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English Roadsters


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AGE / VALUE:   indian princess child's bike w/rod-actuated brake posted by: Michael on 7/31/2010 at 4:03:12 PM
The hub Perry 14-40 is in mint condition.Rod-actuated brake. The bike is excellent condition. it's been re-painted.


by: 67.186.132.209


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   indian princess child's bike w/rod-actuated brake posted by Chris on 7/31/2010 at 6:16:02 PM
I have never seen one with the rod brakes
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   indian princess child's bike w/rod-actuated brake posted by David on 7/31/2010 at 7:27:52 PM
This CL ad may be it:

http://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/bik/1867448708.html

1950s, I'd guess. Which English mfr made bicycles for Indian?
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   indian princess child's bike w/rod-actuated brake posted by Chris on 8/1/2010 at 4:33:17 PM
Phillips of Birmingham

J.A. Phillips and company who had three factories and were known for the wonderful pedals hugemongeous maker of many different and wide range of bicycles ice skates, componet parts for bicycles
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   indian princess child's bike w/rod-actuated brake posted by Michael on 8/20/2010 at 5:52:03 AM
The hub Perry 14-40 is in mint condition.Rod-actuated brake. The bike is excellent condition. it's been re-painted. ill_bid@yahoo.com
by: 67.186.132.209




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AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub Problem posted by: Ron on 7/30/2010 at 9:53:41 AM
I have a 1950s Humber with a dynohub. (The lamp is the kind with the big screw head at the back.) Until yesterday the lamp was working fine - you just had to find the "sweet spot" on the switch and push the switch back a bit. Now the sweet spot is gone. The connection from the dynohub to the lamp is fine. I resoldered a wire to the back of the lamp socket, thinking that was the problem. I rewired the lamp exactly as it was when it was working. The contacts are touching. There don't appear to be any short circuits. The bulb is good; I checked it on another dynohub. Still nothing. Can anyone shed light on the problem? Thanks.
by: 68.122.33.227

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub Problem posted by David on 7/30/2010 at 4:15:54 PM
Test the generator w/out the wiring attached - should show 6V AC when wheel's turning. Try substituting a battery for the generator and see if it lights up. I'm suspicious of the switch and the connectors to the bulb. Generator itself is almost certainly NOT the problem. Good luck.
by: 216.15.114.27




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by: Thom J. on 7/29/2010 at 11:49:00 AM
.....that is the question. I recently noticed that the 1972 Raleigh Sports that I bought a few years ago from Menotomy, when they were selling and shipping bikes, was made in Malaysia!! All of my other Raleighs were made in England, or so the decal on the top tube says. I'm planning on getting my bike collection down to two or maybe three bikes. Would the "made in Malaysia" situation lower it's re-sale value? Had I known that up front, I may not have bought the bike. Thx in advance for your input. Thom.
by: 63.204.42.231

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by Chris on 7/29/2010 at 5:28:17 PM
I'd love to see pictures of this bike! for the archive of pictures as well!

These made in malaysia bikes were just assembled there, with tubing and parts and threading and everything, from England.

England supplied C.K.D. "completely knocked down" kits a big container arrived in malaysia and they assembled it there painted it there

I think it's cool, out of the ordinary no reason to hang your head at all.

Raleigh was a hugemongeous EMPIRE larger and more detailed then we will ewver really know.


I want a Raleigh with the Springs South Africa badge on it.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by Chris on 7/29/2010 at 5:30:51 PM
The colors were better! different the foreign markets were compettitive and customers demanded special things and the factory listened to the needs of the customers.

