster. You'll need to apply it more often, and it will get messy. If you're really fussy, we sell genuine Sturmey-Archer oil for $7.95...but I like Phil Wood better, it's cheaper, and it comes in a container that won't leak.




Subject: Wes's Philips
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 20:41
Entered by: Warren ()

Message:
Wes...your bike is very similar to my ladies Hercules from the same era. I keep it on my front porch for quick trips to the store. The thing I LOVE about the bike is its' extremely relaxed geometry...mines a few degrees slacker than a ladies Sport. It tracks like a dream...both hands off the bars negotiating backstreet turns. My rims were shot so I used a pair of Raleigh "Westricks"...the rims found on Raleighs better bikes. They work just fine. Hope your bikes a good ride as well.




Subject: Cycle oil(A little but often)
Entered on: Oct 7, 1999 20:44
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I use Singer sewing machine oil found at local fabric shops. It is intended for sewing machines but the label says "BICYCLE GEARS" and that means the Sturmey-Archer hub. I find it to be perfect, non-detergent,light oil. I have old tins that go into more detail but the modern red and white plastic bottle still says" bicycles." WD- 40 is no good, will lead to trouble, I put in some Mobil 1 5 W 30 and it did no harm, ran well, but as I am experimenting, I don't reccomend you try it. 3 in one household oil? I do not like it,you want to stay away from anything that can gum up.




Subject: Hub Oil
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 02:16
Entered by: Paul M. ()

Message:
Thanks to Sheldon, Clarence and Dennis for commenting on acceptable and unacceptable oils for the Sturmey-Archer hubs. Clarence, maybe you should stock up on Singer sewing machine oil since The Singer Company recently filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. :-) Hopefully, they will be able to come out of that situation. Thanks again for your suggestions.




Subject: 28" Rims
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 02:25
Entered by: Bill H ()

Message:
I was on a visit to Seattle last summer and I bought a pair of 36 hole 28" Roadster style rims at a place called "Bikesmith" (if I remember correctly). They had the rims (new ones) hidden in the back room. They are from Germany and look like typical Roadster rims, with no flats on the sides to engage a caliper style brake. I've also seen Dutch made rims of new manufacture, and I would imagine they would be easily available over in Holland. The "Bikesmith" shop also had several types of rod brake pads, and a few interesting, although pricey, vintage 3 speeds for sale. I also bought a copy of the great "Sturmey Archer Story" mentioned in an earlier post. This shop is located north of downtown Seattle, west of the University. I hope this helps in the search! Bill




Subject: The interesting Phillips
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 02:38
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Thanks to Sheldon and Warren for your replies/info. I think this has got to be the bike with the most character in my collection thus far. From the way I understand it from the guy I baught the bike frome, it has been in the US for a very short time ( 1 or 2 years at the most). He got it in a "container load" of stuff that had been braught in from England and sold at auction. I'll agree with Sheldon about the "Sporty" material- the complete bike with full fenders and Phillips-style chain guard is suprisingly light. I forgot to mention the strange way in which the handle bar stem is retained in the steerer. It is not by the typical bolt from the top with an expander, but with a special clamp-like affair sandwiched between the top bearing cone and the locknut. Was this a common construction during any one time period? Since I started cleaning the grime off it, I've also noticed from chips and scratches that the paint is applied over chrome plated parts in some places. Valve stems are also very interesting. Sheldon would probably know what these are, the stem is fully threaded and of the same size as is what we usually see, but the ends where you put the air in are much smaller and have very course threads on them. This little valve body has two little keys on it that fit in two slots on the stem, and everthings held in place by a knurled nut with the same thread & diameter as a regular valve cap. Is this what is called an English Valve? I wonder if this bike was at one time what you would call a "black-out" bike? a couple of chips of paint still remain on parts of the chainwheel. Anyway, Cheers!!




Subject: RE: 28 Replacement rims
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 03:01
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Mark, have you tried Steve at www.thebikeproject.com ? I think he can still get 28" Westwood rims. They are real nice and beefy and have 32-40 drillings. The rims on my Forever are real solid. I mean REAL solid. I'm sure Steve can order you up a pair or two- keep a set of extras around incase you find another old bike with rusty rims or just a frame!! Anyway, Cheers!!




Subject: URL Correction
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 03:04
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Sorry, its www.bikeproject.com




Subject: Rechromer
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 04:19
Entered by: jake ()

Message:
Custom Metal Finishing,Inc., 5270 E. Apple Ave., Muskegon, MI. 49442, does chrome plating, polishing and buffing for cars, motorcycles, bikes and boats. The man there to call is Bryan Proctor. Phone 616-788-4277; 1-800-383-4277 or FAX 616-788-1338.




