Discussion - English Roadsters

Menotomy Vintage Bicycles


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Discussion - English Roadsters

Archived discussions: July 17, 1997 through Sep. 17, 1997
Archived discussions: September 17, 1997 through Nov. 17, 1997
Archived discussions: Nov. 17, 1997 through March 19, 1998
Archived discussions: March 19, 1998 through June 8, 1998
Archived discussions: June 8, 1998 through August 8, 1998
Archived discussions: August 8, 1998 through October 28, 1998
Archived discussions: October 28, 1998 through January 5, 1999
Archived discussions: January 5, 1999 through March 27, 1999

Raleigh date codes based on serial number

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Messages:




Subject: RE: Tea Time
Entered on: Mar 25, 1999 08:48
Entered by: MattF ()

Message:
Send email to Menotomy, they'll archive it. It's great they provide this at no charge and with no banner ads.




Subject: Raleigh Robin Hoods
Entered on: Mar 27, 1999 13:12
Entered by: Pattie (pboffy@aol.com)

Message:
I have a collection of 5 Raleigh Robin Hood bikes (one man's, 4 women's) from l959-60. They are all in good to like-new condition. I would like to sell them as a lot. Anyone interested? Please e-mail me! I'm open to ideas.




Subject: Is this working?
Entered on: Mar 30, 1999 23:16
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
I think this discussion may not be working, it doesn't seem to fully download.




Subject: test
Entered on: Mar 31, 1999 08:38
Entered by: test ()

Message:
Looks ok to me




Subject: Yeah, it's fine
Entered on: Mar 31, 1999 08:39
Entered by: test ()

Message:
They just archived more than usual this time




Subject: 1954 Indian Princess
Entered on: Apr 2, 1999 10:00
Entered by: Melissa (sovtek@bga.com)

Message:
I had first palced my question yesterday, but in a different discussion group. I was told that moving it here would be a better idea...so here I am. When I first wrote I knew little about this bike...I have since learned a bit about i, but would appreciate any info that anyone might have. It is a 1954 Indian Princess made by Phillips Company of England for Indian Springfield. It has Sturmey Archer components (it is a 3-speed) Does this bike have any value, is it worth restoration? It is in original condition...everything works properly, but it does need a makeover cosmetically. If you know anything about this bike please let me know. Thank you!




Subject: Dynohub
Entered on: Apr 2, 1999 15:43
Entered by: David (eerick@okstate.edu)

Message:
Hi. I'm looking for a 32 spoke hole front dynohub. Cosmetics aren't important, but it has to work. Thanks.




Subject: English Roadster knockoffs
Entered on: Apr 2, 1999 16:16
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Hi!! I have several knockoffs of the Raleigh DL-1 and although they aren't bad for the money, I have had some teething problems. For instance, on my Forever Roadster I had to replace the saddle springs with those from two old Brooks saddles to make up for the entirely too weak ones that come with the otherwise beautiful stock saddle. I have had other problems too most notably with the brakes. If any one has come up with any good colorful solutions to some of the colorful problems some of these bikes have, please pass them on as otherwise these are very passable copies of the Raleigh, and I personally think people would like'um a lot!! Thanks.




Subject: Knock offs redux
Entered on: Apr 2, 1999 16:20
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Hey! I had no problems with the brakes on my Forever, I think they work great! I had the problem on a Roadmaster roadster. Most folks would probably love the Forever, bloody commie built or not! As a matter of fact, my Forever is built almost as well as my Raleigh DL-1! The Roadmaster? Well it really looks good, and thats a fact! Ride on!




Subject: Need 40 hole SA 3 speed coaster brake hubs
Entered on: Apr 5, 1999 12:25
Entered by: Nick Nichols (basic@leys.com)

Message:
I recently got gents and ladies Roadmaster roadster knockoffs from Bicycle Arts. Unfortunately the rod brakes have a fatal design flaw that prevents the front brake from working. I plan on rebuilding the rear wheel with a 40 hole 3 speed coaster hub as a work around (One of the brakes can be made to work, either the rear or the front, not both). Does anyone have any 40 hole Sturmey Archer 3 speed coaster brake hubs in good condition they are willing to sell me? Nick Nichols - DBA Basic Cycles, Charlottesville, Va.




Subject: bIkes in general
Entered on: Apr 5, 1999 15:04
Entered by: Chris S. (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Hey! A new page! I wanted to thank all who helped me try to get an RSW 16 compact, but my dad found one at a garage sale and it's dandy! Question- does anyone have a white seat? I'd like to buy one if anyone has it, and does anyone have the bracket that bolts onto the Raleigh front badge for a light? Mark R is right- I have a Chinese Forever, and it's a great bike, though i'd put a 3-speed rear hub on it, which I'm going to do (thanks Mark!) I'm also looking fo rsome white pedals with the diamond pattern on them. Any leads? Cheers! Chris




Subject: Indian
Entered on: Apr 5, 1999 15:08
Entered by: Chris S. (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Hey Melissa! I have a Phillips in my shed, and couldn't tell you much about them though I think they were the poor man's Raleigh made by the same, if I'm not wrong. Someone here once said it's worth how much you'd pay fo rit or something of that sort. personally I say YES! Why not? If it was a shoddy 80's Huffy, I'd say don't waste your time.They do have aesthetic value, and th eindian badge is nice




Subject: ebay coaster brake new
Entered on: Apr 5, 1999 16:38
Entered by: Chris S. ()

Message:
http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=85066513 in case anyone is interested, check it out!! It's for a BSA, but probably a Sturmey??




Subject: Indian
Entered on: Apr 6, 1999 09:59
Entered by: melissa (sovtek@bga.com)

Message:
hey chris...thanks for the reply.....I think this one is destined for a little face lift (not much) and will be ridden.....it is really cute...is yours a princess or scout (?)




Subject: Phillips
Entered on: Apr 6, 1999 13:04
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
That's cool Melissa. Actually, mine is just a standard Phillips with the Lion on the badge. I saw a chief at a swap a few weeks ago, and I liked it, but space is shrinking at home, so I didn't buy it. Anyone interested in this Phillips? it's dandy, just a little sunbeaten from the CA sun.




Subject: Death of Menotomy
Entered on: Apr 6, 1999 17:18
Entered by: Chris S (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
How can we save Menotomy? This site has given us friends , connections, new bicycles, and a way to hook up with people and parts. Is there any way we can at least save the site? Any ideas gang?




Subject: No more Menotomy??
Entered on: Apr 6, 1999 17:44
Entered by: Mark R. (Deenybeany@earthlink.net)

Message:
All I'd really like to say is that if it is possible for the fine folks at Menotomy to keep running their web site, I hope they do. I've personally only had a few months of regularly checking out these pages, I found the bicycle I've been looking for for years right here on the first day I checked out the page. I've met a friend all the way 'cross the country who has like interests, and I'm sure there are plenty of others I'd enjoy talking to too! It'd be a Damn(yes I swore) shame to loose this ,you know? There are so few places where old nerdy nuts like us can talk about the old bikes you know? If you must close the site, well so be it and Thanks! for what we've had, and fair thee well. But, if you do stay, you'll always have at least two regular readers. Thanks, Mark




Subject: Alternate location For Discussion
Entered on: Apr 7, 1999 00:01
Entered by: Bill (whoads@msn.com)

Message:
For months now this forum on English bicycles has been a real joy. Its hard to believe it might go away. If that happens, I suggest we move over to the Yahoo! clubs forum. I'm in the process of getting the information to set up an English bicycle club there. What do you folks think? I participate in a vintage aircraft club, and in addition to verbal messages, there is a place to post pictures. If several folks think this might work, I'll proceed with setting up the club, and provide the URL's etc. to get people pointed in the right direction. Bill




Subject: "old nerdy"
Entered on: Apr 7, 1999 02:06
Entered by: RED (dskelton@stkate.edu)

Message:
"old nerdy"?!?! I may be nerdy but I hate to think 23 is old. Also, I second the Yahoo idea if it becomes necessary. And, Chris (I hope I got the name right, I fear if I go back to the posted messages that I'll have to type this over again---and that isn't good for lazy people like myself) I have a white seat, whatever the second thing was that you were looking for, and I might also have those peddles--I'll have to check. Anyway, If Menotomy does go under, its been fun reading what everyone has had to say. ---Red




Subject: Open frame vs Ladies frame
Entered on: Apr 7, 1999 10:44
Entered by: Mark ()

Message:
I hope if this thing moves that one practice will change. I am a short rider and I need the open frame in order to ride safely on a DL-1. I plan to buy a '66 open model soon. I understand that the Ladies frame is an American creation and since most bikes mentioned here are British that the Open frame designation should be used. Also, does an American-spec DL-1 come with full chaincase, rack and bell as standard equipment?




Subject:
Entered on: Apr 7, 1999 11:50
Entered by: Chris S (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Well put Mark R! I agree. If the menotomy does go down, we can all say "Thank you" and have done with it. I check this site almost as much as I do my own mailbox. It has been a gift, and we thank thee. Hey Bill- if menotomy does go down- I'm game for the English bike/airplane site as well. I have some cool pics of my wifes father's B17 crash wreckage. He made it, but the old fortress didn't. Hey Red, I'm hip for the seat if it is in pretty good shape. Mark (not R>) I'm not sure about the specs of DL-1 American versions, but my wife has a DL1 with the curved downtube, and it dosen' thave the enclosed chainguard, or bell, but these CAn be acquired. There is the ladie's step through that has a straight downtube instead of curved, but it is th ecable brake version, and has 26" rims. Is this what you're looking for? I could probably find one fo ryou for super-cheap, but you might have to refurbish it a bit. Cheers! Chris S




Subject: Open frame?
Entered on: Apr 7, 1999 17:46
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Mark, I'd never heard of "Open frame" and I have seen English Raleigh adds that refer to "Ladies" models, but, who cares anyway? A bike is a bike, and besides the "open frame" Raleighs and such work just fine. I have a US model Gents DL-1 and it had no full chain case, bell, etc.. American models often came without the full case to reduce the wieght just enough to avoid a higher tariff. If you are new to these bikes try going for a "Sports" model. they are a little lighter, and a little faster handling and such. Otherwise I think they have almost as much charm as the rod models. And, don't be so concerned with restoring it to perfection too, the "warts" and bumbs,and scratches aren't neccessarily a bad thing as they tell a story about the life and times of the bike.Just as long as the mechanics are in good shape, and it isn't too rusty, enjoy it as is. Restore it in the future. thanks,Mark




Subject: Ladie's Raleigh
Entered on: Apr 7, 1999 19:00
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Mark- Mark R is right. Chrome won't get you home, good mechanicals will. The sports (ladie's ) raleigh I'm working on is almost as tall as the DL1 and looks keen too!




Subject: Discussion Site
Entered on: Apr 7, 1999 22:25
Entered by: Bill (whoads@msn.com)

Message:
I've read Menotomy's list of possible courses of action they may take regarding the sale of their company, bikes etc. It seems there is a pretty good chance this forum may remain alive and well. If they keep it going, or if someone buys the whole lot and keeps it going, then this is where we should discuss these great bikes. In the event it all folds, I have begun getting a English Roadster Club going over at Yahoo, but we should stay here until the rug is pulled out. How does that sound for everybody? On a lighter note, great spring weather here for the DL-1.




Subject: Bill's Idea
Entered on: Apr 7, 1999 22:44
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Yo Bill! In the event we need a life boat, your idea sounds good, count me in if neccessary. Thanks,Mark.




Subject: Rudge
Entered on: Apr 8, 1999 01:47
Entered by: Doug (DLKENNEDY@webtv.net)

Message:
I have a 1950 Rudge with a four speed hub. I am looking for a shifter for this bike.




Subject: Ebay
Entered on: Apr 8, 1999 12:07
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Sounds good Bill! Hey- if anyone is interested, there are a couple of ladies Raleighs on ebay, nice shape, though no DL-1s. there's also a bell, and even a poster I just bid on, pretty cool stuff. It's raining cats and dogs here in erm,, sunny CA. I always wanted a new pet.




Subject: Raleigh (Nottingham) Front Wheel Cones
Entered on: Apr 10, 1999 00:05
Entered by: Bill (whoads@msn.com)

Message:
Does anyone have a source for new front wheel cones for Nottingham 3 speeds (Triumph, Dunelt,Raleigh etc). I'm looking for both the left and right, that is, the one with spanner flats and the round "fixed" one. Any ideas/sources appreciated. Bill




Subject: rigby master meteor
Entered on: Apr 12, 1999 22:00
Entered by: robert (rsosay@aol)

Message:
rigby master meteor for sale e-mail rsosay@aol kansas city




Subject: Bike names
Entered on: Apr 14, 1999 12:24
Entered by: Mark P. ()

Message:
I think that "old nerdy" is a great name for a bike. Also "toadster" is good too. I have a stripped early Huffy ATB that is know all round the neighborhood as "junkyard dog".




Subject: limie show and dan's new e-mail
Entered on: Apr 14, 1999 17:58
Entered by: dan (daniel.field@usa.net)

Message:
hi folks, it's been a long long time since i was here. before any further ado let me tell you that the limie show in boston is sunday june twentyseventh 1999. our unoficial theam this year is "it's the end of the century,BRING OUT YOUR DEAD"! the theam is as yet unofficial becuase i don't have a scrapper signed on yet to bring us a dumpster but if all goes well we will be offering a minimum price to the general public for there dead bikes to encurage recycleing and to totally deflate prices to the point where you idiot collectors will finally throw all this crap away, (can you tell I,ve taken the cure and sold off my collection)? At any rate you can exspect to find the world lagest assortment of neato old english bike stuff for the most good afully low prices you could ever imagine.The location is still Sullivan Square Charlestown but if you search this on the webb with map quest or some thing you will get a totaly bogus map the is hopelessly out of date so stay tuned to me at this address for a true map posting at a web site near you. i'm on the road for a hoiday to montanna, but i;l be back to boston to do the shows and i'll be checking in with my phone and e-mail but don't call me. ps a guy named john called me about aaaan imperial (one of the most rare short lables of the fifties)I figure he wants to sell so if you need one his number is 617 983 5028 i don't get paid to call thease guys back (i'm curently in north carolina)so if you call him please explain. oh and if your thinkin of knockin over my loft, i don,t live there any more.till show time dan




Subject: Raleigh Rudge #3310 AY
Entered on: Apr 14, 1999 23:05
Entered by: Jeff (motorheadx@aol.com)

Message:
Any parts, information, literature, or accessories? My Rudge is sort of complete, although worn out and needing renovation. Thanks.




Subject: 1932-38 Humber Livery and other
Entered on: Apr 15, 1999 07:11
Entered by: Paul (scat1017@sable.ox.ac.uk)

Message:
Hi, I'm new to posting here, but have been enjoying dabbling in the archives! I'm in the process of restoring a 1930's Humber (so far dated to between 1932 and 1938). Hidden beneath two scrappy coats of - thankfully cellulose based - paint is a nice solid deep blue with the traces of original lettering still visible. The lettering is pretty much complete. So my plan is to trace it with a fine paint brush and a paint that can be removed later without damaging the original below. A few questions: Does anyone know what colour the original lettering would have been? There's a white rectangle on the seat tube, just below the crossbar - any significance? Any thoughts on how I can work out the age more accurately than I already have? The wheels (1956 S-A FG) and saddle (thrashed 19?? B17) are not original, but the rest appears to be, and is in good condition. Thanks for your help... I'll get back to browsing the archives now! Cheers, Paul.




Subject: Raleigh for sale
Entered on: Apr 17, 1999 12:39
Entered by: Tom (tcapell@wa.freei.net)

Message:
I am selling my fathers Raleigh sports 3 speed. Bike is in original condition except for repainting. Has original tires, brooks saddle, and front dynohub. Asking 150 bucks. Email for more info Thanks




Subject: Rudge, etc.
Entered on: Apr 20, 1999 15:59
Entered by: Chris (chrisb@wfmu.org)

Message:
Well, after a year of searching (sort of), I found a surprisingly nice '63 Rudge Sports De-Luxe in someone's backyard for $20. Intact, decent paint, good chrome, working lights! Now, I need some info: 1. recommendations for decent bulbs (halogen??) 2. anybody have a correct Rudge chainring (the one with the hand) to sell/trade? (this appears to have been replaced with aa 48t generic part) 3. rear luggage rack that looks right for this bike 4. (not for this bike) any US sources for aluminum fenders/mudguards? Gawd, is it heavy! Thanks, Chris (in NJ)




Subject: Replace fenders?
Entered on: Apr 20, 1999 17:53
Entered by: Mark in N.J. ()

Message:
Chris, These bikes are on the heavy side, but they aren't intended for racing so weight isn't so big a problem, especially in the fenders.If you need to lighten it, try finding lighter rims, maybe mountain bike rims, and it'll make a far bigger change in weight and performance without changing the character of the bike. The difference in weight between the steel fenders (mudguards)and alloy or plastic, will be completely unnoticable.Good luck!




Subject: Fenders
Entered on: Apr 21, 1999 17:06
Entered by: Chris (beyerc@volvo.com)

Message:
To Mark in NJ: thanks for the feedback, but the alloy fenders are for another bike. I know that attempting to lighten the Rudge would be an exercise in futility, and probably ruin the bike.... Now, all I need is an exploded view of a Dynohub.




Subject: SEAT WANTED
Entered on: Apr 23, 1999 22:53
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Wanted: Decent, used Brooks model B-66 leather seat for Raleigh Tourist. Please E-mail with description and price.




Subject: Norman Roadster
Entered on: Apr 24, 1999 23:38
Entered by: Warren (warbetty@netcom.ca)

Message:
I've acquired a three speed roadster with a double top tube. The rear hub is a 1954 AB Sturmey with internal drum brake...the front hub also has a cable operated internal drum brake. It's branded a "McBride" bicycle from Toronto...when I contacted them they said they thought it was a "Norman" out of England. They also rebranded Raleighs and Schwinns. I've been unable to find any info apart from a 1939 catalog being auctioned on line. Does anyone have any details about Normans they can share?




Subject: Raleigh Ladies Superbe FS
Entered on: Apr 25, 1999 23:06
Entered by: Tim (EMGEETD@aol.com)

Message:
I have a '69? vintage Ladies Raleigh Superbe FS w/ the front Dyno hub. Bike is in g-vg shape , all decals are nice. $65.00 =S/H Thanks




Subject: nit-pickins
Entered on: Apr 27, 1999 00:04
Entered by: calvert (cycletruck@aol.com)

Message:
I haven't visited this board in a while but i'm checking now to ask if there is any experiance out there with the S/A Raincheck rod brake pads.....i bought several nos sets and i'm wondering if the leather insert should be so hard....shoud i soak them in lexol first?..............also i've noticed that i good number of our posters refer to the ladies Raleigh tourist as a ladies DL-1.....this is (strictly speaking) incorrect......the ladies tourist is a DL-2.....and the frame style is often refered to as a step-through frame.....if this has already been pointed out, excuse me, please, for belabouring the issue.....




Subject: Calvert
Entered on: Apr 27, 1999 08:42
Entered by: Mark P. ()

Message:
My thoughts exactly Calvert, I brought the open frame subject up a few weeks ago.




Subject: 28" Frame Road Bikes
Entered on: Apr 28, 1999 06:04
Entered by: BobbyMag (enquires.ponsonby@xtra.co.nz)

Message:
I have a large number of english bicycles. Mostly with 28" wheels, some with 26". The 28"s are mostly single speed bikes with Perry pedal operated brakes. Although a number have a very simple form of rod operated front caliper brake. The brands are Humber, B.S.A, Hercules, Rudge, Ralegh and Phillips. Their vintage is between 1920's at the oldest to about early 1960's in the case of the 28" and early 70's for the 26"s. I would be interested in restoring these bikes and would be very keen to find a good source of parts. In particular front brake parts and also things such as the older styled 28" rims. Also items of pannel work such as chain guards and mud guards (fenders) Any info would be greatly appreciated.




Subject: Ladies DL-1
Entered on: Apr 29, 1999 11:06
Entered by: Louis (lorsini@aol.com)

Message:
Calvert and Mark - I can't speak for other eras, but throughout the sixties, at least, Raleigh designated the Tourist as DL-1 and the Ladies Tourist as DL-1L. You might be getting the DL-2 designation confused with DL-22, which was how the Sports models were coded (also followed by letters referring to the hub with which the bike was equipped, as in Dl22AW, Dl22AWL, etc. As for the term "step through", I've always understood it to be a generic term for all ladies style bikes. Raleigh's (and other English manufacturers) specific term fro the Ladies DL-1 frame was the "loop frame" or "loop-tube frame", so called because the dropped top tube din't run parallel to the downtube, but rather bent, or looped downward to provide a lower step through point on theses bikes with their large head tubes and wheels. This made mounting and dismounting, particularly with skirts, easier and safer. Hope all this helps. Cheers




Subject: DL1 AND DL1L
Entered on: Apr 29, 1999 20:38
Entered by: Clarence ()

Message:
The mens model is the DL-1 and the ladies model is the DL1 L. The L stands for ladies. Raleigh was not the only company to produce this type of bike, and they all had their own names. I love all the diffrent variations on this type of cycle between makers and years of manufacture.




Subject: DL with it.......
Entered on: Apr 29, 1999 22:12
Entered by: calvert (cycletruck @aol.com)

Message:
Now, i've got go back and find where i got that DL-2 story but it seemd to me it came from a Raleigh catalog some 30 years back..... i'll check.....perhaps i'm wrong.....and i hate it when that happens....."step-through" is in fact the generic term for the ladies frame & the only one i use for it so as to avoid confusion....though i think it can also be properly applied to those folding bikes that either fold or break on the down tube.......i've heard the term "drop frame" used for the ladies frame but it is also (and more correctly) used for "camel back" frames......So, noone wants to weigh-in on the S/A Rain-Check pads question?




Subject: Rims
Entered on: May 1, 1999 03:11
Entered by: bobbymag (enquiries@xtra.co.nz)

Message:
I am desperate for a source of 28" rims. I have several fine steeds that are fine but for unuseably rusty wheel rims. please help!!




