Discussion - English Roadsters

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Discussion - English Roadsters

Archived discussions: July 17, 1997 through Sep. 17, 1997
Archived discussions: September 17, 1997 through Nov. 17, 1997
Archived discussions: Nov. 17, 1997 through March 19, 1998
Archived discussions: March 19, 1998 through June 8, 1998
Archived discussions: June 8, 1998 through August 8, 1998
Archived discussions: August 8, 1998 through October 28, 1998

Raleigh date codes based on serial number

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Subject: LOOKING FOR SPORT WITH ROD BRAKES
Entered on: Oct 26, 1998 20:48
Entered by: HOWARD (WOBEL1@AOL.COM)

Message:
I AM IN THE MARKET FOR A MENS RALEIGH SPORT WITH ROD BRAKES, WITH 23" FRAME. SHOULD BE IN VERY GOOD ORIGINAL CONDITION ANY ACCESSORIES GREATLY APPRECIATED IE ENCLOSED CHAINGUARD, DYNO HUB, BATTERY TUBE. THANKS




Subject: Rider's Rant
Entered on: Oct 26, 1998 20:58
Entered by: calvert (cycletruck@aol.com)

Message:
Keith....my small sunday riding group is hardly an ample sample for determining the current popularity of cycling and though i've seen such booms come and go they have had (i think) little effect on riders like myself......i will continue to ride my wheel---dodging cars whose drivers think blessed are the bigger; enduring the gasps "you rode your bike!?" as i arrive @ dinner, meetings, and other gatherings as if there was something unbalanced or excentric about my chosen means; &c. I don't expect there will ever come a time in this country when any significant portion of the pop. will stop and think before they run an errand "hey, i've got the time why don't i pedal on over there"........and we might as well get used to it (unless you've got a divy of a plan)....still, there are many riders who feel the way i do and i can find them @ most of the older bike shops in this area (mostly on the Missouri side of the line.....the ambient capacity for social consciousness drops radically as you cross over into Johnson County, Kansas) ............On the issue of what kind of bike is ideal for the average occasional rider in this country, i think you're right: that S/A 3spd is tough to beat but why not a smaller chain ring up front.....they were made for Brit delivery bikes so there should be some source for them.........The Globe looks great; i look forward to testing one.....& as much as i disapprove of shimano's predatory marketing strategies, that nexus 7 does a very good job; the one i tried shifted smoothly and positively......i saw one taken apart and yes it is complex, it @ least comes apart in layers and appeared to be repair friendly......




Subject: bike components
Entered on: Oct 26, 1998 21:05
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
Since Sram (Gripshift) bought Sachs the bike component market may change over the next couple of years. Shimano makes great stuff that is well engineered but since they are so far ahead of everyone else, it's always gratifying to cheer for the underdog. Although I appreciate rugged, long lasting components, most new stuff that needs replacing isn't that expensive considering the type of use city bikes get.(Mtn bikes can go through lots of drive train parts!).I could care less if my derailleur lasts 30 years. By the way, I assumer you're all aware of the Rohloff 14 speed hub which is supposed to be a marvel of engineering.




Subject: Rohloff and more
Entered on: Oct 26, 1998 23:10
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Steve - the Rohloff may be a marvel of engineering but have you seen the price!! 600-700 wholesale!!. I don't see much of a future for it except on the bikes of well-heeled connoisseurs. Also, we've been hearing alot about Nexus 4-speed and 7speed and Sachs internal hubs. How about Sturmey. Has anyone else tried the Sprinter 5 speed? I've been using one for the last 3 years and it's great. One cable and indicator, a la the AW, a slightly wider gear range with the middle three ratios much like a medium range 3 speed (I'll post the numbers if anyone is interested) It's been dead reliable through all kinds of weather (it rains a lot up here) and solves the major bugaboo of an AW used for more spirited riding - ratios spaced too far apart. Don't give up on the British; the Sprinter is definitely worth considering if your thinking about laying out the bucks for a Nexus




Subject: Re:Rohloff and more
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 06:03
Entered by: Nick (basic@leys.com)

Message:
Louis Where can a bicycle shop get one of the Sturmey Archer Sprinter five speed hubs? I know where to get the Nexus 4 and 7 speed hubs, but not the SA Sprinter. Nick Nichols - DBA Basic Cycles, Charlottesville, Va. (http://leys.com/basic)




Subject: 1950Boys Elswick 28rod/enclosed chain/3 speed
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 06:27
Entered by: Bob Siegel 703 569 5240 Virginia (kbsiegel@juno.com)

Message:
1950 mens Elswick 3 speed rod brakes/brooks seat built on rear wheel lock/28 inch wheels /enclosed chain guard withsprocket exposed so you can see chainwring that says Elswick. 200+shipping.




Subject: 1952 mens Armstrong 26 in 3 speed 75+shipping
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 06:38
Entered by: Bob Siegel703 569 5240 Virginia (kbsiegel@juno.com)

Message:
1952 mens armstrong 26 in 3 speed/sprocket says armstrong in large letters/nice headbadge/good chrome could use repaint not rusted must have been kept inside. I put raliegh fenders/chainguard and rear rack on due to the fact that they were missing when I bought it. 75+shipping Bob Siegel 703 569 5240




Subject: Black knight 26 in girls year unknown looks old
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 06:45
Entered by: Bob Siegel 703 569 5240 Virginia (kbsiegel@juno.com)

Message:
tank/long spring seat/rear carrier rack/headlight on front fender is missing lens and bezel.Value unknown please call for details and make offer. thanks




Subject: Shift cable stops?
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 08:29
Entered by: Nicko (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Anyone ever try to replace the stops on a SA shift cable? I clipped mine off at the shifter so as to replace some frayed cable sheathing, but now I can't find a replacement stop to fit. I'm told my only choice is to replace the entire cable, but that they are no longer made with the rubber housing of the originals. Thanks for any help.




Subject: Quality of parts, etc.
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 09:36
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Stephen: In response to your suggestion that parts on cheap deralliers are easily replaced, I agree. I would add, however, that I'm beginning to find that the average consumer gives up on a bike VERY QUICKLY when it doesn't work. So at this point I'm wondering if a more foolproof internal gearing system isn't better for most. Another related observation about derailleurs: this weekend I rescued a decent 10-speed Raleigh for $10. The bike was clean -- no rust -- but it didn't shift properly when I got it because the derailleur was bent inward at the mounting bracket. A little nudge back into place and it works perfectly. But the original owner had given up on it. I put upright handlebars on it and a wide, sprung seat, and gave it away to a friend. (I've recycled a lot of 70s and 80s 10 to 12 speeds that way.)




Subject: Changing drive ratios on S-A AW hubs
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 12:03
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Calvert; In an earlier posting I talked about replacing the hub sprocket on 3 speed hubs with sprockets from Shimano freewheels. I found this information in one of Sheldon Brown's articles. Shimano freewheel sprockets have the same internal diameter as S-A & Shimano 3 speed hub sprockets. To make them fit you need to remove 3 of the splines from the freewheel sprocket and round the corners of the remaining 3 splines. You will have to do the grinding with a die grinder since the spocket material is very hard. Since the freewheel sprocket is thinner than the 3 speed sprocket you will have to install a spacer. I found a number of spacers of different thickness in my collection of salvaged hubs. I have made this modification to two of my bikes; one uses a 25t sprocket, the other a 28t sprocket. Most bike shops have old freewheels around and may even give you the parts. I haven't addressed the effects of the narrow teeth on the Shimano sprocket on the 3 speed chain since I also installed two speed chain wheel cranks on my bikes and used the 7/32 chains. This is an easier mod to make than changing the crank sprocket and you can try different sprockets until you find the one you like best. Incidentally you can see the two bikes I made this mod on in Jim Wilsons new web magazine. See his posting dated Oct 17 in the Rod & Custom discussion area.




Subject: Phillips 3-speed
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 14:42
Entered by: DavidH. ()

Message:
There is a men's 3-speed Phillips sitting at our local Goodwill store. It is in VERY nice shape. The date code on the Sturmey-Archer rear hub indicates 1972. Any ideas on how much it may be worth? Wondering if I should go buy it...THANKS!




Subject: SA Sprinter
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 16:34
Entered by: Stephen ()

Message:
Louis, you're a wealth of wonderful info. I'll look into the SA Sprinter. It may be just what I'm looking for.




Subject: Other websites for Roadsters
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 16:36
Entered by: Stephen (Steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
Various websites have been mentioned here.Please send me other websites for Roadsters you might know of. Thanks.




Subject: Cafe Bicycle
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 17:36
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
O.K. so somebody tell me what a cafe bycycle is. I haven't worked in a bike shop for twenty years and most of the young people there don't seem to know what I'm talking about. So I haunt swap meets and thrift shops and pick up what I like and stay out bike shops. While I'm ranting... last saturday I wnet into a small shop in Phoenix and asked for a "clamp on cable stop for the chain stay." The young guy in there took what seemed to me to be a long period of time decoding what I was asking for. Needless to say he didn't have one. I suspect he didn't really know what I was asking for. So what is a cafe bike? Is it something that a lover of S/A coaster brakes could love?




Subject: Re: Phillips 3-speed
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 18:06
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Welllllll...back in '72 I was selling these brand new for $38.50 at the Bicycle Revival in Cambridge, Mass. For the person who asked for urls, you might start at      http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english_3_speeds.html at the bottom of this page you'll find other related links (if anybody has any other suitable links that I should add, let me know!)




Subject: Thrift Shop Bike Values
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 22:35
Entered by: Nicko (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Hi, David. Having just done a tour of thrift shops in the Portland-Salem, Oregon area, I can tell you that bikes go for $8-$35 most of the time. The price seems to have little to do with the bikes and is just a matter of what the "fair used bike price" seems to be for that particular store (they are getting them for free and often have trouble unloading them).




Subject: Favourite Bike URLs
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 22:39
Entered by: Nicko (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
In response to the request, here is my little list: SA Parts and Servicing http://www.toehead.demon.co.uk/st_main.htm; 3-Speed Parts from Harris Cyclery http://www.sheldonbrown.com/ha-three.html#sturmey; Servicing English 3-Speeds http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english_3_speeds.html; Vintage Bicycle Database http://users.aol.com/videomap/db_val_a.htm; Bicycle Trader Newspaper http://www.bicycletrader.com; Bike Project Import Roadsters http://www.bikeproject.com; Older Raleighs (by Sheldon Brown) http://www.sheldonbrown.com/raleigh.html; Raleigh Links (modern Raleighs) http://www.speakeasy.org/~tabula/raleigh/raleigh-links.html




Subject: Cafe Bikes--A Definition
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 23:19
Entered by: Claudia ()

Message:
Kevin, there really is no such thing as a "cafe bike." It is just a marketing strategy to get people, mainly hi income types, who would never dream of getting sweaty (except on the stairmaster at the gym) to buy a somewhat expensive bike. I have one, but I don't fit the marketing profile. The Globes by Specialized were presented as something one would hop upon on a Saturday morning to ride to the nearest Starbucks. Have a croissant, a double latte, read the New Yorker, ride home and never touch the bike again until the next Saturday. This is what you would conclude from their brochures. But the stock equipment belies this image...full fenders, built in lighting system including a fender mounted tailight, a rear carrier, and of course on the 7, the 7 speed Nexus hub. This bike would be a boon to anyone in a third world country as major transportation, but here they are niche marketed as "cafe bikes." Go figure.




