Discussion - English Roadsters

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Discussion - English Roadsters

Archived discussions: July 17, 1997 through Sep. 17, 1997
Archived discussions: September 17, 1997 through Nov. 17, 1997
Archived discussions: Nov. 17, 1997 through March 19, 1998
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Archived discussions: October 28, 1998 through January 5, 1999
Archived discussions: January 5, 1999 through March 27, 1999
Archived discussions: March 27, 1999 through June 30, 1999

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Subject: Hunhh!! Mountain Bike..What is it good for!
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 02:05
Entered by: claudia ()

Message:
One of the best days of my life was the one where some idiot broke into our garage and stole my Specialized Rockhopper leaving (and that proves he/she was an idiot) my Raleigh Sports and my Globe 7. As U2 lyrics have it, "outside it's America!" I think mountain bikes will be seen some day as America's version of Tulip Mania. If you don't know what that is...look it] up in your Britannica.




Subject: Tourist is out
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 09:43
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Bob, using the term "Tourist" for a 26-inch Raleigh Sports could confuse things even more. Most 28-inch rod-brake Raleighs are actually Raleigh Tourist models.




Subject: What is your favorite lock?
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 10:26
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Kryptonite makes a nice long black rubber coated lock that is perfect for the DL1,Sports, and anything else. It is marketed for the mountain bikes but is best because it is long enough to attach to almost anything. (I do a quite lenghty spell and the bike becomes cursed if it gets stolen.Works every time!!)




Subject: 3-speed prices
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 14:53
Entered by: TimH ()

Message:
I'd like to add my $0.02 on all the discussion about prices. Jim said "The people who pay the inflated prices are the folks who have the money (obviously) and not the inclination to track down the correct SA bit to make their '72 Sports complete". Well, I have to say there are other factors at work here. Namely geography. Sure, British 3-speeds are commonplace in some areas, Boston, NY, etc, but that is not as true here in Colorado. I'm constantly on the watch for bikes, an occasional visit to thrift stores over the past 5 years has not seen a single British 3-speed. Neither has cruising slowly by the occasional garage sale in the old parts of town turned up a single example. So, count your blessings those of you who live in 3-speed rich areas! BTW, I'm still in need of cones for my FG hubs.




Subject: bicycle history book
Entered on: Jun 21, 1999 01:43
Entered by: kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Someone mentioned a bicycle history book that included a lot of photos of old Raleighs, Rudges, etc. It was written by someone named Serena ???? Can anyone fill in the blanks for me? I'd love to read it.




Subject: What size is your wheel, Lars?
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:19
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I am sure that someone will have your wheel,but we need to know what size it is. Is it 26 X 1 3/8 or 28X 1 1/2 ? Is it a Westrick or Westwood pattern? Westrick is Raleigh's cheaper cross between Westwood and Endrick. Westwood is the full rod brake type rim and Endrick the cable brake type. Westrick rims were able to be used on a cable or rod brake type bike.




Subject: Like a ride??
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:20
Entered by: Mark R. (deenybeany@earthlink.net)

Message:
Hey gang, I would like to know if anyone in the central Jersey/ Philly area would like to meet at Washingtons' crossing for a spin up the Delaware canal to Lambertville for lunch or something, and then back to W.C. Nothing serious, or strenuous, just a simple get together to say hello, and have a spin together. I'd like to go in the next few weeks, or any good Sunday in July or August. I have a friend who's willing to come alone and ride one of my spare push bikes, so there would be at least three of us. If anyone is interested e-mail, and we'll make some plans. Mark R. in South Joisey




Subject: Evil fixed cup
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:29
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Both of the fixed cups on my pair of late 1940's R.R.A.(Raleigh Record Ace) machines have a altogether diffrent type of fixed cups that defy all known ways of removal!! I took it to the machine shop where I am having a tool made that will fit the Campy bottombracket tool I have. I had to have another adaptor thing made up for the standard fixed cups on Raleigh's .Now those come out at once without any problem.




Subject: What year was 26 T.P.I. threading abandoned?
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:45
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I phoned the Raleigh works a couple of years ago. I asked if I could buy new 26 T.P.I. cups for my bike. The fellow said that it was not used since the 1960's and everything is now 24 T.P.I. I KNOW that they used it up to probably the early 1980's My 1987 Raleigh had 24 t.p.i.cups. I said that Raleigh made millions of bikes over many years and I found it hard to believe they had no spares around to sell. He claimed that they do not have folks asking for them. I was referred to someone who wanted me to send out the old worn cups and he was going to resurface them and ship them back for an exorborate amount.I declined saying that that was a silly idea. No one admitted to having any spares to sell,they said "These are quite rare" I finally found a stash of them and some things have been retapped to use 24 T.P.I. Spindles have been much easier to find for some reason.Some things I do not want to re-tap.




Subject: Sport or Cruiser?
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:50
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
My neighbor"s son had a Schwinn that had 1-3/8 x 26 wheels, 3-speed and a cruiser style frame. I also ran across a step-thru model recently with the same type frame. The latter was particularly beautiful. Does anyone know what these bikes were called and if they were adult or youth models. Anyone in N.E. Texas have an interest in old Raleighs? If so I'd like you to E-Mail me. Mark P.




Subject: Don't move, this is a raid!! I want everything!!
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 13:05
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I have a list of items I buy with pictures and descriptions. I hit a shop with my list and$ 600.00 in cash and the delighted owner rushes around in a flurry opening every drawer, pulling out old stuff, giving me unbridled access to the basement, upstairs attic,or the back room. With glee the guy collects the 20's off the counter and finds me a box. (a big box!) The dusty Roadster that had been buried in the basement for 40 years is liberated at last! There are old tools and all sorts of goodies asleep still in some shops. "Since you know what it is, I"ll sell it to you." They are glad to be rid of this stuff that usually gets thrown out.The waste is unbelievable!! Box after box of vintage parts thrown away UNLESS THEY HAVE YOUR BUSINESS CARD AND KNOW WHAT YOU WANT.( Be sure to leave the basics such as Sturmey parts and cables so they can do repair work that comes in.) Usually they know someone else who has stuff for sale.




Subject: Lar's Rim
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 17:36
Entered by: Clyde ()

Message:
Hey Lar, tried to e-mail you about rim, but it did not transfer. I've got a 26" WESTWOOD pattern rim. Maybe it's the size you need. (Thanks Clarence for the wheel pattern nomenclature).




Subject: Rim types
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 19:11
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Clarence wrote: "Westrick is Raleigh's cheaper cross between Westwood and Endrick." This is not quite correct. I believe "Westrick" is a colloquialism for what is properly called the "Raleigh pattern" rim. These were not "cheap." This was used on the top-of-the line Raleigh models, and was considered a special deluxe feature. These rims are preternaturally strong. The less expensive caliper-braked models used the lighter but more easily damaged Endrick rim. My pair of '54 Superbe roadsters features 635 mm (28 inch) Westwood rims on the gent's model, 590 mm (26 inch) Raleigh pattern ("Westrick") rims on the lady's model. Both bikes have rod brakes, 4-speed dynohubs, locking forks, full chaincases, etc. I don't believe the Raleigh pattern rims were available in the 635 mm (28 inch) size.




Subject: 28" Raleigh pattern rims
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 21:39
Entered by: Louis (lorsini@aol.com)

Message:
Sheldon- I. like you didn't think Raleigh pattern rims were available in the larger size. Then, on a search for 28" Westwood rims, we ordered some from Winkel Wheel (it was the last of their stock and they were happy to get rid of them). When they arrived, lo and behold they were 28" Raleigh pattern rims, stamped Raleigh of England. Anyone ever see a roadster with these rims? Unfortunately we have 40 hole only, so we can't even build up a set of wheels with matching rims). We've got 5 or so of them. Know anyone who needs one (or two, or three, etc.?)




Subject: Wanted: nice 23" Raleigh Sports Mens Bike or Superbe
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 22:10
Entered by: Randy (hirelevel@mindspring.com)

Message:
I would like to hear about any Raleigh Sports that are in excellent condition. I prefer the forest green color which I had when I was a kid. It was the best and most comfortable bike I ever had and I want it back. I would also like to hear about any Raleigh Superbes you may have or know of. I used to memorize the Raleigh specs in back of the catalogs while imagining that I was pedaling along the rivers edge on a crisp spring morning just gazing at the countryside with the cool wind pushing me along the path....




Subject: History Book
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 11:43
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
KEVIN: The book is Serena Beeley, "A History of Bicycles (Wellfleet Press 1992). It's an overview, but with a strong British slant. The author is British, so that should be no surprise. It covers (though not in great detail), among many things, the origins of Raleigh, the famous Sturmey, Archer, Mills & REILLY 1902 patent, the origins of Rudge-Witworth, the rise of "lightweights" (what we call "sports") bikes during the interwar years, and so on. It has nice photos bikes by Sunbeam, Raleighs, Humber, BSA, Rover, and others. It reproduces several nice Raleigh posters. Best of all, Beeley opines, inter alia, that British bikes are the best made, French bikes are cheaply made, and Italian bikes are flashy but not as well-made as British. She devotes one sentence to Tulio Campagnolo. You go girl! But I don't want to overstate it -- the book only has two and one-half chapters out of ten that say anything about the specific bikes that we talk about in this forum. I picked it up about three years ago at a publishers overstock book store.




Subject: Rims, various types
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 13:14
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Personally, I feel that a bike with rod brakes (roller leaver) and Westwood rims to be better than one fitted with Raleigh pattern (Westrick) rims. The rod brake Sports bikes (26 inch wheel) got this treatment later on and thats why I said "cheaper". The Raleigh pattern rims were good for a while, but then the finish changed from a dull silver to the bright chrome. There is a timeline here as far as quality goes. The equipment changes thru the years reflect efforts to lessen the cost of production. The rod type 26 inch wheel sports was available with either type rim. Westwood or Raleigh pattern (Westrick)rims. The cable brake, 60's Superbes(models fitted with locking forks,Sturmey-Archer dynohub light sets, and prestitube minor racks) had the Raleigh pattern rims.The basic cable brake Sports (3 speed) used the Endrick rims. The Raleigh pattern rim was a BIG thing and they started making them in the early 1950's I believe. You see this exact type rim on the Schwinn bikes of the same time period. Only they had Schwinn's knurling down the center and the finish was diffrent because they were made by and marked "Schwinn" for use with their "Schwinn Racer."(Which used the Sturmey-Archer A.W. 3 speed also.) A English 28 inch Roadster with Raleigh pattern(Westrick) 28 inch wheels is hardly ever seen.They all had Westwood type rims.I do not believe that Raleigh made these in 28 inch for very long. The Dutch on the other hand, did use a 28 inch Raleigh pattern (Westrick) rim for years and still do. The tire size was 28 X 1 5/8 They had alloy rims and the tires were out of this world.(beautiful, Cream colored,all white tires and also Black tires with reflective sidewalls. The rims are lightweight and work well. They are not as bombproof as the all steel Westwoods though. Raleigh owned Gazelle in Holland for a time until it was sold or spun off into a seperate company as they are today. The all steel Westwood 28 inch rim has gone through some changes too in quality. The recent rims I bought from India are not as solid as earlier Dunlop or Raleigh ones. I was really surprised at the way the bike would glide so smoothly with the India rims.Perhaps this is because they are new and the other rims are older.(Although I keep them true) Holland is Sturmey's biggest market today.The Dutch bikes were and still are breathtaking.




Subject: Raleigh Pattern -vs- Westwood rims
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 13:39
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
The Raleigh pattern rim was indeed used on the top of the line bikes. I prefer the Westwood rims myself.




Subject: Swedish roadsters
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 16:49
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
I visited Goteborg, Sweden last August, and everybody (it seems) rides bicycles. They're not the classic things of beauty that the Dutch bikes or the Flying Pigeios are, but they're interesting, robust bikes. The best appear to be made by an outfit named "Rex", and their top o' the line bikes have 7-speed Nexus hub gears, hub roller brakes F & R, generators, rear racks, and these plastic things which resemble spiderwebs which cover about 40% of the rear wheel, and appear to be there to keep one's baggage (or skirt) away from the spokes. Weight does not appear to be a design consideration, but the bikes appear well-built and nicely finished. Not as pricey as a Pashley, either.




Subject: Weighty matters
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 19:36
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
Having participated in the discussion about how nice it would be to have a lightweight neo-roadster, I have to confess I like the heavyweight design of my Pashley. The weight gives it the feel of a substantial piece of machinery. I was surprised when I discovered I felt this way, because like many American cyclists, I was raised to believe lighter is always better. Perhaps the weight contributes to the stately ride of these machines, but whatever it does, a truly lightweight roadster might ruin the bikes' character.




Subject: Mobo Mini Bike
Entered on: Jun 24, 1999 10:47
Entered by: Dave, of course (flipndave@aol.com)

Message:
Hello there. I know this board is for English Roadsters, but a friend of mine as this Mobo Mini Bike and she's looking for some information on it. It's a childs bike, about 50 years old (she's had it since she was a child) and has "Made in Enland" on it. I thought maybe Raleigh may have made it for Mobo, since they dealt, mostly with riding toys (I think). Any info would be greatly appreciated!




Subject: Roadster weight
Entered on: Jun 24, 1999 14:08
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I agree with Dennis, The weight plays a part in the feel of the bike.I prefer a steel frame.




Subject: Indian Roadsters
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 10:52
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
I may be a day late and a dollar short (I didn't start following this discussion until a few weeks ago), but has ther been any discussion about the quality vs. price of the Ijndia-made single -speed rod-brake roadsters for sale at www.Retrobbike.com? If those things are actually selling for $395, maybe our DL-1s, Superbes, and the like are more valuable than we thought!




Subject: Modern roadster
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 17:28
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
I think the idea of a Modern roadster bike made with modern materials( not neccessarily aluminium)has real merit, even though I agree wholeheartedly that part of the charm and quality feel of our Raleighs is the greater weight and stability inherent in the design. I had really meant to say that I would THINK a modern bike built more along the lines of our roadsters would be MUCH more logical, and fun to ride, and be much more efficient then those God awful mountain bikes! I have caught myself checking the mt. bikes out in the shops, and thinking how pleasent a bike like ours would be if built with SOME of the technology of those overengieered monstrosities, especially in the wheels. I believe you could have a VERY strong wheel made exactlly like ours, only out of good aluminium. It would stop real well in the wet to boot. Reguardless, I'd never give up on MY DL-1 only to ride a bike like I've described, but I bet they would sell real well.




Subject: Repro Roadsters
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 20:33
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
$395!!! Turn your bike around!!!! I just purchased a Chinese DL-1 copy from Bicycle Arts for onl $159!! And shipping was only $18! (to Oklahoma) That's not bad, when you think about it: Wal-Mart sells those nasty mountain bikes with prices from $80 to $190!!! $159 for something that is ENJOYABLE to ride is not bad. Anyway, Cheers!!




Subject: $395 for an Indian Roadster???
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 21:29
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
From personal experience I'd say $395 for one of those Indian Roadsters is a little steep by about close to three times. Opt for the Chinese Roadsters. They are much better made copies, 'though they too suffer from teething problems. Watch those brakes on the Indians.




Subject: Roadster madness
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 21:42
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
$395 for an Indian roadster? Look around and you'll probably find a real Raleigh, not a knockoff, for less than $100 (and sometimes a LOT less). I have purchased three nice, 28-inch, rod-brake DL-1s in the past three months. Total outlay: $200. For lovers of English bikes, the good old U.S.of A. this is the Happy Hunting Ground.




Subject: cheap DL-1
Entered on: Jun 26, 1999 04:53
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
I wish I knew where you lived, Kevin. I'd come there and hang out at garage sales and frequent thrift shops for a couple weeks. Where I live the only used bikes to be found are WalMart leftovers. When the DL-1 was being sold, most of the roads in my area were unpaved soft sand, so a skinny-tire bike wasn't a good option. So the Happy Hunting Ground for a DL-1 must be somewhere that had lots of pavement in the 50s.




Subject: Hubs
Entered on: Jun 26, 1999 16:18
Entered by: John (Edward Moore) (mooreje1@juno.com)

Message:
I am rebuilding a Robin Hood. It came with an AW hub and someone came along and stole my wheels at the bike shop in which I was working on it. It was a 1952 AW. I was given a 18 58 SW to make up for my loss. Is it the late 50s SW which was famously weak or do I have the model wrong or is that an old wives tale? They also gave me an old shimano 3 speed which they said was virtually identical to an AW. But (I'm crying in my heart) I want a totally English bike. It's nice to know that there are people out here who are interested and knowledgeable. Thanks, John M




Subject: Hubs
Entered on: Jun 27, 1999 12:02
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
John (Edward Moore) told a tale of woe of having his '52 Robin Hood wheels purloined. Neither the SW nor the Shimano 3-speed is a suitable replacement. The SW was notoriously troublesome (though delightful if you get a good one...it's lighter, quieter, more efficient and has a wider range than the AW.) If the SW actually works OK without skipping in high gear, it would be the better choice...but the odds are agin it. I've got an SW on one of my bikes. It works pretty well, but I'm careful to NEVER stand up to pedal it (good idea with Sturmey-Archer hubs in general.) The old Shimano 3-speeds are no-way comparable to the AW. They require a different trigger and cable, and are very failure prone. They were designed for much lighter riders than average Americans. Current Shimano hubs are fine, but the old ones are bad news.




