Discussion - Vintage Lightweights...

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Discussion - Vintage Lightweights



Archived discussions: February 23, 1998 through August. 8, 1998

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Subject: CCM Formula 110 speed
Entered on: Jul 30, 1998 11:19
Entered by: Richard ()

Message:
Help! Any information on this bike would be greatly appreciated. All I know is that it is Canadian made in the mid to late sixties and that I bought it off of my neighbor for $20.




Subject: Triumph three speed light weight
Entered on: Aug 3, 1998 16:18
Entered by: david ()

Message:
I have a triumph light weight, three speed in great condition, how much is it? What is the price? A 70's model bike.




Subject: Titan adjustable stem
Entered on: Aug 4, 1998 13:43
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
I recentlyobtained a Titan chrome steel adjustable stem. Who made Titan, and when?




Subject: Sanwa/Yamaguchi/Sekine
Entered on: Aug 4, 1998 19:52
Entered by: Dave (dernst@usinternet.com)

Message:
About 7 years ago I bought a usedbicycle labeled a "Sanwa 250." I love the bike - chrome-moly frame, Dia-Compebrakes, Suntour derailleurs, Sugina crankset. I've become curious about itsorigins. After using several searchengines, I found "Biknet," a TaiwaneseWeb site that gave an address and telephone number for a Sanwa/Yamaguchi/Sekine bicycle companyin Japan. Is there any way I can findsome background information on thiscompany and its bikes short of writingto Japan and hoping for an answer?




Subject: "Titan" stems
Entered on: Aug 6, 1998 03:56
Entered by: Johan ()

Message:
Donīt know exactly what you mean byadjustable, but all swedish racebikesin the 50:s used them. On my bikes fromthat era they are always toghether whith an alloy handlebar with a small mapof France and the names of M. Kint and Shotte. Think they were called Tour de France handlebars. The stems that i haveare all of the same lenght apprxm 80 mm.




Subject: Colnago decals
Entered on: Aug 6, 1998 04:23
Entered by: Johan (johan.eriksson@sabo.se)

Message:
Anyone got any leads on decals for my -73 Colnago Super? Preferably yellowwith black outer edges but anythingfrom the right year will do.




Subject: Adjustable Titan stem
Entered on: Aug 6, 1998 08:41
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
By adjustable, I mean the horizontal part of the stem is held onto the vertical part by an integral clamp and bolt, which allows the stem to extend from about 7cm to about 14cm. Adjustable stems were common on track bikes, especially during the 20s and 30s, and Ambrosio still sold adjustable alloy racing stems as late as 1964.




Subject: Swedish racing bikes
Entered on: Aug 6, 1998 08:48
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
Johan, could you please send me your e-mail address? I'd like to know more about Swedish racing bikes from the 1950s. By the way, the bars you mentioned with M. Kint and Shotte... probably stands for (Marcel?) Kint and Brik Schotte, who were Belgian racers during the 1940s.




Subject: 1972 Schwinn Paramount
Entered on: Aug 6, 1998 20:46
Entered by: Tom (hayesbikes@nls.net)

Message:
21.5" Schwinn Paramount, the touring model, green, with Campy NR, including triple, in near perfect original condition. $1175, e-mail for more information if you are interested.




Subject: Message to: John (KingR4Brit)
Entered on: Aug 7, 1998 10:12
Entered by: Jon (jon.sharratt@mts.com)

Message:
John:Please contact me concerning your Jack Taylor. I am interested!Jon




Subject: Allegros?
Entered on: Aug 7, 1998 14:56
Entered by: Tom (hayesbikes@nls.net)

Message:
Dose anyone out there know anything about Allegros. What was original equipment, which company made them, different models? Somewhere in my moth-ridden memory, I have this idea that Allegros were made by Mondia. Does anyone know if this true? If this is true, do Allegros have the same threading as Mondia as well as spacing. Thanks




Subject: re: Titan adjustable stem
Entered on: Aug 8, 1998 14:00
Entered by: Dana (dana@potatoes.nmt.edu)

Message:
I have a Titan adjustable stem on my Ideor Asso track bike, which I think dates from sometime in the early/mid sixties (due to the 151 bcd Campy inch pitch chainrings, mainly).I could very easily be mistaken about the age.--p.s.- If anyone has a better indication of the age of this bike, I'd be interested!




Subject: Motobecane Jubilee Sport
Entered on: Aug 9, 1998 21:05
Entered by: Fred (webmaster@cybureau.com)

Message:
Anyone heard of a Motobecane Jubilee Sport? It has: Suntour BL derailleurs, Weinmann side-pull brakes, Nervar pedal cranks, Maillard pedals and Heliomatic freewheel, 27x1.25" wheels/tires, Gujdons Phillipe handlebar, and Fourreau Inexternal chrome fork. It has a sticker on the frame which says Inexternal Columbus Gamma Haute Resistence. Motobecane's web info guy tells me it's 4130 chromoly, 0.9MM butted to 0.6mm and back to 0.9mm. Just thought this would be the place for any input. thanks.




Subject: Mercian
Entered on: Aug 14, 1998 12:33
Entered by: Jim (jcole@cc.memphis.edu)

Message:
A friend recently gave me a Mercian frame he's had hanging in his attic for several years. Not too flashy on the graphics, but flawless brazing, durable oven-baked enamel paint, and perfectly pinstriped lugs. I wrote the company for a catalog and sent them the serial number off of my frame to inquire the date of production. Turns out the last two digits of the serial number indicate the year it was made. Mine is an 1986 model and they had the records of who originally ordered it, color, size, etc. If you have some cool vintage parts and you're looking for a frame to hang them on you might consider a Mercian. I noticed they still offer retro-ish options like 120mm rear spacing and nutted brake attachments. Tell them to leave off the braze ons and people will think you have a NOS frame from the late '70s! The graphics seem to have changed little since then, too. You can get a catalog by sending an internationl reply coupon to: Mercian Pontefract Street Ascot Drive Derby DE24 8JD England Jim Cole




Subject: Mercian
Entered on: Aug 16, 1998 16:00
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
My second handbuilt bike was a Mercian "Superlight" ...bought in 1973?...Pure white with delightful scallops carved into the lugs & bbkt...and their traditional head & seat tube transfer with the rider emerginging from a circle (reminds me of the Carlton decal of the 60's -70's) I agree that Mercian carries forward the grand artisan traditional. Maplewood Cyclery in St. Louis MO has been the authorized importer of Mercian to the USA. They had, as of a year ago, very few frames in stock and high prices, especially if one knows the Mercian UK retail prices!....Did they state that they would sell directly to you? (Of course you could be somewhere other than the USA; I may have incorrectly assumed that...) I see ads in Cycling Plus (UK) for custom frames starting at 299LB! Remove VAT and add $75 .00 for air shipping and that is an amazing bargain! Now, amonsgt my collection, I have a Mercian "Olympic" Road bike, which is a straight up 531 prugnat lugged, no frills but beautiful design ..I invite any readers to send me pics of their Mercians for the Clasasic portion of my website: http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Classic_home.htm....... to fill the Mercian section (as yet empty!) Dale Brown oroboyz@aol.com




Subject: Mercian again
Entered on: Aug 17, 1998 11:59
Entered by: Jim (jcole@cc.memphis.edu)

Message:
Yes, Mercian does sell direct to the consumer. Their prices seem quite resonable for the amount of personal attention and great workmanship you receive. When I wrote them the director of the company, D.W. Betton, took the time to send a personal letter. He mentioned he just built a frame for a U.S. customer which is the fifth one the family has ordered over the past 25 years. I posted their mailing address earlier, but their fax numer is (01332) 751033. They seem to be old school all the way and don't have an e-mail address as of yet. I love it! Jim Cole




Subject: Frejus
Entered on: Aug 18, 1998 07:33
Entered by: ed (jaed@ameritech.net)

Message:
Any information on a 1956(my guess) Frejus Torino 27" alloy racing cycle would be helpful




Subject: Garllati road bikes
Entered on: Aug 18, 1998 22:46
Entered by: Dave (iidread@idirect.com)

Message:
I've recently stumbled across an old italian road bike in the trash in my neighborhood. It's a 24" Garlatti (model unknown) made in Parma with an old 10 speed Campy Record gruppo. I've never heard of Garllati so my question is this: What do I have here? Is/was it a reputable name? Can it be upgraded with a modern group (probably Shimano STI)? Thanks.




Subject: Frejus
Entered on: Aug 19, 1998 21:15
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I am not an expert on Frejuws but I know they are prized by some vintage Italianophiles. They were last imported into the USA by Thomas Avenia's shop in NYC He has passed away and been closed for ten years or more. Therefore there were a reasonable bunches in the NE USA. The Frejus bikes were nice to very nice ,i.e., unlike some Italian bike marques, there were not a lot of real cheapos brought in. If in original paint & componentry, and good condition, this brand is a sure pleaser to some collector..........




Subject: Garlatti Bike
Entered on: Aug 19, 1998 21:22
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I am not familiar with Garlatti but if it is complete with an old Campy group, think twice before you strip those parts off and "Up Grade" to new componentry...There are bike builders in every small Italian town plus many more in the larger cities..Also, as in Britain, many shops have "private label" bikes built by good builders...These are all of interest and some are gems! Please! Find a knowledgeable bike shop or vintage buff in your region to look & evaluate your bike before you "modernize" it! If you can find no one who knows much (very possible!) you could send photos or e-mail scanned pics to me & I'll give you an idea of what you have. Dale Brown cycles de ORO 1406 West Northwood St. Greensboro, NC 27408 336-274-5959




Subject: Mercians
Entered on: Aug 20, 1998 13:15
Entered by: Velohund (velohund@yahoo.com )

Message:
I have about 20 bikes, half of which are road bikes. Everything from a Trek 5200 to a Cannondale to beater bikes, 3-speeds, middleweight Schwinns, etc. But my all-time favortite is my purple Merican, which I've owned since 1972. It's been through hell and back with me many times, and if I could have only one bicycle that would be it. It rides absolutely true, and is very responsive (mine has the extra long pinpoint lugs and uncrimped chain stays) yet is bery comfortable. I personally think it blows away the flashy, overrated Italian stuff. VH




Subject: Garlatti
Entered on: Aug 24, 1998 11:01
Entered by: TimH ()

Message:
I agree with Dale, you have a potential collectors bike. When I started working in the bike shop in 1970 one of the owners had a Garlatti. It was well build with fine detail. Tim




Subject: Van Hauwaert Bruhelles?
Entered on: Aug 24, 1998 12:19
Entered by: Ted (tw406@aol.com)

Message:
Anyone know anything about this recent find? Cyrille Van Hauwaert Bruhelles on headbage. Name on sidepull brakes, initial on single chainring and crankarms. 3 cog freewheel. Rear derailler only, 2 piece, forked changer and single wheel tensioner, marked Super Champion. Plessier small flange hubs, rear double sided. Brooks Swallow seat, GB bar and stem. Thanks, Ted




Subject: Cyrille van Hauvaert
Entered on: Aug 24, 1998 13:56
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
Could the last word on the headtube badge be Bruxelles? That's Flemish (I think) for Brussels, Belgium. I've seen is spelled Bruhelles in pre-WW2-era European texts, so maybe it's an old spelling. Anyway, my guess is that the bike is made by or for Cyrille Van Hauwaert, in Brussels, Belgium. Cyrille Van Hauwaert was a Belgian professional road racer 1907 to 1914. He won the 1908 Milano-San Remo and Paris-Roubaix, and the 1909 Belgian Professional Road Championship. Maybe he had a bike company after he retired?




Subject: campy fifty year groups
Entered on: Aug 25, 1998 00:47
Entered by: Brian (gtmstarr@miller.sbceo.k12.ca.us)

Message:
I have two Campy fiftieth anniversary groups for sale. Both are mint and have never been mounted. Is anyone interested?




Subject: R.W.C. "Champion" lightweight
Entered on: Aug 30, 1998 20:06
Entered by: PETER (PBECRONIS @ AOL.COM)

Message:
Can anyone date my R.W.C. "Champion"? It's "Made in Austria", has Campy "Valentino", group, Weinmann brakes and Ambrosio rims (drilled for Schraeder).




Subject: Re: R.W.C.
Entered on: Aug 31, 1998 10:45
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
Exactly what does it say on the front mech and rear derailleur? That should help narrow it down a bit.




Subject: Cinelli 1950s
Entered on: Aug 31, 1998 10:49
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
How can I tell the age of a Cinelli frameset? It's supposedly a mid-50s. Should it have braze-ons for brake cables?




Subject: R.W.C.
Entered on: Sep 1, 1998 22:35
Entered by: PETER (PBECRONIS@AOL.COM)

Message:
Thanks Aldo- the rear d'rer says "Campagnolo", "Valentino", and "Patent". The Front D'rer is an odd box that clamps onto the seatpost and says "Campagnolo", and a world logo is on it, too. Also, the bottom bracket cable guides are Campy clamp-on, too.




Subject: motobecane
Entered on: Sep 2, 1998 10:58
Entered by: steve (sgarskof@email.usps.gov)

Message:
neat discussion group. I had a Motobecane Tour de France 10 speed; got as gift in 1973. It had Huret Deraillers, cottered cranks, Weinmann-Vanquier centerpulls, and the Flying "M" front fork. For it's time, I think it was a solid consumer bike patterned after the racing bikes of the era. I sold it 10 years ago, but they still have it, and I'm thinking of getting it back. Should be a neat project.