Subject: lowering the gear range for a raleigh
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 23:50
Entered by: calvert (cycletruck@aol.com)

Message:
Fred....that's good info for schprocket swappers......i remember that posting and remember thinking @ the time that the process would be time consuming and knowing you'd need to change the chainwheel anyway why not just switch out the chainwheel to begin with......if it is that important to lower the range of a 3spd (admiting that someday i may need to consider it, i'm holding onto a nos 32t & a 34t Shimmy cogs, meanwhile i'm not too embarassed to push my DL-1 up some hills).....the point of that exchange, if i followed the thread correctly, was how do we make happy cyclists out of velophobes & handing them a big conversion bill for work on a cheap bike probably won't help.....and th@'s not to say what you did to your bikes is anything less than tres hip & appropriate for that package---- i look forward to checking out those shots on Jim Wilson's 'zine site.....




Subject: cafe bikes
Entered on: Oct 28, 1998 09:27
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I'd add only one detail to Claudia's description. As I recall, the Globe was originally marketed as a commuter bike, and it is perhaps the best off-the-rack configuration for that purpose available today. And you can guess why marketing a "commuter" bike would flop in this country but the "cafe" designation, which conjures the trendy images Claudia so aptly describes, may indeed fly. During a recent trip I stopped by two bike shops: one in West Va. and one in Va. Both owners said they favored the cafe bike for most of there customers, and that they were making efforts to steer the average person in that direction. Both told me, however, that despite their advice people more often than not walk out with a mountain bike (that will never be ridden off-road -- indeed, one owner refered to trade stats that suggest less than 1% see any real off road use).




Subject: Cafe Bikes
Entered on: Oct 28, 1998 10:11
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Okay, two more things. I think it's appropriate to discuss the cafe bike here because the manufacturers suggest the idea has European roots (look at the catalog for GT's Nexus-equiped Transit Express and Rapid Express), and are in a sense the stepchildren of English 3-speeds mingled with elements of hybrids and cruisers. By the way, as a former motorcyclist, I first encountered the term cafe bike as a description of a fast, light, European motorcycle with a low, racing style fairing used to race from cafe to cafe on weekends. The common element would seem to be caffeine.




Subject: 28 Inch x 1/3/8 x 1 5/8 DUNLOP Gumwall NOS
Entered on: Oct 28, 1998 17:10
Entered by: Randy (hirelevel@mindspring.com)

Message:
Nice 28" Dunlop tire (gumwall) excellent condition. For sale or will trade for Stingray Slik Tire.




Subject: What Bike did 26x 1 5/8 Goodyear tire fit??
Entered on: Oct 28, 1998 17:15
Entered by: Randy (hirelevel@mindspring.com)

Message:
I have some nice 26 x 1 5/8 Goodyear whitewall tires. I have no clue of what rim/bike these would be correct /fit for. Thanks for your help.




Subject: Shimano freewheel sprockets & S-A/Shimano 3 speed hubs
Entered on: Oct 28, 1998 19:05
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Calvert and anyone else following this tale: To make certain that there is no misunderstanding concerning this swap I add this to the story. I hope I made it clear that I started out with 10 speed bikes and installed a 3 speed hub in place of the freewheel assembly. Then wanting lower gearing for our hills here in upstate NY, I changed the stock sprockets of 20t to freewheel sprockets of 25/28t. I found that easier than coming up with larger front sprockets. I have not contemplated doing that mod to a good ol' English 3 speed bike. I like them the way they are and ride them down in the flats. I do plan to put a 22t rear sprocket(a proper cog though, not one from a freewheel) on my DL-1 since it is a very long legged machine. I hope this is not answering questions that haven't been asked but better to be redundant than misunderstood.




Subject: 3 speed gear swaps
Entered on: Oct 28, 1998 20:23
Entered by: John (johnwittwer@prodigy.net)

Message:
ok guys this is how I've changed the gearing on four of my three speed bikes.Inclluding a DL1 roadster.I put a 22 tooth gear on back.For the front chain ring I take a small girls bike chain ring assembley I grind off the swedge then migweld it to the ground off oringinal crank arm I do this because the crank arms are shorter on the girls bike.I wind up with a 40 tooth front chain ring and a 22 tooth rear gear.Thats a major change to the rideability of the bike.It climbs hills great!The only problem is finding the small front chain ring crank assemblies.




Subject: Cafe Bikes
Entered on: Oct 28, 1998 21:03
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
Keith, As a rider of old Indian Motocycles, (or is it old rider of Indian Motocycles?) I remember cafe bikes (motorcycle type). What was it, like 15, 20 years ago? I was wondering if there was a conection. I take it then that a cafe bike has a diamond frame. What about wheel size? Thanks




Subject: Cafe Bikes
Entered on: Oct 29, 1998 09:49
Entered by: Keith (velohund)

Message:
Kevin: You need to wvsit my area and see the Motorcycle Museum in Westerville, Ohio if you haven't already. As for the cafe bicycle, I would have to defer to Claudia and the bike dealers who frequent this site. But as far as I know, as Claudia indicated, the designation is merely a marketing approach and not -- at least not yet -- some well-recognized catagory of bicycles. As best as I can tell, road bikes are more of less a small-scale specialty item, the market for mountain bikes is at or near the flood level, and perhaps the manufactuters are stretching to find a new form. For what it's worth I think the idea is a consumer-friendly bike that stresses comfort. Most major manufacturers appear to have something in their lines in this catagory, with some looking more like hybrids and others looking more like cruisers. Look at Trek's 1999 700 and 720 -- fully upright handlebars. Look at Cannondale's line of SRB's -- "Smooth Riding Bikes." Schwinn's "Searcher" line of "ultra stylish cross bikes" seems to be evolving in this direction. GT's Nexus-equiped Transit Express and Rapid Transit fit the mold: curvaceous, cruiser-like profile, upright riding position, internal gears. And Claudia's Globe defines the class. I see these forms as a throwback to pre-70s bike boom bicycles, combining aspects of the English 3-speed (utilitarian epicyclic gears, relatively lightweight) with MWs and ballooners (also upright, curved frame tubes).




Subject: Any SA Reflectors out there?
Entered on: Oct 29, 1998 10:56
Entered by: Nicko (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
I need to replace a missing old-style Sturmey or just "Made in England" white rubber, round, red lensed, rear fender reflector. Anyone know where they may be available used or new? Thanks.




Subject: Royal York
Entered on: Oct 29, 1998 11:48
Entered by: Don (compuchd@vbe.com)

Message:
I came across an old English 3-speed. It says Royal York on the head badge with a picture of the York Cathedral. It has a Sturmey-Archer hub dated 59, AW. The serial number is K707721 which doesn't match the Raleigh series. Any ideas...thanks




Subject: Cafe bikes and riders rant and so on
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 01:40
Entered by: Philip (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
Hi folks,....May I say that the discussions going on here in the past few weeks are an absolute delight. It's so refreshing to see the musings of so many straightforward, knowledgeable people each trying to add something truly useful to the discussion. That may sound like I've spent too much time in the basement lately, but you should see some of the drivel laid down by the egotistical whacko's on the cycle-activist lists in this area. I know I should just leave it at that but (as you've probably guessed) I have a couple of things to add...........Calvert, I can't comment about anybody in any county of Kansas (although my Grandpa was born in Garden City), but I think there is some hope for some urban areas where people who are currently car-bound will see that the bicycle is a viable option. Cycle commuting has increased substantially in Vancouver in the last five years or so. However, this increase is limited to the central-city, it seems............This leads me to cafe bikes. I agree with Claudia. Here's my sense of it: I have heard from a couple of places that sales of Mountain bikes have plateaued and may now be on the ebb. This leads the bike manufacturers to look for new markets. They (I'm sure) are also aware that there may be a changing consciousness in central-cities and they are looking at how to market to these people. For some reason they seem to think that people will running screaming from a bike that is portrayed as useful and competent so I believe that the "cafe bike" is one of their attempts to create a market for them......And finally, as another former motorcyclist, I'm glad Keith pointed out that "cafe bike" was a term for a type of motorcycle. It originated in Britain as a "cafe racer". I believe it was originally applied to the riders of these bikes because they "raced" to the local cafes and then sat around talking about how fast they went and how incredible they blah blah blah. My father (another former motorcyclist) once pointed out to me that when he was riding it was definitely *not* a compliment. Cheers, Philip




Subject: Commuting and the like
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 09:23
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Philip: I'm encouraged that the people in Vancouver are commuting by bicycle in increasing numbers. Do you see any Brit three-speeds out there on the way to work? Also, I do not own a "cafe bike," and wonder if Claudia or anyone else would care to compare the performance of one for commuting to that of a Brit 3-Speed sport bike or roadster. This weekend I intend to go on a club ride and log some real miles on my fixed-gear mockup "American Roadster." Wish me luck.




Subject: cafe compared to brit
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 12:17
Entered by: Claudia ()

Message:
Keith asked how "cafe" bikes compare with brit bikes for commuting. Well, I have both and have to say that for comfort, my Globe 7 is my favorite...I put a Brooks saddle on it and it is a really cushy ride, but I prefer the aesthetics of my 70ish Raleigh Sports Ladies model. It is a little small for me, so I feel more comfortable on the Globe (I preferred the looks and colors of the Men's model). There is a definite advantage of seven speeds over three! So, for short rides and in situations where I am unsure of the security of the parked bike, I take the Raleigh. Longer commutes, definitely the Globe and I don't let it out of my sight when it is parked because it really gets checked out and they are hard to come by. But for pedaling to cafes for a latte (which I do a lot) I prefer my 1946 Ladies Hartford ballooner, my true "cafe bike." Bottom line for me is that there is no one perfect commuter and that's my excuse for having more bikes than less eccentric people. I also have a "market" bike which has an expanding wire basket on one side of the rear wheel and an incredible hard sided vinyl covered carrier I picked up in New Zealand on the other side. All my bikes except the ballooner have Brooks saddles. Pay ten bucks for a bike, put a fifty dollar saddle on it and you are ready to roll!




Subject: Fred's Juice: an American Roadster?
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 14:46
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
FRED: I just looked at your "JUICE" in the BikeRod & Custom online magazine, which I recomend to all Menotomy fans. It's REAL close to what I'm talking about with the American Roadster bike. It's a beauty. Also saw your custom Austrian Sears 3-speed. I found one of those too but parted it out. I wish I had your restoration talents -- I'd have saved it. Great work!