Subject: Shimano 3 Speed
Entered on: Jun 27, 1999 13:05
Entered by: Bob (vonomis@nep.net)

Message:
This on is for Sheldon. Regarding your June 27th posting about the weakness of the Shimano 3 speed, I have a 1984 Shimano 3 speed coaster brake model and I am wondering if it is a good idea to use it on my project bike. Even though I live in a hilly area which requires some (a lot, actually) of standing up to pedal, I only weigh 120 pounds so there wouldn't be as much strain on the rear hub than if I weighed more. Any thoughts on the suitability of this idea would be appreciated. Thanks.




Subject: My first ride on a Brit
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 02:11
Entered by: Dave (flipndave@aol.com)

Message:
I just bought a 67 ladies Robin Hood at a flea market for $10.00. I bought it because the price was right. It is well, used, but almost complete, missing only the chain guard. The rims are a bt rusty, but nothing that an SOS pad can't handle. I put some el cheapo tires on it, greased the bearings, oiled the hub and took it for a spin. I'm traditionally an American bike fan, but I enjoy the way this bike handles so much that I had to come and spout about it. After 30 plus years of riding and hacking up (I hang on the custom message board) American Iron, the first few minutes was a strange feeling, but I quickly got used to the way that the ol' Robin Hood seemed to leed me down the road, as if it knew exactly where I wanted to go. Now I see why there are so many fans of those old British bikes! I was thinking that I could use my Schwinn Continental for a canoe anchor and I can hardly wait to get a mans British frame!




Subject: Sturmey -Archer hubs
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 11:13
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I agree with Sheldon, Never, ever stand up to pedal with a Sturmey hub. Unless it is the A.S.C.fixed gear hub! I can overhaul all of them, and set the gear adjustment perfectly. I still would not stand up to pedal. I can really get up and fly on any one of my fleet of britbikes without much effort.




Subject: Stolen wheelsets?
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 11:34
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
They took your wheelsets? Or did they get thrown out by mistake and they were too ashamed to admit it? You can come up with another set of wheels without much trouble. You could put in a F.W. four speed hub in this bike and enjoy riding more. You do not need to use the S.W. or anything that is not proper for the bike. The A.W. hub is common, with a bit of looking around you can find a four speed hub. The F.W. four speed is nice.I would advertize for a alloy shell F.W. hub(made by Sturmey-Archer) This hub is no longer made, and you will have to look, but they are out there.This is tricky to adjust but worth it.(You can learn to adjust it) Just do not stand up and pedal with any of these hubs.




Subject: Old trick
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 12:33
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I remember the time a shop owner taught me this trick. We ran the tail light wire thru the fold in the metal edge of the fender(mudguard)connecting the rear light to the dynohub keeping the wire protected and out of the way. It still works.You can't always do it and I wouldn't pry it.




Subject: all original raleigh sprite and sport
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 12:37
Entered by: mark (rodina@rose.net)

Message:
i recently purchased a pair of his and hers raleighs fron an elderly lady one is a sprite one is a sport they are 100% all original and untouched and in very good codition,both are dark green. they are just sitting in my shop they need a good home. i do not know anything about old bikes but one had a 69 model rear hub .and both have perfect brooks leather seats .i paid 150.00 dollars for the pair i knew the were worth at least that much if any one is intrested in buying these bikes or can give me a rough estimate of what they are worth i would really be gratefull.thanks mark 912-498-1975




Subject: Shimano 3-speed coaster hubs
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 14:01
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Don't pass final judgement on shimano hubs yet. Here at OSU I rode a '71 Sears for many years daily equiped with a Shimano 3SC Coaster 3-speed. It never gave me any kind of trouble, even when I would load the rear rack up with 50+ pounds of groceries. The only thing you had to worry about was getting the axle nuts painfully tight after changing a tyre, 'else the wheel would walk out of the drop-outs. Don't like the Shimano triggers, they're plastic & don't have that snappy action that the Sturmey's do. Anyway, time to go ride!!




Subject: Shimano 3-speeds
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 14:46
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
My knock on Shimano 3 speeds was directed to the old freewheeling "333" model. The coaster brake versions tend to be quite reliable, if you can stand riding with a coaster brake (personally, I hate 'em!)




Subject: Stand-Up on a Sturmey 3 spd
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 16:38
Entered by: Phil (moger.graphics@snet.net)

Message:
The comments on standing up on your 3 speed really brought back memories to me. I remember as a kid learning the "hard" way not to stand up (or really be ready if you do). Last year I renewed my interest with a 70 Raleigh Sports and although at a mellow 50 years of age, I don't really want to stand on any bike, I still carry that "don't stand" rule around. After 35 years, I didn't forget. Funny, some guys go through their "mid-life crisis" by buying a 57 Corvette, or a Mazda Miata, or maybe even a 25 year old girl friend........not me, just 3 Sports and a 1978 Super Course.




Subject: Ditto on SA 3spd
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 22:27
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
I guess every kid who grew up with SA hubs has had this experience. I grew up in Florida and fromthe age of 11 rode mybike everywhere. Of course in the summer we wore those cheap flipflops and shorts. I had a Colombia bike with an SA hub. I remember distinctly one time when when I stood up to catch some friends who were riding up ahead racing to get to a playground. Pedaling as hard as I could, standing, the gear slipped. My foot smashed into the pavement and I landed right on the top tube. My foot healed okay, but they had to move me from tenor to soprano in the choir. I'm about out of those Shanghai Forever 28" single speeds. Only have a a dozen or so left in deep dark green.I've still got plenty of the 3 speed 26" jobs.




Subject: Shimano 333 hubs
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 23:02
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I have ridden many a mile on bikes with Shimano 333 hubs and have never had a problem. Of course I don't stand up. When I returned to biking after many years I was shocked to find that my legs don't support me like they used to. I also found that I couldn't ride hands-off like I did when I was a youth. Wes: when you say you had to crank on the axle nuts or the hub would come out of the dropouts, did the axle slip or turn out? If it turned out, you must have lost the special spacers that keep the axle from turning. Without those you can't keep em' in under high torque pedalling.




Subject: Hercules Tourist
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 23:18
Entered by: Kelly (rdywrsl@hollinet.com)

Message:
Just acquired an apparently vintage bicycle made by Hercules Cycle Co. of Birmingham, England. The only non factory part on this bike is the saddle. It is completely intact and operational but does need a deep massage. Anyone interested?




Subject: Raleigh Super Grand Prix
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 23:26
Entered by: Stacey ()

Message:
I feel lucky to have found this site after much searching. I have a Raleigh Super Grand Prix 10 speed, purchased in 1979 for about $269. It has been used very little over the years (far less than 100 miles) )...basically stored while I have actively ridden other bikes. It is in what I suppose could be called mint/nr. mint condition. I am considering taking it out on the street. Is this a good idea or should I preserve it? May seem to be a ridiculous questions as it's not very old, but your thoughts are of interest. As a relative Raleigh novice, I wonder...what was the last yr.& model Raleigh manufactured in England? Thanks.




Subject: Re: axle nuts on a Shimano hub
Entered on: Jun 29, 1999 00:07
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Fred, yes, I do have all the axle nuts, and special keyed serated washers (similar to the ones on the S-A hubs and MUCH better than the crappy little one on the 333 hub). Once I took the bike to a local shop here in town to get the 'deluxe treatment' to the rear wheel (new rubber & true it up) when I got it back I probably hadn't been on the bike 5 min. before the axle started creeping out of the drop-out from the torque! The guy's at the shop don't see too many 3-speeds, (not uncommon in Oklahoma) and didn't know that you have to tighten up tighter than a regular hub. I always tighten them up good and tight, but not so tight that they could cause damage. I also oil the threads up good too before I clamp 'em down. Anyway, gotta keep rollin'!!!!




Subject: 28 inch wheel D.L.1 Tourist with D.B.U kit
Entered on: Jun 29, 1999 13:42
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Well, it's about time one of these turns up!! And it's complete and unmolested too!! I will leave it intact although I hate the A.G. three speed dyno hub!! I always switch them to four speeds, using the F.M.,F.W,F.C, OR A.R.Hubs Since It is fitted for the D.B.U. Kit I will only overhaul, and clean it up. I will leave the origonal rear wheel in it so this one can stay as I found it.It is too nice to mess with. The F.M, F.C., and A.R. hubs were not meant for roadsters, rather the lightweight club machines, but I prefer them anyway in my fleet of Raleigh Roadsters.




Subject: buried treasure
Entered on: Jun 29, 1999 13:57
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
It was a seedy section of the city, the stairs were broken off, I had to use my own ladder that I lugged along, no electricity,water running in places, damp, slipery floors, large rats with red eyes scurrying by us. I looked through all the entire basement and got very,very dirty but the old shop that had been closed for years yielded some really good stuff.After finding the owner of the place, we went down there. I have not had this much fun in a long time. This place had been totally missed by previous toumb robbers or else the rats had gotten em.I climbed up grinning from ear to ear and went home to deposit the treasure in the new parts cleaner,take a shower and celebrate!




Subject: Check out Coventry Eagle on Ebay.com
Entered on: Jun 29, 1999 14:50
Entered by: Ray (Wheelman@nac.net )

Message:
I have a Coventry Eagle on ebay for sale. It is Item #124325972 and features some great vintage parts. Real fair to low reserve also.




Subject: Creeping 3 speed hubs
Entered on: Jun 29, 1999 15:13
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Wes: Now that I offered advice on how to prevent creep of 3 speed hubs I remembered that I worked on a bike last winter and never could keep the axle in the dropouts. The owner dumped it before I had a chance to solve the problem. An example of irony: Last winter someone gave me a wreck of a cheap MB. I took it out of courtesy but upon looking at it for several days took it to the dumpster. I just didn't want to work on c--p bikes. Later this spring a neighbor asked me if I would look at a bike and maybe fix it to ride. When he brought it to me I saw it was the piece of c--p I had thrown away. I believe in recycling but----




Subject: Raleigh or not?
Entered on: Jun 29, 1999 17:51
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
Found a very rusted Hawthorne in a junkpile. It has Raleigh-style fenders, reflector, chainguard,stem,cranks etc. The hub is an S.A. TCW 40-holer. The frame has curved tubes with the toptube having two small tubes side by side. How rusted is too rusted for fix-up? Glad to hear someone near my part of the world appreiates these things Wes K. Mark P. N.E. Texas




Subject: Re: How Rusted is too Rusted?
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 01:23
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Mark, it is good to hear from another Brit bike fan in the middle of 'Crusier Country'. Anyway, how much rust is too much rust? Well, before I was into the English bikes I tinkered with the Ballooners. I was given a rusted out 50's JC Higgins frame. It was nicknamed 'Rust' and had sat neglected for 20 years. The original painted rims were rusted clear through, nothing was left of the fenders, & water had gotten into the seat stays and frozen (ouch!!). So after some sandblasting, brazing, paint, and new fenders and a set of good old rims, I had a very comfy bike, 'till I traded it for a '52 Raliegh Sports (best trade I ever made). As long as at least the frame is sound, I'd say you've got something to work with!




Subject: Triumph brake pads
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 09:40
Entered by: Robert (g8orade@yahoo.com)

Message:
I'm looking for some replacement brake pads for a late 40/early 50s era Triumph 3spd. These are for the U-brake that pulls toward the rim, not clichers. I ordered some Raleigh pads from a shop in Ohio, but the screw is bigger than the bracket hole, and I really don't want to bore it if I don't have too. Also the new ones are much smaller than the original parts. Any ideas, pls email me. I've got to think in England, or maybe China? someone is still using bikes with brakes like these, and making the shoes and pads... maybe? :) Thx! Robert




Subject: Club Ride
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 10:54
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
This morning I rode my first "club ride" on my Raleigh Sports. It started at the far north end of the city bike path, and went downtown -- an organized urban/suburban ride. The club folks were on bikes of every sort -- mountain bikes, hybrids, recumbants, road bikes (including a snazzy Kestrel). It took little effort to stay up front with the "fast" riders. Yes, people noticed the bike. "Was that biker made in Holland?" "What a comfortable looking saddle." (I put a new B-66 on it, switched the B-72 to the Dunelt.) Roadies and hybrid riders avoided a section of cobblestone -- I rode right over it -- cobblestone is fun, even quaint, don't you think? I felt that my bike, which some probably mistook for a Huffy, was better-suited for this kind of riding than any of the 30 or so bikes out there with me. I intend to do club rides on the Sports and DL-1 more often -- I'll quietly spread the gospel of British 3-speeds -- hope none of you mind.




Subject: Roadster Rolling Resistance?
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 11:55
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
Hey: maybe I'm missing something, or there's something wrong with my bike. I have a Rudge Sports DeLuxe with a front dynohub. It presently has Kenda 26x1-3/8" inflated to 55psi, and the bike is somewhat tough to pedal, especially in 3rd. I've lubed all the bearings, and I know it probably weighs the better part of 40 pounds; but I've seen other contiributors to this list (Keith?) write of keepin'up with the Kleins, and this bike doesn't seem to have it! Leisurely cruising, yes, but it feels overgeared.




Subject: Can 3-speeds keep up?
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 14:14
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Chris: My Sports easily weighs 40 pounds with loaded, small panniers (for commuting), a rack, and a large water bottle. But it kept up with the Aluminum and Carbon bikes I saw this morning. This was not, however, a group of 25+ mph racers either -- they just buy bikes and clothes that LOOK like the European peloton. I read about some university study Schwinn used to refer to which concluded that a bicycle's weight really doesn't matter unless you're going uphill. My morning ride was on a bike path along a river. Flat (really downhill!). We were probably only in the 12-15 mph range, Kestrel and all -- sorry if my boasting led you to think otherwise. Regarding efficiency, I once read that a LOT of energy is wasted in an epicyclic hub -- almost 50%. SHELDON! What's the truth on this? (Like the rest of you, I'll still ride mine regardless).




Subject: Rolling resistance Rudge
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 14:50
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I have a few suggestions for the Rudge. Replace all cones,berings,and make sure it is adjusted perfectly, find 26 X 1 3/8 E.A.3 tires that go to 90p.s.i,they are out there, use a Schwinn thornproof tube that will handle the high pressure. replace the rear cog on the A.W. 3 speed(put on a 22 tooth rear cog) Find a Raleigh Sprite 10 speed bike from the 70's remove the bottom bracket spindle from the Sprite and you will be putting it in the Rudge,(keeping the bottombracket cups in place) remove the front deraileur type front chainring, romove the larger ring and keep the 40 tooth front ring .(The deraileur front crankset will accept the 1/2 X 1/8 standard chain that came with the Rudge!) Change the front sproket on the Rudge using the 40 tooth sprocket from the Sprite on the Rudge. (Save all origonal parts not in use as they go to the bike and are collectible.) What we are doing here is reducing the number of teeth on the front sprocket from 46 or 44 to 40 tooth.This is easy, The Rudge and the deraileur Sprite both are cottered crank bikes. Use a wood claw hammer to remove the cotter pins, or the Park cotter pin removal tool. (Wear eye protection) You will have a 40 tooth front and a 22 tooth rear. This setup will make the A.W. hub more palatable especially in hilly areas and gives you a more pleasant gear range. You will be riding in third most of the time,and really enjoying it, keeping the other two gears for hills, Or you could do this:remove the internal parts of the 3 speed hub and insert the internals of a 4 speed F.W.(Sturmey-Archer) into the shell of the A.W 3 speed. This switch will help you avoid the hassle of rebuilding the rear wheel and keep you from the possible problem of the spoke drilling in the hub not matching the rim drilling.(The rim manufacturers used 36 and 40 hole spoke drillings)OR: you can order a Sturmey- Archer 5 or even a 7 speed hub from your local bike shop.(Here you have to be sure to order the right drilling 36 or 40 and you would have to rebuild the rear wheel as you cannot switch internal parts here.They do not let you do that trick after about 1981 or so. Find a shop who can order from Sturmey-Archer in Nottingham, England. Anyway, you want to stay away from Shimano with this Rudge using only Sturmey-Archer parts. A British bike should have only a British hub.Or: have the shop special order you a set of ALLOY rims in 26 X 1 3/8 E.A.3 and use the 90 P.S.I.tires.(You will get better braking out of the alloy rims.(Replace the pads with something compatable with alloy rims. The shop may tell you that the alloy rims are unavailable, but they are out there, do not give up. I want to point out that if you use a alloy rim, or if you change the front sprocket you alter the character of the bike especially if you switch the front sprocket on the Rudge.(because the Rudge has a human hand pattern that makes the bike so neat.And is a cool conversation piece.)( Perhaps just change the rear hub or hub sprocket and leave the front sprocket on.) You can do these changes on almost any British bike: Raleigh ,Phillips, Dunelt, Etc. If the bike has an enclosed chainguard, then you cannot use any front sprocket that is smaller than 44 tooth.(What I am saying is, if you have an enclosed, oilbath type chainguard then leave the origonal crankset alone!) I have tried to use the 40 tooth front sprocket WITH the enclosed guard and it doesn't work.This is your bike, it is best to leave it as origonal as you can, but then again YOU are riding it and deserve to be comfortable.Have the bike shop order from Sturmey- Archer a Brooks B-90/3 Leather saddle! These are so comfortable, really, the best seat possible, you can ride all day and never be sore. It makes riding so very delightful. If you take any of my advice at all, Just switch the seat! It will be $100.00 or so, But it will be the best$100.00 you will ever spend, kind of like a really nice pair of shoes that you wear every day.