Subject: Motobecane team issue (?) bicycle
Entered on: Sep 2, 1998 23:37
Entered by: Michael (MgA27@aol.com)

Message:
I have what I was told was a team issued Motobecane bicycle. When I bought it, it was all Campy Record, high flange 36 hole hubs, Mavic SSC rims, Clement tires, Turbo saddle, 50x43 cranks, 13-24 6 speed, Cinelli 66 bar and R1(?) stem. Was told that it was truely used in Tour de France by Michael Alan when he won the King of the Mountains jersey. Frame is Reynolds 753. Neat bike, I would like to know if anyone has heard of such a model? The frame appears to be custom made, the only thing that shows it to be a true Motobecane are the engraved "M"'s on the seatstays. I remember old advertisements in Bicycling magazine showing the team riding blue bikes with white decals. I would like to restore the bike, but I need some help. Does this sound like a ligit. bike? Could Cycle Art reproduce the proper decals?




Subject: Michael Alan's Motobecane
Entered on: Sep 3, 1998 12:13
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
Michael Alan never won the King of the Mountains jersey in the Tour de France, but perhaps he held the jersey for a stage. When did he race?




Subject: Michael Alan?
Entered on: Sep 3, 1998 13:01
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
I can find no record of anyone named Michael Alan ever participating in the Tour de France. What year did he race?




Subject: Aldo's response to Motobecane team issue
Entered on: Sep 3, 1998 23:26
Entered by: Michael (MgA27@aol.com)

Message:
For some reason the name Michael Alan sticks in my memory, I could, however, be completely wrong. The rider I am thinking of appeared in print ads in cycling magazines in the early 80's. He was definitely riding a Motobecane, and he was wearing the polka dot jersey. His first name may have been Alan or Alain.




Subject: E.G. Bates
Entered on: Sep 4, 1998 20:52
Entered by: Sheldon Brown (CaptBike@sheldonbrown.com)

Message:
I recently bought a very cool E.G. Bates frame, probably of '50s or '60s vintage. It shares characteristics of a road and a track design: rear-opening, non-drop-out fork ends, round fork blades...but mudguard eyelets and generous clearance for 630 mm (27") wheels and mudguards. It has wildly ornate lugwork, with a repeated fleur-de-lis pattern to the edges of the lugs. I've built it up with a Sturmey-Archer ASC 3-speed fixed hub, and am greatly enjoying riding it. I don't know a great deal about Bates, and I'd love to hear from anybody who can enlighten me about this frame. I've put some pictures up at: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bates.html




Subject: a ? about ZEUS road bikes
Entered on: Sep 6, 1998 22:58
Entered by: N. Baldwin (bikehead@rondex.com)

Message:
I would really appreciate it if anybody out there could give me some information on ZEUS. I am looking at a late 60's to early 70's Zeus with french tubing and Zeus parts. From what I understand these parts were made by Campy when some confusion occurred in the patents during the second war. Is this accurate? Was this an expensive bike in its day? I dont remember seeing too many around. Thanks for your help. Could you please e-mail me (bikehead@rondex.com).




Subject: RE: ZEUS
Entered on: Sep 7, 1998 10:44
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz)

Message:
ZEUS was never a manufacturer for Campagnolo. In fact, they were accused of copying Campy designs and at one time sued by Campy for patent infringement (unsuccessfully). In fact Zeus made a range from low quality to very nice components. The absoloute top pieces, the Criterium 2000, were very innovative and exotic, including a very refined alloy freewheel, one of the first. The bikes were similar to the components in that there was a wide range, from fairly rough to pretty neat, although the bikes (frames I should say) do not have the collectablity now that the Zeus parts enjoy. There is currently a bit of an underground flurry of interest in Zeus components, of course the better models being the most desirable. Some of the more basic pieces however are too fundemental to work well or be attractive to old bike buffs. The importer for many years in England was Ron Kitching Co. and they made quite elaborate catalogs that are available in copied form from Chuck Schmidt in Ca (see the resources page in the classic bike section in my web site)..... and studying those is a good way to become familiar with the whole Zeus line, models. etc. Dale Brown cycles de ORO http://www.cyclesdeORO.com




Subject: WTB Sturmey Archer ASC 3 speed FIXED
Entered on: Sep 7, 1998 13:08
Entered by: Scott (sgp@sgpnet.com)

Message:
Looking for 3 speed FIXED SA ASC. If you have one or know someone who does, please let me know. Cheers scott




Subject: Re: Zeus
Entered on: Sep 7, 1998 18:07
Entered by: Bob ()

Message:
I owned a Zeus in the early 70's. The bright green frame was built of French-made Vitus tubing. The components were very similar to Campy NR, though the finish was different. From what I remember, Zeus was able to skirt the patent problem due to Spanish law (where Zeus was made). Something like that. Anyway, it was an excellent frame and the components were as good, if not better than Campy NR at that time. The rear der. shifted better than the circa '72 NR. (That was my experience, at least).




Subject: Schwinn " Circuit"
Entered on: Sep 7, 1998 21:18
Entered by: Dave (ddave532@aol.com)

Message:
Looking for info or a source of info on a Schwinn "Circuit" roadbike , I found used at a shop. Appears to be a lugged steel frame (no sticker left) this was a real nice bike at one time, still is a sweetie. Thanks in advance.




Subject: Zeus
Entered on: Sep 7, 1998 21:32
Entered by: N.Baldwin (bikehead@rondex.com)

Message:
Thanks Dale and Bob for answering my questions about ZEUS for me. If possible I would like to get an opinion for a price range. I am thinking of buying one for $150. The bike is all original. I believe the zeus parts on the bike are at the level of campy nuovo record. any advice?? thanks again




Subject: Zeus
Entered on: Sep 8, 1998 00:36
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
By (buy!) ZEUS!! For that amount you can hardly go wrong! I would be happy to snap it up if you don't want it...If it is the NR level that is doubly true!




Subject: Zeus
Entered on: Sep 8, 1998 13:02
Entered by: Ted (tw406)

Message:
I have a Zeus as well. They are kinda cool in an offbeat sorta way. Velo Retro also sells a large reproduced Zeus catalog from the 70's if you relly want to see all the components and frame models. All the rear deraillers I've seen have been more a copy of the old Campagnolo steel Record or Gran Sport, not alloy as NR. Ted




Subject: Raleigh Grand Sports
Entered on: Sep 8, 1998 17:04
Entered by: Chris (vna.vnacb@memo.volvo.com)

Message:
Sorry if this question has been asked a dozen or more times previously, but....I was recently given a Raleigh Grand Sports. It's Reynolds 531, with a combination of Stronglight, GB, and Simplex stuff on it, as well as a Brroks B15 (?). How did this bike rate from a quality standpoint, and is there any way to date it? Thanks.




Subject: Raleigh Gran Sport
Entered on: Sep 8, 1998 21:15
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
My first "good" bike was a Gran Sport which I bought new in '72 or so..It had the white enamel paint with Carlton blue head tube and seat tube bands abnd the neat carlton "rider" badge. Mikne was unusiuual in that it had a Zeus crankset and bbkt. The Simplex plastic, oops, "Delrin" derailleurs and Weinmann centerpulls were standard on others I've seen. There are more precise historians on the net for Raleigh, but I think the time span for Gran Sport, in that aprox. form, was 1969 to 1975? Interestingly, the "Competition" at the time I bought mine was virtually the same bike but in color and tires (It had sewups and cost just a few dollars more.) That changed quickly the next year though to include a full sloping fork crown and other details. Check out this site: http://www.pipeline.com/~tforhan/periodic.htm ....for a "periodic table of Raleighs."




Subject: R.W.C.
Entered on: Sep 9, 1998 07:52
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
According to "Catologo Campagnolo", the "Valentino Super" wasn't in catalog #14 (1958), but first appeared in cat.15 (1967) and disappeared by cat.16 (1969). The "Valentino Extra" first appeared in cat.16, and disappeared by cat.17A supplement (1979). If your rear derailleur just says "Valentino", then I'm not certain when it was made. Anyone else?




Subject: Michael's Motobecane
Entered on: Sep 9, 1998 07:59
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
Michael, could the name you're looking for be Alain Bondue? He raced the Tour de France for La Redoute - Motobecane in 1984 and 85. Or, what about Robert Alban, 1982-84?




Subject: columbus tubing?
Entered on: Sep 9, 1998 16:45
Entered by: Tom (hayesbikes@nls.net)

Message:
Could someone please tell me about Columbus tubing? I recently bought a bike with a Columbus decal on it, a Colnago, and it says "special" in Italian. Is this a different type of tubing, or is a generic tubing from Columbus? I am familiar with SL and SLX Columbus, but not with this. Thank you.




Subject: Columbus tubing
Entered on: Sep 10, 1998 06:39
Entered by: Johan ()

Message:
If the decal is gold coloured (old one) or in blue and (sort of) bronze(newer but still old) and just says Columbus "acciaio speciali" it is Columbus SL.




Subject: Columbus Tubing designations
Entered on: Sep 10, 1998 20:20
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
For a great many years, from the earliest "foil" style decals in the 1960's, through the 1980's, the Columbus decals, if they didn't say otherwise in the printed text, could have meant SL, SP, PL or PS, or a mix of these sets. Record tubing also did not have it's own decal until later in it's somewhat limited use. Cheaper sets, Aelle, Matrix, Chromor & Tre Tubi, all had their distinct decals stating what they were. Then when KL, SLX , SPX & TLX were introduced, all variations started having dedicated decals including all the maker's variations like Colnago's special sets. So, for instance, a 1975 Italian bike, size 59 CM, might have Columbus decal and could be all SL, part SL and part SP or all SP! (That is the size range where builders often used heavier tubing for the bigger riders) Clear as mud now? Dale




Subject: Raleigh Grand Prix
Entered on: Sep 10, 1998 22:05
Entered by: Fred (redl944@aol.com)

Message:
Last winter I bought a Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed at a flea market in FL. It is in good shape mechanically but shabby in the cosmetics department. It is all original and fitted out with a computer(the brains are missing), toe straps, a flic stand (I love em'), and a really trick mirror whose mounting is integrated with the brake lever. The only time I rode it any distance I found it to be a good, fast mount. Where does this bike fit in the lineup? I have no idea of its age but assume it was manufactured in the 70's. The bike was sold in Ithaca NY and I live 50 miles away so it has almost come home. I would appreciate any information anyone can furnish about this bike.




Subject: Raleigh Grand Prix
Entered on: Sep 11, 1998 08:04
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
The Grand Prix was the top seller in the early 70's and was one model up from the bottom in the "racing" style bike lineup. It sold for around $125 in 1972-75, right in there with the Peugeot UO-8, and similar models from Gitane, Jeunet, Mercier, etc. The Schwinn Varsity was a lesser bike and cost less and the Continental more was $. Typical of all these starter 10 speeds was the standard steel frame (not 531 or chromoly)usually tagged "1020 high tensile steel" or some proprietary name ("special Peugeot".) The components were either Weinmann (on the Grand Prix) or Mafac centerpull brakes, plastic Simplex derailleurs, chrome steel rims with 27 x 1 1/4" tires, Atom/Maillard quick release hubs, often (especially earlier editions) a second tier leather saddle (Wrights BIM, etc.) These bikes were essentially touring geometry and rode rather well. There are thousands out there and because of their high availability, their collectibilty has not been high thus far, although eventually that will happen. The next model up in the line up ussually was a very much racier model ofteen with sewups (Raliegh Super Course with 3 tubes 531, Gitane Interclub, etc.) Dale Brown




Subject: Raliegh Competition GS
Entered on: Sep 11, 1998 11:32
Entered by: George (worktodo@msn.com)

Message:
Recently acquired a Competition GS at police auction. The frame is made in England with 531 (all tubes). The only remaining orginal parts are Campy Nuovo Gransport derailleurs and a three arm spider campy crank. Anyone have info on this model or its age? The BB has a serial number with the last 2 digits "57".




Subject: Raleigh Comp GS
Entered on: Sep 11, 1998 19:17
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
The Retro Raleighs! site should have info on dating your bike. Check out http://www.speakeasy.org/%7Etabula/raleigh/raleigh-home.html I have a '73 Competition frame with rather interesting lug work. I'm in need of a fork (62.5cm frame) if anyone has one laying around.




Subject: Raiegh Competition GS
Entered on: Sep 12, 1998 08:21
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
The Competition GS was for the Campy Gran Sport "gruppo" equipment, (although I'm pretty sure it didn't have the brakes....?) Is the bike Black? There were also some purple Competitions but again I don't think in the GS version. I just skipped over to the Retro Ralieghs site (http://www.speakeasy.org/~tabula/raleigh/raleigh-home.html)and it lists gold, black & silver as colors for this bike. I recall the silver after reading that, but I truthfully don't remember a gold version but memory fades.........They definetely were in the 1976-79 era.




Subject: Anyone have a set of Weinmann centerpulls apropriate for '74 Raleigh?
Entered on: Sep 14, 1998 23:39
Entered by: Colin (kakerlak@flash.net)

Message:
would like a set of Weinmann centerpull brakes, as were original equipment on a '74 Raleigh International. I don't need levers, and am not looking to pay a fortune.




Subject: Anyone have the calamp-on mount for NR shifters?
Entered on: Sep 15, 1998 17:44
Entered by: Colin (kakerlak@flash.net)

Message:
I could use a campy clamp on mount for Nuovo Record shifters. I don't need the levers and hardware themselves, just the mount.