Subject: My plans for the Juice series
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 18:58
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Keith et.al.: Thank you for your kind words about my Juice and Ostereichen (Austrian) bikes. I put a lot into them especially Juice. My plan is to build a trio of similar bikes, Juice being the first of the series. No. 2 will be Juice Mark II which will be a Neon green color. Whereas Juice is orange with green and yellow striping, Mark II will have orange and yellow striping. Logic will reveal what colors the striping for Juice Mark III will be. My original concept was to create a citrus theme since I am surrounded 6 months of the year by Florida citrus fruits. Just yesterday I was given a good but grundgy Fuji 12 speed Touring Series II bike by a neigbor. I immediately saw Mark II in my minds eye. Now after looking the bike over it seems a shame to modify it so I may fall back on my plan to use a Schwinn Traveler frame I've been saving. In any event Mark II will become a reality next summer when I return to my major home and shop. This winter hiatus from building will give me time to come up with a drive train configuration. I don't especially want another six speed. I hope I haven't imposed on this group by discussing custom bikes. I do love my Raleighs, and in stock form.




Subject: "American Roadsters" Thread
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 20:04
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
Keith, Thanks for getting this thread started. I generally check this page when I get on the net and I often come away with something new. But this is the most interesting thread since someone took a shot at British engineering a year ago or so.




Subject: Photos of Bike Project/Bicycle Arts roadsters
Entered on: Nov 2, 1998 05:58
Entered by: Nick (basic@leys.com)

Message:
If anyone is interested in seeing photo's of the Bike Project/Bicycle Arts 28" wheel roadsters and 26" wheel three speed, check them out at: (http://www.leys.com/basic/metropolitan.html) Nick Nichols - DBA Basic Cycles




Subject: S/A slipping out of gear
Entered on: Nov 2, 1998 12:57
Entered by: Lynn (lbock@sheltonbbs.com)

Message:
S/A hub on 70's Raleigh Sport is slipping out of gear, primarily in 2nd. At one time I was fairly proficient 10 speed mechanic, but the S/A hub is different animal, have not even tried to adjust it without some direction. Bike was my fathers and is therefore nearly mint ( shifter is a little stiff), just had to air up the tires and sos the rust spots on the wheels. Been riding it on weekends for last few weeks, but not hard. Any help would be appreciated. (No bike shops of roadster era in area).




Subject: raleigh 20 folder
Entered on: Nov 2, 1998 20:37
Entered by: john (johnwittwer@prodigy.net)

Message:
I am looking to buy a Raleigh 20 folding bike or a similar Brit bike.Thanks




Subject: SA Adjustment
Entered on: Nov 2, 1998 21:29
Entered by: Nicko (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Hi, Lynn. About adjusting your SA 3-speed, all you may need to do is tighten the "barrel" at the end of the gear cable where it meets the indicator chain (the funny looking chain coming out of the hub). For details, see Sheldon Epicyclic Brown's excellent web page about servicing English 3-speeds at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english_3_speeds.html Don't be put off by his on-line photo - he's a great guy and has lots of helpful information.




Subject: S-A hub problem
Entered on: Nov 2, 1998 22:49
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Lynn; If you haven't done so, put a few drops of oil in your hub. I find that some problems go away with a little lube. It sounds like the cable has stretched on your bike. I won't go into the adjustment since Sheldon Brown covers it very well.




Subject: Stubborn Cotter Pin on Raeigh
Entered on: Nov 3, 1998 18:40
Entered by: Claudia ()

Message:
Help! The cotter pin on the chainwheel side of my 70's Raleigh is stuck tight. I have applied lots of liquid wrench and other solvents and lubricants, but can't get it to budge. There is no rust involved, so I don't know what could make it so uncooperative. Any ideas appreciated.




Subject: Phillips 10 speed racer
Entered on: Nov 3, 1998 21:51
Entered by: Marty (miestner@aol.com)

Message:
I've recently acquired an older Phillips 10 speed racer. It says on the down tube The True Temper steel bicycle. It has the Phillips badge with Nottingham on it. There are no braise on parts. Everything is a clamp-on. It is primarily orange with some black on the head tube. No rubber hoods on the brake levers, long shifter levers on down tube. Sturmer Archer chrome 27" wheels. Does anyone have a thought on how I can find out when this was made and whether it has any value? Please respond via e-mail.




Subject: AMBO dutch? english three speed
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 08:38
Entered by: Tomek (liniecki@rocketmail.com)

Message:
I aquired two AMBO bicycles from junk. They have steel 28" rims, Sturmey-Archer AW hubs, Brooks saddles, funny aluminum die-cast chainguards. The brass/enamel nameplate shows letters AMBO placed horizontally above the white picture of anvil. Originally they were painted dark green with gold lines. Before I even completed restoration, one of them was stolen, so now I have only one of them. I guess, they were manufactured in Nederlands, England or Belgium about 40 years ago. Does anybody knows anything about manufacturer?




Subject: Re: Stubborn Cotter Pin on Raleigh
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 12:21
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
See my article on Cottered Cranks at: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cotters.html




Subject: Re: Phillips 10 speed racer
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 12:25
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
This was the rock-bottom of the line Raleigh-built 10 speed, even below the Record. If it's the model I'm thinking of, it probably has "squash & slot" front fork ends, maybe even 3-speed type brake levers. These bikes have no particular value, due to the cheap parts, though the frames are OK.




Subject: re: Phillips 10 speed racer
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 15:47
Entered by: Philip (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
There is an old Phillips 10-speed in my family v.similar to what you describe *except* ours has 26 x 1-1/4 wheels. It was bought new in 1967. It is lime green. In addition to the brake levers that Sheldon describes, it has true half-step gearing and Huret derailleurs. I have seen orange versions with 27" wheels and I'm fairly certain that they are newer. Athough it is very cheap, it can be a perfectly functional bike. I put narrow "commuter" bars on this bike in the 1980's and rode it to university for over two years over a route that included trails through the bush.




Subject: Re: commuting and the like
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 16:02
Entered by: Philip (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
Keith: I hope your weekend ride on your fixed-gear "roadster" went well. You asked about people commuting on 3-speeds in Vancouver. There aren't many. Mostly just a few 1970's Raleighs. However, there is one marvellous black Royal Enfield that parks everyday in front of a building on the next block. The bike has "49" stamped on the AW hub (yes, I peeked), has a dynohub on the front complete with front & rear lights. The frame decal says "lightweight supersports". In Vancouver, the overwhelming majority of commuters ride mountainbikes. Vancouver has lots of hills and people are attracted to the idea of having lots of gears. That said, I notice that many bike couriers ride converted road-racing bikes with one-speed hubs. Hope this is useful.




Subject: Elswick www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Villa/9457
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 17:39
Entered by: Bob Siegel (703)569-5240 (kbsiegel@juno.com)

Message:
Hi. I have posted a picture of an English Bicycle, Elswick. Rod brakes, 3 spd., Enclosed chain. Has anyone ever seen a bicycle like this? You can view it on my web page: http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Villa/9457




Subject: TA parts
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 19:42
Entered by: Jeff (jeffb@freeway.net)

Message:
I recently purchased a Hercules. It did not have wheels, and I can not find #'s on the frame anywhere so I am not going to bother you with questions about it's age. I am curious about the cranks though. They have an insignia engraved on them that looks similar to the one Tom Ritchey uses and I believe it is a T and an A. A person is holding on to the top of the T like handlebars. Can anyone give me any info on the maker, and might this at least tell me if it is a pre or post Raleigh Hercules? I am restoring the bike to use as a cruiser and am enjoying working on it so it's monetary value really does not matter to me. Thank you for any help you can give me, and thank you for this very interesting bulletin board. Jeff




Subject: Rotrax
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 20:43
Entered by: Fraser ()

Message:
Does anyone know if this English bike manufacturer still exists ? I have a special one-off 'Rotrax Concours' made for a Paris Cycle show in the early 1950s. As such the handlebars,Brooks saddle,seat post,brake shoes, wheel wing-nuts, etc are engraved with fleur-de-lys.




Subject: Anyone in the Lakeland, Florida Area?
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 22:34
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
I've located a decent Raleigh DL-1 in the Lakeland, Florida area, but the seller is not willing to ship. Anyone willing to do a pack & ship for a few dollars?




Subject: Rotrax Concours
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 22:37
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
Fraser -- anyway you could get pics of the Rotrax up on the Web? I'd be willing to host the space and even do the scanning. WE WANT TO SEE THE BIKE! :-)




Subject: Girls Raleigh Superbe FS
Entered on: Nov 5, 1998 06:28
Entered by: Tim (EMGEETD@aol.com)

Message:
I have a '69(?) girls Raleigh Superbe for sale. Front dyno hub, Raleigh pattern rims, Brooks B72 , Front light. No rear carrier. Green. 21" frame. $100. thanks.




Subject: Fixed gear roadster/Vancouver
Entered on: Nov 5, 1998 09:38
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Phillip: Thanks for the sketch of your local cycle-scape. It's much the same here -- mountain bikes rule by numbers due to their unfounded popularity. You need to discover the owner of that old Brit bike -- would you be so bold to leave a note on it? I talk to bike messengers who deliver to my office. They see the bicycles hanging on my walls and it gets discussion going. Most of them ride mountain bikes simply because it's what they have, but most acknowledge that road bikes are much faster for the job. A select few ride the kind of bike you describe: a stripped down road bike with a single-speed freewheel, and either genuine time trial bars or drop bars cut down and turned upside-down. Often these have interesting custom paint jobs and/or strange stickers. I'm not sure what these bikes are called. Does anyone out there know? (I once heard one referred to as a "Thrasher," but I've heard that before applied to "rain bike," "slag bike," or "beater bike." Anyway, I find it an interesting sub-culture of cyclists. My ride on the fixed-gear roadster was great -- I rode it 40 miles on the Little Miami bike trail. The 67" fixed gear was perfect for the job -- this is a "rails to trails" path, and it's pretty flat. The bike, which has unremarkable 27 X 1 and 1/4 tires, performed well on the path and also on an unpaved two mile section that on which I wasn't supposed to ride. It was very course railroad right-of-way gravel, and the bike held up well: the fixed gear is easier on the gravel because you can really feel what your rear wheel is doing, and the wide, spring saddle absorbed enough shock to keep it comfortable. Yet, the bike is relatively light, and therefore quick to respond - quicker than an English sport bike and MUCH quicker than an English roadster. It was also fun imagining that the kind of ride I was experiencing (especially on the gravel) was something akin to what a rider of the last turn of the century would have experienced with the fixed-gear one speed. Toward the end of the ride I encoutered a pack of well-heeled roadies on high-tech aero rigs, complete with $750/set Spinergy wheels, $200+ Carnac shoes, and so on. Okay, I've gone that route too, but I was having at least as much fun as they were on my $9 American Roadster. It's part of my attempt to grasp the big picture, and reexamine what cycling means to me.