Subject: Keeping up
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 15:04
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
If you play around with the selection of rear sprockets (14 tooth to 22 tooth)or use a hybrid setup and are in shape physically, then you can lead the pack on that old Raleigh. My friend keeps up with 30 year old fellow riders on his Humber Tourist from 1940 and he only uses 3rd gear! and he is 73 years old!! It is unbelievable to see him. He is in top condition, because he has been doing this for years along with daily swimming.




Subject: Keith's Rudge
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 15:12
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I forgot to mention that you will need to scare up some new cones for that dynohub and have it overhauled using Trek's red synthetic bering grease. and have it adjusted perfectly. Even so, the dynohub is slowing you down, dude! and I would go to a standard front hub and use a new Halogen light set for safer night riding. Here we have speed vs.origonality and safety vs.origonality.




Subject: Gearing
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 15:18
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
To amplify what Clarence has suggested, I would say that I'm very happy with the 24 tooth Sachs cog Sheldon provided me. With it, I can easily climb the grades I encounter when riding out of the river valley. 46 x 24. Use it! Love it!




Subject: Keep the pattern chainrings
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 15:20
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I forgot to mention that one advantage of using the 24 tooth cog is that I can have a low gear (37.5 inches), but keep the Raleigh Heron pattern chainring.




Subject: Hiawatha
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 16:44
Entered by: Aaron (vespa321@yahoo.com)

Message:
I was given an english roadster about a year ago. I have decided to refurbish it to be my daily rider. The bike is a 1968 Hiwatha Gambler with a sturmey AW hub. Many of the components have the Raleigh Logo such as the cranks, stem and sproket. I would like to find these items for the bike, preferably used and in good condition : correct style chain gaurd (clamp on type), front sprocket, crank (for sprocket side) and a 3 speed trigger shifter. I would like to find out more about the Hiawatha Gambler bikes if anyone has any info. Thanks




Subject: Sachs 24 tooth cog
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 19:35
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Perhaps the easiest way to alter the ratios on the A.W. 3 speed (or any other hub) would be to order a Sachs 24 tooth cog. If Sheldon can supply them that would be great.




Subject: Gearing down a 3 speed hub
Entered on: Jun 30, 1999 21:41
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
When I customized my 3 speed Sears bike I wanted something that would handle the hills. I did two things: one; I installed a 2 chainwheel crankset. You probably wouldn't want to do that on a Rudge. Two; I installed a 28T cog from a Shimano freewheel. The Shimano cogs have six splines so you need to remove every other one. You may also need to add a spacer. I got this Idea from Sheldon (who needs a last name) Brown who has done it all. The bike climbs. If you want to see it go to my website page URL = http://members.tripod.com/~fredhaj/austropage.html




Subject: Cogs
Entered on: Jul 2, 1999 09:51
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I purchaced the 24T from Harris a couple of weeks ago, so I assume Sheldon has them on hand. I recall the pointer about the Shimano cassette cogs -- I've got a Dremel, so I try a 28 some time too -- maybe on the DL-1. I took the plunge and ordered one of Stephen's Forevers. I find that 26" sports bikes are plentiful here, but 28" roadsters are like hen's teeth. Found my DL-1 at a garage sale last year, but haven't seen one anywhere around here since. Anyone whse set up a Forever have any pointers? The only 40 hole hub I have that's not on a bike is a 65 Sachs (Sears). When I took it apart the grease was still fresh and everything looks good. Would it be worth rebuilding the Forever with the '65 Sachs, or should I hold out for an SW? In other words, were 60s Sachs hubs as dependable as a similar vintage SA?




Subject: 2 Cents on Hubs, Chinese Roadsters
Entered on: Jul 2, 1999 22:45
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I have been having good luck with finding S-A parts at an older bicycle shop in Tulsa. They started as a Raleigh dealer in 1923 and started selling Schwinn-only when Raleigh started making its bikes in Asia in the early 70's. They have been a great help and have often times come up with NOS S-A parts. Check with older bikeshops in your community. I've ordered a Forever and would also like to know if there are any set-up quirks before it gets here. Keepa cycling!!




Subject: Sears bike but whose hub?
Entered on: Jul 2, 1999 23:45
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj)

Message:
In my note about modifying a Shimano freewheel cog I didn't mention that the bike is Austrian. The hub looks like a S-A except for the housing which has 3 raised and radiused bands about 1/4" wide and spaced the same. It is marked "Sears". The original shifter was a S-A and I replaced it with a new S-A. Do you think Sears just spec'ed the housing uniquely or could it be something else e.g., a Sachs. I have never seen a Sachs so can't shed any light on that aspect of the hub. Anyway, whatever it is it has held up under a lot of hard hill climbing.




Subject: Belt/Fujita Saddle
Entered on: Jul 3, 1999 15:13
Entered by: Nick (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Anyone know anything about a Belt leather racing style saddle? I just picked one up for all of $2 used and it appears to be a Brooks knock-off, made by the Fujita Saddle Mfg. Co, Tokyo. Would be interested to know the approximate date. Any thoughts? Thanks! Nick Martin




Subject: Sears Hub
Entered on: Jul 3, 1999 15:15
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Fred, I also have an Austrian made S-A clone. Mine is not a Sears, but is a Schwinn-Approved. Someone once told me that it was made by the Austrian Division of Sturmey-Archer, but that claim may be bogus.




Subject: Raleigh 3 speed - how old?
Entered on: Jul 3, 1999 16:21
Entered by: Kathy (kpacolvin@aol.com)

Message:
My vintage Raleigh Sports has "AW"on the Sturmey-Archer hub logo and "three speed" but no date code. Under the seat lug is the code "RAA 07708" which is not listed here. Any help would be greatly appreciated!




Subject: English bicycles on Ebay
Entered on: Jul 3, 1999 17:53
Entered by: A. Martin ()

Message:
Saw these english bikes on Ebay today. Nice original Rudge with dynohub, item #123867480. Nice Raleigh, item #12620830. Women's Hercules, item #126345136.




Subject: Belt (Fujita) saddles
Entered on: Jul 3, 1999 21:57
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
The "Belt" saddle was original equipment on the mid-70s Fuji S-10-S. This particular bike model was a watershed in the development of Japanese bikes for the U.S. market. The S-10-S was the first Japanese 10 speed to come in a suitable size range, and to be good enough quality to compete seriously in the U.S. These saddles were quite good, virtually indestructable, but notoriously slow to break in.




Subject: front chainring conversion
Entered on: Jul 4, 1999 18:27
Entered by: Warren (warbetty@netcom.ca)

Message:
I was under the impression that the newer narrower chainrings/cranksets have no compatibility problems with older three speed and single speed chains...does anyone have any experience here? I'm about to put attempt just such a conversion on a Dunelt and would like to know before I start.




Subject: Hercules road bike?
Entered on: Jul 5, 1999 02:28
Entered by: Chris (rokinrob@bellsouth.net)

Message:
I have what I think is a Hercules touring or road bike for the 40's. It is in rough condition and I am unable to fully read the serial number. It has a 3 spd. internal hub w/oil port and a 3 pc. crank assembly. Any ideas as to what I have?




Subject: Sears 3 speed hubs
Entered on: Jul 5, 1999 13:02
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Another firm besides Brampton fittings in England that also copied the Sturmey- Archer A.W. 3 speed hub was Steyr- Daimler- Puch of Graz, Austria. The only difference was that this hub had the diffrent shell with the 3 raised ripples.I have seen Steyria leather seats, generator sets, 3 speed hubs and other parts.




Subject: Humber bottom bracket
Entered on: Jul 5, 1999 13:43
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I have a strange war time Humber bike that uses an adjustable bottom bracket cup in place where the fixed cup should go. Meaning it has been threaded to take two adjustable cups. I suppose that they were out of fixed cups that day at the factory. The Raleigh fixed cup is a nightmare to remove and replace unless you have a very special tool to remove it.Everything works very well and it sure makes overhauling this one easy. The finish is black on the cranks and handlebars.




Subject: Re: front chainring conversion
Entered on: Jul 5, 1999 13:57
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
No problemo.




Subject: Removing Raleigh (and other) fixed cups
Entered on: Jul 5, 1999 14:02
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
It isn't difficult to make a "uinversal" fixed-cup tool out of a 5/8" bolt, nut, and a few washers. I describe this at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tt-bbcups.html




Subject: SOME PART INFO
Entered on: Jul 5, 1999 14:09
Entered by: JOHN (RHUBARB59@AOL.COM)

Message:
Hi, I have a 3 speed Raleigh folding bike from the early 60's. Can any one help me with the cost of a chain gaurd,air pump& kick stand? The color is brown if that matters. What about replacement cost if I wanted another? Can any one help me?




Subject: removal tool
Entered on: Jul 5, 1999 15:04
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Sheldon's bolt type removal tool works well and I am grateful for his article on this. I just got sick of the bolt breaking every now and then. I think that it is time that someone markets a good shop quality tool for this application.




Subject: club type bike
Entered on: Jul 5, 1999 15:17
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I have a club machine, It is a 24 inch frame Raleigh Lenton Sports in bright green. It is made of Reynolds 531 tubing, and says Reg Harris model and has cool Lenton Sports decals on the down tube and Raleigh on the main tube. It has Dunlop 26 X 1 1/4 alloy rims, a Sturmey -Archer F.M hub in alloy, a Airlite front hub, and Brooks leather seat.The bike is really fast, and has nice lugwork. How many of these were made? The serial # has the prefix BS underneath the BB shell.




Subject: In mourning
Entered on: Jul 6, 1999 14:27
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
I'm still not over the time when my wife got mad at her Sears Austrian 3-speed and gave it away. We lived in an apartment and she needed the space. Nest time I see one I'll grab it. That bike was a better rider than the Varsity or the Murray 3-speed (the worst bike I'd ever owned) I owned at the time. That Murray would bend and rust while I just looded at it. Lastly can a TCW hub be modifyed to operate without the coaster brake and are TCWs the same as the Torpedo Dreigang 3-speed coaster hub?




Subject: Austrian Sears
Entered on: Jul 6, 1999 15:03
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I passed over a ladies Austrian Sears a few weeks ago. The asking price was $2. It was in fair shape, but my wife would've been a little upset -- I need to sell bikes, not buy more! (Anyone want a 1989 Centurian Triathlon/time trial bike?) Should've picked it up for the parts, including the metal fulcrum sleeve, etc. So, were these Austrian Sears bikes decent? Is my assumption (that's all it is) that the hub is Sachs incorrect?




Subject: Sears Austrian
Entered on: Jul 7, 1999 09:57
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
To answer Keiths question on the merits of the Sears Austrian, I would say that it is a much better bike than the Huffys, Murrays, and Free Spirit bikes common in the 60's. My Austrian is a very spare bike. There is nothing in the design or hung on it that isn't needed. In appearance it resembles a racer. It has a lugged frame and a cottered crank. The components are steel. As evidence of quality, the chrome is good in spite of the use it had and the bad road conditions here in NY. The original owner used it for a couple of years to deliver newspapers. For those interested, the markings on the hub are as follows: SEARS (script 1/4 high) HUB MODEL 903.21 (small script) (3 raised rings) 3-SPEED 65 (small) | | large script) I assume the "65" means 1965. Once again; if you want to see what my Austrian looks like now, go to my website: http://members.tripod.com/~fredhaj/home.html




Subject: What I hear all the time
Entered on: Jul 7, 1999 12:51
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I never have heard of a 28 inch wheel, never seen those kind of rims before. What do these rods do? Sorry, no Sturmey-Archer cables, no shifters, they never made a 4 speed hub.(he was wrong, they did!) You mean 3 speed don't you? Never seen that kind of brake pad, can't order that,(he can, he is just stupid( What's it off of again? No used bikes here,sorry. No cones, no Raleigh parts left, we threw it all away, The owner has it somewhere and I do not have time to go searching for it.




Subject: Don't worry.
Entered on: Jul 7, 1999 12:55
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
"Wouldn't sell it huh? Don't worry, my best friend is dating his daughter. We'll get it, give it time."




Subject: Mud Ride/Club Ride
Entered on: Jul 7, 1999 13:19
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Last night after a thunderstorm I took the Dunelt out on the bike path, which is under construction. It had about 1 to 2 inches of fresh mud on most of it. It was a slippery and fun ride, and I learned like never before why they are called "mudguards." The mud was so plentiful that it filled up the mudguards, along with leaves and gravel, and I'd have to kick the pedal hard to keep it from binding the wheel. When I did, mud would sometimes shoot out of the front of the front fender like a little cannon. But the mudguards kept me clean, other than some small globs on my feet. A large amount oozed out of the fenders and caked along the edges. It took me a good 10 minutes to hose all of the guck out and off of the mudguards -- several pounds of mud, easily. This morning I took another club ride. One of the riders, who recycles old wrecks he finds (truly a kindred spirit) especially admired the Sports. He'll be an easy convert.




Subject: Austrian decency
Entered on: Jul 7, 1999 13:41
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
I thought my wife's Austrian was a wonderful bike. I rode it many miles with baby seat loaded. It would sway if loaded with child but I almost always had the right gear. The clunky Magura twist grip shifter was replaced with a common Shimano and it always worked. Ours was a '69, bright blue with chrome everywhere. I think the men's version was dark green. I'll probably get one while I'm still looking for that Raleigh dreambike. Anyone want a pre-index Univega Gran Sprint or a Schwinn American 3-speed middleweight? The Uni' is all Suntour.




Subject: Deaccumulating bicycles
Entered on: Jul 7, 1999 15:41
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I hear ya, Mark. Within the past month I've sold 3 Schwinn middleweights -- 2-speed kickback American, 2-speed Jaguar, and a Heavy-Duti, as well as a Schwinn Panther ballooner. Don't miss 'em a bit. Sold the Trek 5200 OCLV carbon. Don't miss it either. Still have at least two road bikes to sell -- will keep a '72 Mercian and '71 International, and maybe a Campy NR-equiped Lotus. Want to keep it to bikes I really like -- that will be mostly the bikes we talk about here. I like finding good homes for them -- a neighbor bought the American for what I paid for it -- and rides it around the 'hood a lot.




Subject: information wanted {raleigh 20 inch folding }
Entered on: Jul 7, 1999 20:56
Entered by: john.b (rhubarb59)

Message:
Iwanted to know if I could buy orig. parts for my folding bike. I am looking for info on the kick stand and where it is to be placed.Also any info on where to get an orig chain guard for it, and a air pump. any help would be great thanks john b




Subject: information wanted {raleigh 20 inch folding }
Entered on: Jul 7, 1999 20:57
Entered by: john.b (rhubarb59)

Message:
Iwanted to know if I could buy orig. parts for my folding bike. I am looking for info on the kick stand and where it is to be placed.Also any info on where to get an orig chain guard for it, and a air pump. any help would be great thanks john b




Subject: Disaccumaltion of rolling stock
Entered on: Jul 8, 1999 12:50
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
I've got a plan to move some of my old steeds. At our church we have a yearly missions auction. I plan to make some of the oldies roadworthy and give them to be auctioned. It can really be a silly activity especially when old crazy stuff gets bid up high. Of course it could be tax advantagious if you are into that sort of thing.




Subject: Sturmey Archer Hubs
Entered on: Jul 8, 1999 13:32
Entered by: Ralph (rfjacobson@aol.com)

Message:
I only occasionally hit this sight, so there are usually lots of messages for me to browse. I was interested in the thread about three speed hubs. Specifically, the comments about "Not standing." I've owned my share of roadsters,and worked on many more, and have never had a problem with pawls breaking or slipping while standing. I've seen broken pawls inside hubs, but have never heard a horror story from a customer about the consequences of standing while rididng. I'm a 220 lb. guy, and now that I've seen the comments, I figure I'll be a bit leery from now on about standing on a hill...Thanks guys!




Subject: Too much stuff
Entered on: Jul 8, 1999 13:43
Entered by: Keith (velohund)

Message:
I'm starting to get involved with a local group called "Simply Living", an environmentally-counscious group that advocates, among other things, less stuff. They call too much stuff "accumulitis." Well, I go along, but English bikes are excepted, of course. I hope it can be an avenue for me to find people who are interested in bikes as transportation in this area.




Subject: Whomever dies with the most stuff, wins!!
Entered on: Jul 8, 1999 14:23
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
A ghostly fleet of moving vans will be waiting outside the pearly gates when I cash in. I am not leaving anything behind!!




Subject: Hercules 3 Speed
Entered on: Jul 8, 1999 16:51
Entered by: Teresa (teresa@invivo-corp.com)

Message:
I have what I believe to be about a 1960?? Hercules 3 speed. Is it worth restoring? Where can I find information regarding such?




Subject: Standing while riding
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 09:28
Entered by: Bill (Wakers3883@aol.com)

Message:
Just what happens in the hub if the bike jumps out of gear while riding? I sometimes have to stand while climbing a hill and have not had a problem comming out of gear. What are the chances of this happening if a bike is well maintained and the gears properly adjusted.




Subject: Those itty bitty gears
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 10:42
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I too sometimes "stand up" to pedal, though I prefer to remain in the saddle for most hills. I wonder if using a smooth pedal stroke (many years of fixed gear riding) helps avoid the probem. Anyway, I wonder the same thing. Do the gears actually slip past each other? How is that possible? Or does something break? Yes, those are tiny eency-weency gears bearing all that stress.