Subject: Phillips bike
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 15:08
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
The valve on the Phillips is called a Woods valve or also a English valve. I prefer a Presta valve with an adaptor ring inserted into the rim. I always found the Woods valve type to leak. Although its great for a display bike. The Raleigh R.S.W. 16 (Raleigh Small Wheels) had the clamp type handlebar piece. Or was it the Raleigh 20? This was done at the factory.




Subject: Bianchi Book
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 15:13
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I borrowed a book from my bike shop owner pal, it is the Bianchi bicycle story. He sent away to Italy for this and it was expensive. I really enjoyed it, really complete, packed with pix, I read the book in bed, and fell asleep with it and I had wonderful dreams that night. I guess I had taken it all in a little too much.




Subject: Singer Sewing Machine Company
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 15:23
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Great!! Another thing I have to rush out and stock up on. I did not know that they filed and this bums me out-Big time. I hope they pull through. I never got around to exploring the history of Singer. They made bikes years ago.Did you know that? There were other firms such as White and Kings but they are gone now. In some way bikes and sewing machines are related.




Subject: good metal
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 15:28
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I wish that the metal oil drain bolt on my car was made out of the kind of steel that Phillips used in their bottom bracket cups. The Phillips cups are hard and long wearing, whereas the bolt is cheap and rounds off easily. I had to use the channelocks on it.




Subject: J.C.HIGGINS 3-SPEED LADIES ROADSTER
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 21:46
Entered by: CARL (SPYDER RAY@AOL.COM)

Message:
CREAM&BLUE,FULL CHROME FENDERS,W.W.TIRES,LIGHT GENERATOR,J.C.HIGGINS CARVED CRANK, 7- CONDITION,MADE IN AUSTRIA.$50.E-MAIL OR CALL 978-537-4299.




Subject: Re: good metal
Entered on: Oct 8, 1999 23:39
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
When I was a teenager and didn't know there was a thread difference, I tried to install a Baylis-Wiley bottom bracket cup into a Raleigh frame. I got it stuck. I tried as much as I could with a hammer and an old screwdriver (my usual bb tools at the time) but I couldn't get it to bulge. Finally, in desperation, I tried grabbing hold of the cup with a pair of Vise-grips. I clamped 'em on as tight as I could, but they still slipped on the threads. I tightened 'em even tighter; same result. I tightened 'em even more...I think I closed 'em by stepping on one of the handles. That didn't work either. When I examined the jaws of the Vise-grips, they were deeply marked by the threads of the bb cup. The cup itself showed no sign of any damage from this abuse.




Subject: Non re-movable headset ball cups
Entered on: Oct 9, 1999 22:32
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
This is unusual to me because its the first time I've seen it before. The Phillips- made Standard K I've told you all about has the head-set ball cups made as a part of the headset lugs. I don't know when they started making them with the press-in kind like what we see now, but I'm going to guess it was in the mid 40's (anybody really know?). Anyway, I put some regular tubes in and put the old ones in a safe place, and have riding this bike around a lot the past 2 days. It is amazingly light with the single-speed hub and handles and manuvers better than my other sport-type bikes. Anyway, Cheers and Happy Riding!




Subject: Anyone riding an RSW-16
Entered on: Oct 9, 1999 23:27
Entered by: Richard (pogo@lrbcg.com)

Message:
I have a green RSW-16 and actively ride it on club rides and invitational tours. I wondered if anyone else still uses one for active riding. In my younger years (1975 or so) I rode the RSW-16 on a double century (200 miles) in 14.5 hours. It was even a hilly route. A friend is also looking for an RSW-16 that someone would be willing to sell.




Subject: Seeking BSW tap and die
Entered on: Oct 10, 1999 00:11
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
This is a request for any of you folks in the UK! I'm looking for a 1/16" BSW tap and die, and so far haven't located any here in the USA. If you have a local source, please let me know! (It took me a good hour to figure out that that's the thread on the two halves of an FW indicator...) Thanks!




Subject: S/A (new) "ABC 3 speed rear brake"
Entered on: Oct 11, 1999 01:53
Entered by: Red (dskelton@stkate.edu)

Message:
I don't know much when it comes to wheels. The hub mentioned after "subject:" looks as though it requires two different spoke legenths. If one were to have one of these built on to a wheel would that wheel have a tendency to become untrue faster than with a regular ol' AW 3 speed?