What color is this bike? perhaps not the same as all the rest we find here in the states.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by Thom J. on 7/30/2010 at 10:59:24 AM
Chris- Thanks for your input and kind words. I often forget that Raleigh was a giant in the bike world way back when; kinda like today's global maufacturing systems. I have a pic of the bike on my Reader's Ride page here at OldRoads, see "Thom J's bikes", but will add that I replaced the Kenda tires with Panarace Col de la Vie tires during this past winter. The headlight is a Taiwan made reproduction that I've retrofitted with LEDs front and rear; the beam focusing for the from LED still needs some work but the rear LED works really nice. I go through these moments in life where I want to get down to a minimalist assortment of things, clothes, shoes, watches, hats etc and at times the bikes get into that mix. Until.....I go to the bike shed, take 'em out, look 'em over and ride 'em around for a while......then I realize just how nice they are to have. Oh well, that's just me. Thom.
by: 63.204.42.231

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by Emily on 8/5/2010 at 7:16:56 PM
Hi! I have a 1946 Raleigh Women's Touring bike with all original parts. I was offered $500 for it. Is that too little? Thanks!
by: 96.242.125.94

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by chris on 8/9/2010 at 4:55:23 PM
we need to see pictures and have a better description of the bike what size wheels cable or rod brakes take pictures of the bike

depends
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by Mike on 8/11/2010 at 4:35:09 PM
I have a BSA single speed made in England w/Brook saddle 26" in good condition. I think it's around 1947. Can anyone help me w/value? Thank you
by: 71.232.218.218

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by Ken on 8/11/2010 at 5:18:50 PM
I agree with Chris that theres nothing to be ashamed about Malaysian Raleighs as the earlier batches were CKD models from the UK. The later (late 70s) Malaysian Raleighs were fully manufactured there from locally sourced materials. These can be identified by their headbadges - just two horizontal bars replacing the words 'Nottingham England' - and frame numbers that begin with an "RM...". Decent bikes, but IMHO, they dont ride as well as the English ones.


by: 164.78.248.57


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   To sell or not to sell.... posted by Ken on 8/11/2010 at 5:21:25 PM
Pic here of a 100% Malaysian-made Raleigh


by: 164.78.248.57





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AGE / VALUE:   sa 2 speed kick back posted by: sam on 7/27/2010 at 8:40:50 PM
Seems Sa is selling a 2 speed kick back hub.Find one of theie original Raleigh canterlever frames and you gor a real "american" cruzer type English bike
And at only 54 dollars they are a real bargain!
by: 99.104.89.129

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   sa 2 speed kick back posted by David on 7/29/2010 at 3:32:42 AM
See http://www.sturmey-archer.com/products/hubs/cid/7/id/55

by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   sa 2 speed kick back posted by ken on 8/5/2010 at 10:38:17 AM
good to see you, sam!
I see that hub is an overdrive, like the blue band Bendix (right? the one they put on the StingRays) and I wonder how come. Seems to me you'd want the direct drive ratio to be the high gear if possible, since that would get the most use. The idea behind the overdrive is to overcome the small wheel. When I got too big for my 20" wheel bike, 45+ years ago, I put a bigger chainring on it. More recent experiments with internal gears in a full size wheel led to installing a smaller chainring.
Question for regular 3-speed riders: would you rather have L and N or N and H if you could only have two?
by: 68.238.11.17

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   sa 2 speed kick back posted by Chris on 8/9/2010 at 5:02:47 PM
low and neutral high was always too high

The makers used an 18 tooth sprocket on the hubs the bikes left factory with that 18 tooth sprocket it was not large enough the front chainrings were too large with too many teeth

it affected the bikes appeal and usability.

I have always did a crank transplant and swaped out chainwheels to get something with less teeth on it in the front and used a 22 and later 24 tooth sprockets on the rear hub.


Cog is not the proper term, sprocket is but I am going to say cog as in rear cog from now on i am too old to change.

my 1978 frame has 1950's cranks on it better chrome, longer 7 inch crank arms the heron has eyes a few less teeth in the front.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   sa 2 speed kick back posted by ken on 8/16/2010 at 2:41:22 PM
Herons got teeth in the front? :)
I'm with you- I went to 39t chainwheel. Not getting any younger...
by: 70.105.69.63