Subject: Forever and Ever. Amen
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 10:49
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com )

Message:
Last night I accumulated one of Steve's Chinese Forevers. I admire Steve's pluck for importing these bikes. It rides pretty well. I've only put a few miles on it, but nothing has fallen off so far. I recall awhile back some comparisons between the Forever, the Avon, and the DL-1. My take on the comparison differs from those reviews, but rather than go into detail, I'd say if you really want a DL-1, and you can find one, by all means buy it over the Chinese machine. But if you absolutely can't find a DL-1, or, like me, want a "beater" roadster, the Forever fits the bill. One billion Chinese comrades can't be wrong. Or can they?




Subject: Summertime roadster ride
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 12:25
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
The weather is perfect right now for wonderful evening/ nightime riding with that special someone. I took out my Sunbeam roadster this time, and we had a most incredible time riding along the path under the moonlight. Life is vibrant and exciting again with good things in the future to look forward to. I find myself zipping along in top gear so as not to be late and dissapoint her. The rack holds a large wicker picknick basket and a rolled up blanket. We rode around the entire lake, across the covered bridge. She is surprised that I show up everytime on a diffrent bike!




Subject: Finding a DL1
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 12:53
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
Perhaps one way to find a DL1 is to check with your local church foriegn mission society to see if anyone is returning to your area from a place where DL1s are ridden. Maybe one could be located and brought back to you. That is how we got my wife's Austrian. The family that had it had been in Germany. I think I'll contact my college's alumni office to see if anyone I knew then is returning from the field. I'll let you all know if I'm successful. Please keep praying.




Subject: Comments on Forever, New Raleighs in India
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 12:56
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hello Brit Bike Fans! Earlier this week I recieved the Forever roadster I had ordered from Stephen. Although I had a few teething trouble, I soon figured how to straighten them out (mainly the front fork). The biggest improvement I have made so far has been the addition of a rebuilt '64 AW hub and a late 50's NOS trigger, metal pully and fulcrum, & some NOS ribbed cable to complete the look. The Forever I got has a copy of a Brooks B-73 saddle. It is good, exept the springs are really weak (going to order some from Brooks) The next step to improving it is putting a GH6 dynohub on the front wheel. It is a really great bike! On the other note: A friend of mine from India told me that in India for $36 US you can buy a 28" rod brake roadster made by Raleigh! I asked for more details and he said that you can go into an Indian bike shop and find brand new Raleigh roadster single speeds. Heron headbadge, chainring, and all!!! I don't know anymore than that. The Raleighs are probably Indian or African made.




Subject: Great Gal!
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 12:59
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
She notices your bikes! Thats wonderful! We all think you should hang on her. .




Subject: Chinese top tube
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 15:07
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
How high is the top tube on a chinese 28" wheel men's model? do they come in different sizes? The only hub i have is a TCW 40 hole. Can this hub be modifyed for no coaster brake since ther would already be a rear rod brake in place? Or would three brakes be better than two?




Subject: Dyno taillight?
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 20:26
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Hi all! What a neat resource this is. I'm looking for a Dyno taillight--the older blunt kind rather than the pointy housing. Anyone have one they'll sell? Actually, I'd settle for the later style also... Thanks.




Subject: Cottered BB's
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 20:36
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Were only Raleigh BB cups threaded 26TPI? I'm working on a Dursley Pederson semi-replica, and am up to the part where I need to build the frame. All my lugless BB shells are threaded "standard" 24TPI. Will I have a problem finding a cottered BB assembly to fit?




Subject: RTF (Read the FAQ)!
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 21:04
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Note to myelf: Have a good look through Sheldon "Omni Bicycle FAQ" Brown's website before I ask questions like the above... :-)




Subject: Chinese Roadster sizes
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 22:11
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Mark: The Chinese roadsters are a 22" frame only. The one I ordered is Hunter Green and it is real sharp looking (it also breaks the monotony of my black 6 other Brit bikes I own). If you are going to use the TCW just go ahead and use it as is, I hear the brakes in the TCW were real unreliable. You might be able to find an AW from someone on this site. Keepa riding, and stay cool!!!!!




Subject: Re: Slipping gears
Entered on: Jul 9, 1999 22:25
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
A few postings up people were wondering hat happens when the hub slips out of gear, & I've wondered too. I think what happens is that the clutch doesn't get "engaged" properly with the parts its driving & causes you to go a free 'wheelin foward a bit. If you've ever taken an AW hub apart, you'll see just how narrow the little splines are that the clutch drives in in low (1st) gear. If its not adjusted right it nicks those little corners off and you know what happens. Anyway, thats one idea on what happens!!




Subject: I know where there is a DL-1 for sale
Entered on: Jul 10, 1999 00:26
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I had to think a while before posting this note but I'll be a good dooby and maybe someone will get their heart's desire-I have mine. Babcock Bikes in Endicott, NY, (607 754-0886) has a decent DL-1. The asking price is &299. I bought my DL-1 last summer and when I mentioned it to Kevin Babcock he told me he had one down cellar. I guess I gave him too much information because he turned down my offer, which I thought was high already. I have been hoping he would come around but heck, I have a bunch of Raleigh 3 speeds and my own DL-1 and I don't need anymore unless it something unique. OK Fred, click on the enter bar before you change your mind.




Subject: '78 Raliegh International Information Wanted
Entered on: Jul 10, 1999 04:24
Entered by: Darrin (darrinh@pacificcoast.net)

Message:
I have a '78 International road frame that I ride and enjoy. The parts on it are not original, and I wonder about what it had on it, how much it sold for new, etc. It may be a dream, but I'd like to find some original photos or pamphlets on it. I was told it was raced in the '78 Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, Canada. Any thoughts, or am I in the wrong place? Where can I go?




Subject: Raleigh International
Entered on: Jul 10, 1999 13:32
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Darrin, the Retro Raleigh site at http://www.speakeasy.org/~tabula/raleigh/raleigh-home.html has specs on the International, as well as other lightweight Raleighs. I loved my International, which I bought for $450 in 1978 (had to make time payments--I was a college student at the time) after it had been sitting in the bike shop window for a couple of years.




Subject: Why aren't new European style city bikes available here?
Entered on: Jul 11, 1999 03:52
Entered by: Paul ()

Message:
I was pleased to find this discussion group about English Roadsters and Sports bikes. I was beginning to think that I was the only person who wanted a European-style city bike with a 3, 4, or 7 speed internal hub, good brakes, lights, fenders, North Road handlebars, etc. I have read through the last few months of your postings. In mid-June there were a number of postings lamenting the fact that there were no modern bikes being made and sold similar to the very practical 3-speed English Sports bikes which used to be imported here years ago. Why is this? Isn’t Raleigh Industries still making and selling these in England? Its web site http://www.raleighbikes.com/ (not Raleigh U.S.A) shows at least one model, the Chiltern, which seems similar to the older Sports bikes. (Raleigh’s description: Hi Tensile semi-oversize frame, Sturmey Archer trigger shifters plus 3 speed hub, Non slip platform pedals, Full length silver mudguards, Rear carrier, Chainguard, Alloy propstand, and Pump Colour: Gloss Black R.R.P. £170.) Similar bikes are made and sold in other European countries. Trek makes bikes for the European market which have fenders, chain guards, generator, lights, package racks, etc. Giant does, too. Why can’t we buy them here? I am aware that there are a couple of companies which have begun importing Chinese and Indian Roadsters, most of them single speed and a few with a 3-speed derailleur. While this is good, why aren’t any modern city bikes from England, Holland, Germany and other countries being imported or similar ones made and sold by U.S. bike manufacturers?




Subject: Brooks saddles
Entered on: Jul 11, 1999 08:55
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
I was amazed at the variety of new Brooks saddles still being made for roadsters. Some are extra heavy, with extra springs. Does anyone have a recommendation on the most comfortable one of the lot? Thanks!




Subject: Full-cover Raleigh roadster chainguard for sale
Entered on: Jul 11, 1999 17:43
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
I just spotted an original, unused (NOS) Raleigh full-cover chainguard for a 28-inch roadster on ebay. Search for number 128756557.




Subject: Brooks Saddles
Entered on: Jul 11, 1999 20:32
Entered by: Michael J. ()

Message:
Kevin the Irish Hiker, I ride my mountain bike with a Brooks B-17. Very comfortable and nice looking. My riding buddy has a Brooks Conquest. If you can find it, this is the one to buy. It has heavy coils that never bottom out. The cat's meow! Look at Rivendell Bicycle Works at rivendellbicycles.com. They are the most enthusiastic supporters of Brooks. You'll have a lot to read about them in their web catalogue.




Subject: Re Brooks Saddles
Entered on: Jul 11, 1999 23:19
Entered by: Warren (warbetty@netcom.ca)

Message:
The Conquest saddle is designed for a more aggressive riding position....it has much less support for an upright ride than say a B66 or a B72 could provide. Of course your own physiology is going to play a major role in selecting the correct "mount". For instance I'm over two hundred pounds and I find the springs on the B66 aren't up to the job even though I love the fit! So can someone recommend a stiffer saddle for my roadster?




Subject: Re: Brooks Saddles
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 02:19
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Warren, you could buy the springs used on the Brooks B-33 saddle and use on your B-66. The B-33 springs are extremely heavy and should do the job. You should be able to order Brooks saddle parts from Sheldon Brown.




Subject: Slipping gears
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 10:36
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Not to beat it to death, but I wonder how standing up makes the gears slip IF THEY ARE PROPERLY ADJUSTED. I have had gears freewheel forward when not properly adjusted -- but that had nothing to do with standing up. Does it really happen when things are properly aligned? I'd really like to know, 'cause I ride these bikes hard!




Subject: Standling Up Properly Alligned
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 11:45
Entered by: phil (phil.renner@snet.net)

Message:
I do not really know if the gears can slip if you're pedaling hard and the gears are properly adjusted. Sheldon seems to think so, thereby the comment that "I'm careful to never stand up to pedal." I do remember VIVIDLY that as a kid my Sturmey Archer would slip "kerplunk" about a 1/4 of a revolution forward if I really strained on it under load (steeply uphill). Not always, but enough to make me cautious as a kid could be. I still stood up and it still slipped sometimes, but I always made sure I had a little "crouch room" to spare.




Subject: New European Roadsters
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 12:14
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Paul, you've raised an excellent point. We should attempt to locate and post the various high quality roadsters, sports, cafe bikes, and other city bikes available today. We know the Pashleys are still available. I saw the Chiltern too -- apparently it's actually made in Nottingham. Steve at BicycleArts imports the Chinese Forevers, which are not European quality, but also imports Pedersens, Atalas, and the beautiful Umberto Dei full roadsters. The recent book, "EnCyclePedia" shows several European (and one Japanese) city bikes that look really nice. And recently it's been mentioned that the Raleigh name is still being used on 28" roadsters from Africa. Okay, I KNOW you guys know where this stuff is -- give it up! List the sources. That goes for you too, Clarence! (A date on a Sunbeam -- I'm intensely jealous.)




Subject: City Bike
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 12:53
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
About two years back on that site where all the bike and their specs. are listed I discoverd a bike called the Ross Aristocrat. I've never seen one but I beleive it is a Nexus bike and is a high end model. I asked at my local shop and they wouldn't show me one even though they were a Ross dealer. There were some lesser Ross sport model 3-apeed s as well. I've heard Ross was not a good brand, is this true?




Subject: Slipping Gears
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 13:44
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I ride a bike equiped with an AW hub to class daily, and there are many times that I am quite aggressive about pushing my foot down, & standing at times even. (I have my saddle just a hair low to make stop & go traffic easier) But I have never had the hub slip when properly adjusted while standing on the pedals. I have had hubs slip numerous time when not adjusted properly, or when the trigger gums up. I hav also found that Sheldon's method of adjusting the indicator chain works much better than what the Sturmey-Archer literature says. I have found a few things that will make the AW hub slip when it is adjusted. Things like installing the planet pinion pins backwards; weak pawl springs, or gummed-up pawls; chipped clutches; chipped splines; sticky or worn-out triggers; bend or broken indicator/chain; loose wheel. All these things will cause the hub to malfunction in someway. From an engineering standpoint, the AW hubs is very well made, and there isn't really any play or give in the internal parts that would let them do anything other than break if over stressed. Anyway, Cheers!




Subject: Seat reccomendation for Irish Kevin
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 13:44
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Kevin, The Brooks B-90/3 is the best,most comfortable, durable seat for any Roadster or sports bike! You float along on supple leather suspended on 3 springs. If you have any trouble ordering it, look at the pages at the Sturmey- Archer site (Brooks seat section) They offer the widest selection of repair parts anywhere for seats) This is a must, trust me. It makes riding so enjoyable and you will not go numb no matter how long you ride. Sheldon can order these for you I am sure of it. While you are at it get a Sachs 24 tooth cog for easier hill climbing.




Subject: Front crank conversion
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 14:07
Entered by: Clarence (none yet)

Message:
I never liked the gear ratios of the Sturmey-Archer A.W.3 speed. I have been switching front crank sets reducing the teeth from 46 and 44 tooth to 40 tooth and now that I trashpicked a old excerciser bike for parts I now have a 30 tooth front sprocket with 7 inch cranks on one of my 26 inch wheel sports. Third gear is now the main gear I ride in and I can ride all day, going everywhere. I have the other two gears (second and first) for hills.If I have cable trouble I will not get stuck riding in a terrible high gear.I wish the finish was better on the cranks but it looks cool with the smaller front sprocket and the bike rides excellent. I was amazed that everything interchanged so well without grinding or drilling or anything. I saved all the origonal parts in case I ever want to change it back one day.Most excersisers have very large front chainrings 54 tooth and larger.You have to look around for one with a small front chainring.




Subject: the wait is over...
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 14:18
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@notmail.com)

Message:
I found it, I traded that old Schiwinn in on it and this afternoon its mine. A black American-spec DL-! I found it at Amendson's in Dallas Tx. Now its Raleigh DL-1, Raleigh M-80 MTB, the wife's Sport and that lone Univega Gran Sprint. What is are the names given to mid-range Raleigh touring bikes with Reynolds frames. Soon we'll an all-Raleigh family.




Subject: get you home trick
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 14:31
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
If you have a problem with the shifter cable and do not want to get stuck in high gear only, you can pull on the indicator chain to engage first gear.Wrap a bread bag wire tie, a paperclip, or something around the indicator chain so that it rests against the flaired nut and it will hold the indicator chain out keeping the bike in first or second gear! Then you can replace that indicator chain shifter wire at when you have time. These were actually sold in England in the 1950's and it was called "Get you home" I gave a A.W. 3 speed wheel to a homeless guy and when I met up with him again to give him a cable for the trigger he said he did not need it and showed me the inexpensive trick that was holding. I consider it a temp fix (and it can slip unexpectedly on you)I offered to install the cable but the stubborn cuss wanted to leave it in first all the time.He has a Schwinn Continental that has a French deraileur chainring fitted on with the origonal Ashtabula type crank He uses a 54 tooth front with an A.W 3 speed in low gear with a 16 tooth rear sprocket! He rides unbelievably fast 35 Mph or faster on this and the bike had no brakes until I met him.No bike in my fleet can match his insanely high speeds. I am too chicken to race him and he keeps wanting me to. What good is winning if I kill myself? He is really something to see.He has no car and does not need one.I thought I have come up with crazy projects but he is way ahead of me.




Subject: odd name
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 19:14
Entered by: john b. (rhubarb59)

Message:
may be some one out there can help me, I just got another, in my long list of three speed touring bikes. I never heard of the company before, it's called METTA-JET. It rides like a dream and looks like a night mare!!! The back wheel ticks like one of those "BIG BEN" morning alarm clocks. It's black and looks to be about late 1940's. HAS ANY ONE HEARD OF THIS COMPANY OR AM I JUST NOT AS WELL SCHOOLED AS I THINK I AM? THANKS JOHN B.




Subject: Roadsters, Sports, cafe bikes, and other city bikes
Entered on: Jul 12, 1999 23:29
Entered by: Paul ()

Message:
Keith, I agree that it would be a great idea to compile a list of the various high quality roadsters, sports, cafe bikes, and other city bikes available today and where they can be bought. Are the Pashleys made in England, and are they available here? Are the Atalas you mentioned well-built? The Raleigh Chiltern’s £170 price (about US$266)does not seem too bad, but, of course transportation costs and duty would have to be added to that. Claudia mentioned liking her Specialized Globe 7 very much. I went to the Specialized site last night and saw several very nicely equipped Globe models, some with Shimano Auto D hubs, and some with Nexus 7 hubs: Globe A1 Supreme FLR; Globe A1 Deluxe FLR and the Globe A1 FLR. Unfortunately, each of these models had an * next to its name, and there was a note which said, “International model, not sold in the U.S.” Why wouldn’t they sell these in the U.S. if someone wanted to buy one? Do you think they ship them to Europe stripped down, and the Europeans add the fenders, chain guards, dynamos, lights and racks? Claudia, do you know?