Subject: firestone
Entered on: Sep 15, 1998 21:37
Entered by: Aaron (michelle reinwald gte.net)

Message:
I recently purchased a Firestone custom Deluxe. It is a midsize bike, black and red with a book rack on the back. If anyone has any info, I would like to hear any info about it. thank you.




Subject: Chiorda - Italian Road Bike
Entered on: Sep 16, 1998 01:30
Entered by: Ron (Chiorda@aol.com)

Message:
Could anyone tell me some history on the Chiorda 10 speeds coming out of Italy in the late 60's/ early 70's. I'm looking for all the info I can get. Thanks




Subject: Chiorda Bicycles
Entered on: Sep 16, 1998 10:49
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Chiorda bikes are very similar to the more familiar Italian makers' lines like Atala, etc., in that most of the bikes that were imported and therefore commenly seen are models that are pretty fundemental and routine..with mild steel frames, plastic Simplex or lower end Huret derailleur system, basic side or centerpull brakes, etc. In the 1970's there were quite a few Chiordas even being sold in non-bike shop outlets... All of which has lead some of us to think of the marque as a cheapo and having a not particularly attractive image. However, I was surprised later to see a few really nice Pro level Chiordas and learned that they sponsored Pro riders and in fact had a whole dimension above what my earlier perceptions were! The fact remains that most Chiordas out there in the marketplace are nice but mundane bikes which do not have refined workmanship or components and which are not going to attract a strong collector group unless some of these higher end models are brought to our collective attention! Pictures of a truly nice Chiorda would be welcome in my Classic Bike Rendezvous website and would help claim attention for the higher quality bikes produced under that label! (access through cyclesdeoro.com) Dale Brown




Subject: Choirda Bicycles
Entered on: Sep 17, 1998 01:07
Entered by: Ron (Chiorda@aol.com)

Message:
Dale - Thanks for the info. Ye indeed Chiorda was involved in the professional cycling scene. I do know they sponsored ravers in the Tour de France and the Giro de Italia in 1965. They also had some involvement it professional cyclocross around that time. I live in Tennenssee and around here I haven't seen any Chiorda's anywhere. My first road bike was a Chiorda...and even back in '71, I was the only one around here that even heard of one.




Subject: Asuki 10 speeds
Entered on: Sep 17, 1998 06:27
Entered by: Ron (chiorda@aol.com)

Message:
What can anyone tell me about the Asuki ( or maybe Azuki ) 10 speeds mfg'd that flooded in the USA with Nishiki's back in the mid to late 70's. Also...are they still around ?




Subject: Centurion
Entered on: Sep 17, 1998 06:31
Entered by: Ron (Chiorda@aol.com)

Message:
I was in Europe this summer and noticed several Centurion road bikes. More so than I usually see around here. Are they still imported in Europe ? I have an Ironman and have been very pleased with it.




Subject: Azuki Bikes and Centurion Bikes!
Entered on: Sep 18, 1998 20:39
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Azuki was the "second" line for the same folks who made Nishiki...In the huge bike boom of the early 70's, manufacturers and importers were selling everything they could get their hands on and awarding dealerships pell mell. Nishiki was so popular in the medium to larger towns that every shop wanted to sell the line but those who already had been selling Nishikis wanted exclusivity..They cleverly solved the problem by having a virtually identical (but not as many models)second line that the importer could sell to the guy across the street from the existing Nishiki dealer without anyone getting mad! RE: Centurion...When Western States Imports (the inventors of the USA Centurion and Diamondback brands)wanted to take their successful USA bikes to Europe and Australia, they discovered that other folk had previously licensed that "Centurion" name in those markets..They then abandoned the name entirely in favor of Diamondback (hitherto only used that name for Mountain & BMX bikes)The bikes you might see now labeled Centurion, are not related to the ones we had here................




Subject: Peugeot UO-8?
Entered on: Sep 18, 1998 22:28
Entered by: Tom (hayesbikes@nls.net)

Message:
I wonder if someone can provide me with information about the rarity of a Peugeot I recently picked up. Everything about it is usual--the cottered crank, the centerpull Mafac brakes with safety levers, simplex plastic derailleurs, odd mounting of shifters, white with black linings around lugs--except it has custom full chrome fenders, rear rack, and integrated lighting system. The rear rack is integrated with the rear chrome fender and the lights are integrated with the fenders, and the lighting system runs through specific holes in the frame, and the left rear seat stay has a mounting for the generator. Was this model different than the UO-8, or was is simply a variation of that model, say the "touring model" of UO-8? Is this a common bike from the seventies? Does it have special value? Thanks for information.




Subject: Re: NR Clamp-on shift lever bosses
Entered on: Sep 19, 1998 09:07
Entered by: Greg (Me2uNowell@aol.com)

Message:
Colin. Contact Mike at www.bicycleclassics.com. He has (or had when I worked there for a bit...) NOS Campy clamp-on shift lever bosses for a reasonable price. He has all kinds of goodies. Check it out. Tell him I sent you. Greg.




Subject: Cornado
Entered on: Sep 19, 1998 14:03
Entered by: Matt ()

Message:
Has anyone heard of Cornado bicycles? Mine looks like it's from the late seventies, with Mafac centerpull brakes, a 3T stem, crowned fork and really nice lugs. Is it worth anything at all? thanks.




Subject: Peugeot UO-8
Entered on: Sep 19, 1998 21:46
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Sounds like you have a euro-version of the UO-8...That's cool,but don't hold your breath waiting for those models to appreciate a lot. They are very nice bikes, but there were a jillion sold..That UO-8 model and the Raleigh Grand Prix must have been the big winners sales-wise in the 1970's bike boom.




Subject: bottom bracket generators
Entered on: Sep 22, 1998 00:25
Entered by: Richard (rickkatz@mail.icongrp.com)

Message:
I recently burned out my last Sanyo bottom bracket generator. I have previously used both Sanyo and Soubitez (French) on my touring and commuting bikes and looking for a replacement. I haven't seen any around for several years. Does anybody know of any NOS Sanyo BB generators?




Subject: Peugot PX-10
Entered on: Sep 22, 1998 00:29
Entered by: Richard (rickkatz@mail.icongrp.com)

Message:
I have several NOS (complete bike in box) PX-10's. I am looking for a source of info. on the history of this model. I think it was manufactured for several years with little change. These bikes are all Simplex Prestige, Normandy hubs, Mafac brakes, and leather Ideale saddles. Any info. appreciated. Thanks.




Subject: Schwinn Super Sport
Entered on: Sep 23, 1998 00:33
Entered by: Richard (rickkatz@mail.icongrp.com)

Message:
Does anybody know what model Brooks saddle the Schwinn Super Sports (circa early 70's) came with as orig. equip. Thanks.




Subject: Schwinn Super Sports Brooks Saddle
Entered on: Sep 23, 1998 11:32
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I'm pretty sure that the Super Sports came with a Brooks B17-N (narrow)




Subject: Peugeot PX 10s
Entered on: Sep 23, 1998 11:37
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
There were a bunch of PX10s over the years ... they even had extra suffix letters to further complicate things like PX10-LE, etc. I have a completely restored bike similar to what you describe that you have...It is early 70's, but the PX10 nomenclature went from the mid 60's through the mid 80's, I'm pretty sure.




Subject: Schwinn Super Sports Brooks Saddle
Entered on: Sep 23, 1998 13:30
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
My first new Schwinn was a '73 Super Sport. I don't remember the model, but the Brooks saddle was narrow and had the small copper rivets. I'll check with my brother as he still has his.




Subject:
Entered on: Sep 23, 1998 23:20
Entered by: Art (hesstamiart@earthlink.net)

Message:
I have two bikes that I can't identify. Nitta bicycle on downtube. Japanese (?) characters on fenders and chainguard. Two headbadges, one TRUCK CYCLE, other in Japanese. 3 piece crank. Rod brakes and rear drum brake. 26 in tires. Other has KHS(?) badge. Alum aero tubing. Some shimano ax. Looking for unigue old touring bike or frame. 57c. thanks.




Subject: Campy Rally Der.
Entered on: Sep 24, 1998 11:46
Entered by: Jim (jcole@cc.memphis.edu)

Message:
Can anyone tell me the years of production for the two different Campagnolo Rally rear derailleurs? I'm guessing the earlier model is the one with the cast upper body. The later version looks more like a basic NR with a long cage. Thanks! - Jim Cole




Subject: RE: Chiorda
Entered on: Sep 24, 1998 15:36
Entered by: Alan (alancline@netscape.net)

Message:
I did a little research on this marque after aquiring a particularly nice example a couple of years back. Felice Gimondi rode a Chiorda before joing Bianchi including his TDF winning ride. Mine is a '71 "Gimondi Anniversary" model and is top notch in construction quality. I've seen many bikes after blasting (awaiting paint) and this one is exceptional.I had some correspondence with a fellow (Alex -southern CA) that had restored one identical to mine. He contacted Mr. Gimondi regarding replacement decals and such and passed on the following info to me: Bianchi bought the Chiorda name, this particular model was made in Bianchi's reparto corsa workshop, only 60 were imported into the U.S., and they had a special decal set that read Felice Gimondi on the ST-Chiorda on the DT-and a foil head decal with Gimondis face on the headtube. There was an importer in the Southern CA area. In an issue of Winning a couple of years ago they did a photo essay on the 5 riders who had won 5 tours and riding along side King Eddy is Gimondi on a Chiorda.




Subject: Campy Rally rear mechs
Entered on: Sep 24, 1998 22:20
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
The first Rally (slant parallelogram design)was introduced at the same time as Super Record at the winter bike shows in 1973-74. I do not have info on the newer, cheaper version's intro (Which really like a Gran Sport in it's body) Check out the Campy time line in my Classic Bike Rendezvous site: http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Classic_home.htm




Subject: Paramount "Sprint" Frames
Entered on: Sep 26, 1998 20:54
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
I'm getting ready to auction a Schwinn Parts & Accessories dealer catalog from 1975 on eBay and as I was going though it I noticed a listing in the Paramount frame section for the normal models P-13, P-10, P-14 (road racing, touring, & track) offered with a "Sprint Frame Design" -- and different part numbers. I know Schwinn offered their low/mid level Sprint models that year (and the year prior) with a curved seat tube to give a shorter wheel-base. Are these Paramount frames the same design (curved seat tube)? I have never run across one before (not that that means much). Anyone else care to comment?




Subject: Firenze Road Bike
Entered on: Sep 28, 1998 09:14
Entered by: Ron (Chiorda@aol.com)

Message:
Does anyone know a little bit about Firenze Road Bikes ? I was wondering if it was a late 70's or early 80's "invasion" bike. My guess is early 80's. The serial # is PY87010358. It has DNP components, lugged frame, center pull brakes, and a pretty nice paint finish on it. Any info would be appreciated.




Subject: silver king -silver queen
Entered on: Sep 28, 1998 21:46
Entered by: jeff (thehuffs@erinet.com)

Message:
I recently aquired 2 very old bikes.A silver king and a silver queen.There is no other writingor model number.They are both aluminum frame.If anyone could knows the maker or any info regarding these bikes please email me.I have no idea what year they are but appear very old. THNX




Subject: Firenze Road Bike
Entered on: Sep 28, 1998 23:22
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Sorry to be the bearer of ill tidings, but Firenze was a bicycle that began the Taiwan influx..And before T-town bikes were mechanically acceptable. In our region, these bikes were given away with a purchase of $500 or so in various appliance stores & discount centers. They were often 15 Speeds(!) and the naive owners would call our shop, thinking they had obtained a desirable commodity, trying to sell the things. The most serious flaw in many of the Firenzes was the slotted rear hub spoke holes...the poorly built wheels would loosen up and the spokes start falling out! The spokes themselves were of such soft metal that they also would start pulling themselves straight at the curve near the head! Amazing! As you stated, these things actually look 1/2 way decent from afar.......Sad, sad.




Subject: Firenze Road Bikes
Entered on: Sep 29, 1998 08:42
Entered by: Ron (Chiorda@aol.com)

Message:
Thanks for the info Dale. Actually the news isn't bad. The wheels on the bike aren't original, the finish is good, and I picked it up at a garage sale dirt cheap. So...I can say I own a "vintage" bike of the T-town invasion era - Ha. And by the way...It is a 15 speed. You really know your bikes !




Subject: Lygie
Entered on: Sep 30, 1998 16:47
Entered by: Daniel (steelehoyer@earthlink.net)

Message:
I've got 2 Lygie bikes one with Campy Record the other with Gran Turisimo. Can anybody tell be about Lygie? I know they were an Italian Company and that the bikes came from I.Martin in LA.




Subject: Raleigh 20-30 tubing
Entered on: Oct 4, 1998 06:19
Entered by: Andy (marchantshapiro@yahoo.com)

Message:
Not long ago, I bought a Raleigh Grand Prix (my second--my first was back in '78 or so) and I've been transmogrifying it into something fun. NOW--I wrote to Raleigh, and they sent me back some nice information, including the fact that the frame was made of "Raleigh 20-30" tubing (consistent with the damaged decal on the seatpost). Is this the same as 1030 hi-tensile, or is it something else? Just curiosity, as it won't matter all that much to me (like I'm gonna break the bike, or worry about a few pounds when I weigh 210!). Any info appreciated.