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Update on broken cotter posted by: Kevin J on 7/24/2010 at 3:18:52 PM
Well gents, (and the occasional lady who graces us with her presence!)it wasn't easy. Everyone's suggestions helped: the hammer and pipe, the drilling with various bits and oil ( I broke two bits), the propane torch heating, slamming the pedal hard in each direction. The press also sounds like a great idea for future reference, the distant future, I hope! It finally came off/out. Some of the soft metal cotter is still in the crank.
Before starting on this adventure, I tried taking off the replacement cotter from my spare Colt and it came right out, giving me what turned out to be false hope to continue the operation on my Sports.
I've decided to also use the crank from my Colt, thinking it might be more compatible. The spindle is fine, but I'll save the filing out of the rest of the cotter from the old crank for some Winter's day. It's too hot for English bicycles and for me.
I still wonder if the squeak/slight movement in the right crank had to do with a cotter pin. Keith mentions that the cotter problem should be noticeable on the left. A couple weeks prior, I had a bent pedal on this very crank (I replaced with a pedal from the Colt) and I noticed it had become slightly unscrewed. I'll never know.
I'll see if the new set-up loosens and if it will take a little gentle hammering (that metal(steel)is soft!) and tightening, as per Sheldon Brown.
I'll try to post a couple of pictures. The blue Colt in the back (19" female frame, nice paint, but not good for me to ride), the green '67 Sports in question, and my other brown rusty Sports. The astute observers will notice the non-original crank now on the "67. I probably have all the original stuff for the '67: saddle, pump, generator for museum purposes. In the mean time, I've adapted things economically and for daily use. I think I need to have two running for dependable transportation. I enjoy riding these bikes more than fixing them, though I enjoy the occasional challenge.
I've never worked on a 3-speed hub, rarely worked with ball bearings. This was the toughest job and it may not be over. Thanks to all for your help!


by: 24.185.84.239


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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Update on broken cotter posted by Kevin J. on 7/25/2010 at 5:06:36 AM
Sorry, wrong link. I'm an amateur. Hopefully it works now. The pictures aren't that good anyway.


by: 24.185.84.239


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Update on broken cotter posted by Steve on 7/25/2010 at 4:28:02 PM
Kevin, if you keep scratching around with a decent quality curved miniature file, the wafer like remains of the cotter pin will/should eventually just drop out all of a sudden.
At this point you can frame it, and put it on display in your bathroom !
As for hubs, I've spent many hours today working on a KT6 (three speed hub), solved the original problem....then ended up with two more !
They're lovely to look at, but can drive you mad at times.
Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Update on broken cotter posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 7/26/2010 at 2:03:54 AM
A bit off-topic... but Steve... you reminded me (with the framing and hanging in the bathroom comment) of my very first car. My 1963 Plymouth Valiant.... I still have part of it.... the fractured timing gear (crankshaft) and a goodly chunk of the telephone pole that I took out falling asleep at the wheel.

Lovingly encased in epoxy.... to be preserved in all eternity....

Kevin... GO for it. As this has been for all of us (especially you!) quite the memorable event!

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - cast in stone? Not quite....
by: 4.248.91.7

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Update on broken cotter posted by Kevin J. on 7/26/2010 at 8:06:41 AM
Yes. Up on the shelf these stubborn parts go, so I can admire them. I think I can find something in my tools from my '69 Plymouth Valiant to put up there too, that has somehow moved around with me. I much prefer the '63 and '69 bicycles. Either we're opening things, taking apart and running into problems, or we can't the one stubborn piece off.
Regards, Kevin
by: 24.185.84.239




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WANTED:   1976 Raleigh Record posted by: Cain on 7/21/2010 at 4:13:13 PM
Hello all, I'm looking for a 1976 Raleigh Record in the Blue/Black color scheme with the full size frame.
Though I would prefer the Blue/Black I would also consider the other frame schemes for a good price.
by: 208.17.105.50

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           RE:WANTED:   1976 Raleigh Record posted by Matthew on 7/25/2010 at 1:07:02 PM
Try the vintage lightweight discussion board.

Matthew - trying to help.
by: 86.31.174.47

           RE:WANTED:   1976 Raleigh Record posted by Cain on 7/27/2010 at 12:04:06 PM
Thanks, Matthew.
I've posted there as well already.
I really want one of these bicycles.
by: 208.17.105.50

           RE:RE:WANTED:   1976 Raleigh Record posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 7/28/2010 at 3:03:19 AM
At the risk of stating the blatantly obvious..... I do see them pop up from time to time on Ebay. There should be enough of them out there... that if you're patient, one should pop up relatively local... if you don't want to pay shipping.