Subject: Forever more . . .
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 10:32
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Last night I measured, compared, and rode my DL-1 and Forever. Yes, the Forever is a clone -- frame dimensions virtually identical. It rides nearly as well as the DL-1. With nicer, wider tyres it may well match the DL-1 in comfort (the Forever's tyres are not really 1 and 1/2 inches wide -- more like 1 and 3/8, and the front one on mine has a distorted casing and "hops"). This morning I rode the Forever on my 12-mile commute to work. It eats up the irregularities and bumps as well as the DL-1. Definately more comfortable than a 26" sports bike. My plan is to replace every nut, bolt, screw, and washer I can with better quality stuff, and loctite a lot of them in place. Maybe new bearings all around too, we'll see. The major components -- frame, rims, bars, and cranks -- all seem solid, so it's a suitable base for tinkerers to improve upon. The brakes actually work fine for me -- I recall someone indicating a "fatal flaw" -- what was it? Okay, those saddle springs were designed when the rice harvest was bad, and my 185-pound American body make them bottom out on most bumps. But it is nice and "floaty" ride on most surfaces, and the leather itself provides some suspension when th springs bottom out. I may also keep it a one speed. There's a charm to the primative simplicity of the one speed machine -- like what I imagine an early 1890s, pre-Reilly/Sturmey Archer roadster would be like. Frees you from thinking about shifting -- I like that (the same way I like fixed gear), 'cause I've got too much to think about already.




Subject: oops
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 10:35
Entered by: Keith (velohund)

Message:
I meant a LATE 1890s roadster.




Subject: 26" Tires
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 13:16
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
OK, everybody, I've about given up hope. One of you out there (Clarence?) recommended that I fit a better set of tires to my Rudge than the cheap Kendas which are currently protecting the rims from damage. The problem is: I can't find any! Conti lists both the Touring and the Top Touring 2000 on their website, but they have advised two of my local bike shops that they are not stocked, but can be specially-ordered oin lots of either 25 or 100, depending upon which of their customer service reps was reached. michelin makes a World Tour, which isn't imported either. Of all the components I thought would be easy to get, the tire situation is the most inexplicable to me. These bikes are all over the place; what are the rest of you doing for tires? Thanks for any Helpful Hints.




Subject: 26 inch tires
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 14:26
Entered by: Chuck ()

Message:
Chris, I have been using a pair of Specialized tires on my Western Flyer. They were not expensive, maybe $9 or $10 per tire. They are slicks so you *definitely* want to be careful on wet/oily roads, but you can pump the buggers up to 80 lbs. On dry ground they are just wonderful, you can almost fly. I haven't had much experience with the Kendas, but they don't look to be quite as grippy, although I would imagine the Kendas might be better on wet roads. That said, I ride year round, every day, here in Nebraska, where if it rains or snows it REALLY comes down. I have yet to have a problem. Specialized tires seem to be easy enough to get. Hope this helps.




Subject: Our own Bard
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 15:06
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
CLARENCE: I admire the wit and charm of the narratives you provide us. As dash of Victorian, a hint of Edwardian, and a splash of P.G Wodehouse. In all, inspiring, romantic, anachronistic expressions. Allow me to offer a suggestion to complete the picture a little. You need to have correct vintage fountain pens for your bicycles, a nice Parker Duofold for your Sunbeam, for example. A good, gold-nibbed fountain pen is as smooth to write with as a good roadster is to ride. So you simply must banish all biros (ball points) from your sight forever. Intolerable post-War junk! Like writing with a nail! As rough as riding a Colnago on cobblestone! Totally unacceptable. You must also find some correct vintage watches -- there are lots of old Hamiltons, Elgins, Gruens and the like out there from the 20s to the 50s. I find these personal items reflect some of the same charm as the old bicycles -- and using them is a pleasant and elegant diversion from the madness of 1999. Fill your pen. Wind your watch. Ride your bike. Trust me on this.




Subject: Metta -Jet
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 18:33
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Never heard the name Metta-Jet. Plaese describe this bike, what size wheels, color,cable or rod brake,mens or ladies? I recomend you oil the rear hub if the ticking is loud. Late 40's huh? Sounds interesting. How did you come to get this?




Subject: Tires for Chris
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 19:15
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I understand what you are going through, I have encountered this crazyness before, and still do. If the tire size is 26 X 1 3/8 E.A.3 (for English bikes) Then Kenda makes a 90 P.S.I. Gumwall tire, other Taiwan companies offer tires that go to 50 in gumwall. I have a set of Bridgestone whitewalls but suspect those are hard to find. (These came on a recently acquired bike.Sheldon can sell you tires for your bike I am sure.(check out his list of things Harris sells) Check out hardware stores also. Or I reccomend that you keep trying area shops until you find someone cooperative that carries them.7 out of 10 shops should have these in stock. Just be sure you do not accidentally get the Schwinn E.A.1. size as they do not interchange.This is the easiest thing to hunt down, but I understand that you may be living in an area where the shops are idiotic. I still go crazy in finding tires. Shops carry this size in small numbers and some of their suppliers ask for minimum order or large quantities. Also a lot of shops are deliberatly not carrying tires and Sturmey-Archer parts so that the customer coming in will get all discouraged and cave in and buy a no good, worthless mountain bike that costs $300.00 and upwards. (When all the customer wants is a pair of tires for $16.00 and go home.) This is one reason we see these in the thrift shops and out at the curb. People percieve that they can't get parts. The situation is still messed up. Tires are available, but it's getting spotty.Ask nicely if the shop can order you some Kenda gumwall tires in your size. Or go over the shops head and look up bicycle distributors in the phone book and call them up and ask to be referred to some other shop that can sell you a set.If enough people ask they will find then for you.




Subject: fountain pens,watches, English roadsters
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 20:10
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
These things are rooted in a world that we are being carried away from. (I am going kicking and screaming, myself) Nothing disrupts the present like the past.What bothers me so much is that we are going backwards,trading good things and getting junk in return. Yes, I collect vintage pens, clocks, watches,furniture,etc. It is always neat to see what you can turn up. I am learning so much and getting good at finding things, but nothing calls to me like the chase for old bicycles!




Subject: tires for Chris continued
Entered on: Jul 13, 1999 20:43
Entered by: Warren (warbetty@netcom.ca)

Message:
In my part of the world the Continental Top Touring tires are found in 700c x 32 and 700c x 38. The 38's will fit a 28" rim and they are a marvellous tire but most roadster fans will find them too narrow. This also applies to other 700 x 38 tires...they will stretch on to your roadster rim without too much difficulty. There's even a 700 x 40 knobby made by Wheeler...I think it's named Cross master. That could be a great snow tire. Check your local performance bike shops for these tires when nothing else is available...of course you can mail order anything.




Subject: Tires
Entered on: Jul 14, 1999 01:15
Entered by: Louis (lorsini@aol.com)

Message:
For tires for 28" roadsters it seems to be pretty much a crap shoot. All I've been able to find are Taiwanese Kendas and Cheng Shins. These seem to work well as basic utility tires -they run true and last reasinably long. For 26" sport models I've tried (and we've stocked in the shop) just about every one available. My take on the 26 inchers is that the high pressure (85-90lbs) ride too harshly, and are made even more so when thorn resistant tubes or Tuffies are used. Their are, however, very nice 26" tires made by Hutchinson. They're fat, true, and have a much more supple casing than any of the Taiwanese gumwalls. They're rated at 65 lbs, yet roll much more easily than 90 lb. Kendas, all the while providing what the Brits would call a "creamy" ride. I've seen, and used, two tread patterns for the Hutchinsons. One is a ribbed tread that rides well but evaporates quickly on the rear. The other is a triangular block tread, which I'm currently using. These show every indication of lasting 2-3 times longer than any of the Taiwanese tires I've used, a good thing since they retail for aproximately $29.95. Well worth it, though, if your serious about tires for your Sports model. I believe Sheldon carries them. For those of you on the West Coast, they can be had from Blue Heron Cycles in Eugene, Oregon (We also stock Brooks saddles, SA parts and have have an ever changing stock of used British parts which we'll get around to inventorying and cataloging one of these days).




Subject: The better things in life
Entered on: Jul 14, 1999 11:09
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Clarence, you are a man after my own heart, a kindred spirit. I picture you sitting at a fine antique desk, penning a missive to the woman whose red hair flows in the wind at sunset, waxing eloquent, perhaps writing in verse, using special ink, and handmade, watermarked paper, from a European maker that goes back to the days of the guilds, or something exotic, jute paper from the orient. Music of Ralph Vaughan Williams plays in the background. And, as you know, there are those rare ladies who appreciate such things, who don't ogle at SUVs. I know this to be true. I hope you've found one. Cheers!




Subject: Forever A Real Head Turner at Collage!!
Entered on: Jul 14, 1999 12:58
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I think the subject title speaks well for this posting. My constant zipping around the OSU campus on my new "Greene Ghost" Forever 28" 3-spd is making quite a scene. I have alredy recieved a lot of comments and questions about it, the most frequent of which is "where can I get one?" An OSU Police cyclist was very swayed by the very no-nonsense arrangement and even wondered why the OSU police was so intent on buying mountain bikes when he thought this bike could do the job just as well. It is very interesting to note that I have seen a noticable increase in the number of three and single speed machines in the past 2 semesters, both on the road and at the racks. I once saw a bronze greene Raleigh Sports that had converted into a single speed coaster!! At least the sea of pavement mountain bikes is being diluted, if only a little. But alas, the day is young and there's cycling to be done, Cheers!!!!




Subject: Good things come to those who wait
Entered on: Jul 14, 1999 13:34
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Today I met with a colleage who took me out to lunch to thank me for helping him get a particular job. When he was in my office, he saw my Forever and my Raleigh Sports. We talked about bikes. As a further token of his appreciation, he said he wanted to give me the Raleigh 3-speed he purchased used in 1958. He says its in great condition. My jaw dropped -- could I give him anything in return? "Absolutely not," he said. I won't sleep well until I the old Raleigh is safely in my grubby, greasy hands. The Goddess of bicycles, Bike (pronounced like the name of her sister, Nike), is smiling on me today. Many thanks to her and my friend!!




Subject: Forgive the expression, but I lost my nuts today.
Entered on: Jul 14, 1999 13:56
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Wes -- your references to O.S.U. are confusing me. I rode through O.S.U campus six times already this week to and from work! Ohio State University. I rode my Forver to work today again, and two bolts backed out during the ride and the nuts fell to the ground in traffic. One was the rear brake pivot bolt, which I had tightened this morning -- the other was from a saddle spring. Have you had this problem at all. I'm going to give my Forever a rest until I can find the time to replace as many bolts, screws and washers I can, and use up a tube of loctite on them! The morning commute was with a club ride that goes my way, and, yes, people were amazed at the Forever, though not enough to buy one. I passed Steve's catalog around. As I rode, I preached the gospel of three-speeds. But I didn't turn water into wine. Darn!




Subject: HELP Please!! Armstrong 3 speed parts ?????
Entered on: Jul 14, 1999 14:47
Entered by: Rick (Alaron.int@iname.com)

Message:
I have an old Armstrong 3 speed, 26". The bike is good shape except It is missing the shifting cable and hook-up to the rear axle. Does anybody know were I can find these parts??? Thanks, Rick




Subject: Brit Sports v. Modern City Bike
Entered on: Jul 14, 1999 15:26
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
While I was riding to work today, a guy told me of a British bicycling periodical he has that always includes a consumer report article. He says that one issue reviewed various modern "city bikes" and that, for comparison, the reviewers got an old rod-brake Raleigh 3-speed for comparison. The conclusion was that the old Raleigh was as good as or better than the modern city bikes. He says he'll give me the publication next Wednesday -- I'll gladly mail a copy to any of you who'd like it.




Subject: Which OSU???!!!RE: Loose nuts on Forever
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 00:15
Entered by: WesK (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Keith, sorry, I mean Oklahoma State University. You would thinks someone originally from Marion, OH would know that OSU doesn't always mean OSU!! My Bad!! Anyway, On my Forever I have not had any problems with nuts coming loose. A trip to the hardware store has produced nuts of the correct size for use as locknuts on the rear brake pivot. As for the seat, I have been using my new B-66 saddle until I get stiffer springs from Brooks. I would imagine that the problems that will be encountered on these Forevers will be different form bike to bike. The biggest problem I have had is the front fork- it appears to have been welded crooked, and I am waiting for its replacement to get here. As for the rest of the parts, I too am on a rampage to replace as many of the nuts, bolts, and front hub with English ones, or older looking straight-slot screws. Other than these little things I really love this bike. Their trade mark could be "Forever: The Bicycle That Makes Commuting Enjoyable"




Subject: The middle of America?
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 08:10
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Wes, I agree about the Forever -- a fine commuter once the bugs are worked out. The friend who's giving me the pre-1958 Raleigh noticed the Forever -- he's traveled and seen them. Friends of his lived in China for a couple of years, and bought two of them. My friend recalls them saying that they had to try 3 or 4 before finding a "good one." It really has potential -- sounds like you're way ahead of me on refining your. Isn't it funny when you travel to either coast, and people think that Ohio, Oklahoma, Idaho, etc. are all nestled next to each other in some forgotten location in the hinterlands? "You're from Ohio, do you grow soybeans?"




Subject: CLARENCE, YOU MUST HELP ME!
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 09:35
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Hear me out, O elusive Eidolon of Roadsters! I have about 70 fine vintage writing instruments, and some rare ones. But, alas, only four British 3-speeds, and three of them are mere sport bikes. I implore you -- consider a trade at your distinct advantage. I have a beautiful sterling silver 1926 Wahl ribbon pen, in its original velvet-lined box -- what better gift for your red-haired companion? Two glass vial-fill Eagles, which one author (Jonathan Steinburg) lists as "exceptionaly rare." A near mint 1928 Duofold Sr. with original nib. A rare mandarin yellow Duofold Jr. with original nib. A pearl, sleeve fill LeBouef, a never opened 1988 Duofold Centennial, and many many more -- Waterman, Scheaffer, Swan, etc. I would trade several of the nicest and most valuable ones for the LEAST rare and LEAST favorite of your 28" rod-brake roadsters. I have the roadster bug, and I'm languishing, pining away with this glut of otherwise beautiful writing instruments, but a dearth of roadsters.




Subject: and watches too
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 09:51
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
And watches, Clarence. Another gift for your friend, a vintage Elgin ladies watch with 14k rose gold case and four cut diamonds. It's on the block. Really it's on my desk right now, ticking away.




Subject: More on the never ending Bicycle
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 13:28
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Ah, it is good to see that everyone is being nipped by the Roadster bug this summer. You all know what the cure (and cause) is right? More Roadsters!! I have been really riding my Forever a lot more now, and will probably start riding it full time once I get a dynohub and a headlamp on it. But since I have been riding my Forever during the day, and my dynohub equiped '57 Royal York sports type bike, I have been able to get some good comparisons about the two different types, and decide which is better for campus commuting. Some of the things the sports type bike has going for it include smaller turning radius; faster, sharper cornering, lighter than roadster, short wheel base makes it easier to carry up stairs. The Roadster has these advantages: longer crank arms for more power; longer wheelbase for a much smoother ride; largr wheels make potholes, curbs, and storm sewers more tolerable; much more stable on gravel; doesn't have the tight turning of the sports, but is very capable of taking a turn well. I think they both come out about equal, but the roadster comes out ahead when you factor in comfort, weather resistance, carrying capacity, and general maintnece.




Subject: harsh ride with higher pressure tires
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 13:37
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I agree with Louis about the high pressure tires giving a harsher ride. However it does not matter to me as I sit upon a Brooks B-90/3 and nothing is better. This compensates for the harsher ride the tires make. Also I like the high pressure because I can go much faster. I have been hunting the elusive Kenda All white tires in 26 X 1 3/8 EA.3 they are a block pattern and they only go to 50 P.S.I. but they look awesome especially on this one bike that has rechromed rims! I still do not have them in hand only having one at the moment , but I will have them if my one shop friend will place the minimum order needed. As to the 700 X38 C Continentals fitting the Raleigh F10 Westwood rim? I thought so! but I have been fooled before. I will hit this one place where I had these in my hand. Thise time bringing a rim to try it out on! Thanks for the tip!




Subject: 1949 Clubman
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 13:43
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Today I had lunch with Dick Seebode. I've known hin since I was 13 (1971). Dick is a real cyclist, not a pretender, like me. He's ridden Paris-Brest-Paris twice, and logs many thousands of miles every year, year after year, all over the country, the world. I told him of my newly found interest in British 3-speeds. "Oh, I have my 1949 Clubman hanging in my basement." Yes, he's been riding since that time. "And did you know so-and-so has his original Lenton Tourist?." These people are a higher order of being than I.




Subject: Sports v. Roadster
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 14:17
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
The past two weeks I've ridden my DL-1, Forever, Sports, and Dunelt on the same route. Since most of it is bike path, I believe the roadsters win overall because they are so comfortable. On city streets, with pothole and car dodging and the like, I think the sports has the edge. P.S. 700c road tires on a roadster -- should I try some 700 x 20 Conti Gran Prixs? I see myself passing Lance on a decent in the Alps, whipping around the switchback in an aero tuck -- using the weight of the roadster to its full advantage. And you purists were scoffing at my suggestion of using solids!? I think I saw an ad in Bicycle Trader from American Cyclery which offered 26 x 1 and 3/8 whitewalls.




Subject: Exciting talk
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 16:35
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
ever since I picked up "Elvira" (DL-1) the other day I've been wondering how to begin showboating. On what do I need to take precautions on to avoid losing parts? I've no experience with a Loctite type product. I intend to order some chinese accesories soon, are dynohubs still availible new? I'm not sure my grips are original, they say "made in england" but I thought DL-1 grips had the places for your fingers, mine don't. "Elvira" is a 66 step-through model.