Subject: RE: Lygie
Entered on: Oct 4, 1998 23:49
Entered by: Scott (sgp@sgpnet.com)

Message:
Lygies were pretty much a second tier Club quality bike that came with components far better than the frames themslves. They were made for riders who wanted a good quality Campy Nuovo Record kit but who were unable to afford a Cinelli or Masi. etc. I. Martin was the major west coast importer on the bike and they still have two on the wall there. I own own that I'm gutting the parts to put on a more desirable frame. scott




Subject: Motobecane Le Champion
Entered on: Oct 5, 1998 23:24
Entered by: Doug (riderktm@aol.com)

Message:
I have this 1978(Ithink)Motobecane Le Champion. I bought it new in 1979. It is mint, I never road it until recently when I got into mountain biking and needed a road trainer. The bike is completetly original except for tires and tubes(dryrot). It has lesss than 400 miles. It is 59cm 531 frame and fork. Campy Nuovo Record derailers and seat post, Mallaird 700 hubs and Rigida rims, Wienmann Carrea side pull brakes. The cranks are works of art, drilled stronglights. The components look like they just came out of the box, no wear or scratches. I want to sell the bike but do not want to give it away. Where should I advertise and how much should I ask. Since I recently got back into biking I am stuck on the modern style click shifting. Any help would be welcomed. Thanks, Doug




Subject: Jack Taylor
Entered on: Oct 6, 1998 16:56
Entered by: Jim (jcole@cc.memphis.edu)

Message:
Can anybody provide a brief history of Jack Taylor frames? I was under the impression at least one of the brothers was still involved in the building of frames until the mid-80's or so. Those custom racks on their touring model are really works of art. Any help would be appreciated. There are a couple of cool pictures of the Taylor brothers and some bikes on Dale Brown's fantastic Cycles de Oro web site at www.cyclesdeoro.com if anyone is curious. - Jim




Subject: Vintage Lightweight Values
Entered on: Oct 6, 1998 19:07
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
Not sure how I missed this one (maybe it's new?), but in addition to all the other wonderful stuff on Sheldon Brown's site is a "Wild Guesses of Value for Selected Vintage Lightweights" page. It's divided into two sections alphabetically -- here's the first -- http://www.sheldonbrown.com/vrbn-a-f.html




Subject: Coventry Eagle
Entered on: Oct 7, 1998 04:38
Entered by: Don (ddeibel@morgan.ucs.mun.ca)

Message:
I recently picked up a rusted and abused Coventry Eagle 10-speed road bike from somebody's junk pile. I'm guessing that it was made in the middle 1970's but I'm not sure. I am looking for information about the mark, including factory history and the history of the model that I have. Does anyone know anything about Coventry Eagles? Is there a homepage for the mark? Thanks. Don




Subject: Coventry Eagle
Entered on: Oct 7, 1998 15:19
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
We sold Coventry Eagles at my first bike shop job in 1973. They were made by Falcon of England, who at the same period of time made bikes under their own name as well as the Eddy Merckx labeled bikes. The Coventry Eagles were a smaller line (fewer models and no really fancy versions) and were kind of like Azuki was to Nishiki. 90% of the bikes I remember were white with a 3D headbadge!




Subject: Bennotto Road Bikes
Entered on: Oct 7, 1998 15:35
Entered by: Ron (Chiorda@aol.com)

Message:
My neighbor has a couple of really beautiful bikes. They have a sloped top tube and nicely finished. They are Bennotto's and one of them has a disc rear wheel actually signed by "Bennotto" himself at a bike show. My neighbor won't even ride them in the driveway. They are both in his family room. What do you know about Bennotto's and more specifically, are these particular bicycles worth a lot. He has them right next to his Spaceliner ( I've seen him ride that one - ha ).




Subject: Benotto
Entered on: Oct 7, 1998 21:37
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Benotto was, in the pre-1980's, a marque of much reknown & prestige. They were ridden by Pro teams and the top of the line models were as beautifully crafted as any. They also were one of the earliest makers to use silver brazing alloy in the construction. The "signature" color was a champagne metallic and virtually all of the best models used this color.Somnetimr3e in the late 70's or early 80's Benotto openned a factory in Mexico anfd went for a larger market, higher production. The subsequent bikes were not of the same level as the Italian produced bikes. Also, the champagne color was slowly retired and White became the most commen color of the newer versions, especially in the fancier models. Your neighbor has time trial bike(s)if they have sloping top tubes. The disc on the rear would also indicate this... I would also bet they had 26" (i.e., smaller) front wheels and were of the 1980's production. There was a distributor for the Mexican made Benottos in Florida when they were last heard of.




Subject: ATALA COMPETIZIONE
Entered on: Oct 8, 1998 23:43
Entered by: David (davidler@aol.com)

Message:
I am looking for decals for my 1970's era Atala Competizione. The Letters spelling Atala were white block letters with gold trim. Also, there was a blue sticker on the top tube which said competizione. Also does anyone have any old literature and know what happened to Atala. Are they still in business?




Subject: Columbus Tubing
Entered on: Oct 8, 1998 23:46
Entered by: David (davidler@aol.com)

Message:
Does anyone know about columbus tubing labels. I have an Atala bike from the early 70's which has columbus double butted tubing. It had a decal in gold with a dove on it. Is this the SL or SLX or some other type? Also, how does columbus compare with Reynolds 531?




Subject: ATALA STILL IN ITALY
Entered on: Oct 9, 1998 17:09
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
Yes, ATALA is still alive and well, though they no longer have a US importer. I contacted them several months ago about decals for my 72 Atala Record Competition, and they said they'd be able to provide them. Go to www.atala.it. By the way, I think the sight's in Italian, so take your dictionary!




Subject: Early Schwinn Paramount Parts
Entered on: Oct 13, 1998 20:43
Entered by: Rod (rsjinks@swbell.net)

Message:
Looking for early 1940's to 1950's 3-arm Paramount crankset, bottom bracket, and seatpost. Any leads would be appreciated. Thanks, Rod




Subject: Fuji Espree
Entered on: Oct 13, 1998 22:44
Entered by: Clive Miller (clivem@hevanet.com)

Message:
I recently purchase this Fuji Espree that I am guessing was made in late 70's, early 80's. The triple Sugino crank caugt my eye and I intend to restore as a commuter/rain bike. The decals are mostly unreadable. I am wondering if anyone knows specs on tubing that this bike was built from.




Subject: Fuji Espree Tubing
Entered on: Oct 14, 1998 10:09
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I am pretty sure that model was made with a tubing they (Fuji) called "VaLite," about which there was much debate at the time as to what it actually was... The catalogs, as I recall, said it was a Vanadium alloyed steel of wondrous properties, but many of us suspecteed it was a nice, moderately inexpensive, possibly seamed, steel. As in "badge engineering," the bike companies often have taken a somewhat mundane element, renamed it and then hyped it up as being unique. Nonetheless, the Espree was a well made Japanese bike (they soon shifted to Taiwan) and was certainly a decent ride.




Subject: miniciclo
Entered on: Oct 16, 1998 21:12
Entered by: john (bass1@the-bridge.net)

Message:
i need to know if anyone can give me any info on a bike called a 'miniciclo' it is not a race bike,but it is a lightwieght bike that folds down in half,has quick clamps on the seat,bars,etc. it is orange and chrome ,in good shape,and was last licensed in '75.whats it worth?where did it come from?etc. please e-mail me if anyone knows.thanx.




Subject: Roberts touring frame circa 1979-80
Entered on: Oct 17, 1998 23:52
Entered by: Richard (rickkatz@mail.icongrp.com)

Message:
I recently came across a beautiful red touring frame made by Roberts (in England). Does anybody know anything about this builder and the quality of his frames. Is he still making frames? Thanks




Subject: Charles Roberts bikes
Entered on: Oct 20, 1998 23:22
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Charles Roberts has passed away but the concern continues in Croyden, England by family members. Perhaps another reader would know the intricacies of the family, but I think one son has broken away on his own and also makes bikes. Charles himself was considered a top builder and had a strong following. I have a very unusual Time Trial model he made that was a featured bike in the 1977 New York Bike Show (On display in my shop... Come visit!)In any case, the Roberts frames were imported in the 70's & early 80's by the small distributor (Bob & Judy!) Cycle Imports in Cornish, Maine. There were never a lot of them, so preserving whatever we find is important!




Subject: Tubulars and Brooks Swallow
Entered on: Oct 21, 1998 05:04
Entered by: Johan (johan.eriksson@sabo.se)

Message:
1/What years were the original Brooks Swallow produced? 2/What is the widest and most retro-looking tubular awailable? What tubular (still manufactured) to use on fourties to sixties classics? 3/Anyone knowing anything of reproduced rim labels? 4/If there are any other swedes out there interested in vintage lightweights, contact me.




Subject: Peugot UO8 and PX-10
Entered on: Oct 21, 1998 21:24
Entered by: carl (carlo@ttlc.net)

Message:
I have a UO-8 in excellent condition. Used for one summer Green. And a PX-10 orginal Owner in good condition White Make me an offer




Subject: RE: Campy Rally rear der
Entered on: Oct 22, 1998 00:02
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Dale: Your reply about Campy Rally derailers threw me at first. I was unaware that Campy (or ant other manufacturer for that matter) made a slant parallelogram rear der in the 70's. I the nrealized that it was the nomenclature that had me confused. I think the early Rally 9 with the cast top body) is more properly called a "twin pivot" based on the drop paralellogram design, as the parallellogram moves in but not down, as in the Suntour design. As understand it "slant parallelogram" refers to its orientation to the freewheel, and not the cluster, that is, the jockey wheel moves down (to accommodate larger cogs) as it moves in). At the time period you indicate, Suntour held the patent on the lant parallellogram design. The first gen Rally really resembles the old Shimano Crane GS der. That said. I'd like to cast my vote for it as the most underated Campy der ever. I've been running one, with a Super Record cage, for the last 7-8 years ($20.00 when Euro-Asia was blowing the out), and set up this way, it's a much nicer shifting derailer over today's road standard 53-39 rings, a combo which has Nuovo and Super Records straining at their limits. Put some cheap Shimano blue pulleys on it (deeper cut teeth to better control today's more narrow and flexible chains) and run a piece of index housing to the rear braze on (to more precisely control der movement over narrow six and seven speed clusters) and you have the best shifting der Campy (never) made. Friction shifting to rival indexing and all with the "Classic Class" so characteristic of Campy.




Subject: Campag Rally 1st gen
Entered on: Oct 23, 1998 09:38
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Louis, you are exactly correct.. I was being a little sloppy in my descriptions! "Dual pivot, drop parallelogram" is a much better description! It's just a mouth full! The key word that is incorrect is "slant"... as the Suntour patented design had an angular twist in the parallelogram body to allow the unique action that allowed it to follow the profile of the cog set.. And I agree this Rally derailleur was a class act. Those tune up tips you mention are valuable for any vintage derailleur. An interesting note- There was a tremendous antagonistic reaction to this Rally derailleur design after its introduction by Italian enthusiasts. It seems that the Shimano Crane-like looks put them off, the inference being that Camapagnolo was not "leading" in design work but following the Japanese! This offended their nationalistic pride and forced Campagnolo engineers to stick with the "high pivot" design for some years to come.....




Subject: Colnago
Entered on: Oct 23, 1998 10:22
Entered by: tom (lichen@global.co.uk)

Message:
I am in the market for a 60's-70's colnago frame ....anyone know where to look?




Subject: teledyne titan 4 sale
Entered on: Oct 25, 1998 23:27
Entered by: bill (jbsdiving@aol.com)

Message:
i have a great clasic racer i'm considering selling. does anybody know a good brodcast e-mail method to get the 4-sale flyer with pics out there?




Subject: Re: New place for Stuff for Sale.....
Entered on: Oct 26, 1998 00:44
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I have just added a free, Vintage Lightweight Only, "For Sale or Want to Buy" section in my web site. I know this is discussion forum, not intended for selling, etc. so perhaps this is something that will catch on and be a benefit to those of us into lightweight old bikes. http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/buy__sell.htm I also have added a lot to the classic bikes sections...Still a lot more to go. Please check it out and see if you have stuff to fill in the empty spots. Thanks to the folks who have already sent info & pics. I'm processing new pics & goodies now. http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Classic_home.htm Thanks, Dale




Subject: Cazenave Bicycles
Entered on: Oct 26, 1998 15:46
Entered by: Jim (roslof@dcim.com)

Message:
Does anyone have information on the brand "Cazenave"? I recently obtained a Sam Benotto Cazenave. Its similar to many French imports of the Bike boom era... Universal cranks, Simplex f&r derailers,Shimano Tourney centerpulls w/ Dura Ace levers, Normandy hubs. Interestingly (to me) my first "new" road bike was a Cazenave.




Subject: Info on Schwinn Super Sport Saddle
Entered on: Oct 26, 1998 22:42
Entered by: Tom (tomk@access.digex.net)

Message:
FYI, I checked my SS in the basement, and it is/was a Brooks B15 saddle. This is a 1972 model.