Subject: rims and parts
Entered on: May 1, 1999 16:00
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
Marc. I have 28" rims and all sorts of brand new parts (for Raleigh copies made in India) to sell brand new. I also have complete bikess at great prices. Check your email.




Subject: Looking for 1996 Raleigh Information
Entered on: May 1, 1999 18:39
Entered by: Sherry (dancinboo1@aol.com)

Message:
I am looking for any information regarding the replacement cost of a Raleigh Sturmey Archer 3 speed bike. I took it to a local bike shop for a tune up in October 1998. When I went to pick it up after I finally received a call in December that it was ready, I discovered they had totally stripped the bike of it's headlamp, taillight and generator. The information on the hub is GS patten 593189, 6 67. Dyna 3, Sturmey Archer. Unfortunately, I am unable to get cooperation from this bike shop. And I have tried since December to obtain the information I need. They asked me to tell them what it was worth as evidently the stripped parts were thrown away because they didn't work!!!! And they are unable to locate replacement parts. I'd appreciate any information I can get on how to research this situation. Thanks.




Subject: Holiday for workers of the World
Entered on: May 1, 1999 22:22
Entered by: paul (randa@lakenet.com)

Message:
This is my first time checking in on this site for some time, though I first contributed over a year ago. I still have not gotten over the joy of seeing these wonderful old machines referred to with such interest. What a fate of cultural ignorance that a bike shop would pitch an old Dyno headlamp just because it didn't work. Of coarse it wouldn't work! Something like that can't work without a degree of love. A person would have had to have a portrait of the Queen Mother over their bed since they were a child for that headlamp to just 'work'. Happy Mayday!




Subject: Three Speed Sturmy Archer
Entered on: May 2, 1999 06:28
Entered by: bobbymag (enquiries.ponsonby@xtra.co.nz)

Message:
I would have been tempted to do something rash in your position Sherry! They were obviously unclutured slobs with little understanding of quality or antiquity. Did you loose the whole bike or do you still have it sans lighting?




Subject: Sherry's bike shop fiasco
Entered on: May 2, 1999 06:40
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
A lot of people in bike shops are totally ignorent savages! I think you're probably screwed on those lights. You should go back and cuss them out! Don't go there any more!! My brother took his beloved old Peugeot to a GOOD shop here once to see if they could thread the deraileur drop out so it could take Campy. deraileurs,(Peugeots had Simplex un-threaded drop outs). I kid you not here, the shops' answer to the problem was to hacksaw off the dropout tang and they told him to use a hanger bracket!!!Yeah right. You can't always assume the folks in just any shop have any idea about what they're doing, and a lot of shops just want to sell expensive bikes. I hope you find a lamp, and if I can dig one up, I'll get in touch.




Subject: Bike shops- good and bad
Entered on: May 2, 1999 17:51
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I was really angered to read of a bike shop vandalizing a classic bike out of sheer ignorance. There is no excuse for discarding parts for any reason. The auto repair industry is required by law to return all removed parts to the customer. Too bad that law doesn't apply to bike repair shops. I never cease to be amazed at the ignorance of some bike shop owners and employees when it comes to older bicycles. Some are young and honestly don't know any history of the product, but I have met mature bike shop owners who just don't give a damm about anything but the latest and greatest, which usually means mountain bikes. I have crossed several local shops off my list for insulting my intelligence, refusing to answer any question not related to a sure purchase, and other offenses. Fortunately there are a few good people out there who will listen to the customer and not insult them as being dummies. Forgive me for venting my feelings on this subject. Sherry, I would cosider taking these people to small claims court if they can't give you any satisfaction. Good luck.




Subject: Sherry's bike
Entered on: May 3, 1999 12:00
Entered by: Chris S (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Heresy!!! This is an outrage! I will never understand some people. Do any of you really believe they actually "domped" those lights or really just kept them... I've dealt with people like that in the past, and they usually will treat you with less respect because you don' tride a 7k Cannondale or something of that genre. I'm sorry that happened to you Sherry, and Mark R told me first thing this morning. Were these lights dyno hub lights or generator lights with the generator that rubs against the wheel? If that's the type, we can probably help, I know I have a headlight floating around in the Raleigh sarcophogus ( the shed) I'll let you know. Phillistines! Knuckledraggers! Some people.




Subject: Bike Shops
Entered on: May 3, 1999 16:18
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
I went into a bike shot a couple months ago and asked for a "clamp on, chain stay, cable stop" after the child (I'm 40+ and they all seemed to be children) spent several moments deciphering what I was asking for, I was informed that "NOBODY uses those anymore." I should have known better than to ask is a stripmall shop where the only bikes in evidence are mountain bikes. I did walk past the place last weekend (I did not go in) and noticed a Raleigh Grad Prix, Chrome seat and chain stays and, top of the line Suntour derailiers, nice Brooks Saddle in the used bikes for $125. I suppose consummers are at blame when they can sell incredably specialized mountain bike for hundreds and thousands of dollars and no one will drop $125 on a beautiful piece of twenty year old machinery that cost someone a good deal that. Anyway I for am tired of being looked at as if I had three heads when I ask for something as simple a S/A hub cable. I rarely ask questions, buy parts, or enter these small shops manned by individuals with significant knowledge about the last three years and not much else. shops where




Subject: Sherry's plight with the knuckle draggers
Entered on: May 3, 1999 16:36
Entered by: Mark R. (deenbeany@earthlink.net)

Message:
Sherry, I have a new little red tail light from a generator set up, and some new 6 v bulbs that you are welcome to if they will help get your bike half-way back to normal. Please e-mail me and we can make the arraingments. Chris S. will probably be able to sponsor a headlight too.Chris?? And I know someone else out there must be able to dig up some other things to help too, come on guys! From Mark R. in New Jersey




Subject: Sherrys light plight in the night
Entered on: May 3, 1999 17:20
Entered by: Chris S (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Kevin, don't worry, you are amongst friends and Three speed colleagues. Those pups wouldn't know a Dl-1 if it came up and bit them in the bum. cretins. The old Rals are tried and true, and have lasted this long. Why does most of India and China ride copes of these great design? Don't feel bad, you're amongst friends. Mark, I'll check tonight and see what my stash provides, I know I have lights though they won't be miller. Gotta keep the spare Miller. I have other lights and even an old Royce Union still in th ebox! I know I do. Sorry about the spacing gang. Cheers!




Subject: Dyno-hub axle needed
Entered on: May 3, 1999 17:33
Entered by: Mark Lynn A. (sonm@uhura.cc.rochester.edu)

Message:
I need an S/A front axle for a Dyno-Hub. Locknuts too would be great. Also, my "condolences" to Sherry. Bicycle consummerism strikes again! The market could care less about history, but people do care as you can see from this list. Don't let them get you down; nothing disrupts the present like the past!




Subject: Poor Sherry's Light
Entered on: May 3, 1999 18:49
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
Hey Sherry, send me your mailing address and I'll send you one the dynamo generator sets I have for free. It looks like the original equipment, but it works and looks great. (Normally, we sell these for $9.95 plus shipping.)Jeez guys, I just love all that indignation.




Subject: Sherry's light
Entered on: May 3, 1999 18:55
Entered by: Warren ()

Message:
At the risk of being labelled a cynic, I'd suggest that the bike shop in question actually "procurred" the missing light set for somebody. I really can't imagine anyone stripping parts of anyone's bike without their permission. Although we might think that the roadster/3 speed is a specialty item, any wrench in any half busy bike shop would encounter many of them over the course of a year. Of course if I'm right, it makes the whole situation even more heinous. Just wonderin!




Subject: Kevins' bike shop troubles
Entered on: May 3, 1999 20:47
Entered by: Mark R. (deenybeany@earthlink.net )

Message:
Kevin, if you don't find a chainstay cable stop, I have one and it's workable although not S/A,but it did come off a Hercules, so it is Brit. It'll work, and you can have it if you want it.




Subject: front rod brakes
Entered on: May 3, 1999 22:25
Entered by: Aaron (aaron@quidnunc.net)

Message:
I need some front fork brake brackets for a raleigh with rod brakes. does anyone know where I can get them? I own a bike shop so any supplier info would be great. please email me directly.




Subject: '37 Hercules Info. wanted
Entered on: May 3, 1999 23:10
Entered by: Charlie (charles.hurst@yale.edu)

Message:
Anybody out there have an older (prewar) Hercules? Please email me if you do, for I'd like to learn more about them. There's a few parts I could use too. Thanks!




Subject: Sherry's lights and arron's brake brackets
Entered on: May 4, 1999 03:13
Entered by: red (dskelton@stkate.edu)

Message:
Wow! I haven't seen such a discussion inducing topic since "the american roadster". I would put in my own two cents but I think the subject has been explored rather extensively. However I would like to remind folks that there are a few Raleigh appreciators out there that are young. Please don't dismiss all of us whipper-snappers as historically ignorant MTB advocates. Also, sherry, perhaps if you were to tell us the name of this bike shop some of your discussion comrads might be inspired to share their thoughts with this them. Anyway, Arron, I have a bag of new brackets if you need a couple. My guess is that if I was able to find a bag of them, then the good folks at Harris Cyclery sell them. all for now, Red




Subject: bike parts
Entered on: May 4, 1999 12:39
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
Stirrup guides (brackets). I'd like to remind you all that here at www.bikeproject.com we have brand new aftermarket replacement parts for all aspects of Raleigh(and Philips)style roadster bikes. All parts are new and fully guaranteed.




Subject: Brackets shmackets
Entered on: May 4, 1999 18:36
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Stephen, where are you located? Are you in the bay area? In the city or Oakland, could you give an address? Cheers! Chris S




Subject: NYC Tourist
Entered on: May 4, 1999 23:15
Entered by: Tim (emgeetd@aol.com)

Message:
Had to go into NYC on Sunday eve to see a group called Tower of Power. Parked near Wash. Sq. Park and there chained to a tree in the park was a Raleigh Tourist with a full chain case no less and a weathered Brooks saddle! Lots of other British stuff either chained to trees or going on by powered by NYU students. Really neat to see especially in the Big Apple.




Subject: Cable Stop
Entered on: May 5, 1999 00:02
Entered by: kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
Mark, I did find my cable stop at another shop I know (not S/A but it works). Thanks. Why is it that the people who frequent this group seem to be more helpful? I read a couple of the other groups and it seems that even the questions are rarely answered. (perhaps e-mail answers are made) I do like the tone and attitude here. Thanks to all of ya. Kevin




Subject: English Bicycle parts
Entered on: May 5, 1999 20:46
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Folks: A good source of parts for older bicycles is "Loose Screws" of Ashland OR. They also have a division called, "Third Hand" that can supply tools. I have dealt with these folks for years and they have always been utterly honest and reliable. They can supply a host of Gear hub parts for SA and Shimano as well as a myriad of other items for all kinds of bikes. Their phone number is: 541 488-4800. Remember; Walk if you must but ride if you can.




Subject: Indignation Ye Gads!
Entered on: May 6, 1999 03:01
Entered by: bobbymag ()

Message:
Humphf! Indignation is my specialty. I'm glad it turns someone one on. I have a question for the truly obsessed. Several of my old bikes have Eady Coaster Hub Brakes. I have been to a few countries on the Planet and to date have seen only Perry Hubs or their imitators except at home in New Zealand. Q. Where else were English bikes sent with Eady Coaster brakes?




Subject: Add to fred
Entered on: May 6, 1999 15:08
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Hi gang, in addition to what Fred said, there is a great bike shop in Salem Oregon named Lombardi bicycles, sadly I don' thave their number, but will get it, andb they specialize in Brit bikes and I got my wife's DL-1 for a very reasonable price and Francis the owner even delivered it to me in Sacramento, though this was a single occasion, but it shows how helpful they aqre, and nice nice people. Cheers! I'm sending Sherry a light set, is anyone else? I don't think she'll need more than one.




Subject: A special thanks
Entered on: May 7, 1999 23:57
Entered by: Sherry (dancinboo1@aol.com)

Message:
Hello all you bike lovers! I just figured out how to get back to this discussion page and was amazed at all the comments my email generated. (Also, guess you figured out my bike is a 1967, not 1996!) I'm new at this home computer email stuff and hadn't gotten into any discussion areas before so this is a unique experience for me. I've been in contact with Chris S. and want to thank him for his kindness and help. I also want to let all of you know how much I appreciate all your comments and responses. It really amazed me. It's heart warming to know that there are such caring people out there. Chris said that the bike community looks after each other, I'm a believer now! I am so tempted to take out a whole page ad in the Dayton OH paper and add everyone's comments. I took my bike to what I had previously thought was the most reputable shop in the area (one of a group of family owned businesses in this area). I want to thank each of you for your offers of advice, lights, and everything. Thanks to Chris, looks like I'll be able to get the "missing" parts I need to have replaced. Now, one more question, does anyone out there have any suggestions as to where I can get these repairs made? Currently, my bike is still at the bike shop because I refused to pick it up in the current condition (yes, it IS still there, I just got the manufacture info off the hub last weekend!) I'm in the Fairborn OH (Wright-Patterson AFB OH) area. Please DO NOT suggest WHITMANS!!! I'd appreciate any guidance or advice on an honest, reliable, trustworthy shop in this area. Again, thanks so much for all your kindness. I am very impressed! Sherry




Subject: Information/Help
Entered on: May 8, 1999 03:32
Entered by: Graham (gramgreen@yahoo.co.uk)

Message:
I have recently acquired a Royal Enfield bicycle, don't know if it qualifies for inclusion in this section but am certainly interested in finding out more about the cycle and restoring it, condition in general is not too bad. One of the tyres is a michelin "war grade" so I am assuming that it was around during the 40's or thereabouts probably confirmed by the obligatory dab of "black out" white paint on rear mudguard. It appears to be a ladies cycle because of the step through config. and the tooled (flower motife) leather Rudge saddle. Can anyone give me information as to how it could be dated/identified more accurately and tips as to how it should/could be restored.




Subject: old bu\ike
Entered on: May 8, 1999 08:41
Entered by: rick ()

Message:
i have an old bike im looking to restore i rode it as a kid and recieved it free because our friends had out grown it. its a royal crown thats about all i know. does any one know where i can get more info on this?




Subject: Oh, ah, try Whitmans!
Entered on: May 8, 1999 18:02
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Calm down!! I was just kidding for Gods sake!! Seriously I like to think some of us can get what we need out of cycling by using these old English bikes, and by creating links with one another that don't require spending $100 on a pair of handlebars or what ever like the bloody roadies seem to have to do. Seriously again people need to slow their lives down a little and smell the roses before their gone. If we can't have equality and humanity in our "Real" lives(not bike related that is)than we can have it here, and maybe this sort of decent inter-relation vis-a-vis helping one anouther out with our bikes is a really great venue for it. Anyway thats what I've been finding the last few months at any rate. Chris S. and others I've spoken with are great people! If they perfect the transporter in the next few years we ought to all get together some Saturday and have a spin together. Wouldn't that be great?!




Subject:
Entered on: May 9, 1999 18:55
Entered by: Teal (TealD@BronxDefender.org)

Message:
I don't know all the lingo that y'all are using, and I'm not even sure these bikes qualify as Roadsters, but maybe someone can point me in the right direction. I found 2 bikes in Florida, a Dunelt and a Hercules. I have no idea of the years, although I'd love to find out. The Dunelt has a curved frame that reminds me of an old beach cruiser. It's a one speed with foot brake. It seems that this bike was in an accident and the rear part of the frame that runs from the back wheel to under the seat is bent. I live in New York City--does anyone know of a place in the area where I can have the frame straightened? Also, any ideas how to find out the age of the bike? I've just recently started checking the internet for vintage bike sites, but haven't seen a picture of my bikes. The other bike I'd like to age check is a Hercules, also a one-speed with foot brake. It's bright royal blue with red pinstripes, and has a much more angular frame than the Dunelt. The fenders have a shape that reminds me of the fins on '60's American cars, so I'm geussing it's of a similar age. One thing that's fun about these bikes is that they FEEL totally different from American bikes. I have 2 Scwinn one speeds, one from the 50's and another that I'm geussing is 60's, and they feel very laid back in comparison to the Brit rides, which make me sit up all straight and proper like a schoolteacher or a mailman. I love them!




Subject: Parts
Entered on: May 10, 1999 12:41
Entered by: Jason (jcloutier@archchemicals.com)

Message:
Hello all, I recently purchased the remaining inventory of a bike shop that had gone out of business after 100+ years as a bike shop. There are lots of new and used three-speed parts in the load. I need to move the inventory before I catalog the items, but I may be able to satisfy needs or curiosities in short order. I'm not in the bike business. I am an analytical chemist that should have been a bike mechanic. I came on a possibility and took advantage of it. Hopefully I can help others with their needs. Best regards, Jason Cloutier




Subject: DL-1 Raleighs!!!1
Entered on: May 10, 1999 18:16
Entered by: Chris S. (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Hey gang! Two DL-1 Raleighs in E-bay! Go get em if you don't have one! Wowee! I have one, so you guys need to get one. yay!




Subject: A query
Entered on: May 11, 1999 03:09
Entered by: Marcel (marcel.groothuijzen@schroders.com)

Message:
I am not too sure if I am in the right discussion group. I am looking for info on a bike. It has the following on the frame: "New Hudson Ltd. Waverly Works Birmingham" I have done some searching on the 'net but drawn a blank. Can anyone help out? Thanks




Subject: Birmingham
Entered on: May 11, 1999 13:52
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Hey Marcel, you're on the right page! I would assume the bike was made by BSA, like how raleigh made other brand name bikes but under the same roof like ford/Mercury. Whoever has the bike with the war grade rubber tires, I havve them on my WWII BSA and I guess they are precious. Kepp it clean, eh? cheers Chris




Subject: Dan/Boston show
Entered on: May 11, 1999 14:32
Entered by: dan (daniell.field@usa.net)

Message:
Hi folks; Dan her again to pester you all about the show in Boston this year (1999) on sunday june 27. If you find this group a blessing for your delite please remember that there was/is a pre web cellibration of English bicycles (" The Limie Show" Boston ,Ma usa) and that thannks to the folks at Menotomy you all get to here about it. If you are in the area please stop buy for the day. The show is located at the Sullivan Square traffic circle (how britt can you get?)on the Boston/Sommerville line. Hope to meet you all and thanks.dan




Subject: Boston Show
Entered on: May 12, 1999 09:52
Entered by: Jason (jcloutier@archchemicals.com)

Message:
Dan, Your e-mail address may not be correct. I sent a message and in was returned as undeliverable. Question, is there swap space available at the Boston show? Thanks, Jason




Subject: Handlebar grips
Entered on: May 12, 1999 19:17
Entered by: Gene (a3hatww2@aol.com)

Message:
Looking for a pair of grips to go with my raleigh, prefer the smooth bullet type. THANKS!! Happy trails!!




Subject: new with raleigh bikes need info soon!!!!
Entered on: May 12, 1999 22:35
Entered by: Kenna (KLHARRELL@aol.com)

Message:
found a raleigh sport only info I have right now is 3 speed with strumy archer on the shifter made in ?molten or morten?, England. wanting to know it's value, if it should be cleaned up or will that decrease the value, also the seat was a brooks seat, is that an original or what? PLEASE HELP me thanks Kenna




Subject:
Entered on: May 13, 1999 18:48
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Does anybody want a ladie's frame with crank and forks? It's Raleigh, and still has the badge, but someone painted it blue, and the forks yeller. Please don't make me file it. SOmeone out there can use it!! Pleez take it from me. Forks are straight, and so'z the frame. Cleaning house Chris




Subject: Jason`s show question
Entered on: May 14, 1999 13:39
Entered by: dan (daniel.field@usa.net)

Message:
Why yes Jason, ther is alway plenty of room at the Sullivan Squre shows ("The Limie Show" in june and "The Yankee Show" in september). We are still in our original parking lot under the bridge (rain or shine). Ther are multiple lots to over flow onto. The rent is 220,00 daollars the day oof the sshow or two dollars per bike for consignment. We do claim elecronic repro rites for online aauction puposes for the intire following year. Providing you are the soul and ttrue owner of what you bring to sell. And sorry about the e-mail, I spelled it wrong please forgive me I`m a hamer machanic not a lace maker. And also, a fellow just contacted me about some prewar track iron (complete units) I`l tell him to post here if he promises to complete he deals at the show so everone can see thease bike. Dan




Subject: Kenna "new with Raleighs"
Entered on: May 14, 1999 13:51
Entered by: Clyde ()

Message:
A look at Sheldon Brown's web page under old raleigh bicycles (sheldonbrown.com/raleigh.html) may answer most of your questions, like approx. bike age (Date stamped on S-A hubs) and OEM Brooks saddle (probably B-72). For pricing, you might visit the archives (use search mode - CTRL & f key) where most folks will advise that the DL-1s are collectible, and the Sports make great city bikes. I picked up a pair (male and female frames) of 1973 Gray "Sports" in great condition with B-72 seats at a garage sale for $50. Someone recently was advertising a "Sport" for $150. Ride and enjoy the original index shifter.