Subject: Superbe Parts Wanted
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 19:14
Entered by: Barry (robinchil @aol.com)

Message:
Hey gang-looking for a rear tail light lense, Raliegh grips and an original style pump to complete my early 70s Superbe...can anyone help? Thanks,BC




Subject: Brooks B-90-3
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 19:16
Entered by: kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Clarence, Thanks for the advice on which Brooks saddle to buy. I looked up the B-90-3 and I see what you mean. Jackie Gleason could have ridden comfortably on those heavy-duty springs. Looks like a winner.




Subject: Jessica's Raleigh, mine to, and a couple of Schwinns
Entered on: Jul 15, 1999 23:05
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I happened to catch an old episode of "Murder she Wrote" today and discovered that Jessica Fletcher rode a green Raleigh 3 speed with wicker basket, pressed steel rack, and one of those big fat "ding dong" bells,(I just bought two of them). I couldn't tell if it was a Sport but it was definately of the breed. That sighting stirred me to go to the loft and bring down a nice green Raleigh 3 speed I bought last fall and hadn't seen since. I was surpised when I grabbed for the right brake lever and it wasn't there. Yowee! a coaster brake 3 speed. All the old ladies in Florida want em' since they will stop with their feet before they touch a hand brake. I also brought down a ladies Schwinn World Tourist and a mens Suburban,(man is that thing heavy), which I also bought and hadn't played with. Gonna ride em and see which feels the best. The real reason I dug them out of storage is to take pictures for my web page. I'll let you know the results of my comparison.




Subject: Royal Endfield
Entered on: Jul 16, 1999 07:50
Entered by: Heinz (HMG4851@AOL.COM)

Message:
Ok Guy's. What information can you give me on a Royal Endfield Woman's Bike. It has Rod Brakes and the Chain is completely enclosed(Which I having a tough time to remove for cleaning).




Subject: 1952 Rudge Sports
Entered on: Jul 16, 1999 08:52
Entered by: Rolf ()

Message:
Greetings from Australia. I recently acquired a 1952 Rudge Sports. It is fitted with; 26x1 3/8 rims, Sturmey-Archer AB Series Rear Hub with 3/4 speed brass finished trigger control, GH6 Series front dynohub with full lighting kit (Missing rear lens), front rim brake, hockey stick chain guard, Mansfield mattress saddle,. All of these I assume to be original equipment and all are now in good working order. The chainwheel, cranks and pedals do not appear to be original and it is in this area that I would appreciate some advice. The currently fitted crank axle is 138 mm long and protrudes 38 mm from the bottom bracket on the drive side. As the current chainwheel is only 26 mm wide this leaves a 12 mm gap between the inside of the chainwheel and the bottom bracket. This doesn’t seem correct and leads to a misalignment of the chain. I would be interested to know if the axle is the correct length. Also the current chainwheel does not contain the hand motive. When did this feature get dropped ? The image of the Rudge at http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Rudge_1956.htm indicates that by 1956 it was no longer used. Should a 1952 model have one or not? Look forward to your advice.




Subject: Mark's Loctite
Entered on: Jul 16, 1999 10:16
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I've never had to use loctite on a bicycle before other than the bolts on the old Pletcher rear racks. No part has ever backed out and fallen off my DL-1 (of for that matter, any other good bike I've owned), and I've ridden it a couple of hundred miles, some of it on choppy paths and roads. I used some on the Forever last night because the hardware is, I think, soft metal and not made to close enough tolerences to tighten properly (although aparently Wes has not experienced this problem with his). I replaced the bolt that holds the upper pivot for the rear brake -- this is certainly a material AND design problem -- using a carriage bolt and single nut without a lock washer on a part that will constantly be turned by the pivot arm. A hardened, stainless metric bolt, TWO nuts, brass washers for smoothness, and loctite, and I hope never to have to deal with it again! I intend to do this to all of the small parts.




Subject: Locktite & Bicycle Bolts
Entered on: Jul 16, 1999 13:28
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
It is correct that I have not had any problems so far with nuts coming loose on my Forever, I have had plenty of problems with nuts working loose on other bikes. The most notorious of them is my 1952 Raleigh Sports with caliper brakes and chaincase. The rear left fender stay bolt and nut always seem to come loose, no matter how tight I tighten them. The front brake also tends to have these problems. On the Forever I found that putting a little drop of oil on the bolt threads before tightening every thing down allows things to get much tighter without stripping the soft threads. Also, on the Forever, oil EVERYTHING that moves. Use non-detergent motor-type oil, or else everything will gum up in a couple of weeks. Thin oil dosen't last. Cheers!




Subject: RE: 1952 Rudge Sports
Entered on: Jul 16, 1999 13:34
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Rolf, I own a 1956 Rudge that has many of the same features as the bike you describe, but mine has the hand chainring. You can see several pictures of it at http://home.earthlink.net/~kenneyk/56rus.htm Your chainring may have been replaced at one point in time.




Subject: Warning! Forever back brake
Entered on: Jul 16, 1999 14:08
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Wes, I urge you to keep an eye on that pivot -- on my Forever it could only be tightened so far -- too much and the pivot will not turn. So it was designed in a manner that allows it to work apart quite easily -- on the left side the frame holds the nut, on the right the pivot turns the bolt, presto, no back brake. (Didn't the Bicycling magazine article talk about a Forever with one working brake?) I don't think this is the "fatal flaw" I recall someone alluding to before, but it merits some extra attention. Please let me know if you come up with a better solution -- I think a smooth drilled pin/cotter pin would be even better. I've had loose screws on bikes too -- and even more in my head -- but none have just fallen out so quickly. Mine did so after I tightended it that morning. Admitedly, I've ridden mostly on Campy-equiped road bikes, and when you tighten Campy screws and bolts, you can feel when they are snug. And the old Schwinn stuff I've had can take some torque. Anyway, I too have greased a lot of the threads on the Forever, especially the front axle, which is play-doh soft, in my opinion. Found a potential replacement in someone's trash last night, however, as well as another SA hub. But I don't mean to whine so -- yes, the bike has potential!




Subject: Loose nuts on Forever
Entered on: Jul 16, 1999 17:14
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Keith, I have now come to the conclusion that no 2 of these Forevers are made made quite the same. Mine came with a badly aligned fork, your's has got loose threads. It has been nearly a week and a half since I oiled and tightened my rear break pivot screw, and it hasn't even backed out an 1/8 of a turn! BTW: in an earlier posting you mentioned that your's had a carrige bolt (same type of bolt used on most seatpost clamps on 60's & 70's US cheapies). Mine has a straight-slot pan head machine screw. An I have rattled the crap out of this bike riding on brick sidewalks and such. I will certainly agree that the front hubs are junk, and I can't wait to get a Dynohub laced onto the front wheel. Those rims are tough though, I followed a friend down some steps in a side walk, wasn't going very fast, but wow!! The bike took them like a real champ!! These things aren't designed to take abuse, but they sure can handle all the things you'd find in a campus with 50+ year-old sidewalks!!! Keep 'a riding!!!




Subject: Looking for Raleigh Parts
Entered on: Jul 16, 1999 17:31
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hey all, I am looking for all the special washers that go behind the centering spring on an early 50's Raleigh front caliper brake. Thanks!!!!




Subject: Wanted
Entered on: Jul 17, 1999 21:38
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
I guess I might as well put in my standing request for a DL-1 or 24" frame Gents' Sport. I live in Rio Vista, CA (south of Sacramento) and seem to be in solid mountain bike country. We don't have a bike shop in Rio Vista, but I've been combing bike shops, thrift stores and Salvation Army stores (as well as checking out yard sales) and have found nothing other than one very rusty ladies' frame Sport. When I mention the DL-1 to bike shops, they almost invariably say "28-inch wheels--oh, you mean 700c". The closest I've come was when a customer at one shop said he'd had a DL-1 ("hub generator and full chaninguard") but sold it "26 years ago". I'm gonna keep looking, but would also appreciate any pointers from "locals". The idea of lacing an FW and a Dynohub into a Forever and replacing all the fasteners doesn't sound *all* that bad, but having worked for a Raleigh shop in my college years (why didn't I buy a DL-1 *then*?!) I'd rather have the "real thing". Thanks! P.S. I have fallen off a bike once from a hub gear slipping while pedaling standing up, but it was a Sachs hub... I still have the scar on my knee, and haven't stood with a hub gear since.




Subject: Forever brake pivot
Entered on: Jul 18, 1999 17:51
Entered by: Mark R. back from holiday(vacation in lime-ese)! ()

Message:
Hi gang, as far as the pivot on the Forever rear brake, I took a punch and put a few wrinkles in the threads of the bolt, not to the point of damaging them beyond repair, but just enough that the nut CAN NOT back out on it's own. This solved the design flaw for me. The FATAL flaw refered to before I believe is the poorly placed rod anchor on the Indian bikes. They place the anchor very close the the pivot point of the cam on the end of the hand lever, and naturally there is very little leverage because of this, rendering the friggin' brakes damn near un-usable. Very dangerous!! One must adjust the brake pads very close in such a way that the wheels must be very true, or you get pad rub. This is very annoying. Also, I had a few teething problems with my Forever, I.E. srings in the saddle were VERY wimpy, forks were a little tweeked, and such. But, if you take off the rack, WATCH OUT! The thing acts like a spring and flies all apart just as the last thread gives way as you back off the seat post nut!! OUCH!!! Others will back me up on this I'm sure. These bikes were intended to be used very roughly on very poor roads and I beleive that although some of the parts are not up to Raleigh standards, they should hold up OK even under conciderable abuse. The only thing I'd like to see different on mine is that I wish I could have it in a 24 in. frame. The 22in. is just a little small for a 6 footer. Have fun and ride those bikes people!!




Subject: Rod Brake Sports by Forever
Entered on: Jul 18, 1999 18:29
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hey all check this out http://www.chang-jiang.com/bicycle/bdtl85m.html Forever also makes 26" Sports bikes with chaincases with rod or caliper. Here's the rod brake version http://www.chang-jiang.com/bicycle/bdtl16.html Note the pump pegs on the one with caliper brakes. I wonder how many of the parts will interchange with the older Raleigh Sports and Superbes??




Subject: Forevers
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 10:12
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Wes: Sorry, mine was a slotted machine screw as well, not a carriage bolt. Mark -- the punch method sounds good -- more than one way to skin a cat! Mark, would you have trusted the pivit to stay together without having done some work on it? I still think that it was designed in a way that almost guarantees it will loosen unless something is done about it -- I'd think the pivot would eventually turn that screw and nut apart. It concerns me, and I'd still urge Wes and others to consider a more secure solution than oil on the threads, even if he's not had trouble so far. But I agree that once the few bugs are worked out, this will be a very good machine. It's certainly been noticed a lot every time I've ridden it.




Subject: 26" Forever Sports
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 10:24
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
By the way, Stephen at BikeProject indicated that he'd sold relatively few of the 26" 3-speed Forevers -- if they're made like the 28" roadsters, I'd bet the 3-speed derailleur is junk, but that's super-easy to remedy -- I'm sure all of you have boxes of good old derailleurs, not to mention SA hubs! And from what we've learned setting up and debugging the 28" models, we'd know what to look for in perfecting the 26" bikes.




Subject: Forever Sports and Rear brake nut
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 13:19
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Keith, you've got to go to the website listed in my last reply. The Forever Sports shown on that page is markably different than the ones that Steve is selling: they are one-speed 26" x 1 3/8" wheels with caliper or rod brakes and chaincases. The one with caliper brakes appears to have brazed-on pump pegs & a pump just like the Raleighs from the 50's. On the other note, over the weekend I looked at my rear brake bolt & it turns out that it already has what Mark did to his- A burr on the threads. If it ain't broke don't fix it!!! I also received a mid-50's Raleigh catologe over the weekend that I had won over Ebay. I hope to get it scanned in for on-line veiwing soon Anyway, Cheers!!!!




Subject: Can you ID this bike??!!!!!
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 13:23
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I have had this machine for about 3 months now and still don't know what make it is. Definitly English, but no headbadge and any other clues have been painted over. See it at http://home.earthlink.net/~kenneyk/59msb.htm Any ideas welcome!! (nt:rear dropouts are NOT Raleigh)




Subject: Reg Harris Lenton Sports (531 Club machine)
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 14:37
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I had mentioned that I love old Raleigh bikes, and that I buy them. The next thing I knew I was waiting to see what he was bringing up from the basement. I was not sure if it was a 28 inch wheel or a 26 inch wheel. I only knew that it was a old Raleigh. It turned out to be a 1951 Raleigh Lenton Sports, a Reg Harris Road model in green with the lightning bolt decals. (A 26 inch wheel bike) These were equiped with 4 speed hubs and alloy GB brakes. Only this one had been dressed down with steel parts , a common A.W. hub and steel Raleigh caliper brakes. It does have a early pletscher rack and Beautiful drop racing bars(they cleaned up wonderfully and are pristine) I have replaced the bottom bracket parts and the headset, raised the seat post, fitted a new Brooks, cleaned the Dunlop alloy rims, trued the wheels, fitted a N.O.S. F.M. hub, switched to an Airlight front hub, replaced the straps on the Midland bag, cleaned and polished everything. This took quite a lot of work. The bike is finally ready to fly and eveverything is period and it came out well except some pitting on the chrome cranks from rust. I could not believe my eyes when he brought it up. I thought this model was hard to find, now I have two of the exact same model! He lives just down the street too!




Subject: duomatic hub
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 14:48
Entered by: Aurora (amendels@lynx.neu.edu)

Message:
I have a duomatic hub from a 1970's Italian bike. Is it worth selling? How would I do so. I would appriciate any tips or information. Thank you.




Subject: Fountain pens, watches, old Raleigh bikes - In my quest, there is no night and day!
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 15:00
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Keith, I am grateful for your generous offer of a trade. You have quite a collection of neat stuff. I will have to decline however. I reccomend you Suscribe to the Bicycle trader newspaper. (which is excellent) have cards made up that say you buy old bikes and leave them with area shops, Make it easy for them to get ahold of you, put a pager number on the card, let them know that you buy those crazy old Raleigh's with 28 inch wheels and rod brakes. (Ask to be put in touch with the owner of the bike)Pass the word that you are looking for these, flea markets, swap meets, Estate sales (once again, get to know the people running these and let them know you buy bikes) Get there 2 hours before they open and bring a good book and be the first one in the door, with cash. Be on the lookout for these as they are seen in use daily. Have ready cash in hand and go up to them, tell them you love these and buy it! The people you will meet and the things you will add to your growing collection will surprise you. The hunt is on, these are still out there, asleep and hidden you just have to track it down. Have fun, take my advice.




Subject: Forever pivot
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 16:45
Entered by: Keith ()

Message:
Keith, I also feel that the bolt on the pivot of the brakes on my Forever was destined to fall apart if something hadn't been done, and if they are ALL that way, everyone should do something right away to avoid getting killed by a car or something. Oil or grease on the threads isn't a workable solution. i would suggest replacing the pivot bolt with a slightly longer one and using two jam nuts to lock the darn thing inplace and still have a free moving pivot. To be honest I was out on mine and the nut was SO loose, it would have surely fallen off on the way home. Since wrinkling the outer threads I've had no problems at all, exept I've changed the saddle. I like the bike quite alot and I think anyone would. I heard that they have made and sold 80,000,000 of these mounts! 80,000,000 Chinese can't be wrong! Cheers!




Subject: Sport bike info.
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 17:00
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
I dug up two articles on sport bikes in Consumer Reports. One from Nov. '72 and one from Nov. '81. they are both comparisons of 3-speed bikes from those time periods. As expected Raleigh did well. Enjoy




Subject: Thanks for advice! & Forever more
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 19:37
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Clarence -- I've delayed too long having cards made -- every bike shop, antique dealer, and thrift shop in the area should get a supply. And the estate crowd was good for the occassional pen or watch -- bikes may be even better. I also plan to run an "Wanted to Buy" ad in the bike club newsletter -- as I mentioned, one old friend still has his '49 Clubman, another has his Lenton. Communism: the information flows from the top down, not the bottom up. Frank criticism is generally not encouraged. Hence record rice harvest reported from areas where famine was starving tens of thousands, etc. The variety of bikes is also likely very limited -- not like you'd have a choice of dozens of different brands and groupos if you didn't like the Forever. In short, one billion Chinese could be wrong. In othert words, citizens of China may have little to say if their bike doesn't work very well. Still, I think they've probably come up with their own, creative solutions for the bugs. That being said, I'll repeat the Forever has a lot of potential. Also, I notied the Forever is pictured in Dodge's The Bicycle more then once -- traffic in Shanghai, bikes loaded on a raft (logos, racks, bells are all identifiable), and George Bush in China with one (let's not have another opera, shall we?). Wes, I went to the Website you provided -- very interesting.