Subject: cycle oil
Entered on: Oct 11, 1999 06:09
Entered by: UK Pete (peter@fullers-pc.freeserve.co.uk)

Message:
There was a message a week or so ago suggesting that Three-in-One was not good for oiling Sturmey Archer hubs. What is the objection to Three-in-One please? Concerned, UK (used it for years)




Subject: English?
Entered on: Oct 11, 1999 16:42
Entered by: Mark ()

Message:
You see? There ARE Brits who read this page! And hey! What IS wrong with 3-in-one? That's all I ever used!




Subject: Three in One
Entered on: Oct 11, 1999 18:09
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
3-in-One oil has a vegetable oil base and is supposed to become gummy after prolonged use. If two of you have been using it for years with no ill effects, it seems it doesn't. Another myth exploded.




Subject: S-A hub lubrication
Entered on: Oct 11, 1999 21:51
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I know people who never lubricate their S-A hubs and get away with it somehow-for a while. 3 in 1 oil is better than nothing I suppose but doesn't have much film strenth which is what gear oil needs to be effective. Light oils like 3 in 1 are meant primarily as a barrier to corrosion such as in door hinges and other household applications. Any motor oil is better than a light oil and will stay in the hub longer.




Subject: Royce Union
Entered on: Oct 11, 1999 21:57
Entered by: Jenny (scrappy_64067@yahoo.com)

Message:
My brother collects old bikes. He found a tandem bike with Japanese symbols on it and coaster brakes. It's a Royce Union. Serial #63068. He wants to know some kind of history on it if possible. If anybody knows anything about a Royce Union bicycle Please e-mail me. I'M CLUELESS!!




dLj#E\XdI~xKIeʈLrR&"#f@J:8i 1ȟs full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



dLj#E\XdI~xKIeʈLrR&"#f@J:8i 1ȟs full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com


Subject: ABC's of wheel building
Entered on: Oct 12, 1999 18:47
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Red, I don't think you'd have any problem with the ABC hub. The flanges are different diameters, of course, but there is nothing like the extreme dishing you'd encounter on a rear derailer wheel, several of which are in successful use. Or, for that matter, compared to a front Dynohub, which has the same large flange and a much smaller small flange (whichever side the small flange goes on!)


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: Another DL-1 on eBay
Entered on: Oct 12, 1999 20:02
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
This one looks really nice seller says near-mint, lookls like a 24" gents' frame, with full chaincase, but apparently has a singlespeed rear hub... #179493287


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: New Page
Entered on: Oct 12, 1999 20:47
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
I went to the new discussion area. I, for one have enjoyed greatly checking the current page. I do not have the patience to chase threads. If this goes away I will miss it. I know things change but I do not feel the "new" format is an improvement. On the bright side it may be better than going away as suggested by the scare earlier this year.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: 3-in-One oil ingredients
Entered on: Oct 12, 1999 23:00
Entered by: Paul M. ()

Message:
For those of you who are curious about the ingredients of 3-in-One oil, I went to WD-40 Companys web site, because they make and sell 3-in-One oil. There I found two Material Data Safety Sheets. One was for the Multi-Purpose 3-in-One oil in the regular red and white can. It is described as 97% Severely Hydrotreated Heavy Napthenic Oil and 3% Non-hazardous Ingredients. The MDSS for their SAE 20 oil for electric motors (in the blue and white can) describes that stuff as 96% Solvent-Refined Heavy Paraffinic Oil and 4% Non-hazardous Ingredients. I am not a chemist and cannot comment on those ingredients, and I am not recommending it for use on your bicycle.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: The New Format
Entered on: Oct 12, 1999 23:30
Entered by: Paul M. ()

Message:
I tried to answer Kevin on the new site, but my reply was truncated. What I tried to say was: Well, I sure find this new site a lot more complicated to use. I really liked the way the old site worked. I thought it was ideal for a discussion group, and I didn't mind scrolling back to look for previous items. I know that Webmasters like to try new things that come along, but I still believe in, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." This new site also forces you to enter an e-mail address although I did not see it posted. I hope that spammers won't be able to grab the e-mail addresses.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: New site doesn't seem appealing
Entered on: Oct 12, 1999 23:43
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
As a long time user of the Menotomy discussion pages, I find the new site scary. Everything being clumped together does not look like it will serve each individual group well. I like the individual attention the catagories gives us. The new site reminds me too much of the very wild and at sometimes out of control Schwinn discussion group a few years back. Anyway, cheers!