Subject: Cazenave
Entered on: Oct 27, 1998 12:05
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
I looked at one for sale on the Web a while back. I passed on it, but put the pics up for the seller to use if he needed to. I haven't heard back on whether it sold or not and can't remember the particulars. See the bike (with an e-mail link to the seller)at: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/9338/73cazenave.html




Subject: Holdsworth
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 11:52
Entered by: Mark (mdolson@mge.com)

Message:
Does anyone have info regarding Holdsworth bikes? I have a late 70's model in mint condition and would like additional information on its origin, etc. Thanks, mdolson@mge.com




Subject: Holdsworth
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 15:13
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
Check out Dale's page at http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/holdsworth_home.htm or Sheldon's at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/vrbn-a-f.html




Subject: Ideor Bikes
Entered on: Oct 30, 1998 20:24
Entered by: bob (bobd33@hotmail.com)

Message:
Hi everyone. hey what a cool site. i just found it a few days ago. I'd give my left nut to get ahold of the coolest racing bike of my teen years. The Ideor Super or Ideor Isso. Trouble is they seem pretty scarce, and not much is known about them now. I knew of them in the late 50's, maybe even into 60 or 61, but nothing after that. Any info either on the brand, or (even better) how I could get one would be appreciated greatly. thanks, bob




Subject:
Entered on: Oct 31, 1998 12:07
Entered by: AARON ()

Message:
HELP IJUST BOUGHT AN OLD SCHWINN THE SPROCKET HAS HEART SHAPES ON IT ANY HELP PLEASE




Subject: Fuji Touring
Entered on: Oct 31, 1998 17:28
Entered by: Fred (fredhaj@aol.com)

Message:
Another "I just picked up note". This one is a Fuji Touring Series III bike that has been languishing in a neighbors garage for years. He also had a Gitane racer but wouldn't part with it. The Fuji has Nitto stem and bars. Suntour shifters and front deraillier. A Shimano 500 rear deraillier on a Mailard hub. The crankset is a Sugino and the pedals are unknown but from Italy. The wheels are Wolber Super Champion Alpine with Specialized Touring II tires, size 700 x 25c. Not what I would expect on a touring bike. The brakes a Dia Compe cantilevers. It is full fendered with a dyno and lights plus a blackburn rear rack. No side stand or evidence that it ever had one. All in all a nice bike albeit very dirty from storage. Anyone have a guess when it was made? This bike is # 36 and my second Fuji.




Subject:
Entered on: Nov 2, 1998 18:32
Entered by: Dave (ddreilin@SummitH.S._GWD.s)

Message:
I have a raleigh international never riden and a raleigh competion near mint.Any idea of value?




Subject: Raleigh International
Entered on: Nov 2, 1998 23:02
Entered by: Rod (rsjinks@swbell.net)

Message:
I saw a Raleigh International last weekend posted for $350. It sold before I could buy it. Hope this helps. Rod




Subject: Last of the Bianchi Hourglass Headlugs
Entered on: Nov 3, 1998 15:36
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
What year did Bianchi stop using cup-shaped headlugs which flared-out to for part of the headset?




Subject: 1960's Indian Scout
Entered on: Nov 3, 1998 16:09
Entered by: Janine (coprbyrd@aol.com)

Message:
I recently obtained a men's 3-speed Indian Scout. If anyone has any information about this bicycle, please e-mail me. Also I am looking for the little chrome piece that sits at the front of the front fender.




Subject: vitus and bonded frames
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 09:34
Entered by: steve (Garko1@aol.com)

Message:
Dale, I sent you an e mail, but don't know if it made it! I recently bought a used bike built around a vitus frame; 56 cm, the components are mix/match, some dura ace, some 105. The bike has a 7 speed cassette and is a good rider. I'm guessing it's about 10 years old at the most. Question 1: I paid $300; seems like a good deal to me..your opinion? Question 2: I noticed a "creaking" noise every time I Stood up on the pedals to sprint, etc., or when lateral pressure was applied on the handlebars at times. I eliminated the brakes, sheels, pedals, crand, bott bracket, etc as the causes, and found that the noise comes from the top tube to headset joint. A fellow rider suggested that the bonded type frames (non welded) are designed for riders up to about 165 lbs; I'm 6'2" and weigh about 195. Can this be the reason for my creaky frame, or has the structural integrity been compromised, or both? It "feels" safe, but I would appreciate your opinion. Thanks! Steve




Subject: vitus and bonded frames
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 09:34
Entered by: steve (Garko1@aol.com)

Message:
Dale, I sent you an e mail, but don't know if it made it! I recently bought a used bike built around a vitus frame; 56 cm, the components are mix/match, some dura ace, some 105. The bike has a 7 speed cassette and is a good rider. I'm guessing it's about 10 years old at the most. Question 1: I paid $300; seems like a good deal to me..your opinion? Question 2: I noticed a "creaking" noise every time I Stood up on the pedals to sprint, etc., or when lateral pressure was applied on the handlebars at times. I eliminated the brakes, sheels, pedals, crand, bott bracket, etc as the causes, and found that the noise comes from the top tube to headset joint. A fellow rider suggested that the bonded type frames (non welded) are designed for riders up to about 165 lbs; I'm 6'2" and weigh about 195. Can this be the reason for my creaky frame, or has the structural integrity been compromised, or both? It "feels" safe, but I would appreciate your opinion. Thanks! Steve




Subject: Raleigh International
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 11:05
Entered by: Dave ()

Message:
Rod,thanks for the info on the international.No one in Colorado knows anything about it. Appreciate it.




Subject: Dave's International
Entered on: Nov 4, 1998 22:28
Entered by: Bob Hufford (bhufford@mail.orion.org)

Message:
Dave, you can check out the Retro Raleighs! site for more info on your International. They have one for sale on there, but it is on the high end of the scale. The asking prices I've seen average around $500 - $600 for decent examples. http://www.speakeasy.org/~tabula/raleigh/raleigh-home.html




Subject: Vius bonded frames (A response)
Entered on: Nov 5, 1998 22:46
Entered by: Dale (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Hi Steve: I saw the return e-mail address was "nobody@email.esp" which struck me rather odd at the time I responded to you... Here's that original sent you > Hi: Yes, the Vitus is best with light folks... I have never seen one come unglued though (Have seen other brands though, incl. Trek, Look, etc.) I think it will be OK for weekend comfortable road miles.. Definitely not a Crit bike though! You said you eliminated the BBkt from creaking.. But did you? We have to wrap the threaded portions with teflon plumbers tape to keep alot of Aluminum bikes from creaking...And it comes back! Plumbers tape & tight as holy bejesus! $350 seems more than fair.. Especially if you like it! We are in Greensboro NC right in between Raleigh Chap[el Hill (Univ. of NC "Tarheels!") and Winston Salem (Wake Forest "Demon Deacons") Have you looked at our web site? cycles deORO.com Take a peek... It will give you some of the flavor of the joint! Dale




Subject: Creaking Aluminum
Entered on: Nov 7, 1998 02:11
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Dale and Steve - Put a permanent end to creaking BBs in aluminum frames by smearing the cups and/or cartridge mating surfaces with Permatex Never Seize - Part #133K - available at most auto parts supply houses. I havn't had an aluminum creaker yet that it's failed to fix and now use it routinely when I set up aluminum bikes.




Subject: Creaking bbkts in Aluminum bikes
Entered on: Nov 7, 1998 21:15
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I agree about Anti-seize.... that is an important tool in the use of titanium products too (Never found on vintage bikes though!)




Subject: Spring '99 Cirque du Cyclisme!
Entered on: Nov 7, 1998 21:26
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I apologize for the somewhat early notice, but I want all of you within driving distance to set aside Sunday May 2 for the 3rd Annual Cirque du Cyclisme in Greensboro NC. It will offer a Metric (+ 1/2 & 1/4) Century ride, a gigantic Swap Meet and a Classic Bike Concours... The hobby of collecting & preserving these special bikes is growing and there are many newly saved machines due to be shown. As many of you know, I am a fiend for vintage lightweights and will have a bunch of my own (36?) bikes on display. Last year, despite tornados, we had an amazingly good turnout, and this year we are planning to waterproof it (either a rented building or a circus tent ...TBA) so you can drive in from afar without risk of sitting in the car waiting for the rain to stop! Pics of last years on web site; http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/classic_home.htm Ya'll come now, hear? Dale




Subject: Cirque du Cyclisme
Entered on: Nov 7, 1998 21:31
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Whoops! Here is the URL to go directly to the Cirques' web site: http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Cirquemain.htm




Subject: Rotrax Cycles
Entered on: Nov 10, 1998 16:11
Entered by: Fraser ()

Message:
Can anyone please tell me ? does this English cycle manufacturer still exist or has it passed into history ? I have a special 'one-off' 'Concours' model from the very early fifties that was made especially for a Paris, France, cycle show. As such it is engraved with Fleur-de-lys on handlebars, seat post, wheel wing nuts,brake shoes etc. I would love to know more exact details of its history.




Subject: Rotrax
Entered on: Nov 10, 1998 22:08
Entered by: Dake Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Although I know next to nothing of the Rotrax, I am pretty sure they have been gone some time now (like 20 years +) I would love to see some pictures of that bicycle. It sounds like the pinnacle of artisan era handwork! Any chance of getting pics to publish in the Classic Rendezvous web site? FYI the return e-mail wasn't working on this orig. entry.... Dale




Subject: Rotrax bicycles
Entered on: Nov 10, 1998 22:14
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I know very little of Rotrax, just bits from old advertisements, and I am quite sure they are long gone (20 years+?) This particular bicycle sounds like a real gem and an example of the pinnacle of artisan craftsmanship! Wouldn't we all love to see it! Any chance of obtaining photos or e-mailing digital pics for publishing for the world's enjoyment in the Classic Rendezvous web site? That would be great and educational! Please consider the idea! Dale




Subject: AntiSeize
Entered on: Nov 11, 1998 22:31
Entered by: Ted (tw406)

Message:
No anti-seize on vintage bikes? Man, did you ever try and get a 60s Regina freewheel off an old Campagnolo hub? You know, the kind with the narrow slotted ridge that just peels off when you try to use the freewheel tool so your have to disassemble the thing bearings and pawls flying and falling all over the place and take the body off the hub with a giant pair of channel locks? Put somne anti-seize on those freewheel threads! Ted




Subject: anti sieze
Entered on: Nov 12, 1998 11:54
Entered by: steve (garko1@aol.com)

Message:
Dale & Louis... Thanks for the responses on my creaking problem. I'm gonna try the anti sieze on my BB. Although I don't think the creaking is coming from there, I'm not absolutely positive, so it's worth a shot. Plus, I've never disassembled a BB before, so it should be fun to do anyway. Recently got Nashbar's "big tool kit". I't's already been worth it as I've already used the headset wrenches several times. A good deal for $59!! Dale, why do some manufacturers use bonding instead of welding frames together? Does it have better flexibility properties? Just curious.




Subject: Re: AntiSieze
Entered on: Nov 12, 1998 11:59
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
Just remember; "Never Seez" etc. is nearly impossible to wash out, so wear disposable gloves and don't get it on your fancy Italian silk bike-mechanic's apron.




Subject: Vintage Book
Entered on: Nov 12, 1998 13:50
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
About a year ago I picked up a vintage 1972 publication titled "Two Wheel Travel, Bicycle Camping and Touring (Dell). It's a HUGE format book -- 14 and 1/2" by 10 and 1/2." I had this book when I was young, but eventuilly lost it. It's straight out of Whole Earth Catalog -- very early 70s. Something I think you'd all appreciate, and get a kick out of, is a very detailed comparison of the relative strenghs and weaknesses of Simplex, Huret, early Suntour and Shimano, and of course Campy derailleurs. It did the same with brakes -- here's a good quote about the Campy: "They are very expensive, fifty-five to seventy dollars and only worth the money if you have the bug in the worst way possible. At least go to a shop and handle these brakes in order to appreciate the state of their art. As for their appearance, let me only say that I apologize for the less than ideal paper on which we are reproducing these pictures. The real thing is extraordinary." Reading thse words now makes me laugh a bit. At age 13 or so, they made me lust for Campy. The guy who wrote it is named Robert Drennan. Robert, are you out there?!




Subject: Re: Creaking
Entered on: Nov 12, 1998 21:50
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Steve - I have one other thought about your creaking problem. It's a longshot but worth a try. When I worked with Bruce Gordon in the eighties we had this big strong guy on an SL (Columbus) Bianchi who would stop by from time to time with a creaking problem. We tried everything to do with the BB and H'bars and stem. Out of Desperation we removed his seat post and noticed a strange wear pattern on it. Seems he was big enough to flex the frame considerably when he stood ond it hard, and his seat post was rubbing on the moving and flexing seat tube. A clean-up of the post and fresh lube (anti-seize?) did the trick and cured the creaking completely. I've since had this happen to two or three others and its always been the same - a big strong guy on a light frame.




Subject: Keith's Old Book
Entered on: Nov 13, 1998 08:41
Entered by: Aldo (swampmtn@aol.com)

Message:
Keith - I, for one, would like to see more quotes from the cycling book... what do they say about Simplex, for instance?




Subject: Vintage Commentary on Simplex
Entered on: Nov 13, 1998 10:30
Entered by: Keith (velohund)

Message:
Aldo: I'm happy to oblige. "Their equipment is famous for its extensive use of a plastic called 'delrin.' The first derailleurs made of this material were used in the 1962 Tour de France and the acetal resin has been used by Simplex ever since. Delrin has a number of advantages. The first is that it is extremely light, about half the weight of steel. It can be machined very smoothly and so makes an evenly operating bearing wherever it is used. For a plastic, it wears very well, but, relative to other derailleur materials, not so well at all. Major faults include its general weakness: it will simply break under pressure. It is also a workable material, that is, and constant force on it will eventually dent or gouge it, loosening any attachments made to it, such as spring ends." The book goes on to compare the bottom line Simplex "Export" (white plastic), the common "Prestige," and the slightly nicer "Criterium." The gist of the author's comments is that Simplex works well when new, but because of the weakness of the delrin they will eventually get sloppy and perhaps fail under stress. When I was 13 or 14 I wrote a parody of this detailed type commentary for my local club newsletter and compared Simplex, Huret, Suntour, and Campagnolo kickstands point by point. I noted that the Simplex kickstands, made of delrin, worked smoothly, but had a tendency to warp on hot days. One local shop displayed a fake Campy kickstand in its Campy parts case.