Subject: FS: 1949 Sturmey Archer ASC 3 Speed FIXED Gear Hub
Entered on: May 14, 1999 19:37
Entered by: Scott (sgp@sgpnet.com)

Message:
After considerable debate, I have decided to part with a Sturmey Archer ASC hub on E-Bay. The URL is: http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=104258539 The copy reads as follows: The ASC is a unique three speed FIXED gear hub that Sturmey ceased making in the mid 50's. My hub was made a half century ago in July of 1949. I got it from an acquaintance in England who had it for years. Riding fixed gear is one of the great pleasures in cycling and having three gears at your disposal is a remarkable experience. I have an ASC on a 1950 Bates B.A.R. lightweight that I restored and it is truly a joy to ride. Below is a link to an article by Sturmey expert Sheldon Brown on the gear including a picture of a 1953 ASC ad. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/asc.html The ASC comes with a vintage (i.e. tatty) SA 4 speed trigger which Mr. Brown assures me is compatible with the ASC. ASC triggers are all but impossible to find. The 40 hole hub comes with a 16 tooth 1/8 inch cog and an unopened (NOS) Clark's Control cable (white). Also comes with standard (non-wing) locking nuts, top tube stop and pulley. Cheers




Subject: Yes, DL-1 is best.
Entered on: May 17, 1999 09:41
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Dear Fellow Anglophiles: It was a beutiful weekend here in central Ohio, and I spent most of it on bikes. I rode three different ones: a 1984 Cannondale w/ Campy NR (I hear the boos from the crowd) for a fast ride, a 1961 Schwinn American w/2 speed kickback (I hear more boos and hisses), and, the one I rode the most, the beloved DL-1, which is, of course, by far the most comfortable and fun to ride. On Sunday my wife and I spend many hours on the bike paths and back streets soaking up the beutiful weather, stopping for lunch, coffee, and in the evening, ice cream. People smiled whenever I rang the two-tone bell as I passed by. I hope you're all enjoying some good rides this Spring! Best, Keith




Subject: Raleigh Serial number
Entered on: May 17, 1999 10:46
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I have a tall frame Tourist.It is stamped G71007 and thanks to Jim Burton and Sheldon, I believe it is from about 1930. I am glad they put the serial numbers on the web.




Subject: Solid or Semi-solid tyres for DL-1?
Entered on: May 18, 1999 13:05
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Okay, since I ride my roadster a lot, the tubes or tyres are gonna go sooner or later. I noticed the valve on the front is showing some cracks near the valve hole in the rim, so I'm just waiting for it to fail. I dread the day the rear tyre or tube goes. Anyway, I recall Sloane's book refers to solid and semi-solid tyres. Does anyone out there know if these are available for 28" roadster wheels? Would it be stupid? Lemme have it!




Subject: tyres
Entered on: May 18, 1999 16:05
Entered by: Chris S (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Keith, you KNOW what happens to the main wheel on bigwheels when they wear out, they split don the middle, adn you get no traction whatsoever! you don't want that! Seriously, I think you should do as you see fit, but th eavailability is probably nil. I wouldn't, just because that's not th eway it came, and I like to keep the DL-1 as original as possible. Mark R. just got new tires for his, and is really pleased! Stephen can supply you with tyres as well, look into it, but if you go solid, let us all know- I'm sure we'd be curious how i tturns out! Eh gang?




Subject: SOLID TYRES!!!!!
Entered on: May 18, 1999 17:05
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Don't do it!!! Good God man!!! Solid tyres!!!Cripes!!!NO,NO,NO,!!! real tyres are available and some are rather inexpensive, please someone get the address for some place to this poor guy before he goes the solid route, it's simply not neccesary. I'll look up the address where I got my Semperits, and write back in a bit. Mark R.




Subject:
Entered on: May 18, 1999 18:05
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Well there you go. Mark is right, but he's a purist like myself. I have to tell you though, don't put 10-speed handlebars on it upside down PLEASE! I saw someone in Los Gatos with a DL-1 with bars like that, adn I was very tempted to drag him out of the pub and flog him and liberate the bike, but I didn't. I think I regret that now, heheh. Cheers!




Subject: Solids
Entered on: May 18, 1999 19:34
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I think the one company Sloane talks about for solids is British, if that helps. How long has it taken the rest of you to repair a major rear tire blowout -- one that can't be patched on the wheel -- like a shot valve or large shreded puncture? If someone can convince me its less than an hour, I'll skip thinking about the solids. By the way, I've put Brit "Northroad" bars and sprung saddles on lightweight racing machines, though I don't consider that sacrilege. I'm not a purist, but even I'm offended by your story. You should've liberated that defiled roadster.




Subject: hopper
Entered on: May 18, 1999 19:44
Entered by: frankg (frankandlorigreene@goplay.com)

Message:
looking for info on a "hopper" bike made in england, sprocket reads hopper bike has fender "fins" looking for year and approx. value any info would be greatly appreciated thanx frank




Subject: Re: SOLID TIRES!!!
Entered on: May 19, 1999 07:44
Entered by: Nick Nichols (basic@leys.com)

Message:
I have new Semperit Super Elite 28 x 1 1/2" blackwall tires for $12 each or $10 each for 4 or more (plus shipping). These are rated at 55 lbs pressure. Looks like the tires are made in either Austria or Germany (implied by the "Semperit Reifen AG" on the tire). Tubes for $4 ea. or $3.50 ea. for 4 or more. Nick Nichols - DBA Basic Cycles - Charlottesville, Virginia (http://leys.com/basic)




Subject: Solid tyres
Entered on: May 19, 1999 09:43
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Darn, I checked and Sloane refers to solid and semi-solid tires made in NEW JERSEY, presumably from some sort of toxic waste. The issue is somewhat significant for me, because, but for the fear of flats, I'd commute on the Roadster instead of the Dunelt and (ugh) Schwinn Collegiate. LOTSA glass, nails and other nasty stuff on our streets. Flats occured every couple of months for me until I started using tire liners a few years ago -- something else that's undoubtedly not available for 28" (though I could put shorter ones together). Never had any luck with products like "Slime", which I found eventually clog the valve, and never prevented a flat for me anyway. Anyway, I'll look around and let you know if I find any. I'd go for semi-solid.




Subject: Keith's tyres
Entered on: May 19, 1999 12:12
Entered by: Chris S. ()

Message:
Boy, Keith, if I didn't know any better, I'd say you lived in Chicago! I can't tell you how many times I got flats back ther because of all the mines in the road- my tubes looked like speckled doughnuts! I say do what you need to, they're just tyres really. That slime is a pain to deal with. I usually carry a tube in my bag, and once some guy in a car helped me by letting me have a can of their fix a flat® when the saw me pushing my sport home once. It worked! Just please keep away from Big Wheel hollow wheels, bad traction! They split too.




Subject: Tyres
Entered on: May 19, 1999 14:44
Entered by: Chris S (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Hey I think this i sfor Keith, but Mark R. mailed me asking me if I could post this address, and I think it's fo rthe cats who have thetyres he has, so here it is; Trophy bikes-311 Market St. - Phila, PA - 19106 - -mcget@aol.com. I hope that helps .




Subject: Solid Tires
Entered on: May 19, 1999 15:59
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
SOLID TIRES (or Tyres for you pome's)The new generation of solid tires are not like the heavy, hard rubber ones found on your old scooters. They are extremely light weight, very durable, and for commuting, rentals or free ride bikes, a great idea. Problem is, I don't think they are made in a 28" version. There's a free ride program in Carbondale and what they do is put solid tires on all their bikes and never have to worry about flats. I think it's a great idea. I think it's wise to always be open to new ideas). I can get a tire off one of my bikes, patch the tube and put it back on in less than an hour, but I'd hate to have to do it alongside a busy road. I too have new tires (from India), complete 28" for around $10 plus shipping. wheels as well (32 & 40 spoke) I don't know if they're as good as Semperits, but they're made for 3rd world abuse. Weather's finally warming. Regards, Stephen




Subject: Re: Solid Tyres
Entered on: May 20, 1999 11:22
Entered by: Dave (nosliwsd@worldnet.att.net)

Message:
Greentyre [http://www.greentyre.com/english/index.html] has solid tyres, including a 28x1and1/2.




Subject: Solids
Entered on: May 20, 1999 11:35
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Thanks Dave! The fact that they're made for 28" arguably confirms they are "proper" in some respects. Okay, they're not factory original, but I'll bet more than one genuine Brit roadster rider has used them in jolly old England after flatting out once or twice at an inconvenient time. Otherwise the company wouldn't bother to make that size. I'm gonna try them. To hell with purity! In fact, it's more pure, dammit. Let's reach back further in time for a bike that's really crude -- a safety with solid tires. Next thing I'll switch to a fixed gear and a spoon brake.




Subject: Solid-non-pnumatic tyres
Entered on: May 20, 1999 23:09
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Hey! After checking out the web page on those Greentyres, I may have jumped to the wrong conclusion on this idea. I think there may very well be some merit indeed in THIS product, and I'd like to hear some more about it/them. The only experiences I'd ever had with such a product was with some older products from the seventies. I had no idea someone had engineered what appears to be a viable product. If any else has experience with them, I'd like to know more. Thanx gang.




Subject: In defense of New Jersey (re: Keith's remarks)
Entered on: May 20, 1999 23:16
Entered by: Claudia ()

Message:
I must in all good humor take tongue in cheek offense at Keith's remark about things being made in New Jersey out of toxic waste. What is this thing about New Jersey- must be all those Woody Allen movies. But I must tell you that New Jersey is quite beautiful, I spent part of my childhood exploring the woods there, and yes even learned to ride a bicycle. One other thing...the only people who have accents in New Jersey are transplants from Manhattan or elsewhere. And why did they move there? Because it is beautiful and bike friendly. Now an aged Califoria girl enjoying her green Raleigh Sports (1974 model)




Subject: In defense of New Jersey (re: Keith's remarks)
Entered on: May 20, 1999 23:17
Entered by: Claudia ()

Message:
I must in all good humor take tongue in cheek offense at Keith's remark about things being made in New Jersey out of toxic waste. What is this thing about New Jersey- must be all those Woody Allen movies. But I must tell you that New Jersey is quite beautiful, I spent part of my childhood exploring the woods there, and yes even learned to ride a bicycle. One other thing...the only people who have accents in New Jersey are transplants from Manhattan or elsewhere. And why did they move there? Because it is beautiful and bike friendly. Now an aged Califoria girl enjoying her green Raleigh Sports (1974 model)




Subject: tounge n cheek
Entered on: May 21, 1999 11:45
Entered by: Chris S. ()

Message:
Dont worry dere Claudia, all dat toxic waste is from any big city. Besides, I'm from Cheecaago, and I live in CA. too and I gotta grate accent dere dude! heheh. Cheers Chris




Subject: Rim Needed
Entered on: May 21, 1999 15:44
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
I'm in need of a Dunlop Special Lightweight 27x1-1/4 32H front wheel for the front of my '58 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix. will pay reasonable $ for nice used or NOS piece. Help! Thanks...Chris




Subject: Dunlop
Entered on: May 21, 1999 17:06
Entered by: CHRIS S ()

Message:
Hey Chris, this is Chris. I bet I have one for you. I'll check, info on monday




Subject: Toxic waste N.J.?
Entered on: May 21, 1999 18:12
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
New Jersey may have it's low points, but it's on the whole a beautiful little State. Yeah North Joisy may have an odd odor or two in the East,and some of Camden sucks, but practically the whole rest of the State is a green Garden. Bicycling is tops in N.J.! Everyone who rides here likes it a lot. There are lots of back roads, in the country, farm lanes,some hills, but not too many, etc..... I was just today telling Chris S. That N.J. is a sort of topsy-turvey tee-tinsy mirror image of California ah, sort of... I know a route or two here in the South Jersey region that would blow you away!!




Subject: Solid Tyres
Entered on: May 23, 1999 01:16
Entered by: Bobbymag ()

Message:
Solid tyre sound terrific you can also get light emmiting diodes for lights and little silcon chip screamers instead of those unreliable mechanical bells (with the tops that unscrew from indiscriminate ringing. Chaps and Chapesses what are we talking about here. Tyres are freely available at a good price and it is no problem to cary a spare tube under the saddle. If it takes over a hour to repair a puncture even in a gale I suggest you use the other hand as well. Surely we are talking purest obsession here and not humdrum practicality!




Subject: Greasy key bourds and rickshaw bikes
Entered on: May 23, 1999 11:24
Entered by: dan (daniel.field@usa.net)

Message:
sorry about that sloppy message on the bike show a few crauls back. my keybourd is burning up with all the grime. I found another bicycle rickshaw in Montanna. This one is a twenty inch. If you know anyone in Boston who was at my first show (1992?) they may remember a tweny four inch rickshaw bike that came to us thru the a museum of transportation clearance sall. In modern times the museum has been plaiged with the ravages of "museums profesinals". They would recriut and aquire more stuff than they had room for. Not that I can do a better job. Anyway I fond a tweny inch rick shaw bike it need a new front fork and probable some apolstery. I have the guys number and will entertian him with serious offers if anyone is interested. I`m also headed back to Boston in a short while. I can bring this to the show or deliver most anywhere along the way. I`ve also found a french twenty inch in Kansas, but I don`t think this guy actually sells stuff. From Dan o.t.r.,,,, see ya in Boston




Subject: Need QR lever for Raleigh Folder 20
Entered on: May 24, 1999 13:18
Entered by: Clyde (clydecarlson@juno.com)

Message:
Greetings fellow English Roadster (and Folder) riders. I stripped the internal threads on the seatpost Quick Release lever for my Raleigh Folder. Of course I could substitute a modern cam-operated QR seatpost bolt, but that might detract from the charm of British engineering. It's an approximately 3-inch long, L-shaped, chromed-plated device that bears the wording "TIGHTEN SECURELY". So, please check your spare parts bins and drop me an e-mail with details if you'd be willing to part with one. Presently, to tighten the seatpost bolt, I've substituted a Raleigh front axle nut which works find, but without the QR feature. Thanks




Subject: Pedaling in the Garden State
Entered on: May 24, 1999 15:51
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
I didn't make it to Philadelphia early last month. Anybody want to do a 3-speed ride in northern NJ?...Chris




Subject: New Jersey Ride?
Entered on: May 24, 1999 17:28
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Chris, what kind of ride do you have in mind? Like maybe the canal from Trenton to New Hope? Or, a more taxing ride?




Subject: Needed: 4-speed Sturmey trigger
Entered on: May 24, 1999 17:51
Entered by: David (davidd_dt@earthlink.net)

Message:
I need a 4-speed Sturmey trigger. For some dumb reason, I had 2 new ones last year and I gave them away. Well, now I need one! If anyone has such a thing, please contact me. Thanks.




Subject: Joisey Ride
Entered on: May 25, 1999 15:44
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
Mark: I'm in Northern NJ. there's a Folding Bike ride scheduled to begin at City Hall in NYC on Sunday, June 6 and ride to Coney Island(how appropriate), which I'm told is about 10 miles. I have 3 Moultons, but it would be more anarchistic to do it on a 3-speed. Why conform with the non-conformists?.....Chris




Subject: non-schwinn
Entered on: May 25, 1999 17:11
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
Ive been watching the bike sales on ebay and I have a question. Several of the Raleigh bikes for sale have the words "non-schwinn" or "not schwinn" in the description. Was ther some rebadging or bikes from the same factories? Thanks




Subject: non schwinn
Entered on: May 25, 1999 21:37
Entered by: Kevin ()

Message:
Mark, They do that so that collectors using the search engine for Schwinns will "hit" on their ad. I think its rather a rude thing to do but it is real common. (Wish they'd knock it off)




Subject: brake pads
Entered on: May 25, 1999 22:18
Entered by: kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
After searching everywhere for brake pads for my Raleigh Tourist rod-brake roadster, Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com) fixed me up with four pairs. Now I can ride in style ... and even stop! Thanks!




Subject: Dunelt Cycle Co LTD
Entered on: May 25, 1999 22:57
Entered by: Dave (dfry@fix.net)

Message:
Does anyone here know anything about the Dunelt Cycle Co LTD. It was or is an English company. A friend of mine recently acquired an old three speed made by them. Looks to be from the fourties or fifties. How would I find out anything about this bicycle? Any help would be appreciated...Thanks.....Dave




Subject: Norwegian Club
Entered on: May 26, 1999 00:42
Entered by: Trond (Trond.Schoning@student.uib.no)

Message:
Sir: I write to draw your attention to the existence of our club, Sportsveteransykkelklubben Cyklus, or the Sporting Veteran Bicycle Club "Cyklus", of Bergen, Norway. The club was started on a whim in april 1994, after three of the founding members struck up acquaintances while riding their vintage bicycles about town, drew up the formal foundations of the club, and started recruiting, mainly with the celebrations of the Norwegian day of independence, May 17th, in view. Since then, we have participated in the formal independence day parade, placed between contingents of the Royal Norwegian Navy and the University, this year with a turnout of 26 of our members, among them four on our famed 1930´s four seater Danish bicycle, "Hamlet", – so named, because he never seems to know whether to be or not. In addition to "Hamlet", the club collection has a few other gems. One, which might be interesting to american collectors, is our only American bicycle, a c1946 Monark Silver King balloon-tyre type, with battery-operated horn and lights, in an astounding original condition. It was brought to Norway by an exiled Norwegian family after WW2, and was originally paired with a matching girls´ model, which is sadly lost. Among other highlights are another tandem, in a tatty, but very charming condition, an absolutely mint Norwegian "Roald" 1948 gents´ model, a 1910´s Royal Humber ladies´ model with rod-operated brakes (quite a few of of our bicycles have this feature) and fully enclosed and oil-sumped drivetrain, several 1920´s Raleigh similarly equipped, one of them with an integrated dynamo in the front hub, a Norwegian "Diamant" 1940´s 5-speed racer, a hand-built 1960´s Bianchi "Lusso" gents´model (my own), down to a Norwegian legend; a mint 1972 DBS "Apache". The latter is a model akin to the Raleigh Choppers or the Schwinn "Krate" models, but in a size quite suited for adults. (Also my own, and a birthday present from my girlfriend.) The majority of the collection, though, consists of variants of the Norwegian DBS brand, an acronym for "Den Beste Sykkel", – the best bike. This brand has been the dominant Norwegian brand since the name was launched by the factory in 1934. Before then, the factory made American brands on licence, and made their market position on ther base of them. Incidentally, Bergen has a disproportionately high share of British bicycles, thanks to a local importer, with good connections in local society. Apart from the May 17th celebrations, we normally arrange two full day picnics, a tobogganing christmas party, and our annual three-day bicycling excursion, based at Villa Fridheim, a beautiful 18th century country house belonging to the family of a founding member. All these events are seen through in period attire and with the proper paraphernalia; Wind-up grammophones, wooden tennis rackets, pre-war cocktail shakers, monocles, signalling trumpets, and sabres for opening the champagne "á la russe". Our members are mostly students, with strong representations of the departments of fine arts, law, and art history, although a few have graduated. The next start-a-tradition-project will be the celebration of Wilhelm Henie day, to celebrate a legendary but sadly underrated Norwegian; the first bicycle racing world champion, renowned loudmouth, art collector, tycoon, man-about-town, and father of Sonia. In re our fifth anniversary dinner, to be held at Villa Fridheim, Tysnes, Norway, in the middle of august, we also want to proffer a formal invitation to the celebrations, including the traditional port-wine-in-the-portico welcome, the tournaments in croquet, badminton and couronne,the seven-course nocturnal dinner (dancing between the three last courses),and quite extensive fireworks. If you´re unable to attend our modest fête, we will be only happy to furnish you with photographs (mostly black and white), some rolls of Super 8 silent film, menus, speeches, etc. As you may have gathered, we crave publicity, and after having been worn-out, more or less, as subjects in the local newspapers, we feel that a more global publicity approach is needed at the end of a rather spiffing century, overall. Our best regards, and toodle-dee-pipp, Trond L. Schøning




Subject: Raleigh Men's 3 Speed For sale
Entered on: May 26, 1999 08:25
Entered by: Tim (EMGEETD@aol.com)

Message:
I have a very nice mid 70's Raleigh 23" frame men's 3 sp FS.With SB. Very original condition. Hardly used.Brown $85.00




Subject: Brakes, dunelts, and Norway
Entered on: May 26, 1999 11:02
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
Miscellaneous comments: 1. if you need brake choes for rod-brake bikes, American Cyclery (SF) and Bicycle Outfitter a.k.a. Storage Cycle (Raleigh, NC) ususally stock 'em. 2. Dunelt was one of the myriad British bike makers swallowed up by Raleigh. Like robin hoods, I think they were at the lower end of the quality range. 3. Isn't Monark a Swedish, not American, bike?....Chris




Subject: Monark
Entered on: May 26, 1999 12:34
Entered by: Jason (jcloutier@archchemicals.com)

Message:
Monark (Sweden) were road bikes of questionable quality. Some had Reynolds 531 stickers, but were made with seamed tubing. Goofy orange paint with checkered flag decals. Monark (USA) made bikes prior to WWII. Some of these are very collectible.




Subject: Rudge - British Bicycle made in Nottingham ENG
Entered on: May 26, 1999 17:24
Entered by: Cory ()

Message:
I have an old Rudge that I'd like to date and determine it's rarity. The serial # is AL 67714. Bike Details: bowed top tube, seat stay is bolted rather than welded to the chain stay and seat tube, headbadge had hand logo, attached to handlebars is chrome R signifing Rudge, Handlebar grips are made by John Bell of England, the seat is a Dunlop M15 it's made of rubber it has embosed on it "Made in England under Prilastic Patents" whatever that means? 3 springs on seat, If anyone has any info on Rudge Bicycles please shout back. Til future days.




Subject: Royal Enfield book
Entered on: May 28, 1999 10:00
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I was looking for information about Royal Enfield and was able to get a book on the company. Contact:Hunt End Books,66 Enfield Road, Hunt End, Redditch,B97 5NH Telephone 011-44-01527 542516 Book is titled Royal Enfield. I was told of the book by the motorcycle club who also said they could not be of any further assistance to me. To the best of my knowledge, there is no club or anything for bicycle owners.Only for the motorcycles. The Royal Enfield bikes were not imported into the U.S.A. like Raleigh, Phillips, Rudge, etc. These were very high quality bikes and the book is excellent and well written giving insight into the Royal Enfield works.Contact your local bookstore first, see if they can order it.