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: Single speed fun
Entered on: Oct 12, 1999 23:53
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Well, while the front wheel of my Forever has been at the local bike shop getting a dynohub installed, I have been riding around on my Phillips-made Standard K. For a single- speed bike with rod brakes, it is fun to ride. No gears to fiddle with also, but, starting after starting is sure a chore! And it does have more laid-back geometry than my other sports- type bikes. What a blast!!


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: BSW tap and die, UK readers
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 08:10
Entered by: UK Pete (peter@fullers-pc.freeserve.co.uk)

Message:
Sorry Randy, not good news - I cannot find BSW taps/dies smaller than 3/16ths, and then only in expensive sets. I have one more line of inquiry - I'll get back to you. I read this site daily and it coincides exactly with my own interests - are there any other UK readers out there? I'd be pleased to get in touch. Cannot figure out how to use the new site at all yet. Pete.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: The new format
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 08:12
Entered by: Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles (Menotomy@aol.com)

Message:
Hello all. Don't give up on us yet. We don't believe in making changes if they don't provide any improvement. I've posted some (truncated!!) replies on the new discussion area. All suggestions and ideas are welcome. This whole flippin' web site is a break-even proposition and that's not even factoring in the hours we put into it. So I don't want us spending time on something that's not going to make a big, positive difference. -Vin


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: BSW Tap and die
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 10:04
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I pledge to help find this size, and when I do I will post it here! Patience my friends.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: New site format
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 10:14
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I got a look at the new site format and it looks harder to use, is fustrating and is more time consuming to view and answer. I like the old(current)style better. Although I want to say that this has potental to really rock. I am excited to hear that the site will grow. I want it to be sucessfull and profitable, well worth the time and effort. I am very grateful and excited to have discovered this page. I am a avid lover of these bikes. I am confident that all will be ok.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: Terrible new format
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 10:27
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I got another look and AAUUGH!! It's got to go!! Please change it.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: They pop up all the time
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 11:11
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I am forever seeing the Rod brake bike in T.V land.In car commercials, in movies,In print advertizing. Why? Because this bike is a classic in a way few things are! The latest was on Benny-Hill! The chase scene with the credits where Benny is running from somebody's husband or the cops . This time he was being pursued by Bobbies on Raleigh's through a garden with little Jackie Wright( the bald guy) behind them all. It was a added treat to a great show.Benny is gone now, and it makes me sad.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: They pop up all the time
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 11:11
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I am forever seeing the Rod brake bike in T.V land.In car commercials, in movies,In print advertizing. Why? Because this bike is a classic in a way few things are! The latest was on Benny-Hill! The chase scene with the credits where Benny is running from somebody's husband or the cops . This time he was being pursued by Bobbies on Raleigh's through a garden with little Jackie Wright( the bald guy) behind them all. It was a added treat to a great show.Benny is gone now, and it makes me sad.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: ** OK ** Have a look now
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 13:15
Entered by: Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles (Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles)

Message:
We've made a bunch of improvements, go to oldroads.com and check it out


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: 1/16 BSW found, but they're not cheap!
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 13:16
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
I have located a 1/16 BSW tap and die, but the tap is USD18.20 (GBP11.01 today) and the die is USD28.70 (GBP 17.36) in high-speed steel. Is the price correspondingly high in the UK, or am I paying for the "convenience" of not ordering overseas?


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: They pop up all the time
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 15:27
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I see rod-brakes in Monty Python sketches. In one sketch, a cop pushes someone off a roadster, and chases after a guy who had jumped on a roadster leaning against a building. It seems that you always see them leaning against something, or laying on the ground. Anyway, Ta ta


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: "extra" 26" rod-brake bike
Entered on: Oct 13, 1999 21:31
Entered by: Robert (rbowen@uclink4.berkeley.edu)

Message:
Hi all - I have waaay too many projects right now so I am selling my Apollo 26" rod-brake 3-speed. It is a Raleigh-made frame, and I will include two brand new Westwood 26" rims for it. Please email me for details and pics. If no one on the list wants it, the bike goes on ebay. Thanks!