Subject: 36-Speed
Entered on: Nov 5, 1998 11:18
Entered by: TimH ()

Message:
Ok. All this talk about hybrids got me to thinking about a bike I built in the late 70's. I used an Italian frame(10-speed type) called "A. Camera", and built a 36 speed, upright bars, various saddles, 27x1 1/4 alloy wheels. The interesting thing is obviously the drive-train. I used a Sturmey AW with a long axle and a rare threaded driver, a 4-speed freewheel, and a Stronglight triple. It wasn't a terribly effective gearing arrangement, but then I did it just to do it... Tim




Subject: Vancouver Bikes
Entered on: Nov 5, 1998 20:05
Entered by: Bill ()

Message:
I saw some talk about bikes and Vancouver Canada. I get up there on business on occasion, and near our layover hotel, across from a restaurant called "Kettle of Fish", there is a bikeshop with a repair annex, and the mechanic rides a great old DL-1 he got from his grandfather in Ireland. He leaves it outside all the time and the leather seat is turning to jerky, but its a dependable mount and a classy bike. It has an interesting fork mounted bell that is activated by a cable and handlebar mounted lever. It forces the spring mounted clapper into the spokes, and the owner said the resulting sound sends people scurrying. Vancouver also seems to have an interesting bike messenger culture, with all sorts of intersting bikes in use. They seem to have favorite coffee shops that they take over. But alas the dominant bike seems to be the ubiquitous cheap mountain bike. There is fun riding in Stanley Park up there if you just have a day. Bill




Subject: Raleigh Space Rider
Entered on: Nov 5, 1998 21:55
Entered by: colleen (colleenz@olynet.com)

Message:
I'm wondering what I've just bought from the thrift store...It is a blue, ladies 3 speed, 3 wheeler & has "Raleigh Space Rider" on the gear cover...I took it straight to the bike shop to have the 3 speed fixed, checked out & adjusted for me...I didn't take the time to check any serials, I was so excited to have got it for $45...The bike man says I got a great deal.....I'm 62 & had a total hip replacement in March & am now afraid to ride my bicycle..it seems too high & too fast & I'm afraid of falling off..I'd been toying with the idea of a 3 wheeler & as my first bike in England was a Raleigh, I know they are good...I've looked all over the net, & can't find where Raleigh ever made a 3 wheeler, so am nonplussed..any ideas?? ....thanks....Colleen PS, the bike man did say something about Archer hub?




Subject: Re: Raleigh Space Rider trike
Entered on: Nov 6, 1998 00:30
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Raleigh used to make a "Winkie" chain-drive trike with 451 mm (20") wheels. If memory serves, the Space Rider was a 540 mm (24 x 1 3/8") wheel big kid's bike. My guess is that your trike is a bike with an aftermarket tricycle conversion kit; these are not too rare, and bolt on to any conventional bicycle.




Subject: Raleigh
Entered on: Nov 6, 1998 18:54
Entered by: colleen ()

Message:
I'm wondering what I've just bought from the thrift store...It is a blue, ladies 3 speed, 3 wheeler & has "Raleigh Space Rider" on the gear cover...I took it straight to the bike shop to have the 3 speed fixed, checked out & adjusted for me...I didn't take the time to check any serials, I was so excited to have got it for $45...The bike man says I got a great deal.....I'm 62 & had a total hip replacement in March & am now afraid to ride my bicycle..it seems too high & too fast & I'm afraid of falling off..I'd been toying with the idea of a 3 wheeler & as my first bike in England was a Raleigh, I know they are good...I've looked all over the net, & can't find where Raleigh ever made a 3 wheeler, so am nonplussed..any ideas?? ....thanks....Colleen




Subject: Raleigh again
Entered on: Nov 6, 1998 19:04
Entered by: colleen ()

Message:
Sheldon, thanks for your post & Email. I expected my new message to come to the top of the page instead of the bottom, hence my posting same question twice ...Took one of my DUH! pills today... Thanks again..I can't wait to get it home next week & start looking for numbers....




Subject: Take a look at my new web page
Entered on: Nov 6, 1998 20:50
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I am in the process of building a web page to display my bicycle collection. At present 9 bikes are featured and I have 25 to go. The pages so far contain 5 Raleighs,2 Sports and a DL-1 roadster along with 2 10 speeds. Two of my custom bikes are shown, "Juice" and "The Austian" both hybrid 6 speeds. Also shown is my beautiful 12 speed Kia. My restored Canadian CCM 3 speed and my wifes Schwinn Traveler complete the show. Each picture is accompanied by information on the bike. I have a long way to go and I'm really new at constructing a site but the bike is whats important. The architecture will come later. Take a look and let me know what you think. Fred




Subject: I goofed
Entered on: Nov 6, 1998 21:06
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
In my previous note I invited you to my web page but didn't include the URL. So here it is: http://members.tripod.com/~fredhaj/index.html I think I had what they call a senior moment. Fred




Subject: To Colleen
Entered on: Nov 6, 1998 23:13
Entered by: Claudia ()

Message:
Hey Colleen, Despite its pedigree, it's great you have found a bike to let you continue riding. You are a role model... ride on sister!!




Subject: cafe bikes
Entered on: Nov 7, 1998 00:22
Entered by: Stephen (steveh@sunvalley.net)

Message:
Regarding the designation "cafe bike" I don't think there's any connection with the cafe racer motorcycles of Europe or the derogatory use by the heavy metal motorcycles crowd. It's really a very apt description of what the bike is perfect for, going for a latte, cruising around on a weekend morning, doing the bike path, etc. Let's hope it will lead to people realizing they can expand that usage for general transportation. I think it's happening and will just take time. Specialized is a great company. However, being astute marketers, they realized that they were ahead of their time pushing the Globe, so they backed off. There's no benefit being too far out in front with a product. You just do a lot of marketing for the companies that follow.(As I'm finding out with the Metro bikes.) It's a real uphill marketing push. I think electric bikes might overtake the "manual" bike as boomers retire. By the way, if you've never tried one(an electric bike), do. They're a lot fun and whisper quiet.




Subject: Kogo Miyata
Entered on: Nov 7, 1998 16:38
Entered by: George (Worktodo@msn.com)

Message:
Read some of the discussion re Indian and Chinese roadster and was wonder if anyone owns any one of the Kogo Miyata Town & Country bike?? Saw some on they web site @ www.koga.com. Check it out.




Subject: Rudge Whitworth year ID.
Entered on: Nov 8, 1998 13:45
Entered by: Chris (CMcKi15010)

Message:
I am trying to find out the year of a Rudge Whitworth Sports bicycle.It does not have any wheels.The front sprocket has the hand molded into it.The frame is stamped 16061RA or 16081RA under the seat post clamp.It is a 3 speed model.Please help,thank you !!




Subject: Re: Rudge Whitworth year ID.
Entered on: Nov 8, 1998 16:58
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
For information that may help you date your bike, see http://www.sheldonbrown.com/raleigh.html




Subject: thanks
Entered on: Nov 9, 1998 14:59
Entered by: colleen (colleenz@olynet.com)

Message:
Claudia.....Thanks for your kind words....I just hope the bike man can fix or adjust the 3 speed: He said they were almost impossible to find...




Subject: Raleigh schemes
Entered on: Nov 11, 1998 12:12
Entered by: Nicko (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Saw an unusual Raleigh Sports (gent's) the other day with a fully red rear fender (no lower quarter painted white); and the gear cable did not go to a stop on the top bar and then to a pulley, but was threaded through clips along the down tube to a stop on the chain stays. It had a mint condition 68 SA hub and primo 60's Brooks, although the frame and pedals show lots of wear and use; my thought is that it was a late-50's bike with some parts replaced (like the hub). Also, it said "Raleigh The All Steel Bicycle" on the chainguard. Anyone have any thoughts? Wonder when Raleigh started painting the rear fenders part white. Thanks for any ideas!




Subject: test
Entered on: Nov 15, 1998 16:31
Entered by: vin ()

Message:
test




Subject:
Entered on: Nov 15, 1998 23:30
Entered by: chuck (fredlud@aol.com)

Message:
Kinda quite in here so I'll post a question. Does anyone know how to tighten the "guides" on the handle bars that the rods for brakes go through? I have a couple that have a slight up and down wobble to them. It makes it impossable to get the proper tuning of the brakes.




Subject: Loose levers on rod brakes
Entered on: Nov 16, 1998 00:00
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
I haven't had to deal with this, but it is my impression that these fittings screw into threaded holes in the handlebars. If you disassemble and remove the levers, I think you might be able to tighten the loose ones half-a-turn to get rid of the play.




Subject: questions
Entered on: Nov 16, 1998 05:47
Entered by: red (dskelton@stkate.edu)

Message:
questions #1-3: Is a 1964 "Ranger" (Phillips?) worth restoring? Was this bike made by a company that Raleigh owned (before or after 1964)? Should I try to track down original parts or can I use Raleigh parts? question #4: Where can I find a long axle for an AW hub (see Oct 23rd, RE: American Roadsters, message by Louis)? Thank you for any answers, Red




Subject: Re: Questions
Entered on: Nov 16, 1998 09:04
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
I believe Phillips was subsumed into the Raleigh fold in '62. My English 3-speeds page has information on telling Raleigh (Nottingham) bikes from others, such as a Birmingham Phillips. See:      http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english_3_speeds.html        I believe we have the 6 1/4 axles in stock. See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/ha-sturmey.html




Subject: Loose levers on Rod Brakes
Entered on: Nov 16, 1998 13:05
Entered by: Tim (EMGEETD@aol.com)

Message:
I've had the levers off of my Tourist. The guides that the levers go through are held in place by a threaded nut that forms to the curve in the handle bar. If you unscrew the guides, the "nut" will come out of the bar if you have the grips off. It is a little tricky getting the guides to screw back in. I had to hold the bar above my head, fiddle with the bar until the "nut" was in place and then gingerly screw the guide back in. Takes a few tries. It takes some experimentation to get the guides set correctly. Too tight and the levers don't work freely. Too loose and there is too much play and the brakes will not come on correctly.




Subject: Handlebar mayhem, Herons
Entered on: Nov 17, 1998 09:49
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I wanted to put upright bars on my Mercian raod bike, but could not decide which bars to use. I've been admiring the Rivendell's moustache handlebars, but I'm such a tightwad and don't like waiting for things to arrive by mail, so I decided to use what I have on hand. Anyway, I removed the old-logo Cinneli bars and stem, and installed a cut-down set of 80s Cinelli bars I'd been using on another bike. I had cut these drop bars at about the point where brake levers are typically installed. Previously, I'd been using the bars in a "time trial" configuration, but on the Mercian I rotated them about 180 degrees, toward the back. So, they resemble the upright bars on my DL-1: they come straight back but curve downward slightly. The resulting "hump" fits my hands well. I installed the old Campy road levers in the forward position used for moustache bars -- i.e. on the front of the bars about four inches from the stem, with the ends of the handles pointing to either side. I installed old Suntour bar-cons and wrapped the bars with cork tape to complete the setup. Has anyone out there done this with old drop bars? Also, I think the Riveldell/Waterford Herons are worth a look. www.heronbicycles.com




Subject: Setting up a DL-1
Entered on: Nov 19, 1998 12:54
Entered by: Kelly (jollekd@mail.auburn.edu)

Message:
Hey, I recently bought a DL-1, and am getting ready to reassemble and ride it. Since I've not had one before, I was hoping someone might give me some set-up tips, if any are necessary: anything to watch out for, etc. Are there standard relative positions for seat and handlebars, or is that just a matter of individual preference? Please forgive the request for basic information and the simplistic questions--I'm a roadster rider in statu nascendi.




Subject: Red Robin Hoods
Entered on: Nov 19, 1998 13:27
Entered by: Nicko (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Am curious to know how many red Robin Hoods re out there. If anyone has one, please let me know.