That and Craig's List.

And of course ALWAYS ALWAYS... and ALWAYS... keep an eye peeled for the odd machine out at the curb (kerb) on Trash Day.

Those.... are the dearest of all.... rescuing a machine as such from oblivion... you'll earn your velocipede rescue angel wings for sure.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - basement full of strays....
by: 4.248.95.87




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AGE / VALUE:   Paging Boneman: For Sale posted by: JS on 7/21/2010 at 1:27:31 AM
Larry-

You had asked to know if I would be posting anything for sale on my website...as it should happen, now I am. Small stuff, hopefully useful to somebody.

JS

Http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 193.23.43.5

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paging Boneman: For Sale posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 7/21/2010 at 3:00:41 AM
Ah, wonderful! I'm sure I was not alone in hoping to see some things put forth for purveyance from your very roadster-friendly source....

Now, let me go find my drooling towel.... ;-)

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Not since Carley Simon... has there been this much "Anticipation".....
by: 4.248.78.181

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paging Boneman: For Sale posted by sam on 7/23/2010 at 5:28:06 PM
JS a few years ago I got my hands on several sets of all red 28" tires.Swallow brand made in the Far East.Swallow later became swallbe tire of Germany.Have you seen any of the All Red or natural rubber tires?I still get requests for them---sam
by: 99.104.89.129




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MISC:   HELP, S/A FREEWHEEL BEARINGS posted by: PETERS on 7/18/2010 at 12:06:21 PM
How many bearings belong in the two races in the freewheel of a S/A flip-flop freewheel/fixed combo? I am currently rebuilding a '49 RUDGE with this hub, and it is not included in the '56 master catalogue. Somebody did a real number on it in the past trying to get at the hub flange to re-spoke, and I find 50 balls on the inside race, and 52 on the outside. There is a good bit of room in both races for more balls so I am assuming a few disappeared along the way. Anyone know the answer? Thanks in advance for any assistance.
by: 69.86.194.252

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           RE:MISC:   HELP, S/A FREEWHEEL BEARINGS posted by Keith Body on 7/18/2010 at 2:30:47 PM
Peters, I can't actually remember, but if you fill it up and leave about one space you should be OK, these were not critical. The balls were .125 inch, can you still get them.
If necessary we used to remove the freewheel by dropping it apart, then keeping the pawls in place, grip fairly gently across the pawls in a vice with some soft protective metal in place, and turn the wheel anticlockwise. If the vice is tight this squeezes the freewheel body on the threads and it won't move.
by: 92.8.211.227

           RE:MISC:   HELP, S/A FREEWHEEL BEARINGS posted by PETERS on 7/18/2010 at 2:50:39 PM
Thanks, Keith. I want to say I can get 60 or so balls in each race, so I am guessing it is about 10 shy each side. Whoever 'fixed' the spokes really mauled it, so I bet they had balls flying everywhere....I got the thing off by placing a piece of steel the right thickness in the jaws of a bench vice just proud enough to seat in the slots of the freewheel body (disassembled as you suggest)and laid on top of the vice, and then c-clamped the whole thing through the spokes with a piece of wood to protect the off side. I could then turn the whole wheel with a slow and steady amount of force till it turned loose.
I never see these flip-flops. Any idea why they seem to be so scarce? I was under the impression they were the cheap option.

by: 69.86.194.252

           RE:MISC:   HELP, S/A FREEWHEEL BEARINGS posted by PETERS on 7/18/2010 at 2:50:47 PM
Thanks, Keith. I want to say I can get 60 or so balls in each race, so I am guessing it is about 10 shy each side. Whoever 'fixed' the spokes really mauled it, so I bet they had balls flying everywhere....I got the thing off by placing a piece of steel the right thickness in the jaws of a bench vice just proud enough to seat in the slots of the freewheel body (disassembled as you suggest)and laid on top of the vice, and then c-clamped the whole thing through the spokes with a piece of wood to protect the off side. I could then turn the whole wheel with a slow and steady amount of force till it turned loose.
I never see these flip-flops. Any idea why they seem to be so scarce? I was under the impression they were the cheap option.