Subject: Corey's Rudge
Entered on: May 28, 1999 10:56
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Corey, Does your machine have 28 or 26 inch wheels? rod brake or cable?enclosed or hockey stick (open) style chainguard? Dunlop rubber seats are awesome and rare. Usually one finds a Brooks seat. ,the Dunlop seats are no longer made.The Brooks seats still are, even a extensive range of replacement parts are available! My favorite Brooks is the B90/3 which is a 3 spring leather seat. I have 4 AL numbers myself and can't find it in the frame number section.The section is incomplete when it comes to Humber, Rudge, Phillips, etc. 28 inch wheels, rod brakes vs.cable enclosed guards v.s open hockey stick machines are worth more. Does it have a rear rack? I am having a terrible time finding cycle bells such as Raleigh, Miller,and C.J. Eadie and nephew.I never find them with racks or bells and the Dunlop rubber saddles have eluded me this far.The bike was made in the huge Raleigh factory because Raleigh had swallowed up other companies such as Humber, Rudge, Dunelt etc.What year does the rear Sturmey-Archer hub say? That is the year the bike was made unless somebody changed wheels on you. If it is a 26 X1 3/8 wheel, then look for high pressure tires at the area shops.I have a pair of tires rated at 75psi and I love them. The bike will move with them on.You can get 28 inch tires from Sheldon.




Subject: GO TO GARAGE SALES
Entered on: May 28, 1999 13:22
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
On the way to work I stopped at a garage sale and picked up a green 1970 Hercules for $20. It's in great shape. It was imported by AMF. The chainguard is chrome, as are the mudguards. It's very clean -- down to the unworn, bright white pedals. It's obviously a Raleigh -- the Raleigh logo appears on the stem and crank. I don't recall, but is Hercules considered low-end or mid-range? Did I pay too much?




Subject:
Entered on: May 28, 1999 20:31
Entered by: Stephen ()

Message:
Keith, you got hosed,man. Should never have paid more than $19.50. The guy saw you coming. Happy Memorial Day




Subject: 1969 raleigh
Entered on: May 29, 1999 16:57
Entered by: Richard ()

Message:
I have a 1969 Raleigh that I have rebuilt, with new parts, The frame was sand-blasted & stove enameled black, but my question is, what decals should be on my frame? my local Raleigh dealer only has parts for newer bikes, & my contact at S.A can't help (I live about five miles from the Raleigh factory but this sort of information is hard to find!)




Subject: RUDGE CLUBMAN
Entered on: May 30, 1999 01:38
Entered by: ART (stregesmith@uswest.net)

Message:
I HAVE A RUDGE CLUBMAN WITH AN OLDER SIMPLEX HAND-PULL FRONT DERAILLEUR AND THE COLLAPSING SPRING DERAILLEUR ON THE REAR. IT HAS FENDER OR RACK BRAZE-ONS, ACTUALLY OD HALF-CIRCLES ABOUT A THIRD OF THE WAY UP THE FORK AND REAR STAYS. ANY KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THIS BIKE JOUT THERE?




Subject: Re: 1969 Raleigh - Decals/Transfers
Entered on: May 30, 1999 17:52
Entered by: Fran ()

Message:
Back in January there was a post on this list regarding a source in England for various bicycle transfers (decals). I received a copy of the list of available transfers, but have never ordered any so I can't say anything about the quality or service. Here's the name of the company that sells the transfers (the "best time to call, etc. is from the list). H. LLOYD CYCLES 2 Craven Park Menston, Ilkley West Yorkshire LS29 6EQ Telephone/Answerphone/fax 01943 879303 BEST time to phone is 8.30-10.30 A.M. If you wish to skip the lengthy message press " * " on your phone If you want to fax press "start" once phone has answered




Subject: Raleigh decals--RICHARD
Entered on: May 31, 1999 12:16
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Richard--Raleigh decals< I have a 1972 Raleigh tourist. It has the word "RALEIGH" in capital letters, in gold, on the chainguard. "Made in England" in gold, script, on top bar; downtube has RALEIGH, in all caps, with serifs; and on the seat tube, beween the seat and sprocket, are two white-gold-white bands, with the Raleigh crest in the center. I hope this is of some value to you. Kevin




Subject: 1978 Raleigh Competition for sale
Entered on: May 31, 1999 20:56
Entered by: al (clztyup@pacbell.net)

Message:
I have a 1978 Raleigh "Competition" for sale. I'm searching for best offers.......or even if you want to email me and give me a ballpark on its value. this bike only has ~50 miles on it.




Subject: Dunelt and Hercules
Entered on: Jun 1, 1999 08:11
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
This weekend I spent some hours cleaning and comparing my '65 Dunelt to my recently acquired '70 Hercules. I've had the Dunelt a year, and was pleased to find that what I thought was rust on some of the smaller parts was just road grime. It's in much better shape than I thought -- all of the chrome cleans right up. Anyway, in comparing the two bikes, I noticed subtle indications of cost-saving and cheapening on the '70 Hercules -- the brakes are not polished smooth, the lock nut on the headset is not chromed, and the fork ends on the Hercules were made by flattening the ends of the tubes whereas the Dunelt's are brazed fork ends (the fork on the Dunelt resembles the DL-1's). Did this cheapening continue until the line died? I recall some debate a while back on whether the chrome fenders are original. I say the ones on the Hercules must have been -- th matching chrime chain guard has the Hersules decal on it, with a small AMF sticker next to it. But were the last of the Raleigh 3-speeds really trashy? I also took the Dunelt out on a wonderful 25-mile jaunt on Sunday. I love these bikes. No apologies to the religious among you -- this was my Sunday morning worship service out on the road and bike path. Last year I picked up several old Schwinns at garage sales -- these are kids bikes and more or less terrible as riders. I've now sold most of them. More and more I've come to admire the riding qualities -- efficiency and comfort -- of the Brit 3-speeds, along with their austere beauty. Up to this point, I've never considered myself a collector, although I have about 30 or so old bikes. But the Brit bikes are truly works of utilitarian art, and more than worthy for collecting. So now I'm commited to chasing the Holy Grails -- fine, older Raleighs, Humbers, Rudges and Sunbeams, dynohubs and all. God save the Queen!




Subject: Trashy Raleighs
Entered on: Jun 1, 1999 21:16
Entered by: Warren ()

Message:
I picked up a 1978 Raleigh Superbe a couple of weeks ago...they were still as fine a 3 speed as you could hope to find. Raleigh pattern rims, chainguard bolt bossess, (3 of them!), threaded fender eyelets, cable stops, keyed fork lock...the list goes on! Definitely a prince among bikes!




Subject: Free to a good home--Newton, Massachusetts
Entered on: Jun 1, 1999 23:52
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
I found an abandoned ladys 1940s Raleigh roadster, but I have no use for it nor room to keep it. It has rusty 26 inch Westwood rims, rod brakes, K series hub. I believe it dates from WW2, 'cause the cranks and brake linkages are painted black rather than chromed. It also has a dynohub but no light. I would like to see it go to somebody who would appreciate it and either ride or restore it, not part it out. I WILL NOT SHIP THIS, ya gotta pick it up at my house. It's in good working condition, except for not having any lights.




Subject: Raleigh Sprite with Huret
Entered on: Jun 2, 1999 00:50
Entered by: Nick (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Anyone have much experience with the Huret Allvit derailleur on the Raleigh Sprite? Got a $28 bargain recently but it needed some work - have replaced the gear cable and chain, and aded three bushings to center the freewheel better. It actually rides and shifts very reliably now, but she's a hard shifter compared to my Suntour on the Raleigh Record. Anyone have any experience with these - is it normal for them to shift hard; is there any simple adjustment or something? I'm more of a three-speed man, so this beastie is new to me. Thanks for any help!




Subject: Keith's $20 Hercules
Entered on: Jun 2, 1999 10:11
Entered by: Clyde ()

Message:
Hey Keith, like Stephen previously noted, you got taken. I recently picked up a 1970 turquoise Hercules woman's frame bicycle at a thrift store for only $15!!!!!!!! It also has some nice touches, but definitely not the details as my pair of his and hers 1973 Raleigh Sports. These Hercules fork ends are also flattened like an undated Armstrong (s.n. 1476189). For dating purposes, it's got a S-A 40-hole hub stamped 70-11. The frame serial number is 2040725. It has a chainring with R M I cut-out letters. Them must have saved a few coins by not chroming the 32-hole front hub and by using the box-type rims. Since the Bates Dunlop Lightweight (original?) tires and the paint are in good shape, it must have been stored inside and rarely ridden. Anyway Keith, enjoy riding your find and keep a look out for those 3-speed bargains.




Subject: The Spending Limit for Sports
Entered on: Jun 2, 1999 10:35
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Clyde and Stephen: Thanks for the learned advice on spending limits, though my question was, of course, tongue-in-cheek. Nonetheless, I think I'll set $20 as the upper limit for sports bikes, unless they're pre-70s and/or very deluxe. Clyde, does your lady's Herc have the chrome mudguards? I wonder if the chrome guards on AMF imports were an attempt to appeal to American buyers more accustomed to flashier cruisers and the like. Anyway, you've inspired me to check the local Salvation Army store over the lunch hour. By the way, on each of the three occassions I've bought a Brit three-speed at a garage sale, the seller has given me a bogus story about buying the bike in England. Anyone else ever encounter this kind of imaginative salesmanship? I probably just look gullible, especially as I stand there, drooling over a bike, with a ten or twenty dollar bill in plain view. Lastly, I wish Sheldon would reconsider his all-caps position on not shipping that lady's roadster -- I'd definately restore it for my wife.




Subject: Keith's bike
Entered on: Jun 2, 1999 13:53
Entered by: Chris S. (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Boy- Keith, that's a good one. I got my DL-1 by going to Germany and riding as fast as I could, and by the time I got to the giant ramp in France, I had enough speed to jump it, and I landed in um,,,New York! I brought a lunch on the rear rack and a warm jacket and it was easy! hehe. I always hear that from people. They just want to make the bike sound better than if they bought it at their neighborhood shop. Speaking of which.. Does anyone know th eapproximate value of a WWII BSA rod model with it's war grade tyres and original seat in very good condition with Lucas generator lights and a ladies Phillips from 1948? That' sa 26'' with rods as well- the BSA is a 28". I may need to sell the two but really should keep them together. Any ideas gang? THese are nice old bikes. I must fund my trip across the pond.




Subject: Salvation bikes
Entered on: Jun 2, 1999 16:48
Entered by: Mark R ()

Message:
Hey! My very first 3 speed was a Hercules in the guise of an AMF that I got at a Salvation Army store for $15. It was all black, all original, and good as new, though I had to REALLY clean it. Subsequently, I always hit the Salvation Army stores. Any one near the one in Lancaster Pa. should check the one there as they had several really nice three speeds, and a racing bike the last time I was there.




Subject: Thrift Shops
Entered on: Jun 2, 1999 21:16
Entered by: Kevin (lrdg@yahoo.com)

Message:
I was gonna suggest that we might list some of our favorite thrift stores. But on seciond thought I don't know if I want to generate more competition for the roadsters that show up at my favorites. I sort of hope that the rest of the US stay on their mountain bikes or whatever is fashonable at the moment and leave the vintage brits to those who understand. While I'm here perhaps someone can explain to me why I'm seeing mountain bikes being used more and more for what we old suckers used to call touring. Surely pushing around those supension systems can't be a good time. There are a bunch of road bike out there for what I believe to be bargain prices so money can't be the issue. Is it only fashion?




Subject: WTB or trade for two 36h 28" Westwood rims...
Entered on: Jun 3, 1999 00:23
Entered by: calvert (cycletruck@aol.com)

Message:
Can you help me out? Turns out all mine are 40h and 32h.....i'll take a single rims too......i'm building a couple of wheels for a bike to ride at the Wheelmen meet later this month......email me or i can be reached at 816/363/4418 evenings and 816/274/8060 at work.......Thanks.




Subject: Raleugh 3 speed
Entered on: Jun 3, 1999 10:45
Entered by: Mike (lytspeed@bright.net)

Message:
A friend wants to sell two 1965 Raleigh 3 speed touring bikes. He bought them new and they are in almost as-new condition. 28" wheels. Rod-actuated brakes. Man's and Ladies matched pair. Does anyone have any idea as to a value for them? Might they be worth $250 for the pair? Mike




Subject: Raleugh 3 speed
Entered on: Jun 3, 1999 10:57
Entered by: Mike (lytspeed@bright.net)

Message:
A friend wants to sell two 1965 Raleigh 3 speed touring bikes. He bought them new and they are in almost as-new condition. 28" wheels. Rod-actuated brakes. Man's and Ladies matched pair. Does anyone have any idea as to a value for them? Might they be worth $250 for the pair? Mike




Subject: Fashion
Entered on: Jun 3, 1999 13:31
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Kevin: I think it is fashion, in this case spawned by marketing by bike companies, plus the Gen-X image of life as a Mountain Dew commercial. So, essentially, a whole generation has been brought up to think mountain bikes are it. Too bad. A dealer once quoted me trade figures on the percentage of mountain bikes that actually ever see dirt, and although a can't remember the exact number, it was very low, like 1% to 3%. Personally, I'd be happy to share whatever sources I find in this forum, but then I live in Central Ohio where no one thinks of anything as elegant as a Brit three speed -- so there is no competition for me even if I was worried about it. I too am glad that it's too esoteric to be widely popular. The whole thing with the Schwinn StingRays and Phantoms makes me kinda sick: the prices are ridiculous, and let's face it, they're all lumbering, unrideable kids bikes anyway. So, yeah, let's keep it quiet and we'll have plenty more throw-away and $10-$20 Brit three speeds available for many years. But then again, I'd like to see more people come to appreciate such fine bicycles, and RIDE them. One last thing -- I noticed Raleigh UK has SA three-speeds in its line. Are these new for '99, and are they made in England (I assume China, right)?




Subject: stinky ol' mountain bikes
Entered on: Jun 3, 1999 16:01
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Keith I agree with Kevin or vice versa. It's the "thing" to have a mountain bike, though I am myself guilty as I ride my mountain bike to work on occasions and I put slicks on it for speed, and personally it's a nice quick ride, and it's about 5 miles to work, 10 min in the car, so it's a relief and I don't hurt my mistress er, Raleigh I mean. That's ok, though, more tasty 3-speeds for us, eh? I think it's like this SUV craze which I hate, no offense if anyone has one but they're uneccessary! Really- does one need 4wd to get groceries? It seems all the idiots are buying them up too, and poor old me in my old Morris will get crushed! It's all a fashion statement. The fact of the matter is we're just one step cooler. hahaha




Subject: Keith - Hercules found in trash
Entered on: Jun 3, 1999 16:14
Entered by: Clyde ()

Message:
Hey Keith, eat your $20-limit heart out, I just found a discarded black Hercules this morning on trash day while out walking the dogs! Previous owner had replaced the S-A with Shimano 3-speed hub, so don't know the approximate age. But with a s.n. of 3770247 it's younger than the lady's turquoise AMF Herc (no it did not have chrome fenders or chainguard, Keith) previously mentioned. The new "free" Herc had chrome fenders, but not original, probably 27-inch size, so the rails had been squashed to get fenders closer to 26-inch tires. Hey guys, I don't want to give out all my secrets, but have you checked the scrap yards for old frames, parts, wheels, etc.? I was buying frames for 10-cents-a-pound and alloy wheels for $1.00 each! That was until the junk yard staff figured they could go into the bicycle recycling business themselves. Anyway, I was just happy to divert usuable bikes (mostly old 3-speeds) away from the local steel mill. I still drop by occasionally with the hope of finding a discarded titanium frame for 10-cents a pound. With spare parts, I should have the black Herc ready for riding soon. How much will you give me for it Keith?




Subject: Raleigh touring bikes!!!
Entered on: Jun 3, 1999 16:39
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Gimme!!! Gimmme!!! Gimmmmmmeee!!!!!$250 for the pair? Definatly! Any others?




Subject: Fountain pens go with these bikes
Entered on: Jun 4, 1999 11:44
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Okay, for $20 the bike should be in near new condition. My men's Herc fits that. This morning I went to about ten garage sales and two thrift stores. It was a bust. Yesterday was great, though. An old secretary of mine found 1936 a Parker Vacumatic fountain pen in her grandfather's drawer. She gave it to me. I had lost a nearly identical fountain pen a year ago -- I'd written with it for five years and it was my favorite. These things just come your way when the time is right. The nice bikes I've found are ones I've basically stumbled into. Use the Force, Luke. Anyway, has anyone seen the new Raleigh UK "Chiltern"? It's equiped with Sturmey-Archer 3-Speed hub. Full length silver mudguards. Alloy propstand pump. Costs 170 pounds. Or is this old news?




Subject: Hooked on Raleigh
Entered on: Jun 4, 1999 14:58
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
Thanks to my purshase of a Raleigh mountain bike I've discovered how much fun this hobby is. However I'm living in a place littered with dept. store 3-speeds. You guys have inspired to keep on digging through the junk. Someday that DL-1 will be waiting for me. Thanks from Texas.




Subject: Triumph Roadster
Entered on: Jun 6, 1999 19:14
Entered by: Phil ()

Message:
Can anyone out there tell me how to find out the age, value and avaiability of parts for a Triumph ladies bicycle, probably 1950's, excellent shape but faded paint. It uses 28 by 1 3/4 tires and both a coaster rear brake and a front brake that is linked with a rod and pulls up against the inside of the rim. A lovely bike to ride and still in use, inherited by my sister. I'm interested in availability of tires somewhere near me in PEI, Canada. Any idea of the value of this bike?




Subject: English Roadsters??
Entered on: Jun 6, 1999 19:39
Entered by: Howard (hmurrill@ix.netcom.com)

Message:
I'm looking for a quick education. When you say "English Roadsters," do you mean made in England or English style? Is a Roadster the same as a touring bike? Are all English Roadsters vintage bikes or are they still being manufactured? What are the most popular brands of English Roadsters? Can anybody clear my brain fog? (I found an excellent place to buy old bikes cheap, but I'm not telling where!!!) Howard




Subject: Spent the limit again
Entered on: Jun 6, 1999 20:08
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Saqturday I found a Raleigh Sports for $25, but talked the guy into $20. Uncertain about the date because there's no date stamp on the hub. Serial number 12050, I'm guessing mid-70s by the decals and the 36/36 wheels. It's a 23", which is great because it fits me better than the smaller frames. It has a cool kickstand -- two legged, called a Trygg, from Sweden. The deep olivew green paint is very good, a dozen or so small paint blems. Tires are unworn. Brooks B-72 not broken in. Other details indicate this was a better model than the Herc or Dunelt I have -- welded mudguard stays, nicer rims, dimpled fork, pump pegs, etc. Rode abot ten miles on it with my 5-year-old on a Trail-A-Bike attached to it. Just got back from a sweltering 20. It runs great. I too have picked bikes from the trash, but isn't it nice to buy one cheap that only needs air in the tyres?




Subject: Keith's Sports
Entered on: Jun 6, 1999 22:13
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Hey, You Go Boy!! Yep there is a certain warm fuzzy feling about actuallY BUYING a classic bicycle, as opposed pinching one out of someones trash(I've done both, felt dirty after the later). Enjoy the new toy!




Subject: hercules
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 06:07
Entered by: gary (dragon2@voyager.co.nz)

Message:
hello > from new zealand > I just aquired a hercules bicycle ,not sure what model ,year it is ? but details are as follows: colour black >name in front sprocket eg: where pedals are is the formed word hercules (like wrought iron work)it has a huge! seat with 4 big springs under it (looks > like an old henry brown tractor seat )ha ha no its not the actual tractor > seat.it has gear lever on handel bars with positions (high) (neautral) (low) on it ,with the words : oswaldtwistle lodge eng.co.,on th gear change and the wire goes to the center of rear hub , to a small chain wich pulls in and out to change gears. > Rear brake is like that of a motor bike drum brake with hub lock arm > attached to frame.On front of bike just above forks is the badge it reads: > (Big letter H in middle) and around the out side of h is " THE HERCULES > CYCLE & MOTOR Co. " and curving around the bottom of H is " BRITTANIA WK3 BIRMINGHAM " excuse my spelling on names if there not exact. > it has large tyres and mudguards




Subject: Tapping a hole to install an oil cap in bottom bracket
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 08:58
Entered by: Chuck ()

Message:
Does anybody have any idea if it would be foolhardy to drill and tap my bottom bracket so that I could install an oil cap? My daily rider is a 1963 "Western Flyer" with a TCW III rear hub. My front hub and obviously the Sturmey Archer take oil, and I've been fooling around with an old York that has an oil cap on the bottom bracket. It would seem that installing an oil cap in the bottom bracket would just about make the Western Flyer perfect. Is there any reason not to do this? Are the oil lubricated bottom brackets in any way different from the non-oil lubricated ones (besides the oil cap that is)? Any ideas would be appreciated. It wouldn't be hard to do and I've got a small supply of caps so why not.....




Subject: SA hub on a 28"wheel
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 13:11
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeprojec.com)

Message:
Anyone know where I can get a SA 3speed built onto a 28" wheel. I'd like to change over one of the Shanghai Forever single speeds to a three speed hub set up. However, I only have 40 and 32 hole rims and understand the SA hub requires a 36 holer. I would consider trading one of my new bikes for the hub and wheel. Also, I've got some 26" rims to sell (for rod brakes).




Subject: mtn bikes
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 13:24
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
Also, about the mtn bike craze. It's true, SUVs and mtn bikes for the masses. I live in central Idaho where it's winter 7-8 mos a year. I've gotten along just fine with a front wheel drive station wagon. Up here people need suv's for all their toys. Mtn biking is a great sport here, but people who just ride the bike path should be on roadsters. The bike biz is going through some pains right now in that mtn bike sales are flat. I see promotions more and more this year for what are called "leisure bikes". They still have 18 speeds, no fenders or cargo carriers or chaincases, but one sits upright, roadster fashion. What bike shops tell me is that most American riders don't need fenders or chaincases because they don't ride in the rain and wear shorts so no need for a gear case. Problem as I see it is the roads here really are dangerous and scary for most people. I've been a road rider for decades, but it can still be scary. Anyway, I think more people will be on quality roadster style bikes down the road here.(no pun intended).