Subject: American Roadster Redux
Entered on: Nov 21, 1998 02:15
Entered by: Claudia ()

Message:
I am hoping we can re-start the thread about "the American Roadster" because it was really fertile ground for those of us who want to get folks out of their cars and onto the streets with serious bikes. I live in Sacramento Ca and unfortunatly every day or so on the morning traffic report there is a bike/car collision. We know who loses here. I am very happy to hear people developing new commuter type bikes based on the upright handlebar design because I think that people riding mountain bike type bikes in traffic are at risk. You just can't see, and I know that when I am driving by a person on a mountain bike, their elbows are just out there, and they are wobbling and they don't seem in control at all. So, I would like to hear from people like Keith and Kevin who want to talk actual biking as a way of life . I don't think we need to restrict this discussion to "how old is it" and "what is it worth." I would like to hear about people riding these things to the grocery store! Spare the Air!!




Subject: Pashley Prospero men's bike
Entered on: Nov 21, 1998 02:51
Entered by: Peter ()

Message:
I'm eager in the USA to locate a preowned Pashley Prospero men's bike. Would appreciate any leads. Locality is in the southern Atlantic coast




Subject: American roadster components
Entered on: Nov 22, 1998 06:54
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Claudias latest note spurred me to seek some information on finding components for the type of bike I have been building lately, i.e., 6 speeds using older 10/12 speed chassis and replacing the freewheel with a 3 speed hub. In addition Keith's comments on my latest bike, Juice is encouraging. The biggest problem I have in finding components is handlebars and stems. I prefer alloy bars in the general configuration of the type used on Raleigh Sports. I know they are out there or used to be because I recently found a pair that were gathering dust at my bike shop-price $8. Suitable stems are also a problem. I also want them in alloy and again in the general configuration of those used on the Sports. By that I mean a long quill and short in the front extension. I have been restoring old road bike stems which are beautiful but the extension is too long and the angle is down resulting in somewhat the same riding position as with the original road bike which is what I want to change in the first place. There are plenty of up-angle stems e.g., those used on mountain bikes but invariably they are made of steel and colored black. I have contemplated modifying old road stems but that requires a Tig welder and is a lot of work in refinishing. Anyone have any ideas or sources? As a postscript, my next project will be a 12 speed using a Nexus 7 speed hub. The down side of that is the weight. My 7 speed custom cruiser uses a narrow alloy mountain bike wheel with 26 x 2 3/8 tire and weighs an even 10 pounds.




Subject: loose rod brake h-bar eyelets
Entered on: Nov 22, 1998 12:22
Entered by: paul (randa @ lakenet.com)

Message:
I would like to add to Sheldon and Tims response on Nov 16 to Chucks inquiry about loose rod brake lever guides. Tight eyelets are are nessesary for a properly tuned brake system, anything else is just faking it. Sheldon has it right that the first thing to try is to carfully try and tighten a half turn on the eyelet. Unfortunatly this only works about 50% of the time, and, it's hard to tell if it's going to work untill reassenbly. The only time I would ever want to take the eyelet completley off the bar is to rechrome or when tightening eyelets did'nt work. Assuming new parts are not available (even new parts don't guarentee a good fix) the method of repair that always works for me is as follows. A 6 x 1 mm die will run over the eyelets threads. replace the old nut from inside the handle bar with a 6 mm nut. This nut usually will be 10 mm outside dia. File or grind the nut to match the inside dia. of the handle bar. The match up will not have to be perfect. Instead of going out and buying a die and a nut any foriegn car repair place should be able to run the die and supply the nut. There may be an equivlent american size thread for this repair but I used to work on VW's so metric's are my friend. Tim discribes exactly the position I end up in upon reassembly. A dab of bearing grease inside the hole helps hold the nut. Remember to check alignment of eyelets by running hand lever threw before tightening eyelet all the way. I have a 1946 Tourist with the older style (upright narrow) bars. A previous owner brazed the eyelet into position. This worked but the heat weakend the bar at the stem so the bar droops and its ugly. Happy stopping!




Subject: loose rod brake h-bar eyelets
Entered on: Nov 22, 1998 12:23
Entered by: paul (randa @ lakenet.com)

Message:
I would like to add to Sheldon and Tims response on Nov 16 to Chucks inquiry about loose rod brake lever guides. Tight eyelets are are nessesary for a properly tuned brake system, anything else is just faking it. Sheldon has it right that the first thing to try is to carfully try and tighten a half turn on the eyelet. Unfortunatly this only works about 50% of the time, and, it's hard to tell if it's going to work untill reassenbly. The only time I would ever want to take the eyelet completley off the bar is to rechrome or when tightening eyelets did'nt work. Assuming new parts are not available (even new parts don't guarentee a good fix) the method of repair that always works for me is as follows. A 6 x 1 mm die will run over the eyelets threads. replace the old nut from inside the handle bar with a 6 mm nut. This nut usually will be 10 mm outside dia. File or grind the nut to match the inside dia. of the handle bar. The match up will not have to be perfect. Instead of going out and buying a die and a nut any foriegn car repair place should be able to run the die and supply the nut. There may be an equivlent american size thread for this repair but I used to work on VW's so metric's are my friend. Tim discribes exactly the position I end up in upon reassembly. A dab of bearing grease inside the hole helps hold the nut. Remember to check alignment of eyelets by running hand lever threw before tightening eyelet all the way. I have a 1946 Tourist with the older style (upright narrow) bars. A previous owner brazed the eyelet into position. This worked but the heat weakend the bar at the stem so the bar droops and its ugly. Happy stopping!




Subject: Roadster Saddlebags
Entered on: Nov 22, 1998 20:17
Entered by: Kelly (jollekd@mail.auburn.edu)

Message:
I'm looking for saddlebags for a DL-1. Does anyone have any to sell? New, used, whatever.




Subject: "How old is it" and "what is it worth"
Entered on: Nov 23, 1998 01:38
Entered by: Red (dskelton@stkate.edu)

Message:
Does anyone know If it makes a difference if one has "duro" or "dunlap" tires/tyres on a 50s Raleigh sport. I have a set of dunlaps and I was wondering if its worth it to put them on.




Subject: Dunlop tyres
Entered on: Nov 23, 1998 09:40
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Raleigh used Dunlop (not "dunlap") tyres (tires) exclusively until sometime in the early '70s, when the two companies fell out. Up until that time, Dunlop was _the_ tire company, and their tires were widely acknowledged to be the best in the world, with none of their competitors coming close in quality. When Dunlop discontinued their bicycle tire line, for a couple of years many cyclists got very good at "booting" damaged tires, 'cause a damaged/repaired Dunlop was still better than anything else you could buy new. After 3-4 years, however, the Japanese learned to make tires even better than the old Dunlops, and, for my money, they're still the best (when you can find them.)




Subject: More American Roadster
Entered on: Nov 23, 1998 11:17
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Claudia et al.: A good roadie friend of mine once offered what I thought was a very wise observation: To become a cyclist, a person must be able to work through a fair amount of discomfort without giving up, and still be able to enjoy the experience. But is all that discomfort really necessary? As a kid in the 70s I honestly believed all bikes needed drop bars and narrow saddles. Pretty silly. I remember scraping together one-half of the price of a cheapo "Chiorda" 10-speed for my dad for father's day one year, so he could share the joy of riding with me. He hated it -- ESPECIALLY the narrow seat and the position. About two years ago I bought my fiance a Miyata Pro road bike. She hated it, until I modified it with a triple, a Terry Saddle, and semi-upright handlebars. So, I started to come to the unremarkable conclusion that an upright riding position was a good thing if it gets people to ride who otherwise would not. Since then I've acquired and built up a number of bikes -- American middleweights, a ballooner, a couple of sting rays (forgive me), a folding bike, 3-speeds, etc. -- riding and tinkering to learn more, trying to be open-minded. For example, riding a cruiser is a lot of fun, but once the novelty wears off the gross ineffiency of these bikes becomes a barrier (not to mention their tiny kid-sized frames). So, I took the upright handle bars and wide seat of the cruiser and added it to a couple of spare 70-80s road bikes. And of course this is nothing new either. About three years ago for $10 I picked up an early 70s Gitane Gran Sport Deluxe -- 10 speed lightweight with really cool uprights -- almost like moustache bars. Very nice ride for around the town. The Dunelt I got this summer strikes a great balance. But as a roadie, I'd like to squeeze a little more efficiency out of it, while maintaining the comfort, simplicity, and durability. So, as a number of you have already done, I decided that one of my winter projects would be to wed the best of the traditional road bike with the English 3-speed. Fred has inspired me to do a series of three. The first is a fixed gear mockup which I already assembled and ride. And one will be a 3-speed, as I've discussed at great length. But I'd also like to make a flip-flop hub model, with one fixed and one free gear, and sue it on some century rides. By the way, I noticed that Harris carries the Electra, which I think fits the cafe mold we've discussed. I wonder what Sheldon thinks of these.




Subject: 1937 Royal Enfield ladies bicycle
Entered on: Nov 23, 1998 17:01
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I picked up a 1937 Royal Enfield ladies bicycle, it has 26 X 1 1/2 Jones West- wood wheels. Sturmey-Archer K series hub.(K-7) top tube shifter. Terrys seat #1073. Lycette tool pouch and Royal Enfield bicycle spanners.. Skirt guard (string type, holes in rear fender.) new Schwinn tires,(have origonal Dunlops). completely origonal, missing pedals,and needs a kickstand. In very good condition.OPEN TO OFFERS wRITE TO: CLARENCE KOKKINIS p.o. Box 725428 Berkley, MICHIGAN 48072-5428




Subject:
Entered on: Nov 23, 1998 21:21
Entered by: Pete (vpworld@aol.com)

Message:
Greetings from L.I New York, Maybe someone can help, we have a bike shop and recently a customer bought in an older raleigh. The bike looks pretty old but when I look at the 3 spd hub it says '84.I guess that means 1984, anyway the bike was disassembled. It was built in England has "rod" type brakes and fully enclosed chainguard. This is the first time anyone has seen this type of bike. We can't fiqure how the back end of the bike correctly goes together. There is a rack that we believe attaches to the axle. We can't fiqure out where the fender struts go, they won't fit over the axle, we feel they might go to small bolts holding the seat stays and chainstays together, but then the spacing doesn't work out right. any photos or info would be appreciated!! thanking anyone in advance Pete




Subject: NY Rod Brake Raleigh
Entered on: Nov 23, 1998 23:35
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Pete - From what you have described, my guess is that someone has changed wheels on the bike. The fender stays and rack do indeed attach to the axle, but the axle you need is the longer 61/4 inch Sturmey AW axle. The hub that is presently with the bike was designed for three speeds which have fender and/or rack stays attached to eyelets on the drop out. Don't attach anything to the seat stay- chainstay joint, as that bolt is really too short for such a use, and acquiring a longer one is unlikely since it's Whitworth theaded. I'm assuming, from your description of the frame, that it was intended for 28" wheels. Since you mentioned that the bike was disassembled, does it have a 28" rear wheel with it?