Subject: More thoughts on Simplex
Entered on: Nov 13, 1998 14:40
Entered by: Ted (tw406@aol.com)

Message:
I agree, for plastic they hold up fairly well, but they seem to get very brittle with age. Careful tightening those front derailler clamps. They'll snap! Also, if you have one where the finish has turned chalky, I've had good luck returning them to black by steel wooling lightly and Armor-alling.




Subject: Daves International
Entered on: Nov 13, 1998 15:28
Entered by: Dave ()

Message:
Bob thanks for the additional info.




Subject: Daves International
Entered on: Nov 13, 1998 15:32
Entered by: Dave ()

Message:
Bob thanks for the additional info.




Subject: Daves International
Entered on: Nov 13, 1998 15:38
Entered by: Dave (ddreilin@SummitH.SGWD.S)

Message:
Bob thanks for the additional info.




Subject: Why do some manufacturers use bonding instead of welding frames together? Does it have better flexibility properties? .
Entered on: Nov 13, 1998 19:40
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
This isn't quit a vintage question, but a quick answer is cost & materials..Once set up with the proper elements, assembly by gluing is quicker & easier, requiring less skilled craftsman or less sophisticated machinery..... And that 's the only way to join carbon fiber and many composites... Of course brazing (silver or brass, not welding) is the way true classic artisans build steel bikes!




Subject: Vitus Framesets
Entered on: Nov 14, 1998 11:33
Entered by: Greg (Me2uNowell@aol.com)

Message:
I've got three of the little buggers inc. one Piste (French spelling) fixed gear and have located possibly a fourth thru a friend in WA. Pretty much everything has been said about them already by Dale et al but I would like to add a few thoughts to everyone's previous comments. The creak does come from the bottom bracket and "Never Seez" does solve the problem. It is esp. critical to apply this stuff when fitting aluminum BB cups such as come with the old ti-spindled Campys I'm using in a couple of them. If you've got a creak coming from the headtube, it's probably your bar and stem. Use very fine emery paper on the inside of the stem where the bar fits. There is often a little ridge left inside there from the forging process which everyone seems to forget about these days. Then sand the bar where it fits thru the tube and sock it all up again. I know, I know- it takes the anodizing off the bar, etc. but this is how pro race bikes were set-up in the old daze. The frames do flex a little when you're really loading the cranks but the bikes are light as a feather and extremely comfortable. I've ridden a lot of centuries on my oldest and most favorite one. I got slammed by a Lexus in Boston traffic some years ago on that same bike. The rear derailleur, a mint Super Record, took most of the hit. The derailleur was fine although the impact snapped-off the hanger. I sent the frame down to H+H Racing in Phila., PA (Harry Havnonian's shop) and they took the rear triangle apart, fitted a new dropout, glued it all together, and shipped it back along with some other bits for under $60.00. And in under two weeks! Not bad I'd have to say in our so-called service oriented economy. People either love these things or hate them. The frames may flex a bit but they are extremely strong and resilient. Take a 979 Dural thin-wall-tubed Vitus for a spin around the block and then go ride a tig- welded thick-tubed Cannondale. You will then begin to appreciate the difference between a "lively" frame and a "dead" one. The cast aluminum fork crown and Dural blades are elegantly designed and absorb a lot of road hammer. Why else would everyone be fitting similar aluminum forks into their titanium framesets. And if I'm not mistaken, I believe it was Sean Kelly, a very powerful rider, who rode Vitus bikes to a few World Championships in the early 80's. A bit more Vitus trivia. The aluminum bits, headtube, BB shell, etc. were cast by CLB, the French company who made those crazy ultralight brakesets way back when. I have all the info for contacting H+H Racing somewhere else so e-mail me and I'll send it off to anyone who needs it. They (H+H) have the replacement cable guide which fits under the BB shell as well. Ride. Come back alive.




Subject: freewheel question
Entered on: Nov 14, 1998 17:59
Entered by: Tom (hayesbikes@nls.net)

Message:
Does anyone know how one can gauge or judge whether a freewheel is "good" without putting it on a wheel and riding it? What appears to me, without putting it on a wheel, looks like, feels like a perfectly workable freewheel turns out to be one that won't "free wheel" or skips or some other odd thing. I would like to able to determine whether the freewheel will work properly before installing it. Any hints? Thanks.




Subject: New Vintage-style bikes: Herons
Entered on: Nov 16, 1998 13:50
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Have any of you seen the Waterford/Rivendell Heron bikes? Go to www.heronbicycles.com The concept seems pretty interesting to me. I'd think there would be a big crossover between vintage groupies and retro-grouches, though I don't think its 100%. (You could love only sleek all Campy racing machines and therefore not be very impressed with the Heron or Rivendell bikes.) Anyone out there who, like me, sees themselves as both? I've got some old all-Campy bikes and love them, but the road bike I ride the most -- my Mercian -- has had most of the NR removed and replaced with the kind of stuff they put on these Herons. Not as impressive, but more practical, at least for me. (I kept the NR brakes and Brooks B-15). Take a look and let's start a thread on it.




Subject: Vitus/Heron
Entered on: Nov 16, 1998 14:41
Entered by: Pete (fixedgear@hotmail.com)

Message:
Harry Havnoonian got his start in the frame building busines repairing Vitus bikes. Apparently there were quite a few frame failures, and he learned a lot about bonded construction in the process. He now builds steel, ti and aluminum bikes - all using bonded construction. Quite a few of them in my club - Bicycle Club of Philadelphia. I ride with one gut whose HH is number 36, and the brake is on the rear (conventional) side of the stays. HH puts the brake on the front (i.e. seat tube) side of the stays, claiming it improves braking performance. I dunno.... Anyway, I'm partial to lugged frames myself, though I confess to owning a Trek 5200, a Trek 1200, an a TIG welded MTB. My current favorite is a Lotus track bike, fitted with a front brake for road use. A fun ride, but I'm finding out that track bikes are less than ideal for road use. I'm searching for a nice used frameset to build up a road fixed gear machine. Great forum, BTW. Regards, Pete




Subject: Heron
Entered on: Nov 17, 1998 11:56
Entered by: Jim (jcole@memphis.edu)

Message:
Heron?! Hey, ain't that the official bird of Raleigh bicycles as featured on their headtube badges? Reynolds 531 tubing? Man, this is really starting to sound like a vintage Raleigh which is a GOOD thing. I'm not too sure about their model names. I mean, "hard-core classic" and "soft-core classic" sounds like they're selling vintage porn movies. I really applaud their efforts and think the frames are a great concept. Personally, I would probably order a Mercian direct from England for the same price or less. Just my .02.




Subject: Heron
Entered on: Nov 17, 1998 12:22
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Jim: Although I too admire the concept a lot, I find the Heron pricey given the components. It's difficult for me to tell how much of the diverse, ecclectic groupo is a result of careful study of what works best, or is driven by what's still available in NOS in bulk, or both. I think what you end up with is equivalent to a mid-range road/touring bike of the late 70s to early 80s with a few unique features. That being said, the price, although undoubtedly fair in terms of their costs and the Waterford/Rivendell workmanship, is hard to swallow inasmuch as complete mid-range 70s and 80s road bikes are available everywhere for next to nothing. Examples in my garage of this ilk include a mint early touring Trek with Suntour I got for $40, an excellent Raleigh Deluxe Grand Prix with Suntour for $20, and so on. And I've acquired 531 or Columbus frame 70s/80s NR equiped bikes for $50 to $300, and we all know where to buy them for $750 to $1000. My long-winded point is why would someone pay more than $1000 for a what is esentially a mid-range bicycle, frame pedigree not withstanding?




Subject: VITUS
Entered on: Nov 17, 1998 12:37
Entered by: STEVE (GARKO1@AOL.COM)

Message:
HEY GREG... NEAT STUFF ABOUT VITUS... MINE DOES HAVE THE DURAL FORKS. (I'M THE GUY WITH THE ORIG "CREAKING PROBLEM" THAT STARTED THE DISCUSSION ON THIS TOPIC, AT LEAST THIS GO-AROUND). IT'S AMAZING HOW FLEXIBLE MY FRAME IS. AS DALE MENTIONED, FOR MY SIZE THIS BIKE IS APPROPRIATE FOR WEEKEND COMFY MILES... WHICH IS ABOUT RIGHT..I RIDE WITH A CLUB; WE USUALLY DO 20-40 MILES; I RIDE WITH THE 22MPH GROUP..SO FAR, THE BIKE IS HOLDING UP WELL...WAS COSIDERING CONVERTING TO STI LEVERS BUT AM STILL USING FRAME SHIFTERS. THANKS FOR THE INFO...IF YOU KNOW OF ANY OLDER VITUSES FOR SALE, PLS LET ME KNOW AT MY E MAIL ADDRESS... STEVE




Subject: Flying Dutchman?
Entered on: Nov 17, 1998 13:02
Entered by: Pete (fixedgear@hotmail.com)

Message:
Anybody know anything about Flying Dutchman frames? I'm buying a NOS one from Jack's Bicycle Closeouts (http://216.49.10.245/ja/jacksbikes-webjump) in Denver, CO, for $75. Frame is double butted 531, lugged, side-tack stays, box crown fork, horizontal dropouts, and no shifter bosses. Should make a nice fixed-gear road rider - I've already got a nice honey colored Brooks Swallow with copper rails to put on it. Any info is appreciated. Thanks, Pete.




Subject: Flying Dutchman
Entered on: Nov 17, 1998 15:02
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Cycles de ORO(my shop)recently bought a goodly batch of Flying Dutchman framesets from Jack Van Gent, ex-proprietor of the Big Wheel Shop in Denver, CO. (and for more $ than they are currently being offered) They are interesting bikes in that they are very traditional and attractive in concept, esp. to those of us with a foot in the past. These frames were apparently made for Jack in Italy to be his "house brand." I believe this all may have been a loooong time ago, i.e., late 1970's into early 80's. The frames are very "shop worn" with paint scuffs and boogers in the decals to varying degrees: some awful, some barely scathed. There also is considerable variance in workmanship, dropouts(Campy, Shimano, Gipiemme & Aquila), seat stay treatment and detailing. Some of rthe frames have obviously been built up as bikes, then disassembled. As someone has noted, they are not "prepped" not necessarily aligned to pro standards but not bad.. Nothing a good shop cannot correct with time & a Campy toolkit. The other oddities is that few of these frames have much in the way of braze-ons especially down tube shifter bosses. "Band" type shift levers and stops are getting hard to find! The Flying Dutchnman frames also require, in order to use 700c wheels, a "normal" reach brakeset, of which few are left. No new campy groups are available in this longer style. Only Shimano's 105SC came in this reach (now discontinued.) That is not to say a bunch of vintage brakes wouldn't work fine and Jack had a bunch of Weinmann centerpulls too that were intended for these bikes! BUT, for a super cheap, vintage style ride, I can't see how you can beat it! Get them while they last!




Subject: Heron frames
Entered on: Nov 17, 1998 15:18
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I am impressed with the aesthetics and marketing flair brought to the Heron project, however I am not sure they represent the huge value as presented by some. I see no mention of it now in their site, but don't I remember Grant or someone talking about about how Heron's were be made cheaply by not mitering the tubes, but by designing the lug set so that they would allow straight cut tubes with a plug-in brazing assembly technique? This is not a great way to make frames, as the lugs should never be relied upon to provide the principle strength to the joint. The 531 tubing needs to go right up to & but into the other 531 tube! The Waterford standard 531 frame (1100?)is made by proper mitering and I don't think there is much of a price differential. Plus there are MANY high quality frames, esp. from the UK, which can be had for less $, with totally custom geometry, hand built, with no plug-ins, etc. A Mercian, Caygill, B. Jackson( domestically bought in England), Condor, Ellis-Briggs, etc. for $400-500 including air shipping & duties. Nonetheless I like the looks of the Heron!




Subject: Heron Mitering
Entered on: Nov 18, 1998 00:22
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Dale - I think someone needs to nip in th bud the rumors concerning Heron mitering. From what I have seen (in the Rivendell Reader) the Heron's are mitered just as precisely as the Rivendell frame, with slightly less ornate head lugs. The "plug in" to which you refer is the seat stay to seat lug joint, where the stays are "plugged in" to a cast pocket in the seat lug- quick yo braze and no cleanup (a la late 70's early eighties Treks). I can't imagine Grant designing and marketing a frame where all the tubes are cut flush and inserted into lugs as the cheap bike boom bottom of the liners were. He's too principled and waaay too into frame design for that. I wish him all the best with the Herons.