Subject: 28-inch wheel
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 14:11
Entered by: JohnD (jdemer@intrepid.net)

Message:
Steve...I put a new Sturmey 3-speed hub with roller brake (model ATV3) on a 28-inch rim. This particular Sturmey hub requires a 36-hole rim. To my (limited, don't trust me) knowledge, the non-brake hubs on my Raleigh Sports are 40 hole. On the front of my bike I've put a Shimano Nexave modulator hub that I ordered from Sheldon (at Harris Cyclery). As I said to Sheldon, I commute on the towpath of the C&O Canal about ten miles each way to and from work. I got tired of fiddling with rod brakes. I got front and rear hubs with internal brakes and rims to match. My daily ride is simply elegant, no other word for it, with the DL's long (nearly 46-inch) wheelbase and 28-inch wheels. Sheldon has the Raleigh and Shimano hubs; you might have to look around for 36-hole, 28-inch rims. The effort is worth it. As an aside, I've ordered my fron and rear fenders from you. After I put them on I'll send a photo. Thanks for all you, Sheldon, JimB, Nick Nichols, and Martin have done to advance the sheer pleasure of riding roadsters....




Subject: Keith's NEW $20 Raleigh Sports
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 15:49
Entered by: clyde ()

Message:
Hey Keith, congratulations on your latest $20 aquisition. While you were out having fun riding over the weekend, I was scraping and sanding rust off that "free" Hercules found in the trash. Then I couldn't find a working can of primer spray paint! So, except for the fact that I enjoy resurrecting old bikes, it may not worth one's time overhauling lower-end bikes like a Hercules, if rideable ones are available within your price range. But you guys already know that. Just enjoy the ride or the work.




Subject: Leather Strap around SA hub
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 16:17
Entered by: Nick (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Recently found an AW hub in a 26-inch wheel with a three-cog freewheel for conversion to a 9-speed. Question is: it came with a strange leather strap around the hub. Not sure if this had any purpose at all. Anyone ever see or hear of such a thing? Thanks! Nick




Subject:
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 16:39
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Hey all, Hi Nick- regarding your question about the leather strap, that is a hub polisher and they usually had a reflector weighing it down, though I don't know how well the reflector worked when a car was behind you.. My wife has a set on her Blue Ribbon (pre-war) and they actually work great! Cheers! Chris S




Subject: Raleigh Sports and Superbe for sale.
Entered on: Jun 7, 1999 20:30
Entered by: Bill (Wakers3883@aol.com)

Message:
Have a 74 Mens Sports mint and absolutely brand new for sale.21 Inch frame Green with gold pinstripes.Never been on the road.$300 plus shipping.72 Superbe,excellent shape,original new tires new pump.Everything works,beautiful.$250 plus shipping.




Subject: $300 -- wow!
Entered on: Jun 8, 1999 09:44
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Holy Cow! $300 for a mint Sports! I'm not questioning the price, but if it's really is worth that much, it shows it pays to check garage sales. My green 70s 23" Sports is not mint, but its genuinely excellent -- the paint blems are merely signs of having been banged around in a garage a bit. I rode it to work today. Best commuting bike so far. With the taller frame I actually have the bars higher than the seat -- great position for looking out over traffic. Someone Emailed me saying the Raleigh Chiltern, equiped with 3-speed Sturmy Archer, is made in Nottingham. I was under the mistaken impression that Pashley was the only current Brit maker of 3-speeds. Also, I have Serena Beeley's "A History of Bicycles." She's a Brit, and her book focuses on English bikes. Nice Raleigh posters, pics of old, old Rudges, Humbers, Sunbeams. Interesting, rambling narrative on Raleigh and Sturmey-Archer history. Anyone else looked at this one?




Subject: Leather CLEANING strap
Entered on: Jun 8, 1999 11:34
Entered by: Nick (4accord@bendnet.com)

Message:
Thanks, Chris and Howard, for your replies to my question about the strap. Makes perfect sense. Howard, tried to answer your note but the address bounced, so here's what I wrote you: What you say makes perfect sense and that hub (dated 62) is VERY clean! I didn't get my first three-speed till 1961, and I'd just never seen such a thing before. To my great surprise, that piece of leather is actually in good shape, too. All the best!




Subject: DL-1 kickstand
Entered on: Jun 8, 1999 13:20
Entered by: kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Did the Raleigh DL-1, 28-inch Roadster have a kickstand? I have two of them and neither one has a kickstand. It seems the rear rod-brake mechanism would interfere. Perhaps a rear clamp-on model was used. Thanks!




Subject: Raleigh Chiltern
Entered on: Jun 8, 1999 17:59
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
I checked out this Chiltern, and I don't think it could be concidered a Roadster. It looks like a city/hybrid modified to do the same job as a Roadster. Check it out here http://www.raleighbikes.com/bikes/bikes/index.htm any comments?




Subject: roadster?
Entered on: Jun 8, 1999 18:38
Entered by: Chris S. ()

Message:
Well if you wan tto get picky, it is by today's standards but I certainly would no tcompare it to th eclassics of the past, btu I do like th efact that it still has the SA shifter! What do you guys think?




Subject: Leather Strap around SA hub and DL-1 kickstands
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 00:18
Entered by: Chuck Fred (fredlud@aol.com)

Message:
That leather strap you have on the rear hub is to keep outside of the the hub clean, I have seen thick twine work also. I have seen a groove filed out of a kickstand to make room for the linkage to the rear brake but kickstands are available.




Subject: Bike Values
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 07:39
Entered by: Bill (Wakers3883@aol.com)

Message:
Golly Moses Keith what do you think a mint Sports should go for? 75 or maybe a big 100 bucks.You must be living in a dream world.Entry level mountian bikes go for over 300 on up to the thousands.Buy the way I think the Sports is sold,thanks for your input anyway.




Subject: Bike Values
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 09:35
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
In other "vintage" hobbies I've been involved with (fountain pens, cameras, pocketknives, stereo cards, postcards), I've encountered the same three types: enthusiasts (those who just like the stuff), "serious" collectors (real historians, and those who buy as an investment), and DEALERS. I'm really glad I don't have to make money at this. And I'd hate to see this go the way of the Schwinn Stingrays and Balloon bikes. Horribly overinflated prices. Ever visit the Schwinn site? Or for that matter the Menotomy Middleweight and Ballooner discussion? Some weird, greedy, and perhaps not completely honest people there. And of course dealers and "serious" collectors have a vested interest in seeing prices go up and up and up. Here, let me help you revolutionize pricing of all vintage bikes. For any bike less than 50 years old, take the price when new, then adjust it up for inflation to reflect today's dollars. Double it if the bike is truly rare or historically significant. Any higher than that and we're getting into the Beanie Baby phenomenon. Holy $$$$$ Batman!




Subject: Re: English roadster?
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 10:22
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
"Howard" asked: When you say "English Roadsters," do you mean made in England or English style? Is a Roadster the same as a touring bike? The name of this discussion group is a bit misleading, because most of the bikes discussed are _not_ roadsters. A true roadster has rod brakes (either rim or drum) and usually 28 inch wheels. Roadsters have slack frame angles, usually around 68 degrees parallel. The "sports" type 3-speeds, sometimes referred to by the horrible misnomer "English racer" are not roadsters, but they're wonderful bikes. For more on this, see my Web page on English 3-speeds at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english-3.html --Sheldon Brown




Subject: Re: Tapping a hole to install an oil cap in bottom bracket
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 10:26
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
You don't need to tap a hole for oil lubrication with a typical English 3-speed; just drip the oil down the seatpost. --Sheldon Brown P.S. to previous message: Roadsters are still made in England by Pashley, big bucks. They are also made in very large numbers for the domestic market in China and India. The roadster is the standard bicycle in those countries to this day.




Subject: Need a Rudge?
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 10:26
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
No, I'm not going to jump on the inflated-price bandwagon, but I don't want to give this thing away, either! I'm running out of space, and need to sell off some of my bikes. Have a black 1963 Rudge Sports DeLuxe (fenders, pump, dynohub/lights, partial chainguard) in VG condition; new tires, new B66. Offers? Prefer interested party pick it up (I'm within 15 mi. of NYC) rather than even think about shipping it! Pretty bike, no rusty chrome. I dunno....what's it worth?.....Chris




Subject: DL-1 kickstanddd
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 10:49
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Kevin: I don't know if DL-1's had a kickstand available but all the old English movies usually show bikes leaning against something. I mounted a Greenfield kickstand on my DL-1. I'm not sure if it required a mod to the stand and I don't have access to the bike at present but it was no problem as I recall. A pet peave of mine is the attitude by a lot of bike riders, particularly owners of road bikes that kickstands are for low end bikes only. I'm not a lightness freak and I have a few good quality road bikes and all of them have Greenfield kickstands. My Fuji also has a flic stand to keep the front wheel on center so it can be safely leaned against a wall but I use it only when doing maintenance on a stand.




Subject: Bike Values
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 10:53
Entered by: Bill (Wakers3883@aol.com)

Message:
Keith,I dont need your help in fixing the value of any bike I have,after all who are you,the great bike authority or something.In any hobby there are those know it alls that think they are the last word on everything.




Subject: Bike prices and other offenses
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 11:58
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Whoa, Bill, don't get me wrong. $300 might be a perfect price! And I don't claim to be an expert. Sheldon Brown is clearly the expert around here, along with a few others, perhaps including you. But I've been cycling since 1970, and buying, selling, and fixing bikes since then, but not to make money. I do it because I love it. I fix bikes and sell low, and give bikes away, to get more people interested. Nothing wrong with making money -- just keep it fair. How much was a Raleigh Sports new in 1974? About $100? (Sheldon sold the lowly Phillips model for $38.50 in 1972). If so, your $300 is probably fine. I just don't want to see readily available, mass-produced albeit beautiful Brit 3-speeds go the route of StingRays et al., which seem to go for about $700-$1200 now. And don't be so sensitive -- what do you have to defend, a bike-selling business? I don't.




Subject: Yikes
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 13:43
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Aw c'mon fellers, put those six guns away and come to the chow wagon and have some vittles! Personally I think we're above that here, aren't we? We all appreciate old bikes as a whole here, and we give each other good deals, and are honest and fair. I think that's why I keep talking to you guys, you're above all that "collector" sell a dl-1 for a million dollars. I admit, I hoard Raleighs, but if any of you guys wanted one, I' d kick one down for super- cheap, and I have the feeling you would too. Mark R is living proof- he sent my brother one N/C! I don't think we'll get caught in this beanie baby thing, but keep your guard up, there's visigoths at the gate! Yours- Sturmey the Archer




Subject: Yikes indeed
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 15:00
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Chris, I'm with you -- I don't care to debate it more in this forum which is, after all, not a selling forum. Besides, anyone who visits this site regularly surely knows where to get these bikes at the rock-bottom wholesale price. So peace, brother.




Subject: Raleigh eyebolts
Entered on: Jun 9, 1999 19:03
Entered by: kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Does anyone out there have a couple of the flattened eyebolts that go on the rear hub of an old Raleigh DL-1, and the little steel caps for them? They keep the hub from slipping forward, loosening the chain. Thanks in advance for digging through your parts bin. Roadsters Forever!




Subject: oh my!
Entered on: Jun 10, 1999 00:15
Entered by: claudia ()

Message:
Well, I have been away for awhile and see that the topics are mainly geared (pardon the pun and I hope no one will take offense) to grease freaks and accountants. I,personally and perhaps others would like to hear lyrical descriptions of fabulous spring rides on our great English bikes. Picnics? Great place discoveries? Tips for various states? Accounts of "yo good lookin' bike" yelled at you? I ain't Miss Manners, but perhaps we should devote more time to English Roadster Conversation. Just a thought for you romantics...enquiring minds want to know.




Subject: Raleigh handlebar grips
Entered on: Jun 10, 1999 09:48
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I needed another 22 inch frame Raleigh sports like a hole in the head. However, when I saw these awesome, thick spongy grey rubber Raleigh handlebar grips with the R.I. stamp on them.I had to have them!! You don't see these type of grips too often, and if you do happen to find an enclosed guard it is usually missing the slide pieces. I did a complete overhaul and now it rides like new. guards and thick grips.I love these bikes.




Subject: Kevin-DL 1 kickstands
Entered on: Jun 10, 1999 10:35
Entered by: Clarence (-)

Message:
Kevin, the DL1 definitly had a kickstand! The earlier models had a Raleigh alloy propstand down by the bottom bracket.A wide variety of rear racks were made with drop down V- type stands that snapped up into the rack.(yes, for 28 inch wheels, too) You do not see these here in the U.S.A too often, but they were made.The later Swiss made Pletcher kick stands were also designed to slip under the rear rod brake linkage without impeding it. Pletcher also made rear racks for the DL1 with long stays for the 28 inch wheel. Some of these attached to the seat stay bolts. While others to the rear axle.The earlier bikes had steel racks made by Raleigh, Ashby,Princip,Midland,and Brooks.(who still make the seats)Hard to find items are: racks,side braces for racks,large leather bags,bells, and mudflaps.(long alloy kickstands with the stamp of Sir Walter Raleigh are also prized) Front racks were also made but are seldom seen.The Pletscher double kickstand will not fit a DL1, as they did not think of the rod brake bikes when it was designed.Check Bike-a-log computer at your local shop or ask them to have a bike rep look for you.




Subject: Raleigh racks
Entered on: Jun 10, 1999 11:15
Entered by: Chris S (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Might I also add to what Clarence had to say- I wanted a rack on my DL-1, but finding that rear rack is next to impossible if not just plain impossible. I found a good looking replacement. Here it is. Take a standard Raleigh rack th epressed metal type, and mount it to the frame at the top, an das for the legs, you need an aircraft part which I can grab for anyone who wants to do this. I believe the part is AN-3305 but don't quote me. It is a hose clamp type piece with a tab on th eside with a hole drilled into it, and this piece is insulated by a hose-like insulator. It's rubber and looks quite nice. this will mount the legs to the bike frame and though this may sound cheesy and poorly thought out, I did it while learning aircraft repair in college, and I have to tell you it's a clean solution! the tab on this piece will take a small ring which I put on, and I use these rings to hook onto when I put my bungee (black to match) on the bike. If anyone would like to try this, I'll send you the pieces I get at sky ranch and photocopies of my bike for reference. Honestly, it looks good, adn won't damage our beloved mistresses, erm raleighs. Cheers Chris




Subject: Re: Raleigh Racks
Entered on: Jun 10, 1999 19:38
Entered by: Philip ()

Message:
If I understand what you mean, Chris S, you're referring to mounting the bottom of the rack to the seat stays. Right? One of the racks for our old Mercury sports is meant to do this and, if the original mounting clamps are missing, you can often get some from someone who has bought good quality full fenders from Esge or, I think, Zefal. These fenders come with nice rubberized seat-stay clamps that go to waste because most bikes have mounting eyelets on the drop-outs. Cheers, Phil.




Subject: seat stays
Entered on: Jun 10, 1999 19:56
Entered by: Chris S. ()

Message:
Phillip- BINGO! You got it exactly, but I used airplane parts heheh. I never thought of going to a shop for that. Note to self; check the local bike shop before scouring city..... Cheers!




Subject: HERCULES
Entered on: Jun 10, 1999 20:21
Entered by: gary (dragon2@voyager.co.nz)

Message:
help some one out there must know about hercules bikes 1936 era or be able to send me a url to a site that does ,i need to find out all i can so i can paint it with the right colours figure out where to mount the gear change and what tpye of hand brake to fit help help help cheers




Subject: rubberized clamps for racks
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 09:48
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
A good place to get rubberized clamps is your local hardware store.The bike shop may have it also.The big hardware stores that have everything are the best bet.




Subject: Riding is the best part
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 10:16
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Claudia: You're point is well-taken. My soon-to-be six year old daughter rides a Trail-A-Bike attached to my recently-acquired Sports, and we love riding together. We sing, tell stories and jokes, and stop for a meal and/or ice cream at the end. I have noticed lately that people do notice the DL-1, Dunelt, and Sports. There are 100s or 1000s of Brit 3-speeds languishing in garages here, based on my garage sale experience, but I seldom see anyone else riding one. (Twice least year, and I'm on the bike path at least three times per week). People with no bike expertise have remarked that the DL-1 must be an old bike. The Trail-A-Bike gets lots of smiles, even though these are becoming more common here. Every time I ride these bikes it lifts my spirits! Hope it does the same for all of you.




Subject: Racks for 28 inch wheel Roadsters,thoughts in general.
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 11:17
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Things I would like to see made and offered at bike swap meets or through a small mail order company: Well made racks for 28 inch roadsters, nice rubber grips in black, grey, and red. slide pieces and "pie plates" for enclosed guards. L shape seat posts, plastic "dress guards" for the rear fender that keep mud off of you.( It fitted over the rear fender and attached to the chainstay) They made them in black, green, and red,(How about a white reflective type fender cover that keeps me from getting mowed down one summer night?) Who makes a reflective rain coat that can be stowed into my bike bag easily? It is time for a nice cotton duck cycle bag I do not have to send away for, something reasonably priced, at my local shop. I met a cyclist who would kill before giving up his English bag.Why can't I get one easily? I am sick of nylon,it rots,is not waterproof and it does not look right on the back of my DL1! WHY DO I HAVE TO GO INSANE LOOKING FOR TRANSFER DECALS?WHY IS THIS SO DIFFICULT? I have some beautiful machines awaiting decals!! I think there must be a good number of people who love these classic bikes and want to restore them.One fellow wrote back saying"Don't hold your breath, they were all burned deliberatly to create space" or are in a landfil still in origonal packaging! Another terrible problem is how to match the paint and not destroy the value of the bike. What is stopping us from bringing these back to glory is matching the origonal paint properly and decals.It costs way too much to have it done at present.Best advice for now is" to ride it as you find it,"(marred decals and all.)Do not destroy the value of your bike.The hobby does not have its act together yet when it comes to restoring Brit bikes.There are a few who do excellent work, but the cost is too high and they won't supply decals unless they get the whole job.Chrome in the U.S. looks diffrent then British chrome and you want everything to match. There needs to be a catalog of available decals and a way to look up serial numbers for Sunbeam, Humber,Phillips etc. Way too much neat information, diagrams, and interesting history is still buried in collectible literature and not easily accessable on the collector pages on the net.This will take time, things are getting better.I find it interesting that most of the cool innovations such as shaft drive were thought up and pantented 100 years ago.




Subject: Riding is indeed the best part
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 11:48
Entered by: Clarence ()

Message:
Riding home after getting ice cream on a summer evening with someone you love,just the two of you.(on matching vintage Raleigh's)All the while enjoying the stars, your path illuminated by the warm glow of your Lucas headlight.Her long red hair wafting in the breeze as you glide down the path.Summer is here, take the bikes out and enjoy yourselves.




Subject: I agree
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 12:30
Entered by: Chris S (silverspecial@rocketmail.com)

Message:
Clarence, I hear ya man! I may have some solutions for you! You know how the standard raleighs have the white section on the rear fender, but our DL-1's don't? Go to a vinyl sign shop and ask for a piece of the reflective stuff in white or silver. cut a round top, an dyou can apply it though I'd take off the reflector and put it on underneath. It's 7 year vinyl, and when you want it to come off it will, with no damage to the bike! My sister works at one of these shops and I tried it on my Superbe, and it's grand! Looks really good! And you're not hurting the originality, because it peels off! Secondly, as far as those nifty English bags what go under your seat for Raleighs, fear not, I won't kill you but I will sell you a spare one I have but the straps to close the bag are cracked a bit, btu everything else is fine! Also, if anyone else wants one of these bags, you can buy them at American cyclery in San Francisco (415) 664 4545. They have NOS parts for old Raleighs and sell DL-1s on occasion. They also have awesome wicker baskets from holland and all kinds of great stuff. If anyone would like me to look for something fo rthem I frequent it a lot when I go to the city. They won't kill you for the bag either. Hope tis helps! Cheers! Chris




Subject:
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 12:31
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Clarence, what are you doing riding with my wife? JK! My wifes a redhead too.




Subject: Decals
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 13:04
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
The most comprehensive supplier of decals I've encountered is Nick T. at Lloyds Cycles in the UK; long list of Raleigh transfers, as well as a lot of arcane Brit bikes I've never heard of. He responds quickly, and the only drawback is that he doesn't take plastic in payment (although US cash is ok). He can be reached at: NICK_AT_LLOYDS@compuserve.com




Subject: Answer for pal Chris S.
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 13:23
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Chris,Yes I am thankful for American Cyclery!They are very helpful, one of the few places to find these things. The reflective fender tip is a change to the look of the bike that can just save your life. Some Raleigh bikes had the white tip and others had all black fenders all the way down.The reflector I have says"Fairylites" the company also made Christmas ornaments! Wicker baskets have just started appearing in the shops, along with 700X35C tubes.Usually though the tires have to be ordered.Very few shops are aware of the size ever was made,let alone carry them in stock. Wheelchair tires are something else people go crazy trying to find. (The redhead said breathlessly that you were away for 2 weeks.) Seriously, I have found bicycle people in the hobby to be first class,decent and helpful.I have met a lot of great people had some good times,and gotten skillful at digging up classics.




Subject: Reflectors
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 15:20
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Clarence: You wax eloquent. The Brit-made canvas and leather saddlebag that came on my DL-1 has a small grommet for mounting a reflector. It's an uncluttered solution that could be added to any saddlebag. Since it's higher I think it's easier to see than one on the fender anyway. It would tragic for your poetic story to end with a car running over you or the fair maiden for lack of a reflector.




Subject: Mounting Reflectors/flashers on B-66 Brooks saddle
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 18:22
Entered by: Clyde ()

Message:
Hey B-66 owners, I shared this safety hint with Chris S, and thought others might be interested. To get the reflector/flasher as high a possible on the rear (of the bike), I replace the lower wire rod (that keeps the springs separated) on my Brooks B-66 saddle with a short length of aluminum angle (4-5/8" long, 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" angle, 1/16" thick). I cut down the top side to miss the twin rails (about 7/8" wide) and use rod as a templet to drill spring bolt holes. On the side that hangs vertically to rear (still 1-1/2" wide) I drill holes to mount a reflector or flasher. Mine is set up for a VistaLite VL300, so I drilled 4 holes - one for the center threaded stud, one large enough to push the on-off button, and the other two for the short "anti-rotation" studs. Get the picture?