Subject: Mark R. not Keith
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 19:38
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Hello people, I meant to put my correct name on the Forever pivot comment above but blew it! Thanks for reading it anyway. MARK R. not Keith




Subject: meta jet
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 20:07
Entered by: john b (rhubarb59@aol.com)

Message:
"meta jet" what was I thinking the "JET PLANE" didn't come out until the 50's right? So the bike must be from the 50's and not the 40's . No chain graurd. My air pump for one of my Raleighs fit in the pump space. It's a mans bike , black, reg. size mens bike stuck in 1st gear. When I said it was loud and ticked like a clock that was after I gave it a bath in WD40. I love that loud sound and thought it was great. The Companies name is METASCO and "JET" is in gold lettering. The one odd thing it has is a generator slit in the frame at the back tire, and there is a generator their and it fits nice and cozy. any ideas what this bike maybe would be great!! john b




Subject: Spiffing up a Raleigh Sports
Entered on: Jul 19, 1999 21:48
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@a0l.com)

Message:
I am just about finished giving the ladies green Sports a thorough servicing. I have been restoring or building bikes for a couple of years and have missed the simple pleasure of removing old oil and grease, rust, and aged dirt. This beauty was really in good shape, having been protected from the elements but not cleaned too often. When I clean em' I tear em' apart about 75%. I like to get at all those hard to reach spots like behind the crank and under stay bridges. The first thing I tackled was the rear wheel and S3C hub. John B., this hub made that loud click like your bike did. Unlike you, I don't like to hear more than a muffled click so I pulled the cog end apart and found that one of the springs was broken. I had been riding it with one pawl driving. Good thing I don't stand and peddle. My bike shop fixed me up with new springs from their secret hoard in the cellar. Next came the bottom bracket. It was at least greasy but very dirty. After cleaning everything up I put it back together only to find that it bound up when I tried to set the bearing clearance. I pulled it apart again and deduced that a ball had strayed out of position and was hanging up the axle. This time I did it right and it runs free with no more clearance than is necessary. I am amazed at the chrome on these old Raleighs. The chrome on this bike had some very light rust which came off easily with chrome cleaner and 0000 steel wool. I used a brass brush around the nipples, a hard spot to get by hand and then steel wool. It looks almost new. Same with the cranks, sprocket, and bars. A tip: Brasso works great as a rust remover and a little goes a very long way. There is great therapuetic value to giving a bike a thorough going over. You can work away on a wheel rim and do some heavy thinking or just day dream. Time passes very easily and the results are gratifying if you like things to work well and look good. These great old bike deserve it.




Subject: Cleaning up the oldies but goodies
Entered on: Jul 20, 1999 09:08
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Fred, I enjoy the cleaning process you describe much the same way. Very theraputic. And a feeling of acomplishment comes when when you free a fine old bike from years of road grime and surface rust. Lately, my wife has been giving me the evil eye when I sneak off to do such things -- so my projects proceed at a snail's pace. I agree the old British chrome cleans up every bit as easily and as well as the old Schwinns -- what looks like deep rust comes off with elbow grease. I use the Menotomy crumpled aluminum foil method unless it's terribly stubborn. You can shape it to reach tiny areas, and it's less messy than steel wool. My '65 Dunelt was like pretty rusty at first -- the rims and brakes looked iffy, but when I got around to it I was able to get them absolutely spotless. I too have a correction -- the pic of President Bush with a Forever is in Perry's Bike Cult, not Dodge's The Bicycle. Dodge's book does have the other two pics I mentioned.




Subject: Loose Nuts, etc.
Entered on: Jul 20, 1999 16:51
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
I'm somewhat surprised at the suggestions proffered for keeping the forevers from scattering thir parts on the road like a Triumph Spitfire. Instead of double-nutting or buggering the threads, how 'bout using nylocks? Even Home Depot stocks these marvellous things; they're designed to maintain nuts in a desired state of tightness without having to bind everything up. I assume the threads on the Forevers are some close approximation of Metric, so this shouldn't be an insurmountable problem. On another subject: any of you found any decent, reasonable-sized saddle bags? the rivendells are too small, and the Carradices too big. I'd love a leather or cotton duck bag in the configuration of one of the old Brooks or Schwinn vinyl bags.




Subject: 1949 Clubman -Lenton bicycle
Entered on: Jul 21, 1999 19:31
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I would buy the 1949 Clubman and the Lenton bike IMMEDIATELY! Pay a fair price and let them know trhat it is going to a good, loving home.




Subject: Could of had another nice bike with the money
Entered on: Jul 21, 1999 19:40
Entered by: Clarence ()

Message:
I had some work done at the car dealership, because unlike the bike I couldn't do it myself. I could of had a nice bike for the $600.00 they got me for. Believe me, I almost bought the bike!




Subject: bike
Entered on: Jul 21, 1999 21:22
Entered by: novacane (jwilson@surfsouth.com)

Message:
well, i didn't know i had a vintage bike. it's a raleigh raceing bike and i'm just looking for help in keeping it in running shape.the serial # is wn8007247. recall # 8w50. i just started to ride it after it had been in storage for a time and wanted a manual on how to keep it in shape. so it goes.




Subject: Can I "ID" that Bike? maybe.
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 01:22
Entered by: Philip (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
Hi Wes, I looked at the pictures of your mystery bike. From what I can see of the chainring, it matches that of the Hercules that's in my family. I might be able to tell by what the lugs look like. The Hercules' that I've seen have lugs that are cut straight at the ends but have little oval holes cut into them. Does yours have this?




Subject: Ah, the joys of a "lightweight" that's not bent!
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 01:34
Entered by: Philip (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
Hi Folks, I rode to work last week on our new acquisition for the first time. It's a ladies Raleigh from about 1974 that appears to have been left in the rain for 20 years. Looks like heck. Even the local bike-recyclers didn't want it. They left it against their dumpster and I picked it up. It's complete, looks hardly used, actually, and, curiously, the paint on the frame is in quite good shape but the paint on the fenders and chainguard is completely peeled. Anyway, I gave it a (very) sparse going-over and rode it to work. It's marvellous. It's not my English lightweight experience. I weekly ride my Mercury (made-by-Raleigh) to work or shopping and I have quite a few miles on my family's old Mercury (made-by-Hercules) but these two bikes are, um, geometrically modified. I think the common vernacular for that is "crashed, bent, and straightened by hand". So it was a real pleasure to ride the Raleigh and feel how pleasantly it tracks along the rode and sweeps into the curves. Delightful. Before I go I have two questions. I hear you folks talk about "sports" and "superbes" and there are a few around here but this model of Raleigh I have is more common here. It has no model name, just says "Raleigh" on several decals on the frame and chaingguard. The frame is reddish-orange except for the headtube which is white to match the fenders and chainguard. I've also seen green ones with the same white accents. Are these also considered to be "sports" or is there another name? My second question is how to centre the brake calipers. I know how to do this on other bikes but my usual tricks aren't working? Any suggestions? Thanks, Philip.




Subject: Torpedo auto- and duomatic hub gear
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 05:44
Entered by: Huibert (huibert@johanneskroeg.nl)

Message:
Hello! I'd be very interested to see detailed pictures of both Torpedo auto- and duomatic hub gears. These appear to have out of production for many years, and there is nowhere I can find drawings or information anymore. Thanks!




Subject: Lenton for Clarence?
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 09:11
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
Clarence: It's not a club bike, but I have a Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix (531 frame w/10-speed Cyclo Benelux derailleurs) that is in need of a new home.




Subject: Raleigh model names
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 12:25
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
My wish is that someone would complie a list of Raleigh model names and their places in the Raleigh bike line. I hope it would include Roadster, Sport, Road and Loaded Touring models I feel this would be of much use to us Britophiles as we are ever searching for the Holy Grail bike. Other british makes should be included too, and their relations to the Raleigh brand. Recently turned down a Dawes 531 due to a bent fork and I was too short to ride it anyway.




Subject: Re Mystery Bike ID
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 13:30
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Philip-the lugs have plain ends and have an oval slot that intersects the end of the lug. also, the whole fork crown is cromed-no removable cap. serial # starts with a K and is 6 digits after that (I don't know the rest of the numbers off hand. The bike appears to have been originally all white (Gasp!!!!) Philips type brake brake calipers-and the brake handle shown in the close-up of the trigger is not original. Fender stays are wire and bolt on with little oval plates and machine screws. flip-top oiler on front hub, BB, and rear SA hub. Does this help??!!




Subject: Re Mystery Bike ID
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 13:51
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Wes, if it helps my 1954 Hercules roadster had the type of fenders you describe--wire struts with oval clamping plates. The chainring on mine had somewhat stylized "H"es as the "spokes". Hercules also made their own 3-speed hubs--virtually identical to Sturmey-Archer, but enough different (pinion pins, for example) that when I serviced the hub I had to keep all the original parts. The chainguard on the Hercules was also deeper vertically than the typical "hockey stick". I commuted on that bike for several years, and absolutely loved it, even though it was a 21" frame and I take 23".




Subject: Hercules roadster
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 14:14
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
One amusing thing about the Hercules (a $20 fleamarket find) was that someone in the past had installed one of the crank cotters backwards, so that the arms were not directly opposite. It was several weeks until I got around to banging the cotter out and installing it correctly, and in the meantime I'd gotten used to the uneven pedaling to the point that the proper crank spacing felt odd at first. By the way, the BB did have an oilcap, but if I remember the front hub just had the sheetmetal oil hole cover (but it's been quite a few years since I gave the Herc away so don't trust me on that.)




Subject: bike marriage
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 16:30
Entered by: stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
Well, I rode into my wedding on one of the Indian AVON roadsters! Never thought I'd do it, but it was perfect. We were married in a meadow below the 11,000' peaks of the Boulder Mtns in Idaho (about 15 N. of Sun Valley). I rode out of a clump of Aspen trees down a double dirt track bouncing along on my AVON, sitting upright, suit open, tie flapping. Dropped the bike in the grass in front of a bowed willow arbor where my bride and brother(who acted as the minister)were waiting in front of 150 guests. It was a great day.




Subject: Forever Comments
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 16:47
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
It's been a while since I've visited the site. I appreciate all the comments on the Forevers. If I were to bring more in, I'd be sure and incorporate some of these changes. Three things I'd like to comment on:1)The reason there aren't more roadster style bikes in the US is because thats not why most AMericans ride bikes. You're seeing more "leisure" bikes now. Riding position more upright, cushy seat, narrower tires, but still no luggage racks, fenders or lights because in the US few places have bike lanes or roads where people feel safe riding bikes as commuters. So, they ride the bikes strictly for recreation. that means in warm, sunny weather. Thus, no need for fenders of lights. 2)Actually the Chinese and Europeans for that matter are moving away from the rod brakes in favor of cable/calipher brakes while stop the bikes better. they still commute, but more modern models are replacing the old single speed roadsters.3)If you want to see 10-15 different brands of brand new roadster bikes go to the Cologne Bicycle and Motorcycle Expo sponsored by Messe Friedrichshafen GMBH . You'll see Gazelle, Kettler, as well as SA's booth, Brooks, Lepper. It would be a great time for any of you and a way to use up some of those frequent flyer miles.




Subject: Comments for Randy & Stephen
Entered on: Jul 22, 1999 22:29
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Randy, I did the same thing with the cotters on my Kia. I couldn't see how someone could twist the axle without bending it. I took it to my bike shop and he laughed and told me what I had done wrong. Yesterday as I was putting the crank arms on a Raleigh Sport I remembered that and was extra carefull. Stephen, congratulations on your marriage. I'll bet the attendees are still talking about your intrance on a bike.




Subject: rudge-whitworth
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 01:11
Entered by: Bill (www.spaceman.com@GBIS)

Message:
I have aquired a Rudge-Whitworth and am seeking information about it. It has front and rear rod brakes, and has inscribed above the head tube badge "light roadster" I would like to know it's age, if it originally came with fenders, and where I can get tires (they are standard raleigh 26x1 3/8 size rims). Plus any info on Rudge-whitworth would be greatly appreciated as well.




Subject: Congratulations!
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 11:05
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Congratulations on the nuptial event, Stephen. And thanks for taking the comments about the Forever in the spirit in which they are meant -- purely constructive. I've battened down the hatches on mine, and I'm liking it more and more. Next step may be to hang SA 3-speed on it. Tonight I'm set to pick up the pre-1958 Raleigh from my friend. It was going to be free, but I've decided to give him a similar vintage Kodak Retina IIc camera, with Schneider lens, case, etc., in excellent working condition, as a gift in return, since he's a photographer. (Clarence, do you enjoy the charm of old time-slicers too?)




Subject: Another Fake-Raleigh Roadster!
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 13:00
Entered by: Philip ()

Message:
Hey Folks, On the way to work today I saw a fake-Raleigh roadster. This one was called a "rolex" and had a head badge that looked suspiciously like a red Heron head. I don't think it was an accidental similarity to the Raleigh head badge. The bike was a standard one-speed roadster with full chaincase, rod brakes front & back, 28 inch wheels. I could not see a place of manufacture anywhere but from various fittings (spoke lock on the back wheel & plastic pedals) I would guess that it came from Taiwan. If I see it on the way home I'll have a closer look.




Subject: Correct Tyres
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 14:42
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I. QUERY re TYRES: what would be the correct sew-ups for a 1971 Raleigh International - (time to make mine like new). I'd ask the lightweight chaps, but they'd probably answer me in Italian and tell me to chuck it all for a Cinelli and what not. II. QUERY re DUNELT: The friend who's giving me the pre-1958 bike now says it's a Dunelt, not a Raleigh. When did Raleigh acquire Dunelt? III. MUST READ: I'm re-reading P.G. Wodehouse's "Thank You, Jeeves." All Anglophiles must read this. It will make you laugh out loud!




Subject: 1953 Indian Princess on Ebay Item #134115106 7/23
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 15:22
Entered by: Ray (Wheelman@nac.net )

Message:
Great vintage English bike. Look at the components and bid. ebay Item #134115106




Subject: Looking for a Vintage Raleigh
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 15:58
Entered by: Ally (alldou@earthlink.net)

Message:
Could someone enlighten me....I'm in search of a ladies English Raleigh...a vintage model. This is a search for someone else and I have no knowledge of these bicycles. This person wants a black 5 or 10 speed. Perhaps one from the 1940s or 50s. Do they exist? IF so, where might I find one? What are the terms I should be familiar with --ie. is this a roadster? What are the best models and what year were they made. Any information you could share would be appreciated.




Subject: Congratulations, Stephen!
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 16:05
Entered by: Paul ()

Message:
Congratulations on your marriage, Stephen. I am sure that you and your Indian Roadster were the talk of the town. Good thing that the screws didn’t fall out of the rod brakes, or you might have gone sailing past your bride. (Just kidding, of course.) I also congratulate you on your efforts to import some practical bikes. Here’s an idea that could possibly increase your sales. Have you thought about letting someone in the Morman Church (Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints) know about your reasonably priced Forever bikes? Most of their male missionaries ride bikes. Years ago, they used to ride English 3-speed bikes, but now most of them are riding mountain bikes. I don’t know if the missionaries buy the bikes individually (I suspect that they do) or whether they get any price breaks on them through their church or certain dealers. Since they ride mostly on city streets, wearing long pants and white shirts and in all kinds of weather, I would think that a good 3-speed sports bike with fenders, good caliper brakes and a 3-speed hub would be ideal for their use. Of course, being young men who grew up with mountain bikes, they might not realize that a sports type bike might be more practical than what they are used to. They might find the good prices attractive, however, especially after they have had one of their mountain bikes stolen as so often happens.




Subject: I'm happy for Steven!
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 17:30
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
May you two have every blessing and joy together. I hope you bring in more Forevers, I know without a doubt they would sell like hotcakes!! I am constantly being asked where they can be bought. I have met a lot of people that ask why bikes today do not have fenders and racks. I see people all the time who ride because they have to or like to commute to work. They are looking for what you have to sell. The marriage ceremony sounded awesome!!




Subject: 1975 23" Raleigh SuperCourse- What's it worth?
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 18:24
Entered by: Ralph (rwechs@aol.com)

Message:
I have a Red 1975 Raleigh Supercourse that I bought new in 1975. Any idea of what it's worth or how I might find out? Any leads would be useful. Thanks.




Subject: Re: Looking for a vintage Raleigh
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 20:38
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Ally, If you are looking for a 40's to 50's vintage Raleigh this is the place, buta 5 or 10 speed derailer type (I'm assuming thats what they're thinking) from that era is not going to be a frequent turn-up. Here in Oklahoma I see lots of 10-speed Raleighs, but mostly from the 1970's, and they are usually orange ans selling for $50 at thrift stores (thrift store in Tulsa are notoriously high when it comes to bicycles, especially beat-up ones). What you will most frequently encounter are the 26" light Roadsters (Sports) type bikes with cable brakes and 3-speed hubs. If you look around at garage sales etc, you might be able to fin just what your looking for. Cheers!!!!




Subject: The Roadster Wedding
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 20:41
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Congrads Stephen!!! and keep selling those great old (new) bikes. I can think of no more dignified way of making an entrance than on one of those majestic old roadsters. Congradulations!!!




Subject: Rear reflector on Avons
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 20:44
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I have a question! are the rear fender-mounted reflectors on the Indian-made Avons round like the ones on the old English bikes? If they are, I know I'm going to be ordering a bunch!




Subject: Looking for a Dynohub!!!!!!!!!!!
Entered on: Jul 23, 1999 23:22
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
I figured this kind of request would get more attention here than on the WANTED page. So here goes, I am looking for a working GH6 32 hole SA dynohub Please e-mail if you think you can help!! Thanks and Cheers Everybody!!!!




Subject: Dynohubs
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 03:08
Entered by: Paul ()

Message:
I was interested to read on Sheldon Brown's web site, "They [Dynohubs]were made by Sturmey-Archer in England for several decades, but are no longer in production. (Similar hubs are currently made by Sanyo, Shimano and Union. The Shimano model is definitely not available in the U.S., due to fear of lawsuits....)" Why would they fear law suits about a device which should be so trouble free? One would think that they would run a much greater risk of law suits by making and selling brakes.