Subject: Heron
Entered on: Nov 18, 1998 11:38
Entered by: Jim (jcole@memphis.edu)

Message:
Keith summed up my main complaint with the whole Heron and Rivendale line of bikes. I was kind of shocked when I first saw the Rivendales. I liked the concept, but you were paying big bucks for a bike that had a lot of components that graced mid-line bikes of the early '80s. I agree that some of the stuff, although decent, must have been what was available in bulk NOS. To be fair, new parts that fit their philosophy are few and far between. The Heron frames wouldn't be bad, but I would build it up with used vintage parts and not consider the complete bike as offered. There's just much better values available in used vintage bikes. I regularly see complete vintage bikes in the $500 to $900 range I would much rather have. - Jim




Subject: More on Herons
Entered on: Nov 18, 1998 12:18
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
I feel I ought to repeat that I really admire the Heron idea and Grant Petersen in general. But I wonder how successful a "budget" retro-grouch bike will be. If money is no object, then of course you would not choose a Heron. If you are budget-minded, then, as others have suggested, there are probably many better deals out there on new 531 frames. Moreover, anyone who knows enough to appreciate the Heron will probably also know where they can get mid-range components from the 70s and early 80s for next to nothing. In fact, I think 70s and early 80s mid-range road equipment is seriously undervalued. People who bought top notch stuff by and large knew what they were getting, so even when original owners go to sell it usually isn't super cheap. In contrast, I think a lot of people bought decent mid-range bikes in the 70s and early 80s more or less as a fad or passing interest. They may have paid $250, $300 or more for it back then, but now they are willing to literally give it away. Are the rest of you seeing this, or is this something that's only local (central Ohio)? The used market seems flooded here -- I can't rescue all of the mid-range stuff I see (for example this summer I passed up a very nice blue straight-gauge 531 frame Falcon with Campy Velox for $20, and two decent Motobacanes for the same price). But by the same token I too wish GP luck on the Heron project.




Subject: New Free Lightweight Vintage/Classic Classifieds
Entered on: Nov 26, 1998 11:56
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Not as hectic as RBM but dedicated to lightweight Vintage/classic bikes & goodies. Classified ads are free (no commissions, etc.)with the ability to include JPEG photos! Only catch is that I can use, if I want!, your pics in appropriate section of the Classic Rendezvous web site. http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Cirquemain.htm Dale Brown




Subject: Help me ID this old Bianchi (decal for headbadge?)
Entered on: Nov 28, 1998 05:47
Entered by: Andy (marchantshapiro@yahoo.com)

Message:
I recently obtained an "old" Bianchi frame. It's spaced for a 7-speed cluster (126), painted Celeste Green, and the 'Bianchi' and 'Made in Italy' decals are the only ones that remain. The fork, also celeste, has a slope-shouldered crown. Interestingly, the headbadge is a decal! There is a raised letter "B" on the lug that connects the head tube and down tube; a chain hanger; an extra set of holes in the rear dropouts (threaded for a rack or fenders). Judging from the brake bridge, this thing is set up for 700c wheels, anyway. A real mix of parts, some not original -- Gipiemme crank, ITM seatpost and handlebar, Campy front derailer, Shimano 300 (probably not original) in rear, Black BSR (dia-compe?) brake levers, no brakes. Any and all information on this bike is greatly appreciated...




Subject: Budget retrogrouch bikes
Entered on: Nov 28, 1998 11:48
Entered by: Russ (rfitzger@emeraldis.com)

Message:
Keith/Velohund's points about the Heron are well made. If I had the money, I'd buy myself a new Rivendell or a Richard Sachs at the drop of a hat. However, as a library tech, I settle quite happily for older bikes Usually a lot of elbow grease and patience is required, but I have yet to spend more than $150 for any bike I have owned in the last seven years. I've bought absolutely serviceable Gitane Tour de France models for $75, a little-ridden PX-10 for $150, and a lovely old Nervex-lugged PX-10 for $125. Even with tracking down and replacing damaged parts, I've held the budget line. At the same time, I do love Grant's ideas. I buy stuff from him quite frequently - but I also make friends with the owners of older bike shops so I can raid the back room for the stuff nobody else in the area wants.




Subject: WTB: Super Champ Rims
Entered on: Nov 30, 1998 11:32
Entered by: Jim (jcole@memphis.edu)

Message:
I'm looking for a pair of Super Champion Model 58 clincher rims in the shiny non-anodized finish. Need 36 hole 700c and can be NOS or good used condition. Will consider complete wheelset if that's all I can find. Any help would be greatly appreciated! - Jim




Subject: Raleigh TEAM Bicycles
Entered on: Dec 1, 1998 14:12
Entered by: Sean (dowds.dnb.com)

Message:
Does anyone have any leads on late 70's Raleigh TEAM bikes 753 Reynolds,original paint. Thanks




Subject: James Pickering and Falcon
Entered on: Dec 1, 1998 17:14
Entered by: Jonathan (jonc@senate.leg.state.mn.us)

Message:
I have a couple of questions: I just picked up a "James Pickering" and am curious to know more. The bike is Reynolds 531 with chrome campagnolo droppouts. The lugs are long point. The frame is red and the only decals are a James Pickering signature on each side of the downtube and a James Pickering sticker on the head tube. The derailleurs are Campy NR with the rear being PAT. 72. The brakes are Gran Compe and the crankset is a Sugino SuperMighty. Any information on this bicycle would be wonderful Question #2: Early 80's Falcon Frames. I picked up a couple of these, NOS. Full Reynolds 531 and campy drop-outs. Paint is not so good, and some decals are pealing. What do you think these are worth, and any info on Falcon at this time would be great. Thanks, Jonathan




Subject: Raleigh Team
Entered on: Dec 2, 1998 12:54
Entered by: Ted (tw406)

Message:
Sean: Your email doesn't work. There was a track one at Velo Sport in Berkeley, consignment awhile ago, ac 510, and I saw one posted in book for sale at Palo Alto Bicycle, ac 650 about a month ago. I have a 22.5" 531, red, maroon and yellow one circa '84 I wouldn't mind selling. Ted




Subject: Bianchi Virata
Entered on: Dec 2, 1998 21:18
Entered by: Kelly (451CTDS@concentric.net)

Message:
Have aquired Bianchi Virata bike # 4 bb Shimano 600 side pull brakes, + deraileurs Prestige CRMO Tange Buldge butted Fork + frame Any idea of value ?




Subject: James Pickering and Falcon
Entered on: Dec 4, 1998 20:30
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Re: James Pickering: a bike shop owner/ builder in Arizona. Of British extraction? He may have been briefly associated with Colin Laing. Probably an elderly gentleman now as he was advertising himself in the 70's as making frames and he said at the time he had been at the bike business already 25-30 years? I have no idea of the build quality of his products. Anyone with more up to date info? RE: Falcon... IMO, They were best as early Coventry Eagles pre & just-post war UK. The Falcons of your possession most likely are from 1970's bike boom when many were imported into USA. They were of moderate quality, not superbe. Falcon also manufactured the Eddy Merckx branded bikes of that time, making a full line from cheapo's ($125.00!) to Campy Pro bikes. I have a Falcon catalog of that time (mid 70's) I will publish pics of in my web site soon. http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Classic_home.htm Dale




Subject: '73 Raleigh Pro 20.5" bike
Entered on: Dec 4, 1998 23:37
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Despite not wanting this forum to become a marketplace, I want to bring this bicycle to your attention: RALEIGH Pro Complete Bicycle, Stunning condition! Pics: http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Ral_74_front.htm. Price... $1225.00 OBO plus shipping. cycles de ORO Inc. oroboyz@aol.com 336-274-5959




Subject: FS 1979 Raleigh Team Pro 23.5
Entered on: Dec 6, 1998 13:11
Entered by: Scott (sm2501@aol.com)

Message:
I have a 1979 Raleigh 531 Team Pro,23.5". Assembled with Dura Ace large flange black hubs, Nisi tubular rims, Shimano Dura Ace black headset,Campy Super Record front and rear derailleurs, black anodised Campy Record crank arms and brakes calipers, Campy Record BB, Campy alloy freeheel, Modolo black brake levers, ITM gold plated handlebars, black stem, leather stitched handlebar wrap ( came all pre done from the factory) Early Brooks Pro saddle, Newer Campy seatpost. Oh, did I mention this frame has never been ridden? I purchased this frame brand new, assembled it over several years and hung it up for display. Everything is brand new on the bike except the wheels(If interersted, I could sub brand new black small flange Dura Ace hubs with Ambrosia black clincher rims). It has a few small scratches from shop wear on the frame, but is a beatiful bike. I can take some digital photos and send to serious inquiries. I can also provide some on line references who have seen this bike. All this for $1750.00




Subject: Turn of the century racing photos
Entered on: Dec 7, 1998 12:08
Entered by: John (Kiskatimbe@aol.com)

Message:
I'm in the process of developing a business web page which will use turn of the century bicycle racing photos and vintage bicycles from the same era as a theme. Could you please refer me to a source for pictures like these which are in good condition that could be reproduced for free or a nominal charge. Thank you and please feel free to email me. Sincerely, John




Subject: **Vintage/Retro bike ride (Pasadena CA) Saturday, Dec 12**
Entered on: Dec 9, 1998 12:11
Entered by: Matthew/Chuck (bikenut@worldnet.att.net)

Message:
Dust off your favorite old-time/retro bicycle for the Rose Bowl round-up on Saturday, December 12. Start at 10:00am at the Rose Bowl Aquatic Center picnic area at the southern end of the Rose Bowl Park. Ride along the Arroyo Seco through South Pasadena & then on through San Marino, Sierra Madre, Pasadena and Altadena. Mostly flat with some hills. It's about 25-35 miles/ 1.5 - 2hrs. Picnic (BYO...beverages and snacks provided) afterwards w/ parts swap out of car trunks if you have anything to sell/trade. Call or e-mail for more details. Fixed-Gears are welcome too.... Chuck Schmidt chuckschmidt@earthlink.net / 213-256-0815 Matthew Gorski bikenut@worldnet.att.net / 562-439-2016




Subject: SUN METAL RIM WANTED:MODEL M-14, HARD ANODIZED
Entered on: Dec 9, 1998 19:39
Entered by: Clarence Kokkinis (NONE:P.O. Box 725428 berkley, Michigan 48072-5428 )

Message:
Despretly searching for Sun Metal Co. rim model m-14. 27 inch (630mm) 36 hole Aero Hard Anodized ( M-13 or M-14)




Subject: Converting from Cottered Cranks
Entered on: Dec 10, 1998 11:25
Entered by: Andy M-S (marchantshapiro@yahoo.com)

Message:
I have an old ('74) Raleigh Grand Prix that's about due for a crank cotter replacement. While I'm at it, I would like (if possible) to convert from cottered to cotterless cranks. Problem: Raleigh used its own thread for the BB, and nobody makes ANYTHING in that thread. Solution: Instead of replacing the whole BB, would it be possible for me to replace the BB *axle*? Seems to me that this could work *if* I can find an appropriate-length axle; I should be able to use the adjustable cup and/or spacers to get a reasonable fit. The nice part (if all else works) is that I would keep the current cups, and so wouldn't have to worry about the non-standard Raleigh thread. Has anyone attempted anything like this? Does anyone have any thoughts? TIA.




Subject: Lost/Stolen
Entered on: Dec 10, 1998 12:45
Entered by: Glenn (ggernert@ikon.com)

Message:
LOST/STOLEN BICYCLE DESCRIPTION: 1970 Raleigh Competion serial number E9119. Bike is black with chromed fork and stays. Gold pinstripes. Campagnola throughout. Mavic MA40 rear wheel (clincher). Zeus dropouts. Simplex downtube shifter. CIRCUMSTANCES: Lost or stolen UPS shipment between NJ and WI. Box disappeared from UPS tracking after reaching IL/WI. ADDITIONAL: Front wheel was shipped separately so bike either has no front wheel or perhaps a non-matching replacement. Brooks Pro saddle and Campy pedals were removed for shipping but were within box containing bicycle. REWARD: $100.00 for information leading to return. CONTACT: Glenn Gernert 922 Johnson Ave. Oregon, WI 53575 608-835-5165 (home) 800-829-2459 X-103 (work) ggernert@ikon.com




Subject: Converting from Cottered Cranks
Entered on: Dec 10, 1998 17:04
Entered by: Karl (Karl.Frantz@juno.com)

Message:
I did just that to an old french bike - swapped in a cotterless spindle with the old cups. It works, but the cups were somewhat thinner than what the spindle was intended for, and there's not a lot of room left on the adjustable cup. The other gotcha might be if the holes in the cups are greatly different size from the new spindle. However, if the Raleigh BB uses the usual eleven 1/4" balls, it ought to worth a try....




Subject: Converting from Cottered Cranks: No problem.
Entered on: Dec 13, 1998 10:56
Entered by: Dale (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Remove cotters (this is a lot of fun on old Raleighs!)and disassemble bbkt. as far as you can.. Take bbkt spindle & adjustable cup to you local (sharp & on-the-ball) bike shop. With calipers, measure distance between ball races on spindle and compare to the charts he has available from Quality and United Bicycle Parts catalogs. Order spindle based upon what you need for your old cups (the measurement you just did) AND what cranks you are buying from him to put on the bike. It for sure will be 1/4" balls and virtually all spindles will work in your cups. Dale Brown cycles de ORO Greensboro, NC




Subject: Magni?
Entered on: Dec 14, 1998 10:08
Entered by: Jonathan (jonc@senate.leg.state.mn.us)

Message:
OK, here is another ID question. A friend of mine just picked up an Italian bike called a Magni. Has anyone ever heard of this make? It has columbus tubing and campy droppouts. The derailleurs are Campy Record, with Universal brakes and a very unique (to me) Ambrosio adjustable length stem. Any information on this bike would be greatly appreciated. Also, any information on Ephgrave bikes would be great as well. Thanks so much, Jonathan




Subject: Austro-Damlier SLE
Entered on: Dec 14, 1998 22:30
Entered by: mike (mike_godwin@mk.com)

Message:
So, I might have hacked the spelling a bit, but I picked up a nice AD at a rummage sale. Original Nervar 3-spoke crank, Weimann side pull brakes, Huret derail's, rr is an adjustable cage, short cage (WOW!), 28 tooth max. English 70 mm bb, french headset, nice simple lugged frame and lightweight bike for a 23.5 inch. Any thouhgts on tubing, value, etc. would be appreciated.