Subject: Bags
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 18:49
Entered by: Chris S ()

Message:
Cheers Clarence! I prefer top keep my rear fender black, but I know what you mean! My wife wants me to put so much stuff on her DL-1 that it's going to weigh 5 tons! Sheesh! Now does anyone know how to keep your little black seat bag from hanging at that angle? the third strap dosen't even reach the seat post! Any idears?




Subject: Roadsters rule
Entered on: Jun 11, 1999 21:43
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Claudia's right. Roadster people are a unique race, and we need to share the stories behind our passions. To me there's no cycling experience quite like the DL-1. It's all class and quiet elegance, like the Queen Elizabeth, a Rolls-Royce, a cup of Twining's. I love to wheel that big, black, understated beauty out and get on that seasoned leather Brooks B-66, which was designed to be sat upon, not inserted. Is there any sweeter sound than the lovely clicking of the Sturmey-Archer hub, or the whisper of the rod brakes touching the rims? It's a bike made for long, faithful service, with oil ports and rebuildable pedals. When I'm on my roadster, I feel like a time traveler, a countryman on "All Creatures Great and Small," or Paul McCartney in "A Hard Day's Night." It's an unhurried, stately, comfortable ride. When I was a child, I loved to ride my Sting-Ray. Today, 35 years later, I love to ride my Raleigh. Others can have their horn tanks, springers and banana seats. For a gentle ride after supper, I'll take my Tourist, thank you very much indeed.




Subject: A Hunter Green Bike?!?
Entered on: Jun 12, 1999 20:28
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hi Folks! I am planning on repainting a 1959 Hercules that I baught recently. At one point in time, someone had painted it metalic blue. I was going to paint it the standard black, until I saw a 3-speed painted a deep, dark green at Harrod's Department store in London. Have any of you ever thought of paintng your bikes a dark color other than black? I'm still going to do the white patch and pinnstripes.




Subject: Robin Hood
Entered on: Jun 12, 1999 23:18
Entered by: John Moore (mooreje1@juno.com)

Message:
I cannot add to the technical advice or make tips for anyone, but yo let Steve know he is not alone, I, too, am rebuilding a Robin Hood 3-speed which seems to be pretty much all original. It was built in 1952 and though I thought it was brown at first look, when I rebuilt the bottom bracket I found that it had been a very nice red. I wish you luck, Steve, from near Ithaca, NY, USA




Subject: Roadsters in living color and b&w
Entered on: Jun 12, 1999 23:53
Entered by: calvert (cycletruck@aol.com)

Message:
I've accepted Raleigh's rather limited palette but if i ever decide to repaint one of mine i'd be likely to choose the dark Raleigh green(almost a BRG) or the Raleigh olive(easier to look at than to hear outloud) & maybe leave the fenders black without the rear bandaid........reflectors work just fine. I've got a parabellum Humber that's a good candidate for a through repaint......imagine all green "all-weather" model.....i hear a lot of nonsense(IMHO) about the correct restoration of bicycles......why shouldn't i customize it?.....i did some rass'lin with that issue over a 1910 Peerless i'm restoring to ride at a LAW meet this month....it was black w/white head tube & trailing darts(dags) on the top & down tubes, its been sand blasted & by monday it'll be bright burgandy and later have black & gold pinstripes.....Those pre-balloon Yankee bikes were essentially roadsters.....the adult models had a laid back geometry and 28x1 1/2 tires......in the teens many were sold with the S/A tricoaster hub; Sears offered it as did Mead..................................Today BTW we held the third annual Bloomsday messenger bike ralleye here in Brookside (Kansas City) it gathered at Bloomday Books where there is a Raleigh delivery cycle in the window....we never ride for very long but today the humidity was in the 90's and the temp somewhere in the 80's and there was free stout back at the bookshop......the Ullysses(don't ask me to spell it correctly) reading has been going on non-stop and at midnight--in about an hour-- they're doing a dramatic reading of the book's final pages.......i need to close now, put some air in Vanessa's ('79 DL-1) tires and head over there..... i'm told i'll be reading the part of the villan......




Subject: rear wheel for raleigh bike with lever system brakes
Entered on: Jun 13, 1999 17:46
Entered by: lar (laurence-fuortes@home.com)

Message:
Dear sirs or madams, can anyone help me find a rim or rear wheel for an old raleigh 3 speed with lever system brakes, thanks a lot, Lar fuortes 1119 east court street, iowa city, iowa 52240




Subject: Re: Roadsters in living color
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 00:04
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Calvert wrote: .Those pre-balloon Yankee bikes were essentially roadsters.....the adult models had a laid back geometry and 28x1 1/2 tires..." I can't agree as far as my 1916 Mead Ranger (which Calvert was a great help with) is concerned. Although it was called a "roadster" in the catalogue, I think that was a different meaning of the term from the English usage. Mine is quite sporty, not at all like the quiet dignity of a British roadster. I got mine at the Limie show last year (even though it's American), a very beat-up bike with no wheels nor saddle, bent fork, rusted chrome and rusted chain. The chain clinched it for me, I've wanted something with 1" pitch chain for a while now, and the chain and chainwheel looked serviceable. I put on a couple of lightweight '70s 27" wheels, with a Phil Wood double-sided track hub in back. It's got 1" slicks, I've got it geared 26/8...and this baby flies! I've been riding it a lot lately, partly 'cause of the reverse snob value, but largely because it feels so good...it's really a sweet riding frame. I'll never restore it...it's got the really ugly dregs of the original paint job. If I were to restore the paint, then the rusted handlebars, stem, crank and fork would look awful, so I'd have to replace them, and it still wouldn't be authentic without wooden wheels and a (yuck!) coaster brake...so I'd have to sink hundreds of bucks into a bike I paid $25 for, and then I'd have to be careful about where I park it and worry about scratching the paint all the time... This is not to say that I disaprove of restorations for those who're into that, but this one's a _rider_. I've got a Web page about this bike at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/ranger.html




Subject: A Roadster by any other name . . .
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 10:34
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I was delighted by Sheldon's reference to "reverse status." I too admire those with the skill, time, and money to do full-blown restorations. For myself, a good cleaning of the bike and mechanical work to get it running well is a full retoration. In fact, I like my Dunelt so much precisely because it's a little rough. Every decal is intact, and the chrome polished nicely. But the rims have a rust patina that makes the bike look old and well-used, which it is. It has a warm, real, "ride me" look, as opposed to a "don't touch me I'm a museum piece" look. Also, an Irish friend of mine says that in his country Roadsters are called "Top Floor" bikes. Anyone else encounter this name? I note that Perry's "Bicycle Cult" refers to all upright handlebar bicycles as Roadsters. And, I noticed that Miami Cycle Co. had a 1910 model with drop bars which it called a "Racycle Roadster." I understand we're using the term narrowly to mean 28" wheel British bikes, usually with rod brakes and epicyclic gears, etc..




Subject: Raleigh DL1 Tourist reflectors-Bags
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 11:27
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Every time I find an origonal bag, it needs new leather straps.Visit the local shoe repair store.They have scrap pieces that they can use for straps.For the third seat post strap, make a long one.This way you do not lose the whole bag.These rot a bit and will easily break if you carry tools. You can pack a lot onto a Tourist, provided you have a REAL rack and good bags.Check out all the army surplus stores in your area.I found a store that had these in stock! Large, with heavy duty zippers, and pockets.Kind of like a Swiss Rucksack only for bicycles.Waterproof cotton duck with real chromed leather straps! I drooled as I ran to the check out counter! Just be careful not to cover up any reflectors.These days you need a good L.E.D. light.I once saw in National Geographic a young man in Africa with a large pig tied to the back rack of his DL1,try that with your Pletcher rack!When you do not have a car, and depend on the bike for carrying groceries you will quickly find yourself wishing for something better. You can polish the alloy Pletcher rack with metal polish and make it gleam like chrome.




Subject: Roadster rod handlebar styles
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 11:39
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
The pattern to the DL1 handlebar is called "North Road Raised" My favorite and the most comfortable, however other patterns of rod handlebars have appeared, several diffrent style bends, drop patterns, etc, all with rod linkage.These pop up on the older and harder to find machines.One Raleigh from the 1930's has the most wide bars with a really long stem.Wild!




Subject: Roadster colors
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 12:17
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Raleigh offered the DL1 in black,the main color (usually with the white fender tip) My later 28 in. tourist came in a medium green,There was a Hunter green also. I only have seen the Sports and Superbes (locking fork model)in Silver, Coffee,carmine(flemenco red)Bronze Green,White, and even yellow.(one friend has a ladies model, that she has rented out to people filming t.v commercials! There was a beautiful Royal blue 28 inch roadster years ago, but these are fairly rare. These always had the gold and red box lining(or pinstripes as we call it,only it's really referred to as lining)The tool was a little box with a wheel that the paint ran onto. This can also be applied with a steady hand and a fine Camelhair brush.




Subject: Correction
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 12:58
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Heavens! I said the Dunelts rims were rusted. I had to correct this right away! It's the mudguards that have a rust patina. Knew you were all dying to know. I'm going to check out the Army surplus on the advice of Clarence.




Subject: AFRICAN MOTORIZED DL1 ROADSTERS!!(RALEIGH AFRICA WHIZZER CYCLES??)
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 13:29
Entered by: Extremly crazed Roadster addict (none)

Message:
I was in touch by telephone with a lovely sounding secretary at Raleigh's now defunct Springs, South Africa factory.(This was about 1987) She mentioned that the latest thing was that the firm was producing a MOTORIZED DL1 roadster,double top tube, in Black, and Flemenco(carmine red) Only the mens models were shown.(I am uncertain a ladies DL1 was made with or without the motor)She said that it would go quite fast around 40 mph. and that the local buyer did not have to buy a licence tag for it. The motor was slung underneath the bottom bracket. I had been sent pictures of the complete line of bikes and one showed a fellow on one with two at his side and the entire factory team all gathered around it in a circle! I called back to ask this lovely sounding secretary to quote a total cost price(because crazy me was going to wire payment to South Africa and get it sent over here!!) She was in tears when I called back, because Raleigh was just bought by Derby who called the South African operation unprofitable and they shut the works down and shuttered the plant.She had just lost her job, and was all upset!The deal could not go through,and she was glad I had not sent any money, I was hours from sending it.She said that the South African market would be served by factories in Taiwan, and that there would be no more DL1 Tourists any more. Motorized or others.(I believe they have bicycles still being made in India) This was a while ago,I have since been writing and calling cycle repair shops in and around Springs, One repairman did admit to seeing one, once.I am good at finding these, but how do I find a used one from South Africa?? I intend to stay on this totally crazy idea until I have one! The shipping will cost a arm,leg,and a kidney. They offered a Sports model for the ladies,Called a city bike it was a three speed in a lovely light blue. All I have at the moment is a Raleigh heron badge that says RALEIGH, SPRINGS, SOUTH AFRICA. The quality was 1940-1950 in the late 80's Awesome chrome,fantastic paintwork, top, top, quality workmanship. I got the badge from trashpicking a thrashed childrens bike that a family that used to live in South Africa had thrown away 3 streets from my house! As to motors, several were made years ago that fitted underneath. I wrote to Roger Worton of Cyclemotor and autocycle spares about these and he said that these get snapped up before any advertisments appear. They are very rare, you need to be in England at the Cycle Jumble(swap meets) to find these or have connections. Roger sells a nice selection of bicycle goodies such as Fibrax handlebar grips. I will post the address soon here. I consider mounting your own motor a extreme project, perhaps the production was mooted for other reasons (safety?) besides unprofitabilty.A gas bike motor has appeared, the MX5. but this is shown mounted on a 26 X 2.125 beach cruiser type bike. Wheather or not it will work on a DL1 I do not know,perhaps if you do a bit of customizing!! Speeds around 30 and you will need to licence it, probably as a moped, with a helmet and everything. BE VERY,VERY, CAREFUL,USE YOUR BEST JUDGEMENT.I would attempt this on a double top tube model only.A MENS FRAME ONLY!!(DIAMOND FRAME FOR STRENGTH) ANOTHER CONCERN HERE IS THE ROD BRAKES THAT ARE NO LONGER ACCEPTABLE, USE A STURMEY DRUM BRAKE HUB SET FOR SAFETY.




Subject: African Raleigh Roadsters
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 14:44
Entered by: Bill (whoads@msn.com)

Message:
Raleigh is still making great Roadster bikes in Africa (Nigeria) as of a year or two ago. I had a friend that had a sister that worked for the state department there, and I talked them into sending two of the bikes to me. They are finished very nicely, with good paint and pinstripes just like the English DL-1's. The handlebars are not as nice as an English DL-1 (I removed the originals and put on some real DL-1 Bars). The seat was an Indian made leather seat copied from the Brooks 90/3 style or B-33. I also replaced that with a proper seat. Otherwise, it is a beautiful bike with full chaincase, sturmey-archer AW hub (the new one with no oil port), and classic looks. I think the fender stays are actually better than the english DL-1's. The decals are all the same, except the word "Nottingham" is missing at the bottom of the crest. If you'd like to see a picture of the bike, go to www.geocities.com/Baja/Ravine/1125/index/html The bike came with a heavy third world rack, a 12v generator set, propstand, and woods valves in the tubes, another item that needed to be changed. Start befriending people about to go to Africa and have them send one your way! Bill




Subject: African Roadster Corrected URL
Entered on: Jun 14, 1999 17:40
Entered by: Bill ()

Message:
The URL to see the Africa bike should be ....index.html, not index/html Sorry for the confusion.




Subject: North Road handlebars
Entered on: Jun 15, 1999 00:24
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Contrary to a previous messages, DL-1s do not have North Road handlebars; I don't know if there is a special name for classic "roadster" handlebars with the brazed stem and rod brake fittings, but "North Road" bars are the type found on the Raleigh Sports and most 26" wheel English 3-speeds seen in the U.S. "North Road" refers to the "North Road Cycling Club," the largest club in Britain. This handlebar design was popularized by and associated with that club. North Road bars are intended to offer the option of being installed "raised" in the normal fashion, or "dropped" so that the grips are lower than the center. This was what the sportier riders would do, before the popularity of French-style Maes bars. My 54 Rudge is set up this way.




Subject: African DL1 Roadsters
Entered on: Jun 15, 1999 09:56
Entered by: extremely crazed roadster addict (none)

Message:
I hope that they are still operating the plant in Kano, Northern Nigeria. I am glad to see the bike pix, it is beautiful but it is a small frame. What was coming out of Springs was really incredible, the flamenco red color one was truly breathtaking. Perhaps they only closed one plant. Raleigh had a habit of using two diffrent mudguard stays, the" bolted rod type" for the home market and the "wire type" for export. Go to:www.geocities.com/baja/ravine/1125/index.html Note the nice long 7 1/2 or longer cranks!! Nice machine!! thanks for the pix!




Subject: More About the Africa roadster
Entered on: Jun 15, 1999 10:17
Entered by: Bill (whoads@msn.com)

Message:
When I got the bikes from Africa, they only were able to get the 22" frames as the roadster addict noted. I would prefer the larger 24" frame, as I have a DL-1 of that size and I prefer the way it feels, although I do fine on the 22" machine. I do prefer the nutted rod fender stays as you can really fine tune the adjustment and they seem stronger overall. As many people have noted here it is a real pleasure to ride these bikes. They have a stately feel, and when I ride around town, I pedal at a slower than ideal cadence, taking in the surrounding trees, squirrels, kids playing, etc. It is funny to see who notices the bike and who doesn't. I notice the same thing when I ride my folding Bike Friday on work trips. Little kids seem to notice it right away, along with the die hard bike freaks, but the rank and file don't notice anything different about any of these bikes, unless they're parked. These old english bikes are rideable art, and even though they were inexpensive they sure made the effort to incorporate elaborate artwork and small style additions that really add to the machines. I find that is a trait lacking in most consumer products these days. They are also the ideal bicycle for 90% of the riding most city people do (the Sport models at least). I think we'd have more cyclists in this country if the Robin Hoods and Triumphs weren't replaced with Huffys and cheap mountain bikes. My 71 year old father hops on his Raleigh Sports almost every day, but the "Super Course" is hung on some hooks and doesn't get out much! For those people looking for great classic canvas saddle bags for your bike, call Rivendell Bicycle Works at 925-933-7304 or www.rivendellbicycles.com. They also sell Brooks saddles and can get any model you want at pretty good prices. They will send a catalog if you call. The carradice bags are not cheap, but you only have to buy them once. They also sell carradice waxed cotton rain gear, for a complete British rain setup. Happy cycling. I'm off on the Dunelt in the Colorado drizzle!




Subject: I'm so happy they had their own threading!!
Entered on: Jun 15, 1999 10:33
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I thought that I could re-use the 1940's Raleigh stainless steel spokes. I have a n.o.s front hub to go into a beautifully re-chromed front rim. The back wheel is a n.o.s F.W. four- speed hub and the other rim. I soon discovered that new spoke nipples are threaded diffrently and do not fit.Nothing in the shop would fit,my mechanic pal laughed at me as I wailed"OH NO!!!" I am searching my stash of nipples to see if I have them. I have a jar of Radalli spoke nipples but these are Italian I believe, and will not fit. I keep a lot of totally useless parts just in case. I have Czech folding bike tires from the 1960's in this strange size and other oddities. Charles Fort would love British bikes, all the strange quirks to catalog. Special spoke threading, Raleigh's own, HMMM... Lemmee Seee here no, thats not it...




Subject: 22 inch African Roadster
Entered on: Jun 15, 1999 10:43
Entered by: Crazed roadster addict (none)

Message:
Beggers can't be choosers I guess, The bike is new, from the origonal factory in pristine comdition, with the enclosed chaincase!! You have a brilliant gem there. Raise the seat and ride it, baby. ride! Why wouldn't they ship a larger frame?? Oh well. Enjoy Colorado!




Subject: Best for 90%
Entered on: Jun 15, 1999 12:32
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I absolutely agree with Bill that the Sports model would be the best all-around bike for 90% of the population of this country. Far more comfortable than road bikes -- my Mercian, 71 International and others are on hooks too. More comfortable, efficient, and durable than derailleur-equiped mountain bikes. And far more efficient than "cruisers." If good ones were available at a fair price, I agree, more people might get out and ride. Where do people ride these days? Many roads here that were once beautiful, rideable country roads are now dangerously unrideable, horrible urban sprawl. Whereas I was once able to ride my bike a mile or so to get into the country, now I really must drive a half hour or so to get to a safe starting place. My point is that compared the the 1970s, the uncontrolled development in the country has, I think, changed the "cycle-scape" for many from country roads to urban/suburban and bikepath riding. And we all know the best bike for this. Maybe Raleigh U.S. or some other company will get the idea and more aggresively market models like the Specialized Globe cafe bike, or something like the Raleigh UK Chilton. As for Roadsters, yes I love my DL-1, but with all due respect to Stephen's imports and the rest, I wonder whether in this litigious society it's a good idea to sell rod-brake bikes to the general public when less elegant V-brakes and dual pivot brakes are, let's face it, safer.




Subject: "Sports type push bikes"
Entered on: Jun 15, 1999 16:47
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
I agree entirely that the "Sports" type bicycle is probably the best all around most usefull bike for the vast majority of the population. I ride a "Sports" Robinhood as a commuter bicycle to work on a regular basis, and of all the bikes I have that one makes me smile the most as I ride. I never could understand why the bicycle manufacturers have pushed those God awful mountain bikes on the public. Talk about over engineered! Holy Smokes! Who in Hell ever ASKED for something like those monstrosities anyway? I believe it's entirely possible to design a vastly better bike with similar technology, by taking the roadster/sports idea and building it with the modern hybrid bicycle technology. Can you imagine a "Sports" Raleigh build like an aluminum hybrid? I think THERE lies the perfect bicycle. Three or four speeds tops, aluminum frame, leather saddle, up right bars like the "north road" style, mud guards with the little bullet at the front, the full Monty, only with modern light weight Quality materials. There might not be the CHARM of the genuine articule, but you'd have a really top notch mount.




Subject: Keith's reference to Miami Bicycle Co.
Entered on: Jun 15, 1999 19:12
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I was recently given four bikes, none of which are noteworthy, however, one of the four is a "Miami Sun" with 26x1.375 wheels. It is a very ordinary midweight single speed. When I saw the head badge I thought; 'did a newpaper called the Miami Sun give these things away'? The bike looks 70's. Was the Miami Co still in business at that time?




Subject: Apology
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 09:56
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I owe Bill and all of you an apology for the rude remarks I flung about Bill's pricing of his mint Sports. After giving the matter a lot of thought (though it shouldn't have taken a lot) I've come to the conclusion that his price was more than fair given the price of inferior, new bicycles. It's true, you can't touch a new quality bike for much less than $1000, and even then it probably won't be as good as a Sports for most people. I should never have muddled this fine discussion with such tripe. I'll refrain from posting comments in the future without first giving it a lot more thought.




Subject: Source for British cycle parts(get on his mailing list!)
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 11:37
Entered by: Roadster addict (none)

Message:
The address for: CYCLEMOTOR AND AUTOCYCLE SPARES 56 CROSSLANDS,STANTONBURY,MILTON KEYNES,MK 14 6AX 01908 314797 FAX 01908 550913 (WEEKDAYS ONLY 8 AM-5PM) CONTACT: Roger Worton Roger has a good assortment of goodies such as:Black grips, mattress saddles,Raleigh mudguards,cottered crank sets,ROD BRAKE SHOES(FIBRAX)white reflectors, saddle toolbags, leather straps, Roger is mainly a source for older moped parts such as the 1960'S Raleigh and Phillips mopeds. Amal,Norman, Honda,Vincent firefly,Villiers,Ducatti,N.S.U. RING HIM UP AND ASK!




Subject: Hey, it works!
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 11:56
Entered by: Clarence ()

Message:
I told a pal that her daughter was 8 now. Why didn't she take off that baby seat? She told me that she puts her handbag there also bags of groceries tied with a bungee strap.Plus, the back of the raised seat is reflective! "Also, what if I have more children?" "Works well, leave it alone." OK. She used the rubberized clamps with a new seat and did not have any problem. When was the last time you saw a DL1 WITH a child on the back?