Subject: Riding position/brakes
Entered on: Nov 23, 1998 23:57
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Keith often spurs me to thought and this time it is how riding position and the type of brakes on bikes affects a lot of casual, new, and mature riders. 3 years ago after spending a winter in an RV resort in FL without a bike, I was motivated to fix up an old balloon tired wreck my kids called "Ol' Boomer". I overdid it and the result was a 3 speed with caliper brakes, computer, water bottle, etc., etc. It rode beautifully so I thought at that stage of my education. Then I picked up a good Raleigh Sports and new thoughts on ride emerged. Solid, majestic come to mind. Next I acquired a Kia 10 speed. More thought adjustment was needed. Then the piece de resistance, a beautuful Fuji Allegro, the lightest bike of my growing collection. Something was wrong though. I hated the narrow seat, the leaned over position, and the instability when I used the stem mounted shifters. So-I mounted a nice midsize gel seat, some upright but narrow spread bars, a long quill stem, thumb shifters, and later bar end shifters, and voila; it was now pretty comfortable. Since the Fuji mods, I have done a dozen or so road bikes in a similar manner. Then came what keith called my close approximation to the "American Roadster" Wherein a road bike is fitted with a gear hub making 6 speeds with the 2 cog crank set. I can't say that the latter configuration makes a better road bike but there is some indefinable feel to them that I'm still trying to characterize. By now I am convinced that drop bars and narrow seats kill more enthusiasm for bikes in the new, especially mature rider than traffic does. Following closely is the reluctance of older riders, particularly females for anything but coaster brakes and low=low seat height. Please ladies, I'm not prejudiced, I'm just relating my many experiences when trying to match bikes to folks here in FL. The brake and seat height problem lies with the rider. The narrow seat and drop bars is a problem with the bike industry . We haven't touched on the other big problem and that is the mania for ATB. I'll leave that one alone. I am crusading here in my little world to try to get people to see that there are alternatives to uncomfortable and/or improperly set up bikes. It sometimes requires learning how to ride a new way which is a hard hurdle to get over. I have made some progress and a few of my friends are now riding lighter but comfortably set up bikes and loving it. I am advising my friends who want new bikes to choose cross bikes and in some cases the new cruisers.




Subject: old ladies and low seats
Entered on: Nov 24, 1998 00:25
Entered by: Claudia ()

Message:
Rred, the only way you are going to get those old broads to agree to a higher seat position is to tell them that if they don't raise the seat they are going to wreck their knees and they won't be able to ride no more. Trust me, I see my eighy something mother every week and the only way to communicate with "older ladies" is to be unblinkingly blunt. They've heard it all, and will resist forever.




Subject: Hubs
Entered on: Nov 25, 1998 07:58
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
Does anyone know which wieghs less- a S/A 3 speed hub and a decent set of calibers and levers, or a S/A coaster brake hub? I nit really interested in shaving "grams" but its a thought. Also, are we seeing any cruiser style (steerhorn?) handlebars in Aluminum?




Subject: English Raleigh Choppers
Entered on: Nov 25, 1998 12:14
Entered by: Barry (David.Jeffries@Btinternet.com)

Message:
Is anybody interested in Raleigh Choppers? Or has one they want to sell? Well i'm the man. I currently have 6 Choppers 2 original red MK2's 1 purple restored mk2 1 original fizzy lemon MK2 1 original horizon blue MK1 1 horizon blue restored MK1 I am looking for an American 10 speed Hi-backrest and a 3+2, can anyone help? Iam also in need of a Mk1 Barrel Gear Knob to finish a retoration project. I also have parts and bikes iam looking to sell or trade, Including choppers and grifters.




Subject:
Entered on: Nov 25, 1998 19:23
Entered by: Pete ()

Message:
Hi,Louis and thanks for responding. Yes the bike has 28 inch wheels. The weird thing is that if you look at the ends of the fender stays you would think that it would slide over the end of the axle, but it doesn't. The diameter is just a little smaller and therefore won't fit. Axle length is not a problem its seems long enough. I called the guy in florida who disassembled it and he can't remember how it goes back together. This is really driving us crazy, it should be a 5 minute project, any ideas. The guy swears this bike is all original. Thanks Pete




Subject: NY Raleigh
Entered on: Nov 25, 1998 23:09
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Pete - If the axle is long enough to accept both the fender and rack stays. it would seem thats where they belong. You didn't specify what type of stay it is and how far off the diameter is. If it's the wire type, it should be possible to open the eye a bit by inserting a screwdriver and prying it. If it's a solid hole in thin steel stock, perhaps it has ovaled slightly from previous tightening of the axle nuts. A lttle judicious use of a hand reamer should fix it. I'm a little perplexed as to the date on the hub. It would seem to indicate that the chainguard would be the hockey stick style and not fully enclosed. Perhaps the bike is one of the African built DL 1s, which are still available with a fully enclosed chain case. Good luck and let us know how things turn out.




Subject: New! Free Vintage & Classic Lightweight (incl. roadsters!) Classified Ads
Entered on: Nov 26, 1998 11:59
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@al.com)

Message:
Not as hectic as RBM but dedicated to lightweight Vintage/classic bikes & goodies. Classified ads are free (no commissions, etc.)with the ability to include JPEG photos! Only catch is that I can use, if I want!, your pics in appropriate section of the Classic Rendezvous web site. http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Cirquemain.htm Dale Brown




Subject: DL-1 Rear Fender Stay mounting
Entered on: Nov 28, 1998 01:01
Entered by: Bill ()

Message:
Pete, I have an African DL-1 and a "regular" DL-1, and they both mount the fender stays using the two small bolts that also hold the lower end of the seatstays to the rear axle slot area. That would explain why the holes in the stay are too small for the SA axle. Those small bolts are hard to replace, so be careful, but that is how mine are mounted. Good luck, and If you need I can e-mail a picture. Bill




Subject: reply to:Tom, July, 25,1997 Raleigh Record Ace pix
Entered on: Nov 28, 1998 13:22
Entered by: Clarence Kokkinis ( write:P.O. Box 725428 berkley, Mich 48072-5428)

Message:
Tom wrote on July 25th 1997 wanting pictures on the 1950 Raleigh Record Ace. I know the beast well, and will send you a photocopy if you send me your postal address.I have a 1948 and a 1951 model.




Subject: Reasonable Shipping Costs
Entered on: Nov 30, 1998 11:48
Entered by: Dave (Owner@wilson-engineering.com))

Message:
I'm relatively new to this hobby, and have purchased 7 bikes [2 26" Ralieghs, 2 Schwinn middleweights, and 3 20" Sting Rays] via Ebay and the Schwinn Forum. The average shipping costs so far have been between $15 and $20 with a high of $28. I recently cancelled a deal because the seller was adamant that the cost to ship the 26" Raliegh was $50. I felt that to be too high, especially since the same service [Mailboxes, etc.] at the same location had only charged $28 a month earlier. Thoughts?




Subject: RE:Reasonable Shipping Costs
Entered on: Nov 30, 1998 19:36
Entered by: MartinH (martin.hanczyc@yale.edu)

Message:
Hi Dave, welcome to the world of bicycle collecting! There are a few factors that determine the cost of shipping a bike: weight, size of box, speed of delivery, distance etc... I had a big 28" wheel, rod brake bike shipped to me half way across the USA via UPS ground transportation for something around $25. I think that $50 is excessive. Good luck!




Subject:
Entered on: Nov 30, 1998 20:19
Entered by: Pete (vpworld@aol.com)

Message:
Bill, If you or anyone could e-mail me a picture of a dl-1 I would appreciate it. Thanks Pete




Subject:
Entered on: Nov 30, 1998 23:06
Entered by: Pete (vpworld@aol.com)

Message:
Thanks Bill for sending the pictures, but after I downloaded them I'm having problems viewing them. I get a "invalid file format" message. I'm using corel photo paint.Any ideas?? Thanks Pete




Subject:
Entered on: Dec 1, 1998 20:06
Entered by: Pete (vpworld@aol.com)

Message:
Hey Bill if you don't mind sending those pictures again I would appreciate it. My scanner came with adobe photo.I just loaded it and maybe now I can view your photos. The ones you sent me for some reason won't open .Thanks Pete




Subject: Hercules Bicycle
Entered on: Dec 1, 1998 21:55
Entered by: Dave (DaveB1157)

Message:
I have an old (late40's-early 50's) Hercules bicycle that was passed on to me by a relative that bought the bike new after returning from WWII. I know nothing about these English bikes, and would appreciate any help in gathering information on this on. The bicycle is in very good shape, with all of the decals entact, and with the original tires. It is a men's 3 speed, with what I would call a planetary gear setup in the rear hub. I'd like to start cleaning and restoring the bike. Any information would be appreciated.




Subject:
Entered on: Dec 2, 1998 21:00
Entered by: Pete (vpworld@aol.com)

Message:
Hey Bill, Thanks for resending the photos but for some reason I can't open them. I don't know why, I haven't had any problems in the past.. Thanks Pete




Subject: Raleigh Chopper
Entered on: Dec 6, 1998 10:35
Entered by: Alan (aok@alveo.com)

Message:
Help !! I'm writing an artcile on the classic British Raleigh Chopper of the early 70's for a magazine and I would be grateful for any details on the bike. I was just looking for a general history of that specific bicycle. Can anybody help ??




Subject: Raleigh Chopper
Entered on: Dec 6, 1998 10:36
Entered by: Alan (aok@alveo.com)

Message:
Help !! I'm writing an artcile on the classic British Raleigh Chopper of the early 70's for a magazine and I would be grateful for any details on the bike. I was just looking for a general history of that specific bicycle. Can anybody help ??




Subject: Raleigh Chopper
Entered on: Dec 6, 1998 10:36
Entered by: Alan (aok@alveo.com)

Message:
Help !! I'm writing an artcile on the classic British Raleigh Chopper of the early 70's for a magazine and I would be grateful for any details on the bike. I was just looking for a general history of that specific bicycle. Can anybody help ??




Subject: Raleigh Chopper
Entered on: Dec 6, 1998 10:36
Entered by: Alan (aok@alveo.com)

Message:
Help !! I'm writing an artcile on the classic British Raleigh Chopper of the early 70's for a magazine and I would be grateful for any details on the bike. I was just looking for a general history of that specific bicycle. Can anybody help ??




Subject: Hercules Bike
Entered on: Dec 6, 1998 17:01
Entered by: Robert (moffett2@erols.com)

Message:
Dave,I have a Hercules Lion which I believe is a postwar model, plus some info that other people have shared about their Hercules. I am also expecting delivery of a 1950 dealer brochure in a week or so. Please E-mail or post some details about your bike so we can compare notes. Numerous people are trying to learn more about these bikes, and info is sort of scarce right now. I will E-mail details on my bike, if you like. Thanks, Robert




Subject: ODDBALL RALEIGH
Entered on: Dec 6, 1998 18:23
Entered by: Robert (moffett2@erols.com)

Message:
I saw an old rodbrake roadster last week that had a feature or two I hadn't encountered before. The first was a Durham Elliptical chainwheel. I have owned slightly elliptical chainwheels before, but this one was as flat as a football, with slightly rounder ends. The other feature was a mount for a S-A hub on the seatpost. That hub serves as a high-low range selector for the wheel hub, making for 5 speeds. The workmanship on the mount was excellent, and I thought that it might be an aftermarket product, but I interrogated the owner, who says he made it 20-25 years ago, and has used it trouble-free in Manhattan ever since. The extra hub mounts right under the seat stays. The primary drive chain is almost vertical, and drives one of two sprockets, and the second sprocket drives the rear chain and hub. An idler gear is mounted on an arm to compensate for the extremely elliptical chainwheel.This is a kooky- looking setup,and very well executed, though it adds a lot of weight to a heavy bike.Weight notwithstanding, the 60 year-old owner says he can out-accelerate anyone from a standing start.Maybe one has to see it to appreciate it. I'll try to post a pic someday soon.