Subject: Norwegian Club, mostly roadsters
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 07:45
Entered by: Trond (trond@picasso.uib.no)

Message:
I´m very sorry if I annoy anyone by repeating this message, but it seems that quite a few of you, Clarence and Keith in particular, are quite typical "Cyklus" material. Comments, please? "I write to draw your attention to the existence of our club, Sportsveteransykkelklubben Cyklus, or the Sporting Veteran Bicycle Club "Cyklus", of Bergen, Norway. The club was started on a whim in april 1994, after three of the founding members struck up acquaintances while riding their vintage bicycles abouttown, drew up the formal foundations of the club, and started recruiting, mainly with the celebrations of the Norwegian day of independence, May 17th, in view. Since then, we have participated in the formal independence day parade, placed between contingents of the Royal Norwegian Navy and the University, this year with a turnout of 26 of our members, among them four on our famed 1930´s four seater Danish bicycle, "Hamlet", - so named, because he never seems to know whether to be or not. In addition to the May 17th celebrations, we normally arrange two full day picnics, a tobogganing christmas party, and our annual three-day bicycling excursion, based at Villa Fridheim, a beautiful 18th century country house belonging to the family of a founding member. All these events are seen through in period attire and with the proper paraphernalia; Wind-up grammophones, wooden tennis rackets, pre-war cocktail shakers, signalling trumpets, and sabres for opening the champagne "á la russe". Our members are mostly students, with strong representations of the departments of fine arts, law, and art history, although a few have graduated. The next start-a-tradition-project will be the celebration of Wilhelm Henie day, to celebrate a legendary but sadly underrated Norwegian; the first bicycle racing world champion, renowned loudmouth, art collector, tycoon, man-about-town, and father of Sonia.In re our fifth anniversary dinner, to be held at Villa Fridheim, Tysnes, Norway, in the middle of august, we also want to proffer a formal invitation to the celebrations, including the traditional port-wine-in-the-portico welcome, the tournaments in croquet, badminton and couronne,the seven-course nocturnal dinner (dancing between the three last courses),and quite extensive fireworks. As you may have gathered, we crave publicity, and after having been worn-out, more or less, as subjects in the local newspapers, we feel that a moreglobal publicity approach is needed at the end of a rather spiffing century, overall. Our best regards, and toodle-dee-pipp, Trond L. Schöning"




Subject: Norwegian Club
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 10:55
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Well, this sounds cool but I could never attend because it is too far away for me. I have no plans to travel to Norway any time soon. I wish all of you a great time.




Subject: Dynohubs
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 11:12
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I would contact someone overseas, someone you can trust, and arrange for a Sanyo dynohub to be sent to you. Another example of stupid policy that makes no sense. A lot of medicine and cutting edge, lifesaving medical ideas are not available here.




Subject: Hercules (help!)
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 14:47
Entered by: Adam (Bronco79@webtv.net)

Message:
Just picked up an old, woman's Hercules. The owner said it was possibly 1930's or 40's. I'm more of a Stingray kinda' guy. I'm wondering if anyone can help me determine the bike's year and possible value. Here's some details... (woman's bike) color is black, lettering is gold. The top bar says "Hercules". Bottom bar says "JDC". Under seat says"REGd DESIGN, No 767936, PATENTS APPLIED FOR". The shifter is mounted on the bottom bar and says "LOW--N--HIGH", with the SA (Sturmey Archer) logo, "ENGLAND". The rear hub is Sturmey Archer, says "AW-8", but no date code. There's a number on the rear dropout- I assume the serial number, says "?0" (can't read 1st digit) on top, "3190" underneith. (1st digit may be a 5?). I'm guessing I'm probably outa' luck for a year without being able to fully read that number. Tires are Goodyear 26 x 1 3/8 x 1 1/4. I'm going to clean this bike of course, but I'm wondering what exactly it is I'm working on?! Thanks VERY much in advance for any info!




Subject: IT'S A BOY!
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 16:54
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Knew I couldn't top Stephen's news. BAD NEWS FIRST: My friend's memory isn't perfect -- I was hoping to break the 1960 barrier, but only got to 1962. THE GOOD NEWS: This 1962 Dunelt is in fabulous condition -- the paint is stunning red, and it's still VERY high gloss. Looks like it was waxed and polished and put away for 37 years. I didn't really even have to wipe it off -- it was already clean. Decals are 99% intact and very sharp. Box striping 99% intact, and still clear. It resembles my 1965 Dunelt in most respects, but the condition is much better. NO RUST. I mean it -- none. A few small scratches, that's it. Differences from the 1965: emblem on rear fender of '62 is enammeled brass, not a decal like the '65. The '62 fork crown is a large plain, chrome cap, not the "D" dimple, like the '65. The '62 has pump pegs, none on '65. Grips on '62 are nice fat ones, not sure if they're original. Came with front and rear racks, working generator, and metal horn. I think I may just put this one on display at home or at work.




Subject: Raleigh Roadster with Rod brakes 60's
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 19:41
Entered by: Krash90 (krash90@aol.com)

Message:
I need help in determining age and value of a bike I just obtained. By reviewing some of the communications by the locals. I have determined it to be a Roadster. Its a 28" has Goodyear tires, black with red pinstripping,has headlight and rear red light. Serial # DR90264. Its in average shape and rides well. Has rod brakes? One pad is missing. Chainguard says, Raleigh The All Steel Bicycle. I have no use for this bike so if any one is interested please make an offer. Thanx!




Subject: Lawsuits
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 19:53
Entered by: Warren ()

Message:
If a dynohub fails it's ripe for a lawsuit due to its maintenance free nature. A brake requires at least some ownwer interaction to keep it functioning well. Which reminds me...what do you call a hundred lawyers at the bottom of the sea?




Subject: English-made Huffy Sportsman
Entered on: Jul 24, 1999 23:26
Entered by: Kent (schn0049@tc.umn.edu)

Message:
I'm a complete greenhorn when it comes to the roadsters, but I picked up an interesting bike today at the Goodwill. It's a Huffy Sportsman, clearly marked as English built with decals proclaiming its English heritage. I first thought it was an old Raleigh because it appeared to be well made and equipped. It's got a SA 3-speed COASTER BRAKE hub (marked '62), front caliper brake, a very pretty emerald green paint job with color-matched rear mousetrap rack, nice sturdy full chrome fenders and these pedals (rubber blocks) that have several yellow dot prisms (reflectors?) that look like sparkly dots (pips) from dice. The chainguard is a sculpted design. The front headbadge is a rectangular metal rivited tag that says "Huffy" vertically. I thought Huffys were American-built? This one's clearly a quality built bike that apparently shares its "Huffy-ness" only by carrying a Huffy nameplate. Any ideas or comments on this cool find? --Kent




Subject: English Huffy
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 01:41
Entered by: Bob (vonomis@nep.net)

Message:
Kent: Your green 1962 Huffy sounds very much like a Roadmaster that I aquired as part of a package deal. Although the headbadge said Roadmaster, it was too English to be American. When I cleaned the gunk off of the badge, I saw that it said "Made In England" at the bottom. Like yours, the pedals had a series of holes for the reflectors, and the S-A three speed coaster brake was from 1962. Although the pedals were worn almost smooth, I could barely make out the "Phillips" script on the pedals, which appeared to be original. Sheldon Brown's site gives a good way to tell Raleigh from the others: if the rear fender eyelets are behind the axle, then it was made by Raleigh. If the eyelets are above the axle, then it is non-Raleigh. Even though Raleigh bought Phillips in 1962, mine has the eyelets above the axle - maybe Raleigh used up existing Phillips frames for a while? Anyway, Phillips (and Raleigh) made bikes under contract for several American bike companies. I would suggest checking the rear fender eyelets and the pedals. Also, my Phillips has a Raleigh type serial number, so it was probably made after Raleigh bought Phillips. Good luck with yours!




Subject: DL-1!
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 02:08
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Well, as of this noon I own a DL-1! I actually rode another today also. College Cyclery in Sacramento (CA) has a 22" gents' frame Tourist, 1975 vintage, all original including the B-66 saddle, for $350. It is actually in pretty nice shape, but no way would I pay $350 for it. But they'll sell it pretty soon, from what they said. The one I bought is a 24" gents', 1972 vintage, that is kind of rough. It was $75 in one of the bike capitols of the country, Davis. The handlebar stem is bent to the left maybe 15 degrees, but I was very careful to look over the frame and fork, and there is no sign that the bike was crashed. A previous owner had inscribed their driver's license number in the down tube, and the rear rim has the chrome worn through in several places. The brakepads are virtually new, and "Made in England". The wheels are 32H front and 40H rear. (It's funny, that the other one was 36H/40H...) The fenders are rusty in patches, but the frame, even where the paint is chipped off, has no rust at all. There was some kind of good surface treatment (maybe the "bonderizing" like my old Herc?) I have the bike stripped down to only the BB and wheels still on. (The saddle is a cheesy Schwinn vinyl matress. I'll be looking for a B-66--or the other heavier-duty one--I weigh around 240lb.) Once I took off the old baby seat and pumped up the tires, I took the bike around the block. What a joy! The 22" frame was definitely too small--my knees hit the bars while turning, but this one is just right. A very elegant ride, though it is geared for downhill racing... I'll definitely be putting a 24T sprocket on the rear. I plan to lace a Dynohub in the front wheel (I'm still looking for a Dyno taillight...) and an FW in the rear, which I'll probably update to S5 operation (there were some S5 bellcranks on eBay recently, of which I bought 3.) The frame does have the boss on the chainstay behind the BB for a chaincase, although it is equipped with a hockey stick. Unfortunately, my Pashley chaincase is too short to fit the Tourist. Does anyone have a source for European or Asian chaincases? I have the whole brake system off, including the hand levers, and will take the bars into work on Monday and make some blocks to hold the straight part of the stem so I can lever the end straight. Does anyone know what the rake of the DL-1 is supposed to be? The fork blades certainly don't seem to be bent, but the bike pulls to the right slightly. Anyway, what a great day! Not quite as good as riding to a wedding on a roadster (congratulations, Stephen!), but it's good to be wrenching on a vintage "3-speed" again. The only time I rode a Tourist previously was when I worked for a Raleigh shop in the late 1970's, and we always test-rode bikes after we assembled them. It was always a treat to get in a Tourist, because we *all* test rode them!




Subject: Paragraphs?
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 02:12
Entered by: Randy ()

Message:
P.S. Does anyone know how to make this form do paragraphs? That last opus was supposed to be about 6 paragraphs...




Subject: Lawsuits
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 02:56
Entered by: Paul ()

Message:
Thanks for the enlightenment, Warren. I didn't think of it that way. So, what do you call a hundred lawyers at the bottom of the sea? We're ready for the punch line.




Subject: Paragraphs?
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 03:24
Entered by: Paul ()

Message:
Randy, I suppose that you could try using HTML tags to do paragraphs. Try putting a <p> in front of each paragraph and a </p> at the end of each paragraph. If this message does not appear in two paragraphs or is otherwise garbled, then this technique will not work.




Subject: May I request an archive please?
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 04:15
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
The forum is becoming really slow to load, and most of the previous archives are not this large. Thanks from a newcomer (and thanks much for hosting the forum!)




Subject: Lawyers
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 07:18
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
A hundred lawyers at the bottom of the sea is called a good start.




Subject: WTB: headlight(s)
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 08:13
Entered by: David (davidd_dt@earthlink.net)

Message:
Does anyone have for sale one or two of those headlights that clip onto the L-shaped bracket on the headset (i.e., the kind that most of the Raleigh 3-speeds had)? I'd like to purchase a couple. Please advise!




Subject: English Roadster fever spreads
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 14:50
Entered by: Kent (schn0049@tc.umn.edu)

Message:
I knew that if I picked up the '62 English Huffy roadster yesterday that I'd start picking up other roadsters. Today, I acquired a Raleigh Sports with a 3 '55 marked SA coaster brake hub. The serial number is on the top left of the seat tube and reads "16757" with the letters "CH" just below. There's also a diamond shape stamped in the tube to the left of the number. I looked at the Raleigh dates sheet, but really wasn't certain I was following them correctly. For now, I'll assume it's '55 vintage based on the SA hub. Oh, and I looked a little more carefully at the "Huffy" Sportsman using the advice posted on this forum. It has the holes for mounting the fenders directly behind the axle (and looks very much like the Raleigh Sports frame in a side-by-side comparison). It also has a very Raleigh-ish serial number on the top left of the seat tube and reads "67844" with the letter "N" below that and the letters "CA" below that. So, is this a Raleigh hidden under the Huffy nameplate? --Kent




Subject: Weird Humber Discovery
Entered on: Jul 25, 1999 21:49
Entered by: kevin c (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
My latest find came Saturday at a small bike show in Indianapolis. It's a 1956 woman's Humber with full-cover chain guard, cable brakes and a rear hub that is a combination SA three-speed//Dynohub generator. There's also a storage battery (I think) in a case that's bolted to the post beneath the seat and wired to the generator. I assume that was to allow the lights to burn when the rider was sitting still. Is this bike anything unusual? I hadn't seen one quite like it before. The back hub is massive; it must weigh five pounds.




Subject: English Huffy
Entered on: Jul 26, 1999 00:37
Entered by: Bob (vonomis@nep.net)

Message:
Kent: From what you wrote about the eyelets and the serial number, I agree that your Huffy was probably made by Raleigh. Cheers!




Subject: Our Noewegian Brethren
Entered on: Jul 26, 1999 13:26
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Many thanks to Trond et al. of Cyklus for expressing kinship and support. Ah, Norway, the land of fjords and Elkhounds, Ibsen and Munch, Odin and Thor, and, dare I say, VIKINGS! A mighty people. Alas, I would love nothing more than to revel with you in your most admirable pursuit of creative anachronism, but I am, truth be told, a mere middle-class American mortal, who cannot well afford to travel to Europe more than once or twice in a lifetime. And my time is not now, my friends. But if you ever pack your roadsters into longships, let me know! I'll greet you at the northern coast with a bonfire and feast!




Subject: DL-1 update
Entered on: Jul 26, 1999 21:22
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
I've started a small webpage on the DL-1 on my website at http://www.rickadee.net/~zephyrus. The only useful content so far is a drawing of the frame geometry of the bike, which I made while measuring the frame, which turns out to be tweaked. I've straightened the bars, but it turns out that I need to do some frame alignment also. No pictures yet, but they'll be forthcoming also. Could someone with a 24" gents' DL-1 make an accurate wheelbase measurement, please? (Any reference, like crank spindle center, to front axle center is fine, because I realize the rear wheel can be moved in the dropouts...) Thanks!




Subject: Raleigh clues
Entered on: Jul 27, 1999 00:38
Entered by: warren (warbetty@netcom.ca)

Message:
Some of the other things Raleigh-made bikes share are the unique BB cups with the raised square purchase; of course the different thread count on the cups and headsets...24 tpi versus 26 tpi I think. Also there is very often an engraved or stamped motif found on the top of the stem or the face of the crankarms. What is that anyway...it looks like a sheperd or a monk standing beside a dog. I certainly don't think it's the Raleigh Heron. If it is I'm gonna blame it on the 70's.




Subject: DL-1 dimensions
Entered on: Jul 27, 1999 08:40
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Randy: I measured my DL-1 and the distance from the center of the front axle to the center of the crank shaft is 26.5 inches with a possible error of .06. due to using a steel tape measure. I'm interested in your efforts to straighten your frame & forks since I have a nice ladies sports that is so far out of kilter I can see it clearly and feel the pull. There is no sign of damage at all.




Subject: Sturmey Archer Problem
Entered on: Jul 27, 1999 11:56
Entered by: Jim (jcole@memphis.edu)

Message:
I'm having a problem with the hub on my 1969 Robin Hood. The crank turn whenever the rear wheel moves resembling a fixed gear. I tried the obvious solutions of loosening the chain, loosening the bearing adjustment on the left side, and lubing the hub. It seems to shift just fine, but something is definitely wrong. Any suggestions? THANKS!




Subject: Re: Sturmey-Archer problem
Entered on: Jul 27, 1999 12:52
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Jim, you might try checking the right-side bearing clearance. Back off the left-side bearing clearance a couple of turns. Back off the right-side locknut and lock washer, and turn the bearing cone finger-tight. Then back it off 1/4 turn, and align the flats so that the lock washer will engage (--not more than 1/4 more turn!) Then go back and adjust the left-side cone. The right-side cone is adjusting both the wheel bearing and the driver bearing clearance. If it is too tight, it is one factor that could cause the drag as you experience.




Subject: Re: DL-1 Dimensions
Entered on: Jul 27, 1999 13:00
Entered by: Randy (zephyrus@rickadee.net)

Message:
Thank you, Fred. My CAD layout says 22.33" from crank spindle to front axle. I'll confirm that this evening after I finish aligning the fork and reinstall on the frame (temporarily! I'll still need to align the rear triangle before I reassemble the bike.) I don't know what the factory tolerance was for such a "derived" measurement, but it certainly sounds close to me. And no, my DL-1 didn't show any obvious signs of damage either (i.e. wrinkled tubes etc.) Years ago, I was rear-ended while riding my International (hit-and-run; never found the guy), and it bent the rear triangle to the side so far that the tire was rubbing on the chainstay, without knocking me off the bike. (I guess my reflexes were pretty good back then...) But I had the frame aligned and rode it for several more years (was capable of being ridden hands-off after the alignment).