Subject: I was afraid this would happen!
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 12:19
Entered by: Clarence ()

Message:
I was at my friends shop and he looked up in disgust at a Raleigh ten speed from the 70's I will give this to you, if you promise to take it now!! Right now, get it out of my sight! Cursed thing has hung here for 15 months, She never came to get it and I can't get through on the phone. It hogs up my space, and I am sick of it." You can have it, new tires and all,(gave tires back) if you go immediatly! The offensive bike and I went to the storage shed. Before I left I asked "Are you sure?" "What if she comes back?" He said"No, it's ok, The law is: if it's been here a year, I own it." "She did not come for it. Take it away!! I took it apart for some spare parts and threw it away, it was a common beat up ten speed.(It was not a Sports or anything.) She came right in, afterward and was enraged!!!! My pal stood his ground,Having exercised his right, but he lost a costomer that time for sure! Next time I was in, he asked" Still have that ten speed?" To my horror I replied" No." " Oh well, don't worry about it." His mechanic said that she yelled in his ear and it was NOT pretty. I have acquired a lot of bikes this way. but be sure it becomes abandoned property. It has to sit in the shop a year of more.Check law in your area. One guy died and it sat there 11 years! This was a DL1 too. He was not coming back.Be careful accepting gifts.




Subject: Why the matching mens bike never made it.
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 12:38
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
The young rider could not speak English only jabbered in Finnish at me.Later I met the owner of this ladies Tourist with a D.B.U kit and four speed dynohub. The elderly lady replied that yes, It was for sale and that her relative had gone home. I bought the bike and when I asked"Where the mate to it was?,I would buy that also" She told me that her husband was no good, drank,and the divorce was nasty."Oh that?Yes, he had a mens bike same color, we used to go together on hoilday." "I ran it over with the car until it was all twisted up!!"" I hated that @#%$***D!" She was red faced, and had a fierey look on her face I asked when this happened, and she said"1951, I left him in 1951!" $75.00, take or leave it, Don't stir up bad memories!! I apologised, and she told me it was a long time ago. The bike was bought new in Finland.




Subject: Modern Roadster?
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 13:02
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
Not only do I agree with Mark R's comments, but I've built a similar bike. Using a Waterford steel frame (black, of course), I added a Sachs Super 7 seven-speed hub geat, North road handlebars, the obligatory Brooks saddle, and 36h 700c wheels. It looks at a glance like an older British bike, but has a much broader gear range, and weighs under 25 lbs. A DL-1 it ain't, but a nice bike it is. Cannondale tried this in '97 with a Nexus-equipped hybrid, and the lack of public acceptance made this a one-year bike. As with SUV's, it seems to be the marketers who've convinced the buying public that they "need" hideous, overly-complex, knobby-tired mountain bikes to pootle around town.




Subject: Raleigh DL1 2000 (Stealth tourist)
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 13:29
Entered by: Clarence ()

Message:
I look forward to what we'll see in the future. I am not the only one tinkering with this idea! There are many diffrent ways of doing this. A nice variety of tires and wheels, alloy parts and frame sets. Black,lightning fast and Dead silent!! Updated for the new millinium.




Subject: Modern Roadster
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 14:17
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
The "Modern Roadster" idea is intriguing. It's close to what I meant when I spoke of an American Roadster a while back, but I think something closer to the Brit 3-speed, which is what you've described, sounds better. I would opt for a steel frame -- call me a retro grouch -- because I don't trust Aluminum as a frame material for the long haul. Waterford is grand, but it could be done cheaper for the masses, or for me -- a decent DB chromoly frame would be fine. North Road bars and Brook -- absolutely! 4-7 speeds, with a lower range than the typical AW with a 46 x 18. Aluminum rims -- yes! Those MTB rims are quite strong. It would be great to do 40/32, but I'm probably dreaming. I'd use 26 x 1 and 1/2 plain tread tyres -- my son rides Avocets that go from 55 to 85 psi. Very efficient. Chainguard or chaincase a must. High quality kickstand a must (I really like the two-legged Trygg on my Sports). Mudguards with the chrome bullet -- of course. Could they be aluminum? Brakes? Gawd, those V-brakes are so 90s and mountain bikish, but they work so well. Aluminum crank and chainrings -- yes, let's save weight where it can be done without sacrificing durability. It would be a nice touch to have a fancy pattern, though. A 25-pound package would be phenominal. A durable, user-friendly bicycle that would better meet the actual needs of most Americans. Price somewhere between $400 - $600. I'd love to see it.




Subject: Sports modernized
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 14:19
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I have a pretty ratty/rusty Sports that I have been thinking of modernizing. How about a 7 speed hub and brake (would I be crucified if it were Shimano?), alloy rims, and crankset, front hub brake etc. Can anyone venture a guess as to how a bike like this would ride and handle compared to the original? As an aside; I built a balloon cruiser with Shimano 7 speed and roller brake and I love the brake. Sheldon said somewhere that he wouldn't recommend the front hub brake but think of no maintenance and weather proof performance not to mention great stopping power.




Subject: American Roadsters
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 17:45
Entered by: Kevin (n7mfv@yahoo.com)

Message:
I'm glad to see the "American Roadster" raise its head again. I rescued an "Italia" frame from the trash the other day. Chrome seat and chain stays and while I haven't done much with Italian frames, I expect this frame is gonna get a S/A coaster hub, front caliper brake, 27" alloy wheels, etc. It has no deraillier hanger and the cable stops are clamp ons (actually they are campy clamp ons). The other frame that got this treatment had braise (sic) on stops and rather than ruin the paint I left them. This will, I expect, make a cleaner set up. I don't The frame's paint job is not too much, but I do like the old Campagnolo sticker so the paint may remain. I don't see any reason why Shimano 7 speed hubs aren't used more in this application. We can be snobs at times about Sturmey-Archer but if we chose to speak disparaging (sic) about mountain bike riders because they are slaves to bicycle fashion, we should be willing to accept those who chose to ride (or build) a certain machine because it is appropriate to the application.




Subject: Modern "sports"
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 17:56
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
Keith, Cro-mo is a far better material for bicycle frames. But, could you imagine a MOSTLY aluminum modern "Sports" done in all modern light weight materials, even the modern brakes, lets face it they are fabulous brakes!! Put you right over the stinkin' bars!! But yeah, I really wish someone would duplicate a Sports, or Roadster for that matter, as a modern bike. I've even thought of doing it myself. Is anyone from Trek, or Raleigh USA reading this?? Bicycles do not need suspention! This isn't retro-grouching. Almost every bike out there with suspention is used on the road where you rarely it! It's a waste of perfectly good engineering! I'd much rather have the weight in mudguards(fenders)and chaincase, and a real leather saddle. Although I love my Raleigh the way it is, I'd jump on a chance to have a bike just like it, only about 10lbs. lighter, especially in the wheels and tyres. You know, for those FAST days. I think I mentioned before that i once flew past a guy on a mountain bike going up hill, while on my old Hercules, and I'll never forget it. On a "modern" Sports, that would happen every day!




Subject: Modern Roadster
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 19:35
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
Sturmey-Archer makes a seven-speed with a hub brake that would be perfect (and authentic) on an updated roadster. I ride a Pashley with the five speed Sturmey-Archer Sprinter Eite rear hub and it has drum brakes at both ends. Not only are the drum brakes effective in all weather, but they give the machine a classy look. I love the ride of the Pashley and use it daily on my 24-mile (round trip) commute, but wouldn't gripe if it weighed about 10 or 12 less pounds. Mountain bike sales are flat now, and I think that's because the market is waiting for the next development. In my mind, the next development is a lightweight roadster. Comfortable, efficient and fast.




Subject: Modern roadster
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 20:23
Entered by: Mark R ()

Message:
Not to mention logical,practical, and sensible(and beautiful).




Subject: Chris's custom built
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 22:32
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Chris: You say you built up a Waterford frame bike under 25 lbs. Thats great but I'm curious how you did it with a 7 speed hub. My cruiser rear wheel with the Shimano 7 speed weighs 10 lbs. alone. I used a narrow alloy ATB rim and 2.375 tire. Is the Sachs hub that much lighter than the Shimano? Also, I just finished a Fuji DS framed bike with 21 speeds and all alloy components and it is just over 24 lbs. I am also curious about the SA 7 speed but they seem to be a rare breed. I haven't seen one bike that uses that hub.




Subject: Re: Sports modernized
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 22:54
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
"Sheldon said somewhere that he wouldn't recommend the front hub brake but think of no maintenance and weather proof performance not to mention great stopping power." OK, don't mention great stopping power, because the Shimano front hub brake doesn't have that feature. I'm actually, in general, a very big Shimano fan, but not their front brake hubs. They have a lawyer-inspired force limiter to make it impossible to go over the bars. It also makes it impossible to stop as short as you can with a good rim brake. If you want a good front drum brake, consider the Sturmey-Archer Elite. I recently special ordered one of these for a customer, and when I saw and felt it I was so impressed that I started stocking it. These are NOT your father's BFC brakes, they have great bearings and appear to have excellent stopping power. For the rear, the Shimano drums are as good as a rear brake needs to be, and I really like their 7speed hub. I've got one on an old Peugeot PX-10 frame. See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/px7.html




Subject: Decimals and fractions
Entered on: Jun 16, 1999 23:02
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
A couple of recent messages on this group made a common but dangerous mistake, translating tire sizes between decimal and fractional notation. One poster referred to a '70s bike as having "26 x 1.375" tires, while another referred to "26 x 1 1/2" mountain bike wheels. Although in mathematics 1 3/8 is the same as 1.375, and 1 1/2 is the same as 1.5, this is most definitely NOT the case with bicycle tires. 26 x 1.375 is a very rare American size that went out in the early '50s if not before. 26 x 1 1/2 is the inch-based designation for the French 650B size. A great many tires and tubes have been ruined by people who were not aware of this peculiarity of bicycle tire designation. It is better to use the new ISO standard designations, which are not ambiguous. DL-1s use 635 mm tires, sorry, tyres, while 590 mm is the size on the Raleigh Sports (one of 6 different, non-internchangeable "26 inch" sizes.) For more on this, see my Tire Sizing article http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire_sizing.html




Subject: Drum brakes
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 05:01
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
I agree with Sheldon regarding the Sturmey-Archer Elite front drum brake. That is what is on my Pashley and when I put the mighty squeeze on the lever, the bike stops now. I too, haven't seen a bike with the SA 7-speed, but if it works as well as the 5-speed, it should be reliable and efficient. The only thing the 5-speed lacks is a lower first gear. With 7-speeds, either Shimano or SA, loaded touring would be within reach on a roadster, mountain country excluded. I've done some weekend touring on the Pashley, loading up the Carridice saddle bag, a small front handlebar bag and strapping sleeping bag, tent and pad on the rack. I had to walk up one very long and steep hill, but other than that the SA 5-speed was sufficient for hilly northern Michigan where I live.




Subject: Frame for Modern Roadster
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 09:58
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I saw a "STREET DOG" frame at a local shop recently -- it's a budget Waterford -- marketed as a special purpose city bike frame. Reynolds 853. Plain, deep gloss Waterford black (beautiful). Rear facing track-style back fork ends (they're not called "dropouts" when they face the rear, are they?, the wheel doesn't drop out -- get it?). Price $500. Maybe Miyata or someone else has something nearly as good for about half that, I'd certainly check around before I'd buy. I wonder who makes a suitable long quill, short reach stem in aluminum -- Terry may carry something like that. An MTB stem would be gross. And are there Aluminum North Road bars out there somewhere? Those Avocet tyres on my son's late 80s Raleigh MTB really say 26 by 1 and 1/2 -- they're mounted on Araya MTB rims. I finally sold my 19 lb albatros -- my '96 Trek 5200 OCLV carbon road bike. Great bike for someone who actually races or rides very competatively -- not for me any more. A friend on mine saw my on the bike path as I was riding my recently-acquired Sports. He too is a washed up racer. He likes Brit stuff too -- restores Morgans, Minis, etc. He urged me to ride it on our local back-to-back weekend double centrury -- TOSRV. I think it's a great idea -- promote the "reverse status" Sheldon referred to -- riding a bike that cost less than a single tire on most people's trick road bikes -- and having more fun.




Subject: Updated DL1 Tourists, the next wave.
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 10:36
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Have you ever noticed the way the tires on a mountain bike slow it down on paved roads? This fellow was riding on the side of the road. The way he was sitting on the bike looked uncomfortable. His riding was laborious and fustrating and the gearing on the bike was not right. I watch people and think of ideas.My "new roadster" has an enclosed guard. I agree with Sheldon about the Sturmey- Archer brakes. Good bearings are very, important.Every time you turn or even roll down the street the tires on a mountain bike slow you down.(It's a drag!) I noticed it right away, and found it anoying. We need a decision maker in the bike industry to wake up to this opportunity. I believe the Raleigh tourist was the real origonal mountain bike. There is no grit slowing me down, everything is enclosed running in oil.(synthetic no less)




Subject: Modern Roadster Redux
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 10:39
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
The Sachs hub is lighter than the Shimano Nexus 7-speed I have on another bike (possibly because the Shimano has a roller brake and the Sachs doeasn't). I picked the Sachs due to its broader gear range (thanks to Sheldon's website), althought the Shimano shifts better (I'm using the lever upshift/button downshift "retro" shifter, which I understand Shimano, as they're all too prone to do, has discontiued). I wanted to use the S-A 7-speed on the Waterford, but at the time, it was unavailable in the US, and offered only assembled to a wheel (!) in the UK. I'm well outside a reasonable budget with this bike; it has Campy Chorus crank, bb, headset, and front hub; Nitto Technomic stem; SunTour Supperbe Pro sidepulls; and Mavic T217 wheels. 3TTT make an aluminum North Road pattern bar ("Inglese"), but I don't think it's improted; I got a Wald bar from Sheldon, which has good chrome, and is cheap. Oh: and if you build one of these things, go to a Bianchi dealer and order a pair of the leather-covered foam grips from a Milano; they match the Brooks honey-colored saddles perfectly, and cap off the color scheme of the amber-walled Continental tires.




Subject: J.M.Keynes might agree
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 10:55
Entered by: Jim (jbanahan@ncb.com)

Message:
As British bike enthusiaists we're at a point in time where the value of our machines is in flux. The $20 yard sale bikes are tantamount to the old story about the guy who's looking for a cheap used car, responds to an ad for a '63 Chevrolet for $800 and finds a split window Corvette being sold by a widow. Basic economics at work, the supply of these great bikes is finite. However, the people who will pay the big money are not the same people using this fantastic website. I forgot who said it a couple of posts back, but we do give each other good deals, because we're in it for the the love of it. The people who pay the inflated prices are the folks who have the money (obviously) and not the inclination to track down the correct SA bit to make their '72 Sports complete. I ride a '63 Rudge around town on the weekend, handlebars upside down - club style, well worn B-17. I've had numerous offers in front of the Post Office, bakery... All from folks who fondly remember bikes like these and certainly wouldn't do any type of service or restoration, so I consider us lucky. Lucky to have Menotomy and Sheldon Brown. Bottom line, let the prices go where the market will bear, covet your favorite machine, and treat your fellow enthusiast right. On that note, I'm looking for a saddle pouch about 3" x 6", preferably leather & a bit worn, anything out there for less than $100 ???




Subject: tall frame Sprite #14
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 10:59
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
OHH,Stop the car! I want it!! No, Chris.Not another bike. Yes, It's a complete tall frame Sprite! I want to overhaul and keep it. You just got 2 the other day Let me out, it's mine. What will you do with it? It's huge!What size is that anyway? We have to go to my shed after dinner!! It's packed, What will you do with another bike? Keep it! I love these!!




Subject: Another Sprite?
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 12:11
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
I have a really nice metallic red Sprite (5-speed Huret derailleur version)in my basement (no fenders, sans original bars and brake levers) that I'll GIVE to anybody reading this if they wanna come pick it up! (Northern NJ). It even has new Specialized tires......




Subject: defending mudsuckers
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 13:30
Entered by: Warren (warbetty@netcom.ca)

Message:
My father gave me his 5 speed Raleigh Lenton in '84...I had been away from bikes a few years and really enjoyed riding again. It wasn't a well made bike and after the forks and frame went I went shopping for a new bike just as mtn bikes were maturing around '89. I think the new technology was the big hook for me...I loved commuting with my deore/21 speed /canti/cromo with a Brooks Conquest saddle and SLICKS for the next five years. For someone still young enough to bend at the waist these bikes are still very utilitarian. Their gear ranges are great...their brakes are superior, their weight is as low as you can afford. And like it or not they are faster...an aggressive riding postion lends itself to speed. Finally for those of us who commute in winters...you can get studded tires that truly work. This is my only reason for keeping one "in the stable". This technology evolved from market demand...not because some industry guy decreed it to be so. To keep this tale short, in the ensueing ten years I then I got into road bikes, touring bikes, and finally vintage Brit bikes! The moral of the story...any riding is good riding...it encourages health & discourages cars. When people mature I think they'll naturally gravitate to the roadster mentality. This gives us hope for the future when the gen x/mtn dew/grunge crowd hit their 30's & 40's. If you build the American roadster, they will come.




Subject: mudsuckers
Entered on: Jun 17, 1999 18:47
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
I, too went the mountain bike route. As I live on a sand road, about 1979 I started thinking there had to be someone somewhere making a balloon tire bike with gears and a good frame. A faithful reader of Bicycling magazine, what do I find in 1981 but an ad in the back for MountainBike, the joint Fisher-Kelley-Ritchey venture. I ordered one as fast as I could and damn the expense. I rode it for many years and then returned to road bikes only to find my old Raleigh Super Course had evolved into a carbon-framed index-shifting monstrosity with the saddle a quarter mile higher than the handlebars. I remembered the kids I envied in the 50s when I lived in the city who rode Raleigh sport bikes and began hunting for one. Where I live now(northern Michigan) not many of the rednecks who live here ever owned Brit bikes, so finding one at a garage sale was out. So I bought a brand-new Pashley and I don't regret it. Not that I wouldn't be happy to find a nice DL-1 if I stumbled across one. But my point is that because those of us that frequent this discussion group have evolved into roadster-type bikes, you can be sure there are others also reaching the same point, just as others were hopping on the mountain bike wave back in the early 80s. Take heart. Our day has arrived.




Subject: Roadster Revival
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 01:50
Entered by: Bob (vonomis@nep.net)

Message:
I've been following the discussions regarding the difference between roadsters (28" wheels and rod brakes) and the 26" drum or caliper brake "sport" type. I have a 1960 Raleigh with 26" wheels and caliper brakes, and I'm drawn to Sheldon's recent message about North Road bars not being used on the classic roadsters. To differentiate between the two types, might I suggest calling the "sport" type a "North Road Tourist", or just plain "Tourist"? Not that the name is all that important, but it would make descriptions in this discussion group a little easier. Any ideas?




Subject: Hunhh!! Mountain Bike..What is it good for!
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 02:05
Entered by: claudia ()

Message:
One of the best days of my life was the one where some idiot broke into our garage and stole my Specialized Rockhopper leaving (and that proves he/she was an idiot) my Raleigh Sports and my Globe 7. As U2 lyrics have it, "outside it's America!" I think mountain bikes will be seen some day as America's version of Tulip Mania. If you don't know what that is...look it] up in your Britannica.




Subject: Tourist is out
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 09:43
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Bob, using the term "Tourist" for a 26-inch Raleigh Sports could confuse things even more. Most 28-inch rod-brake Raleighs are actually Raleigh Tourist models.




Subject: What is your favorite lock?
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 10:26
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Kryptonite makes a nice long black rubber coated lock that is perfect for the DL1,Sports, and anything else. It is marketed for the mountain bikes but is best because it is long enough to attach to almost anything. (I do a quite lenghty spell and the bike becomes cursed if it gets stolen.Works every time!!)




Subject: 3-speed prices
Entered on: Jun 18, 1999 14:53
Entered by: TimH ()

Message:
I'd like to add my $0.02 on all the discussion about prices. Jim said "The people who pay the inflated prices are the folks who have the money (obviously) and not the inclination to track down the correct SA bit to make their '72 Sports complete". Well, I have to say there are other factors at work here. Namely geography. Sure, British 3-speeds are commonplace in some areas, Boston, NY, etc, but that is not as true here in Colorado. I'm constantly on the watch for bikes, an occasional visit to thrift stores over the past 5 years has not seen a single British 3-speed. Neither has cruising slowly by the occasional garage sale in the old parts of town turned up a single example. So, count your blessings those of you who live in 3-speed rich areas! BTW, I'm still in need of cones for my FG hubs.




Subject: bicycle history book
Entered on: Jun 21, 1999 01:43
Entered by: kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
Someone mentioned a bicycle history book that included a lot of photos of old Raleighs, Rudges, etc. It was written by someone named Serena ???? Can anyone fill in the blanks for me? I'd love to read it.




Subject: What size is your wheel, Lars?
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:19
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I am sure that someone will have your wheel,but we need to know what size it is. Is it 26 X 1 3/8 or 28X 1 1/2 ? Is it a Westrick or Westwood pattern? Westrick is Raleigh's cheaper cross between Westwood and Endrick. Westwood is the full rod brake type rim and Endrick the cable brake type. Westrick rims were able to be used on a cable or rod brake type bike.




Subject: Like a ride??
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:20
Entered by: Mark R. (deenybeany@earthlink.net)

Message:
Hey gang, I would like to know if anyone in the central Jersey/ Philly area would like to meet at Washingtons' crossing for a spin up the Delaware canal to Lambertville for lunch or something, and then back to W.C. Nothing serious, or strenuous, just a simple get together to say hello, and have a spin together. I'd like to go in the next few weeks, or any good Sunday in July or August. I have a friend who's willing to come alone and ride one of my spare push bikes, so there would be at least three of us. If anyone is interested e-mail, and we'll make some plans. Mark R. in South Joisey




Subject: Evil fixed cup
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:29
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Both of the fixed cups on my pair of late 1940's R.R.A.(Raleigh Record Ace) machines have a altogether diffrent type of fixed cups that defy all known ways of removal!! I took it to the machine shop where I am having a tool made that will fit the Campy bottombracket tool I have. I had to have another adaptor thing made up for the standard fixed cups on Raleigh's .Now those come out at once without any problem.