Subject: 67 rodeo 3+2 shifter
Entered on: Dec 7, 1998 00:11
Entered by: doug (DLKENNEDY@webtv.net)

Message:
I am looking for a origanal shifter for my raliegh rodeo.




Subject: Geoffrey Butler road racer
Entered on: Dec 7, 1998 10:38
Entered by: GHennecke ()

Message:
I bought a Geoffrey Butler (British) bicycle frame, used, about 20 years ago. I'm currently trying to decide whether to keep it or let it go, but have no idea what kind of value it might hold at the present time. Does anyone have some expertise they might be able to lend on this subject?




Subject: G. Butler
Entered on: Dec 7, 1998 14:19
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
Check out http://www.sheldonbrown.com/vrbn-a-f.html#gbutler




Subject: Sturmey Archer Sprinter Series Hubs
Entered on: Dec 9, 1998 12:35
Entered by: Dave (owner@wilson-engineering.com)

Message:
Does anyone have information about the availability and cost in the United States for the subject hubs? Thanks




Subject: WTB English 3-Speed
Entered on: Dec 9, 1998 20:07
Entered by: Michael (courtian@ms.com)

Message:
I am looking for an English 3-speed (Raleigh, Rudge, Humber, or similar) for use around town. - 23-inch frame - good mechanical condition - cosmetic condition not important - located in New York City area. If you have one for sale, please e-mail me at courtian@ms.com. Thanks Michael




Subject: Sprinter hubs
Entered on: Dec 10, 1998 11:07
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Dave - We have 2 SA Sprinter 5-speed, alloy shell, drum brake hubs in stock - both new in the box with all fittings- I can also provide SA technical info with them. Price is $189.00 ea. E-mail me at lorsini@aol.com or call 541-343-2488 9-5pm West Coast time.




Subject: Models by make and decade?
Entered on: Dec 11, 1998 22:25
Entered by: John (jdonahue@up.net)

Message:
Hello, everyone. I'm a complete newcomer. I wonder whether others with knowledge of Raleigh - Rudge - Humber could outline the lineage of their respective models of the 50s-70s for both mens and womens bikes? I may be quite wrong, but aren't DL-1s, Tourists and Bobbie bikes essentially the same? I see that the Superbe Roadster seems to be a Raleigh model alone? Did Rudge or Humber have Superbe as a model also, or was a different name given to their high-end models? Is there a point in the evolution of these bikes in the 60s or 70s where quality becomes an issue of concern such as with serviceable vs. non-serviceable parts such as pedals? Could there be a FAQ, web-site or available book source that could outline this info? Lastly, what opinions do people hold of the Pashley Sovereigh M/W models, other than they seem expensive in spite of being imported?




Subject: Parts wanted: Top dollar paid.Raleigh D-L1 Rod brake
Entered on: Dec 14, 1998 19:53
Entered by: Clarence Kokkinis (none, P.O. Box 725428 Berkley, Michigan 48072-5428)

Message:
Will pay top dollar for the following: BIKE IS A 1934 Raleigh Roadster 1.Enclosed chainguard set complete 2. Rear rack. Brooks, Ashby, Princip or other 3. A Lucas, Miller or Eadie Bicycle bell 4. Raleigh Lamp Bracket (PRE WAR) 5. bottom bracket set.N.O.S. 6. Headset, complete, N.o.s. 7.period handlebar grips N.O.S. 8. Mudguards, front and rear, with period reflector 9. Flatglass type Sturmey-Archer headlamp N.O.S. 10. Bullet type Sturmey tail lamp N.O.S. 11. Sturmey- Archer F.M. Hub N.O.S With appropriate, period trigger Look around and contact me, I'll pay your price!




Subject: Parts wanted: Top dollar paid.Raleigh D-L1 Rod brake
Entered on: Dec 14, 1998 20:05
Entered by: Clarence Kokkinis (none, P.O. Box 725428 Berkley, Michigan 48072-5428)

Message:
Will pay top dollar for the following: 10 items The project bike is a 1934 Raleigh Roadster 1.Enclosed chainguard set complete. 2.Rear rack.(Must be appropriate for 28 inch wheel) Brooks, Ashby, Princip or other 3.A bicycle bell.(in good shape)Lucas, Miller or Eadie. 4. Raleigh Lamp Bracket (PRE WAR) 5. bottom bracket set.N.O.S.extra long spindle marked G.C. for gear case 6.Raleigh headset, complete, n.o.s. 7.period handlebar grips n.o.s. 8. Mudguards, front and rear, with period reflector, something solid. not tinny 1970's stuff 9. Flatglass type Sturmey-Archer headlamp n.o.s. (in black) 10. Bullet type Sturmey tail lamp n.o.s. 11. Sturmey- Archer F.M. Hub(four speed medium ratio)ALLOY SHELL N.O.S With appropriate, period trigger Please look around and contact me, I'll pay your price!




Subject: Parts wanted: Top dollar paid.Raleigh D-L1 Rod brake
Entered on: Dec 14, 1998 20:07
Entered by: Clarence Kokkinis (none, P.O. Box 725428 Berkley, Michigan 48072-5428)

Message:
Will pay top dollar for the following: 10 items The project bike is a 1934 Raleigh Roadster 1.Enclosed chainguard set complete. 2.Rear rack.(Must be appropriate for 28 inch wheel) Brooks, Ashby, Princip or other 3.A bicycle bell.(in good shape)Lucas, Miller or Eadie. 4. Raleigh Lamp Bracket (PRE WAR) 5. bottom bracket set.N.O.S.extra long spindle marked G.C. for gear case 6.Raleigh headset, complete, n.o.s. 7.period handlebar grips n.o.s. 8. Mudguards, front and rear, with period reflector, something solid. not tinny 1970's stuff 9. Flatglass type Sturmey-Archer headlamp n.o.s. (in black) 10. Bullet type Sturmey tail lamp n.o.s. 11. Sturmey- Archer F.M. Hub(four speed medium ratio)ALLOY SHELL N.O.S With appropriate, period trigger Please look around and contact me, I'll pay your price!




Subject:
Entered on: Dec 17, 1998 12:02
Entered by: Ken (hinman@syrres.com)

Message:
A couple weeks ago I picked up a pile of wheels at an auction. I wonder if anyone can help me with a couple questions? 1) Sturmey-Archer AW hub with 2 cogs, 19T & 16T, on a notched driver. I haven't disassembled it yet, but I believe they are threaded together. Does anyone know how is this setup used? (These are standard thickness cogs, so they won't work with a derailleur chain, though you might not need a narrow chain for only 2 gears. The 19 to 16 tooth step is roughly half the shift step of the AW.) 2) I have a 20" 36-spoke wheel with a Sachs Torpedo Duomatic 2-speed coaster brake hub. The rim resembles the Westwood and Raleigh-pattern rims used for rod brakes, but with a short, straight sidewall. The sidewall is too short to use with caliper brakes, but is textured like many steel rims were to improve braking. What might this wheel have come from, and does it have any value? (The chrome on the rim is slightly pitted, hub looks great, spokes are heavy-duty 12 gauge.)




Subject: Raleigh frames
Entered on: Dec 17, 1998 12:07
Entered by: Ken (hinman@syrres.com)

Message:
I have a pair of Raleigh roadster frames, probably from the 60's. I can't find a serial number on either of them - where should I be looking? If anyone's interested I can probably provide some more details.




Subject: Re: Royal York
Entered on: Dec 17, 1998 15:06
Entered by: Wes (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Don, I also have a Royal York, a '57. The decal on the seat tube on mine says that it was made by the DP Harris Hardware Co, and that they had agents in the Rollfast Bl'n'g in New York. Mine is a 19" frame and I've never seen another oter than mine. Hope that helps




Subject: S-A double sprocket
Entered on: Dec 17, 1998 16:13
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Ken asked about an AW hub with a 16/19 double sprocket. This is part of a Cyclo conversion kit that made it into a 6-speed. The sprockets are threaded onto the adaptor, as you surmised. This would originally have been used with, most likely, a Cyclo Benelux Mark VII derailer. This used the same 1/8" chain as the normal sprockets, except without a master link. This was a standard aftermarket upgrade in the '50s and early '60s. They also made a 3-sprocket version. My first "serious" bike, an Elswick Tour Anglais came with a 4-speed FW hub, and I added one of these triple conversions, giving me a 12 speed bike in 1960, when even 10-speeds were very unusual. (I've got a Web page about this bike at: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/elswick.html )




Subject: Sachs Duomatic wheel
Entered on: Dec 17, 1998 16:16
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Ken asked about a 20" wheel with a Sachs Duomatic 2-speed coaster-brake hub. This would probably have been original equipment on a folding bike of some sort. The Duomatic has the advantage of requiring no cables to run past the hinge of the folding bike. These were also used on take-apart bikes, for the same reason. The wheel is probably of no great value, but the hub is no longer available, and some people really like these 'kick-back' automatic two-speed coaster brakes.




Subject: Cyclo conversion
Entered on: Dec 18, 1998 09:24
Entered by: Ken (hinman@syrres.com)

Message:
Sheldon, thanks for your response. I pulled the sprockets off last night,and sure enough, the back is stamped "Cyclo" (in quotes) and "made in England". The hub is a '63, which also agrees with your comments. Your mama sure named you right, and "Epicyclic" is so much more colorful (colourful?) than "Planetary". Hope the Elswick turns up someday!




Subject: RE: Sachs Duomatic wheel
Entered on: Dec 20, 1998 19:10
Entered by: Philip (philip@realestate.commerce.ubc.ca)

Message:
When I got the Sachs Duomatic that is now on my rebuilt '60s Moulton, it came in a 20" wheel. I don't remember anything noteworthy about the rim but I paid Cdn$20 for it which I was told was a good price. Apparently, these hubs are sought after because they were often found on the "mustang" bikes of the sixties for which there is a healthy collectors market. Also, I noticed that on the Moulton Bicycle Club classified ads on their web site there was a duomatic for sale, asking price 35 GBpounds. That's about CDN$85 right now, so I'm pretty chuffed with the deal I got.