Subject: Raleigh Frame Size
Entered on: Dec 16, 1998 19:30
Entered by: Jim (jcole@memphis.edu)

Message:
I just picked up a 1974 Raleigh International and I'm trying to determine the frame size. According to the Retro Raleighs web page the Internationals were offered in 20.5, 21.5, 22.5, 23.5, and 24.5 sizes. Was this measured center to center or center to top? My frame measures 23 3/4" center to center and 24 1/4" center to top. So, what size frame do I have - 23.5" or the 24.5"? THANKS! - Jim




Subject: Raleigh Frame Size
Entered on: Dec 16, 1998 20:09
Entered by: Pete (PTGEMG@AOL.COM)

Message:
I have a Raleigh Super Course and a Competition GS, both are 25 1/2" center to top. You need to measure to the very top of the seat tube and not the top of the top tube. I'd say you have a 24 1/2" frame. Hope this helps. Enjoy your Raleigh! Pete




Subject: FS: Campy Rear Steel Hub w/QR
Entered on: Dec 17, 1998 10:06
Entered by: TimH (timh@market1.com)

Message:
Hi, I've been holding onto this hub since the mid-70s and still have no use for it. I'll sell it to the best offer received by the end of December + $4 for packing and shipping. It is used but in good condition and includes the quick release skewer (straight lever). 60's vintage Campagnolo.




Subject: Trying to identify history of bike parts
Entered on: Dec 24, 1998 12:56
Entered by: Scott (jsmaloney@earthlink.net)

Message:
I've had a box of bike parts for about 10 years now that I think are from a rare European road racer built in the early 1900's. Unfortunately I only have the parts and no frame. I have been meaning to restore this bike and am now ready but want to get my facts straight and do a good job. I have a one piece forged stem/handlebar by Titan, with removable metal/rubber hand grips. The bike had Bowden brakes. The wheels are 28". The tires have cotton rim liners. red rubber innertubes and Veith Cord Autotyp tires made in Germany. There is a three cog freewheel on one side and a fixed gear on the other side of the rear hub. It has a three piece cottered crank set with continuous, not skip teeth. It has a Simplex rear derailler that is not the conventional parallelogram design but shifts back and forth on a shaft as you pull the derailler cable. It has a serial or model number of 500 or 005. It has a pair of wodden fenders. It has a solid brass generator and rear bulb with a red glass lens. This is about all I can provide in the way of information but I have never been able to find information on these parts so I think I've got something rare. Can anyone help?




Subject: Trying to identify history of bike parts
Entered on: Dec 27, 1998 01:04
Entered by: Chuck (chuckschmidt@earthlink.net)

Message:
Scott, judging by your parts descriptions the earliest your bike could be is late 1930s and the latest probably late forties early fifties. By the way...how do you restore a bike that is missing the frame!?!?!?!




Subject: Clyclin Plus Magazine
Entered on: Dec 27, 1998 03:02
Entered by: Clem (Ahhh-clem@aol.com)

Message:
In the past I could get a British bike Mag. Cycling Plus at some of the local book stores but no longer. Is it still in print. It had some great art. on old lightweights. Anyone know a current source in the U.S. or a web sight?




Subject: Cycling Plus Magazine
Entered on: Dec 28, 1998 23:06
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I get the mag more or less routinely at Borders and occasionally at Barnes & Noble in our area. Maybe you could request it at one of those chains if you have them... It might help if you find a few other bike junkies to ask as well as the book store's prime interest is whether there is a demand. We pay a stiff $7.50 per issue here though!




Subject: Campy NR Triple
Entered on: Dec 29, 1998 13:20
Entered by: Jim (jcole@memphis.edu)

Message:
I have a Campy NR triple crank which has the stock 36T inner chainring. I understand this is the smallest size Campy made for it. I saw two 1973 Schwinn Paramounts (matching his & hers for cryin' out loud!)listed on rec.bicycles.marketplace that were outfitted with Campy NR triple cranks with 31 tooth Merz chainrings. I've never heard of these? Were there any other aftermarket chainrings made to fit the Campy triple bolt pattern that were smaller than the standard 36T? I'd like to find one if anybody has anything. THANKS! -Jim




Subject: Campy NR Triple
Entered on: Dec 31, 1998 00:33
Entered by: Louis ()

Message:
Jim- Regarding your NR triple- Jim Merz was a(n excellent)custom framebuilder who operated out of Portland, Oregon in the 70's to early eighties (he then went to work for Specialized). He regularly outfitted his touring bikes with 31 tooth inners of his own design and manufacture. Unfortunately, they haven't been made for years now. Whem I worked with Bruce Gordon throughout the eighties, we equipped our top line touring bikes with Campy NR or SR triples set up for half step gearing by drilling and tapping the spider to accept Avocet inner rings. This setup allowed an inner ring down to 24 teeth if desired (Our standard half-step was 50-46-30 (or 28) used with a 13-30 (or 32). A really nice shifting set of ratios. If you don't mind drilling and tapping the spider, Bruce probably still has the tooling and should be able to help you out.




Subject: 1976 or 77 Stella bike
Entered on: Dec 31, 1998 10:45
Entered by: Vince (vmcglone@yahoo.com Or vince.mcglone@amd.com)

Message:
Can someone please help me. I bought a Stella bicycle in 1976 or 77 and like a young dumby I painted the frame. Now I would to restore this frame and would any information on decals, headbadge etc. Where can find information on this manufacturer? any help would be greatly appreciated.




Subject: Stella Bicycles
Entered on: Dec 31, 1998 23:02
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
I have just recently added a modest page for Stella... Check it out in the French section of Classic "Rendezvous" (http://www.cyclesdeoro.com/Classc_Home.htm) Of course I am always looking for good illustrative photos to pump up the info base! Dale Brown




Subject: Thanks Dale
Entered on: Jan 1, 1999 08:06
Entered by: Vince (vmcglone)

Message:
Dale, I found the page you suggested and it is a great help. Thank you very much. Now for the really hard question. Do you think one can still find Stella decals for purchse anywhere? Or, is that expecting too much? Thanks, Vince




Subject: Stella; Restore it or forget it and just ride it?
Entered on: Jan 1, 1999 14:43
Entered by: Vince (vmcglone@yahoo.com)

Message:
Dale, One more question please. I am up on the fence about my 1977 Stella frame. I painted this frame once before as young and dumb man. Therefore all decals are destroyed. My questions are: Can I, should I, try to find decals, headbadge etc. to do a restoration? Or, should I paint again and do an upgrade that includes braze-ons and all that good stuff? Is this bike worth a restoration?




Subject: Stella Restoration
Entered on: Jan 1, 1999 23:01
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
It is a tough decision whether to attempt to restore a bike like your Stella... In my mind, it would depend on the model (top of the line or more basic?) I think it will be nearly impossible to get the decals. CyclArt may have reproduced them, but as most of us know, that requires a paintjob from them ... They do premium work and the charges correspond. IF you have all the original parts and IF you want to spend $300 plus on paint & decals and IF it is a nicer model with Reynolds 531 and top parts.... then perhaps a restoration is in order. Stella was not necessarily an intricate lug work, fancy detailed artisan made bike. It was a very good rider with straight forward workmanship. The "value" of a bike like this lies in it's appeal to you on a personal level, and the fact that it is no longer made... In years to come, an extinct brand always has appeal, but obviously one wouldn't expect a Stella to ever be viewed as desirable as a Cinelli, Hetchins, Herse or Confente (the top 4?)




Subject: Stella bike frame
Entered on: Jan 2, 1999 08:55
Entered by: Vince (vmcglone@yahoo.com)

Message:
Dale, In weighing the items you spoke of it seems wiser to just paint and upgrade the frame than restore. The pluses for restoration are; Bike was high-end full Campy Record, sew-ups and 5-3-1 Reynolds tube. The negatives: I don't have all the Campy parts any more and I can't prove it's 5-3-1 tube because sticker is gone. I was thinking of upgrading the frame with all braze-ons as we spoke of. Then some new componentry like a triple chain-ring and Ergo-power shifting. What do you think? Will the rear triangle accomdate modern parts? Any wierdness I need to watch out for? Thanks again for your time and insight Dale. Oh by the way. I printed Stella pictures from your web-site. I have a friend that may be able to recreate some of the decals. Vince




Subject: Stella: the last word........
Entered on: Jan 2, 1999 22:54
Entered by: Dale Brown (oroboyz@aol.com)

Message:
Vince's idea of using the Stella as an every day rider with modern parts is not bad.. New bikes usually will not ride (as smooth and resilient)like these vintage machines. The dimensions and threadings shouldn't pose any problems, just remember that the French bikes (early 70's at least) have metric threading and tube diameters throughout. So you should plan to use your old headset, BBkt cups and possibly seatpost. The pedals are surely French threaded (smaller dia.) and won't work in the newer cranks you might add. If the bike was Campag equipped in the beginning, any rear derailleur should do. New front derailleurs may need a shim to ensure non-slipping on slightly undersized seat tube........




Subject:
Entered on: Jan 3, 1999 14:24
Entered by: Chuck (chuckschmidt@earthlink.net)

Message:
I'm looking for mid-50s or earlier three-piece hubs (alloy flanges with chrome steel barrel) made by Campagnolo, Gnutti, FB, EP, or British Hub (Airlite Continental) either singlely or pairs, large or small flange, road or track, any hole drilling.




Subject: Vince's Stella
Entered on: Jan 3, 1999 15:34
Entered by: Russ (rfitzger@emeraldis.com)

Message:
While the idea of repainting the Stella is a nice idea, my temptation would be to use nice older parts to build her back up. It does require patience, but I have built back up some rather nice old bikes with non-Campy but still lovely bits. The drawbacks I see to current stuff include (a) rear geometry - newer hubsets are wider in the rear and (b) pure aesthetics. Call me one of those who thinks five cogs on the rear are all you need, though I can live with six - but no more. Haunt the newslists and pick up nice but not-so collectible bits. Raid your local LBS that's been around forever for parts. I've just finished cleaning and restoring to service a set of old French wheels with mirror finish Normandy Luxe Competition hubs I got from a shop in Georgia, and I paid very little for them. As someone who takes a certain pleasure in demonstrating that 70s 10-speeds with sewups, Stronglight cranks and Mafacs more than hold their own on club rides, I would urge to you consider older but less expensive parts.




Subject: Back on the fence about my Stella
Entered on: Jan 4, 1999 13:03
Entered by: Vince (vmcglone@yahoo.com)

Message:
I can see this will be a difficult choice to restore or upgrade. Both Russ and Dale present compelling arguements and I am back on the fence as to which way I will fall. My first steps will be to haunt newslist as Russ suggests. Then I think I will price faithful restoration choice. This could come down to simple economics. Thank you both for your input and time. Happy New Year, Vince




Subject: Japanese lightweights
Entered on: Jan 5, 1999 15:45
Entered by: Keith (velohund@yahoo.com)

Message:
Back in the early 70s I don't think I'd have been caught dead on a Japanese bike, though today I'm not sure why. About three years ago, soon after I met my wife, I bought her an almost new Pro-Miyata with friction-shift Dura Ace for $100. The workmanship on the frame appears to be as good as or better than a lot of mid to high-end European bikes (I'm thinking of brand names like Raleigh, Peugeot, Gitane and the like -- not small shop bikes). The brazing is super clean, and the finish on the lugs and dropouts is superb. The lugs are cut out, as is the bottom bracket, though they are not ornate. Much if not all of the frame appears to be chome judging by the chrome shining through the various small paint blems. About a year later I picked up a similar vintage Lotus Competition, with Campy NR for $50. The frame appears to be of similar quality to the Miyata -- the brazing is very clean and the finish at the Campy droputs is nicer than on some Euro bikes. For example, the finish is far better than a '71 Raleigh International I have, and much beter than a Peugot PY-12 I have hanging in my office. Both bikes ride very well. The Lotus is particularly stiff. Anyway, the question all this leads to is, from a totally objective standpoint, how do you guys rate the quality and workmanship of the better Japanese bikes? Would we shun them because they lack the mystique of European bikes?




Subject: Ouch!
Entered on: Jan 5, 1999 16:39
Entered by: steve (garko1@aol.com)

Message:
As I was doing my weekly check of this group, I feel compelled to tell this short story that happened recently. A co worker of mine just told me that she had just found out from her elderly mother that her mother had sold her "old schwinn 10 speed" without checking with the daughter(my co worker). The bike was "still shiny, and in perfect shape, except cracked tires." The bike?.... a 1971 Paramount. The price?... $10. The deals are out there, my friends. My co worker finally called her mother the other day. steve