Subject: What year was 26 T.P.I. threading abandoned?
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:45
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I phoned the Raleigh works a couple of years ago. I asked if I could buy new 26 T.P.I. cups for my bike. The fellow said that it was not used since the 1960's and everything is now 24 T.P.I. I KNOW that they used it up to probably the early 1980's My 1987 Raleigh had 24 t.p.i.cups. I said that Raleigh made millions of bikes over many years and I found it hard to believe they had no spares around to sell. He claimed that they do not have folks asking for them. I was referred to someone who wanted me to send out the old worn cups and he was going to resurface them and ship them back for an exorborate amount.I declined saying that that was a silly idea. No one admitted to having any spares to sell,they said "These are quite rare" I finally found a stash of them and some things have been retapped to use 24 T.P.I. Spindles have been much easier to find for some reason.Some things I do not want to re-tap.




Subject: Sport or Cruiser?
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 12:50
Entered by: Mark P. (markmobile@hotmail.com)

Message:
My neighbor"s son had a Schwinn that had 1-3/8 x 26 wheels, 3-speed and a cruiser style frame. I also ran across a step-thru model recently with the same type frame. The latter was particularly beautiful. Does anyone know what these bikes were called and if they were adult or youth models. Anyone in N.E. Texas have an interest in old Raleighs? If so I'd like you to E-Mail me. Mark P.




Subject: Don't move, this is a raid!! I want everything!!
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 13:05
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I have a list of items I buy with pictures and descriptions. I hit a shop with my list and$ 600.00 in cash and the delighted owner rushes around in a flurry opening every drawer, pulling out old stuff, giving me unbridled access to the basement, upstairs attic,or the back room. With glee the guy collects the 20's off the counter and finds me a box. (a big box!) The dusty Roadster that had been buried in the basement for 40 years is liberated at last! There are old tools and all sorts of goodies asleep still in some shops. "Since you know what it is, I"ll sell it to you." They are glad to be rid of this stuff that usually gets thrown out.The waste is unbelievable!! Box after box of vintage parts thrown away UNLESS THEY HAVE YOUR BUSINESS CARD AND KNOW WHAT YOU WANT.( Be sure to leave the basics such as Sturmey parts and cables so they can do repair work that comes in.) Usually they know someone else who has stuff for sale.




Subject: Lar's Rim
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 17:36
Entered by: Clyde ()

Message:
Hey Lar, tried to e-mail you about rim, but it did not transfer. I've got a 26" WESTWOOD pattern rim. Maybe it's the size you need. (Thanks Clarence for the wheel pattern nomenclature).




Subject: Rim types
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 19:11
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
Clarence wrote: "Westrick is Raleigh's cheaper cross between Westwood and Endrick." This is not quite correct. I believe "Westrick" is a colloquialism for what is properly called the "Raleigh pattern" rim. These were not "cheap." This was used on the top-of-the line Raleigh models, and was considered a special deluxe feature. These rims are preternaturally strong. The less expensive caliper-braked models used the lighter but more easily damaged Endrick rim. My pair of '54 Superbe roadsters features 635 mm (28 inch) Westwood rims on the gent's model, 590 mm (26 inch) Raleigh pattern ("Westrick") rims on the lady's model. Both bikes have rod brakes, 4-speed dynohubs, locking forks, full chaincases, etc. I don't believe the Raleigh pattern rims were available in the 635 mm (28 inch) size.




Subject: 28" Raleigh pattern rims
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 21:39
Entered by: Louis (lorsini@aol.com)

Message:
Sheldon- I. like you didn't think Raleigh pattern rims were available in the larger size. Then, on a search for 28" Westwood rims, we ordered some from Winkel Wheel (it was the last of their stock and they were happy to get rid of them). When they arrived, lo and behold they were 28" Raleigh pattern rims, stamped Raleigh of England. Anyone ever see a roadster with these rims? Unfortunately we have 40 hole only, so we can't even build up a set of wheels with matching rims). We've got 5 or so of them. Know anyone who needs one (or two, or three, etc.?)




Subject: Wanted: nice 23" Raleigh Sports Mens Bike or Superbe
Entered on: Jun 22, 1999 22:10
Entered by: Randy (hirelevel@mindspring.com)

Message:
I would like to hear about any Raleigh Sports that are in excellent condition. I prefer the forest green color which I had when I was a kid. It was the best and most comfortable bike I ever had and I want it back. I would also like to hear about any Raleigh Superbes you may have or know of. I used to memorize the Raleigh specs in back of the catalogs while imagining that I was pedaling along the rivers edge on a crisp spring morning just gazing at the countryside with the cool wind pushing me along the path....




Subject: History Book
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 11:43
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
KEVIN: The book is Serena Beeley, "A History of Bicycles (Wellfleet Press 1992). It's an overview, but with a strong British slant. The author is British, so that should be no surprise. It covers (though not in great detail), among many things, the origins of Raleigh, the famous Sturmey, Archer, Mills & REILLY 1902 patent, the origins of Rudge-Witworth, the rise of "lightweights" (what we call "sports") bikes during the interwar years, and so on. It has nice photos bikes by Sunbeam, Raleighs, Humber, BSA, Rover, and others. It reproduces several nice Raleigh posters. Best of all, Beeley opines, inter alia, that British bikes are the best made, French bikes are cheaply made, and Italian bikes are flashy but not as well-made as British. She devotes one sentence to Tulio Campagnolo. You go girl! But I don't want to overstate it -- the book only has two and one-half chapters out of ten that say anything about the specific bikes that we talk about in this forum. I picked it up about three years ago at a publishers overstock book store.




Subject: Rims, various types
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 13:14
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
Personally, I feel that a bike with rod brakes (roller leaver) and Westwood rims to be better than one fitted with Raleigh pattern (Westrick) rims. The rod brake Sports bikes (26 inch wheel) got this treatment later on and thats why I said "cheaper". The Raleigh pattern rims were good for a while, but then the finish changed from a dull silver to the bright chrome. There is a timeline here as far as quality goes. The equipment changes thru the years reflect efforts to lessen the cost of production. The rod type 26 inch wheel sports was available with either type rim. Westwood or Raleigh pattern (Westrick)rims. The cable brake, 60's Superbes(models fitted with locking forks,Sturmey-Archer dynohub light sets, and prestitube minor racks) had the Raleigh pattern rims.The basic cable brake Sports (3 speed) used the Endrick rims. The Raleigh pattern rim was a BIG thing and they started making them in the early 1950's I believe. You see this exact type rim on the Schwinn bikes of the same time period. Only they had Schwinn's knurling down the center and the finish was diffrent because they were made by and marked "Schwinn" for use with their "Schwinn Racer."(Which used the Sturmey-Archer A.W. 3 speed also.) A English 28 inch Roadster with Raleigh pattern(Westrick) 28 inch wheels is hardly ever seen.They all had Westwood type rims.I do not believe that Raleigh made these in 28 inch for very long. The Dutch on the other hand, did use a 28 inch Raleigh pattern (Westrick) rim for years and still do. The tire size was 28 X 1 5/8 They had alloy rims and the tires were out of this world.(beautiful, Cream colored,all white tires and also Black tires with reflective sidewalls. The rims are lightweight and work well. They are not as bombproof as the all steel Westwoods though. Raleigh owned Gazelle in Holland for a time until it was sold or spun off into a seperate company as they are today. The all steel Westwood 28 inch rim has gone through some changes too in quality. The recent rims I bought from India are not as solid as earlier Dunlop or Raleigh ones. I was really surprised at the way the bike would glide so smoothly with the India rims.Perhaps this is because they are new and the other rims are older.(Although I keep them true) Holland is Sturmey's biggest market today.The Dutch bikes were and still are breathtaking.




Subject: Raleigh Pattern -vs- Westwood rims
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 13:39
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
The Raleigh pattern rim was indeed used on the top of the line bikes. I prefer the Westwood rims myself.




Subject: Swedish roadsters
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 16:49
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
I visited Goteborg, Sweden last August, and everybody (it seems) rides bicycles. They're not the classic things of beauty that the Dutch bikes or the Flying Pigeios are, but they're interesting, robust bikes. The best appear to be made by an outfit named "Rex", and their top o' the line bikes have 7-speed Nexus hub gears, hub roller brakes F & R, generators, rear racks, and these plastic things which resemble spiderwebs which cover about 40% of the rear wheel, and appear to be there to keep one's baggage (or skirt) away from the spokes. Weight does not appear to be a design consideration, but the bikes appear well-built and nicely finished. Not as pricey as a Pashley, either.




Subject: Weighty matters
Entered on: Jun 23, 1999 19:36
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
Having participated in the discussion about how nice it would be to have a lightweight neo-roadster, I have to confess I like the heavyweight design of my Pashley. The weight gives it the feel of a substantial piece of machinery. I was surprised when I discovered I felt this way, because like many American cyclists, I was raised to believe lighter is always better. Perhaps the weight contributes to the stately ride of these machines, but whatever it does, a truly lightweight roadster might ruin the bikes' character.




Subject: Mobo Mini Bike
Entered on: Jun 24, 1999 10:47
Entered by: Dave, of course (flipndave@aol.com)

Message:
Hello there. I know this board is for English Roadsters, but a friend of mine as this Mobo Mini Bike and she's looking for some information on it. It's a childs bike, about 50 years old (she's had it since she was a child) and has "Made in Enland" on it. I thought maybe Raleigh may have made it for Mobo, since they dealt, mostly with riding toys (I think). Any info would be greatly appreciated!




Subject: Roadster weight
Entered on: Jun 24, 1999 14:08
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I agree with Dennis, The weight plays a part in the feel of the bike.I prefer a steel frame.




Subject: Indian Roadsters
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 10:52
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
I may be a day late and a dollar short (I didn't start following this discussion until a few weeks ago), but has ther been any discussion about the quality vs. price of the Ijndia-made single -speed rod-brake roadsters for sale at www.Retrobbike.com? If those things are actually selling for $395, maybe our DL-1s, Superbes, and the like are more valuable than we thought!




Subject: Modern roadster
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 17:28
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
I think the idea of a Modern roadster bike made with modern materials( not neccessarily aluminium)has real merit, even though I agree wholeheartedly that part of the charm and quality feel of our Raleighs is the greater weight and stability inherent in the design. I had really meant to say that I would THINK a modern bike built more along the lines of our roadsters would be MUCH more logical, and fun to ride, and be much more efficient then those God awful mountain bikes! I have caught myself checking the mt. bikes out in the shops, and thinking how pleasent a bike like ours would be if built with SOME of the technology of those overengieered monstrosities, especially in the wheels. I believe you could have a VERY strong wheel made exactlly like ours, only out of good aluminium. It would stop real well in the wet to boot. Reguardless, I'd never give up on MY DL-1 only to ride a bike like I've described, but I bet they would sell real well.




Subject: Repro Roadsters
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 20:33
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
$395!!! Turn your bike around!!!! I just purchased a Chinese DL-1 copy from Bicycle Arts for onl $159!! And shipping was only $18! (to Oklahoma) That's not bad, when you think about it: Wal-Mart sells those nasty mountain bikes with prices from $80 to $190!!! $159 for something that is ENJOYABLE to ride is not bad. Anyway, Cheers!!




Subject: $395 for an Indian Roadster???
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 21:29
Entered by: Mark R. ()

Message:
From personal experience I'd say $395 for one of those Indian Roadsters is a little steep by about close to three times. Opt for the Chinese Roadsters. They are much better made copies, 'though they too suffer from teething problems. Watch those brakes on the Indians.




Subject: Roadster madness
Entered on: Jun 25, 1999 21:42
Entered by: Kevin (irishhiker@aol.com)

Message:
$395 for an Indian roadster? Look around and you'll probably find a real Raleigh, not a knockoff, for less than $100 (and sometimes a LOT less). I have purchased three nice, 28-inch, rod-brake DL-1s in the past three months. Total outlay: $200. For lovers of English bikes, the good old U.S.of A. this is the Happy Hunting Ground.




Subject: cheap DL-1
Entered on: Jun 26, 1999 04:53
Entered by: Dennis (powelldennis@hotmail.com)

Message:
I wish I knew where you lived, Kevin. I'd come there and hang out at garage sales and frequent thrift shops for a couple weeks. Where I live the only used bikes to be found are WalMart leftovers. When the DL-1 was being sold, most of the roads in my area were unpaved soft sand, so a skinny-tire bike wasn't a good option. So the Happy Hunting Ground for a DL-1 must be somewhere that had lots of pavement in the 50s.




Subject: Hubs
Entered on: Jun 26, 1999 16:18
Entered by: John (Edward Moore) (mooreje1@juno.com)

Message:
I am rebuilding a Robin Hood. It came with an AW hub and someone came along and stole my wheels at the bike shop in which I was working on it. It was a 1952 AW. I was given a 18 58 SW to make up for my loss. Is it the late 50s SW which was famously weak or do I have the model wrong or is that an old wives tale? They also gave me an old shimano 3 speed which they said was virtually identical to an AW. But (I'm crying in my heart) I want a totally English bike. It's nice to know that there are people out here who are interested and knowledgeable. Thanks, John M




Subject: Hubs
Entered on: Jun 27, 1999 12:02
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
John (Edward Moore) told a tale of woe of having his '52 Robin Hood wheels purloined. Neither the SW nor the Shimano 3-speed is a suitable replacement. The SW was notoriously troublesome (though delightful if you get a good one...it's lighter, quieter, more efficient and has a wider range than the AW.) If the SW actually works OK without skipping in high gear, it would be the better choice...but the odds are agin it. I've got an SW on one of my bikes. It works pretty well, but I'm careful to NEVER stand up to pedal it (good idea with Sturmey-Archer hubs in general.) The old Shimano 3-speeds are no-way comparable to the AW. They require a different trigger and cable, and are very failure prone. They were designed for much lighter riders than average Americans. Current Shimano hubs are fine, but the old ones are bad news.




Subject: Shimano 3 Speed
Entered on: Jun 27, 1999 13:05
Entered by: Bob (vonomis@nep.net)

Message:
This on is for Sheldon. Regarding your June 27th posting about the weakness of the Shimano 3 speed, I have a 1984 Shimano 3 speed coaster brake model and I am wondering if it is a good idea to use it on my project bike. Even though I live in a hilly area which requires some (a lot, actually) of standing up to pedal, I only weigh 120 pounds so there wouldn't be as much strain on the rear hub than if I weighed more. Any thoughts on the suitability of this idea would be appreciated. Thanks.




Subject: My first ride on a Brit
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 02:11
Entered by: Dave (flipndave@aol.com)

Message:
I just bought a 67 ladies Robin Hood at a flea market for $10.00. I bought it because the price was right. It is well, used, but almost complete, missing only the chain guard. The rims are a bt rusty, but nothing that an SOS pad can't handle. I put some el cheapo tires on it, greased the bearings, oiled the hub and took it for a spin. I'm traditionally an American bike fan, but I enjoy the way this bike handles so much that I had to come and spout about it. After 30 plus years of riding and hacking up (I hang on the custom message board) American Iron, the first few minutes was a strange feeling, but I quickly got used to the way that the ol' Robin Hood seemed to leed me down the road, as if it knew exactly where I wanted to go. Now I see why there are so many fans of those old British bikes! I was thinking that I could use my Schwinn Continental for a canoe anchor and I can hardly wait to get a mans British frame!




Subject: Sturmey -Archer hubs
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 11:13
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I agree with Sheldon, Never, ever stand up to pedal with a Sturmey hub. Unless it is the A.S.C.fixed gear hub! I can overhaul all of them, and set the gear adjustment perfectly. I still would not stand up to pedal. I can really get up and fly on any one of my fleet of britbikes without much effort.




Subject: Stolen wheelsets?
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 11:34
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
They took your wheelsets? Or did they get thrown out by mistake and they were too ashamed to admit it? You can come up with another set of wheels without much trouble. You could put in a F.W. four speed hub in this bike and enjoy riding more. You do not need to use the S.W. or anything that is not proper for the bike. The A.W. hub is common, with a bit of looking around you can find a four speed hub. The F.W. four speed is nice.I would advertize for a alloy shell F.W. hub(made by Sturmey-Archer) This hub is no longer made, and you will have to look, but they are out there.This is tricky to adjust but worth it.(You can learn to adjust it) Just do not stand up and pedal with any of these hubs.




Subject: Old trick
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 12:33
Entered by: Clarence (none)

Message:
I remember the time a shop owner taught me this trick. We ran the tail light wire thru the fold in the metal edge of the fender(mudguard)connecting the rear light to the dynohub keeping the wire protected and out of the way. It still works.You can't always do it and I wouldn't pry it.




Subject: all original raleigh sprite and sport
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 12:37
Entered by: mark (rodina@rose.net)

Message:
i recently purchased a pair of his and hers raleighs fron an elderly lady one is a sprite one is a sport they are 100% all original and untouched and in very good codition,both are dark green. they are just sitting in my shop they need a good home. i do not know anything about old bikes but one had a 69 model rear hub .and both have perfect brooks leather seats .i paid 150.00 dollars for the pair i knew the were worth at least that much if any one is intrested in buying these bikes or can give me a rough estimate of what they are worth i would really be gratefull.thanks mark 912-498-1975




Subject: Shimano 3-speed coaster hubs
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 14:01
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Don't pass final judgement on shimano hubs yet. Here at OSU I rode a '71 Sears for many years daily equiped with a Shimano 3SC Coaster 3-speed. It never gave me any kind of trouble, even when I would load the rear rack up with 50+ pounds of groceries. The only thing you had to worry about was getting the axle nuts painfully tight after changing a tyre, 'else the wheel would walk out of the drop-outs. Don't like the Shimano triggers, they're plastic & don't have that snappy action that the Sturmey's do. Anyway, time to go ride!!




Subject: Shimano 3-speeds
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 14:46
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
My knock on Shimano 3 speeds was directed to the old freewheeling "333" model. The coaster brake versions tend to be quite reliable, if you can stand riding with a coaster brake (personally, I hate 'em!)




Subject: Stand-Up on a Sturmey 3 spd
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 16:38
Entered by: Phil (moger.graphics@snet.net)

Message:
The comments on standing up on your 3 speed really brought back memories to me. I remember as a kid learning the "hard" way not to stand up (or really be ready if you do). Last year I renewed my interest with a 70 Raleigh Sports and although at a mellow 50 years of age, I don't really want to stand on any bike, I still carry that "don't stand" rule around. After 35 years, I didn't forget. Funny, some guys go through their "mid-life crisis" by buying a 57 Corvette, or a Mazda Miata, or maybe even a 25 year old girl friend........not me, just 3 Sports and a 1978 Super Course.




Subject: Ditto on SA 3spd
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 22:27
Entered by: Stephen (steve@bikeproject.com)

Message:
I guess every kid who grew up with SA hubs has had this experience. I grew up in Florida and fromthe age of 11 rode mybike everywhere. Of course in the summer we wore those cheap flipflops and shorts. I had a Colombia bike with an SA hub. I remember distinctly one time when when I stood up to catch some friends who were riding up ahead racing to get to a playground. Pedaling as hard as I could, standing, the gear slipped. My foot smashed into the pavement and I landed right on the top tube. My foot healed okay, but they had to move me from tenor to soprano in the choir. I'm about out of those Shanghai Forever 28" single speeds. Only have a a dozen or so left in deep dark green.I've still got plenty of the 3 speed 26" jobs.




Subject: Shimano 333 hubs
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 23:02
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
I have ridden many a mile on bikes with Shimano 333 hubs and have never had a problem. Of course I don't stand up. When I returned to biking after many years I was shocked to find that my legs don't support me like they used to. I also found that I couldn't ride hands-off like I did when I was a youth. Wes: when you say you had to crank on the axle nuts or the hub would come out of the dropouts, did the axle slip or turn out? If it turned out, you must have lost the special spacers that keep the axle from turning. Without those you can't keep em' in under high torque pedalling.




Subject: Hercules Tourist
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 23:18
Entered by: Kelly (rdywrsl@hollinet.com)

Message:
Just acquired an apparently vintage bicycle made by Hercules Cycle Co. of Birmingham, England. The only non factory part on this bike is the saddle. It is completely intact and operational but does need a deep massage. Anyone interested?




Subject: Raleigh Super Grand Prix
Entered on: Jun 28, 1999 23:26
Entered by: Stacey ()

Message:
I feel lucky to have found this site after much searching. I have a Raleigh Super Grand Prix 10 speed, purchased in 1979 for about $269. It has been used very little over the years (far less than 100 miles) )...basically stored while I have actively ridden other bikes. It is in what I suppose could be called mint/nr. mint condition. I am considering taking it out on the street. Is this a good idea or should I preserve it? May seem to be a ridiculous questions as it's not very old, but your thoughts are of interest. As a relative Raleigh novice, I wonder...what was the last yr.& model Raleigh manufactured in England? Thanks.




Subject: Re: axle nuts on a Shimano hub
Entered on: Jun 29, 1999 00:07
Entered by: Wes K (kinsler1@hotmail.com)

Message:
Fred, yes, I do have all the axle nuts, and special keyed serated washers (similar to the ones on the S-A hubs and MUCH better than the crappy little one on the 333 hub). Once I took the bike to a local shop here in town to get the 'deluxe treatment' to the rear wheel (new rubber & true it up) when I got it back I probably hadn't been on the bike 5 min. before the axle started creeping out of the drop-out from the torque! The guy's at the shop don't see too many 3-speeds, (not uncommon in Oklahoma) and didn't know that you have to tighten up tighter than a regular hub. I always tighten them up good and tight, but not so tight that they could cause damage. I also oil the threads up good too before I clamp 'em down. Anyway, gotta keep rollin'!!!!