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: 1/16th BSW tap and die
Entered on: Oct 15, 1999 06:59
Entered by: UK Pete (peter@fullers-pc.freeserve.co.uk)

Message:
Message for Randy - I have not found a 1/16th BSW tap and die, but even if I could those prices you quoted are just the same over here, judging by the prices of small size HSS Metric taps and dies. Pete.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: LISTEN UP!!!
Entered on: Oct 15, 1999 11:15
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
The new system is BETTER, BUT --- it depends on us being MUCH more accurate in describing the subject. For example -- Vin started a thread that went to "slowness." Slowness of the new system, obviously. But if it was a month from now, it would be confusing. Slowness of what? Roadsters? If we can I agree to be careful and articulate, I think it will be better than scrolling through a lot of stuff (like mine?) that may not be of interest. I'm more interested in the history, riding and "finding" experiences (esp. Clarence's eloquent prose), and trends than nuts and bolts (nothing wrong with nuts and bolts, though). Give it a chance!


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: New system
Entered on: Oct 16, 1999 05:44
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
I'm not real big on the new system. I don't like chasing down threads. I'd rather see the whole tapestry.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: New system
Entered on: Oct 16, 1999 05:54
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
I just visited the new site again. I take it back. I like it.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: Wanted: Good used Brooks B33 or B90-3 seat
Entered on: Oct 16, 1999 11:01
Entered by: Kevin C. (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Please e-mail if you have either of these large, heavy-duty leather seats. They have twisted-wire coil springs on the rear.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: Brooks Leather seat
Entered on: Oct 16, 1999 11:39
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Since this seat is still made, I would order up a new one and break it in yourself. Ask the shop to order one for you. I love getting a new Brooks leather seat!


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: white tyres
Entered on: Oct 16, 1999 11:50
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I am going to take the pole they use to take down new tires at the shop and set off on a quest like Caine on Kung Fu.I am going shop to shop, I will keep walking, asking everyone, searching everywhere,I will not stop walking until I have achived my goal at last!! These elusive all white tires in size 26 X 1 3/8 and size 28 X1 1/2 These cream colored, or white tires that I dream about will be mine one day. I found all white 26 X2.125 Schwinn tires, I held them in my hand and thought "These are beautiful things"


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: White tires
Entered on: Oct 16, 1999 12:12
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Clarence; Really old cars e.g., 1900 Olds, Brush, etc. had perfectly round, no tread, white tires. When owners show these cars they have to put booties over the tire to keep them clean while traveling from trailer to show field. Then they jack up the car and place varnished boards under the tires. They are beautiful but are bound to be dirty if used as intended. I'm fussy and don't like dirty white rubber,(nor gumwalls either), so I'll stick to white sidewalls. To each his own. I hope your quest is successful.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: New Format
Entered on: Oct 18, 1999 23:05
Entered by: Paul R. (britbikes@mailexcite.com)

Message:
Sorry, but I just don't like it...it takes too long and doesn't lend itself to that quick 30 second scan for new messages that breaks up boring afternoon at the salt mines! I suppose it will be better if you are trying to research a particular subject, but I just don't happen to use it that way.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: BSA Dynohub on e-bay
Entered on: Oct 20, 1999 02:15
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hey All! There is a BSA dynohub on e-bay. I saw it yesterday. It looked a little beat up, but would be good for parts if anyone was interested.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: This Format
Entered on: Oct 20, 1999 02:17
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I do agree with the above statement on this format. Being able to see all the messages also helps when titles don't seem appealing. By actually seeing the message I can decide weather it's worth reading, or to keep scrolling.


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com



Subject: Starting to move
Entered on: Oct 20, 1999 10:12
Entered by: Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles (Menotomy@aol.com)

Message:
We're starting to move all of the discussion areas to the new format at oldroads.com . We're trying to incorporate everyone's feedback in order to build quick and useful discussion areas. Once we've moved the discussion areas, our first order of business will be to change the English/Lightweight section to show several lines of each reply, instead of just a subject line. This might help you skip over unintersting messages. It is tough to satisfy the need for message 'threading' while at the same time allowing a quick scan of messages. Maybe we can provide 2 methods of access in the new discussion areas. At any rate, please be patient as we make this move and please continue to provide feedback on what makes the discussion areas most useful. - Vin


NOTICE: Big Changes Coming!!!

Menotomy Vintage Bicycle's web site is going to
G R O W !
We're moving to a new domain: oldroads.com

The new web site will:

  • Have a new and improved Discussion Area (you can start using it today!)
  • Have a greatly expanded Vintage Bicycle Picture Database (and it will be a true searchable database)
  • Have a lot more resources available to Vintage Bicycle collectors.
  • It'll be a while before we've made the new site reach it's full potential, but you can start using it right now: oldroads.com