Subject: Dating old Raleigh
Entered on: Dec 21, 1998 18:11
Entered by: Renee (caveatmtor@aol.com)

Message:
I am trying to date an old Raleigh 3 spd. for my father-in-law. The info. he gave me is as follows: Raleigh Golden Arrow Serial No.: AD53399 Hub: Sturmey Archer Aw-7 Any info. would be greatly appreciated! Thanks




Subject: Old Roadster
Entered on: Dec 23, 1998 20:20
Entered by: Paul (pbrandt@lisco.net)

Message:
I bought an old roaster at a household auction and am looking for any information I can get about it, especially its age. It's a 28" rod brake model. Instead of the SA 3 speed it has a one gear free wheel. Has a Brooks B-33 seat and enclosed chaingaurd. There is a decal on the chaingaurd says "Raleigh - the all steel bicycle" Serial #DF 37007 located on the seat tube near the top on right side.




Subject: HERCULES BIKES
Entered on: Dec 24, 1998 09:55
Entered by: Fabio Ferreira (utility@correionet.com.br)

Message:
I just heired one Hercules, but I never heard about them, needs just a few restore. I need some info about these Hercules bikes.




Subject: Holidays
Entered on: Dec 24, 1998 12:20
Entered by: Kevin (adrsg@yahoo.com)

Message:
Merry Christmas or Happy Holidays, as appropriate to Sheldon, Keith, Claudia, and all of you who have over the past year asked and answered questions, made comments, and shared. May you all recieve in comming year what you want and need. (Perhaps a 28" prewar roadster?) Thanks also to Menotomy for providing the space. Kevin in the Arizona Desert. (No white Christmas here!)




Subject: Holiday wishes
Entered on: Dec 25, 1998 22:27
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Good wishes to all Anglo(bicycle)philes who avail themselves of this fine forum. I for one am very happy to have found this community of friends of English bikes. I took a long ride this afternoon in the fine Florida sunshine and felt thankful for the opportunity to be in such a beautiful place and be able to ride a good bicycle in peace and quiet. I wish all of you sunshine, safe paths, and the wind at your back on all of your rides, Fred




Subject: HERCULES CATALOG
Entered on: Dec 25, 1998 23:45
Entered by: Robert (moffett2@erols.com)

Message:
I recently obtained a 1950 Hercules catalog. It is small, so some details are hard to see in the illustrations, but it has the specs for all the bikes available in the U.S. that year. Alas, my Lion isn't in there. The models included are the Kestrel Super Club, Kestrel Club, Falcon, Diana (racer), C (safety), F, (sports)and Jeep. I will be happy to share info with anyone who is interested.




Subject: Raleigh Golden Arrow
Entered on: Dec 26, 1998 16:08
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
I had not remembered much about the Ralegh Golden Arrow, but today I was talking to Scott Chamberlain of Belmont Wheelworks, and he mentioned that he had one. His, which he described as a "club-tourer" came with a fixed/free flip-flop hub; Raleigh chainring with bolted-on interchangeable chainring; QR mudguards, the front tapering to a sharp point at the front; Lauterwasser handlbars (a sort of drop bar with fairly shallow drop and VERY long reach; Terry "Oppy" saddle (named for Sir Hubert Opperman, the legendary Australian cylcist. Scott said this was the next model down from the RRA (Raleigh Record Ace), and contemporary with the Clubman.




Subject: Great Brit Bike Weekend
Entered on: Dec 28, 1998 08:58
Entered by: MartinH (martin.hanczyc@yale.edu)

Message:
Here's the latest word from Philly... FYI --the Great Brit Bike Weekend in Phila The 3rd Annual Great British Bike Weekend in Philadelphia, April 2, 3 & 4. A celebration of the British Roadster Bicycle. Rides, rallies, a cycle jumble, a BikeOnRail Excursion, the Bike and Pub Crawl, and more. All events center around historic Old Philadelphia, with an emphasis on easy-paced rides and good company. For information, email mcget@aol.com or send an SASE to GBBW/Trophy, 311 Market St. Philadelphia PA 19106, USA PS. I attended the event last year - it was a great time. Check out my comments in the April, 1998 archives. Search for "Great Brit Bike"




Subject: need help with rod breaks
Entered on: Dec 28, 1998 11:19
Entered by: Joseph (joseph.solomon@n2bikes.com)

Message:
Just purchased a cheap, Indian made roadster knock off and I am having a hell of a time setting up the rod breaks. Is there any information out there?




Subject: Roadster Fenders
Entered on: Dec 29, 1998 15:40
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
Anyone have any thoughts on how far back English 3-speeds had crome fenders? I've got a good set I'd like to put on a Hercules for a WWII display. Thanks




Subject: Roadster Fenders
Entered on: Dec 29, 1998 15:45
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
Chrome




Subject: Roadster fenders
Entered on: Dec 29, 1998 15:46
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
English 3-speed "sports" or "roadster" bikes in almost all cases would have come with mudguards (fenders to Yanks) painted to match the frame. Chrome fenders, like chrome forks, would be "generic" replacement units designed to be compatible with bikes of various colors. Only in the late-decadent era (probably late '60s on) would chrome fenders be appropriate. "Club" type bikes would have come with aluminium (aluminum) or celluloid/plastic fenders, depending on the vintage.




Subject: Roadster fenders
Entered on: Dec 29, 1998 17:39
Entered by: TimH ()

Message:
There are certainly acceptions to the fender-painted-frame-colour rule. For example, we own a swell '59 Phillips with Chrome fenders that have a wonderful brass (painted) inset Phillips badge. Can't help with the earliest date however. ----Tim




Subject: "Chromium Plate"
Entered on: Dec 30, 1998 02:10
Entered by: Paul (Randa @Lakenet.com)

Message:
I have chrome fenders on one of my favorite rides, a 1966/7 Dunelt 28" wheel with rod brake parts interchangable with Raleigh. The mild steel fender stays twist and clip onto the fenders instead of a bolt. It has the 7" version oval cross section cranks with chrome 44T chainwheel (giving the leverage of a Thi Chi master), chrome linkage, rims and handlebars. All that dazeling chrome must have contributed to the death of some poor fellow in the chrome mines of South Africa. This bicycle is unusally fast. I'm sure the chrome has something to do with it! The momentum of this machine rolling down the River Road parkway between St.Paul & Mpls. has ate up many a green Bianchi for breakfast. Happy New Year to all you Brit bike nuts, and Gods Speed!




Subject: missing person
Entered on: Dec 30, 1998 12:05
Entered by: dan (none for the moment)

Message:
Hi folks I`m back from the dead. ( dan field " The Limie Show" and "Yankee Show" Boston) I`ve been off line for the last few mounths. My server guru (oh I hat that term!) dide sudenly in october, and hence went my access. But don1t despair, I should be back with my own site in `99. and for sertan the shows will go on, 9like I could ever stop them if I wanted) This yaersthem is "Bring out your dead". The end of the century seems to me like a good time to clean house. i exspect to be offering minimum cash for complete bikes.to the general public, along with full facilities including food. and as always we are free to the public. If you have tried to reach me by e-mail I`m sorry I have not been able to respond. The old sever got tacken over and my e-mail accont was lost to limbow. sorry again for the caous.dan




Subject: Chrome Dunelts
Entered on: Dec 30, 1998 15:48
Entered by: Dave (davehmn@sover.net)

Message:
I also have a chrome-fendered '65 Dunelt 28" w/ rod brakes and will second his observation about their speed. They are deceptively quick--not that blazing on takeoff (it is, after all, a rather heavy cycle) but once it gains momentum those big wheels and the gear ratios really keep it flying like an express train. I bought mine at the Larz Anderson vintage bike swap meet in August, 1997 and it needed absolutely nothing--just ride it away. It now occupies one of the honored places in our "bike room", also known to normal people as a dining room. Keeping it company are Marian's Humber, my BSA WW2 folder and a 1941 Raleigh Club Sport in spotless original condition plus much of our English bicycle memorobilia. May I wish all my Britbike friends a happy, productive and satisfying 1999, especially Jim B and Sheldon, the Guru of us all. Dave Brownell & Marian Savage Britbikes Manchester Ctr, VT 05255




Subject: Bullet-end brake cables
Entered on: Dec 30, 1998 23:38
Entered by: David (davidd_dt@earthlink.net )

Message:
I have an old Humber bike that had bullet-end brake cables. I couldn't find any replacements, so I jury-rigged a slightly unattractive solution with a nut/bolt, etc. for a couple of years. But on a hunch I went into a motorcycle chopper shop that I pass by every day, and asked if they could put some lead "bullets" on the end of the cables. Yep. Those guys make custom cables every day; although they had never done them for a bicycle, they did so for me, and it cost $2 for the front and $2 for the rear. Looks OEM, Hoss! (You just have to be confident enough to traipse in on your 3-speed and talk it up w/a tatooed guy wearing a nose ring.)




Subject: Happy New Year
Entered on: Dec 31, 1998 12:32
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
Happy New Year to all you Sir Walter gearheads, commuter geeks, and roadster junkies. Our Umberto Dei(www.bicyclearts.com) website should be up and running with picts and details on these elegant Italian bikes by January 8, l999. I've really enjoyed reading and writing to this bulletin board.Happy '99.




Subject: RE:Bullet-end brake cables
Entered on: Jan 2, 1999 14:33
Entered by: MartinH (martin.hanczyc@yale.edu)

Message:
You can repair your old brake cables yourself - if you have time/patience. The info was posted on Oct. 4, 1998. Search for "RE:Solution to the Raleigh brake cable problem" Cheers! And Happy New Year to you all!




Subject: Seeking Information on 1951 Dawes English 3-Speed
Entered on: Jan 4, 1999 13:07
Entered by: Steve (hodgess@freenet.tlh.fl.us)

Message:
Recently took possession of a 1951 Dawes English 3-Speed woman's bicycle, and I'm seeking information on it (e.g., rarity, value, standards, parts, etc.) It has the original alloy(!) fenders, generator (frozen) and F&R lights, and the coolest ding-dong bell I've ever heard. I plan to carefully clean and re-lubricate, and probably change out the rims and the spokes due to corrosion. It's a pretty dark, dark burgundy (I think) w/ red and gold pinstripes and lettering. Any advice or other information would be appreciated. Cheers. Steve




Subject: gazelle 3 spd. english racer
Entered on: Jan 4, 1999 16:16
Entered by: john (lorenz.j@mellon.com)

Message:
Can anyone provide information on the above (circa mid-1970's)?




Subject: RE: Raleigh double ended cable repair
Entered on: Jan 4, 1999 23:42
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
I just want to add a few comments, based upon my own experience, about the cable repair method previously posted. Their should be no problem reclaiming old cable ends using the method alluded to. There can be serious problems using the reattachment method. Any time a cable is heated, by an open flame, in both duration and temperature sufficient enough to melt and flow the solder,the strength of the cable is severely compromised. What the 'nose-ringed and tattooed' chopper boys, as well as motorcycle restorers in general and the original cable manufacturer, use is a device called a solder pot. This is a container with a built in heat source of sufficient power to melt the solder and keep it in a molten state (as long as the pot is plugged in) so that you can then dip the new cable, fluxed and with the reattached end, into the solder. This has the advantage of avoiding prolonged heat and a direct flame and yields a strong and long lived joint. (Raleigh cables seldom break or pull their ends off. They usually die from neglect and lack of lubrication). The direct heat method may work for a static display, or for a bike which is infrequently and/or gently used, but for a working bike I'd seek out a solder pot . A cable breakage at an inopportune moment can have potentially disastrous results.