by: 69.86.194.252

           RE:MISC:   HELP, S/A FREEWHEEL BEARINGS posted by PETERS on 7/18/2010 at 2:51:57 PM
Sorry for the double post. I have no idea how that happened.
by: 69.86.194.252

           RE:MISC:   HELP, S/A FREEWHEEL BEARINGS posted by Keith Body on 7/18/2010 at 3:04:15 PM
Most UK Raleighs at the time had SA gears, the single speed was 1930's style, rarely sold. Club cyclists then would mostly have used double fixed, but would have real lightweights, or possibly a Raleigh RRA.
Some freewheels had curved spacers between the balls, cheaper.
The removing slots usually got chewed up, the removing tools had to be clamped on very tight using the hub spindle, and progressively loosened as the freewheel unscrews. You might have to chase out the threads for the end plate.
by: 92.8.211.227




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AGE / VALUE:   MAY 20, 2010 FORBES MAGAZINE ARTICLE DO NOT MISS IT! posted by: Chris on 7/16/2010 at 4:25:10 PM
Just read the May 20, th 2010 Forbes Magazine article

It is not to be missed! Please take a look so we can discuss it here
by: 71.40.121.165

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   MAY 20, 2010 FORBES MAGAZINE ARTICLE DO NOT MISS IT! posted by Chris on 7/17/2010 at 5:56:46 PM
It is the May 10 th issue its about bikes in Africa I'll add more later
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   MAY 20, 2010 FORBES MAGAZINE ARTICLE DO NOT MISS IT! posted by Ken on 7/26/2010 at 12:25:09 AM
Thanks Chris for informing us all. The article can be found here: http://www.worldbicyclerelief.org/

Interesting that the design so closely resembles the old English roadster. Perhaps this might have been how it would look like today if it were still in production...
by: 164.78.248.57




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Lock removal in fork posted by: Steve Consani on 7/12/2010 at 8:05:09 PM
I have a Raleigh with a locking fork and I need to remove the lock from the fork.
I have the thimble or dimple removed and what appears to be a locking inside the fork on the lock itself removed.
The lock will not come out of the fork.
Any help in removing the lock would be appreciated.
Thank You,
Steve
by: 24.4.130.112

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Lock removal in fork posted by Keith Body on 7/13/2010 at 12:24:17 PM
Steve, In "General Resources/Archives" on here search for Raleigh lock, there is an exploded diagram. You do need the key, but I could probably manage with a near match.
I haven't done one for over 50 years.
Keith
by: 92.18.3.155

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Lock removal in fork posted by Matthew on 7/16/2010 at 10:03:12 AM
Try searching 'locking fork' in the search on this site. Keys are available and there have been lots of discussions about them.

Matthew - locked and loaded
by: 86.23.111.20

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Lock removal in fork posted by Chris on 7/16/2010 at 4:28:01 PM
any good local locksmith worth their salt can make up a key with a hand file the lock information is in their books

the original keys say Wilmont Union Breeden on them
by: 71.40.121.165




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports posted by: Jerry on 7/12/2010 at 3:46:45 PM
Just recently purchased a 1976 Raleigh Sports ladies bike. The bike seems to be completely original. But there is one factor that is puzzling to me. The rear fender is solid silver; no white at the very rear of the fender. Did Raleigh build some of its bikes like this or has the fender been repainted. The Raleigh logo is on the fender just like it should be. Just wondering about this. Thanks for any replies.
by: 66.20.185.205

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports posted by Chris on 7/12/2010 at 5:03:12 PM
This is common, well......... it happenes and this is factory paint


we see raleigh tourist d.l.1.'s with all black rear fenders and no white patch as long as you do have a reflector back there on the fender
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 7/12/2010 at 5:21:48 PM
I think from 1976 on.... they dropped the "white tail" paint.... particularly when they went from the standard circular rear reflector to that odd "tombstone" shaped unit.

It was getting to that point.... where they were doing everything and anything to keep pricing competitive and paintint the white tail on the rear mudguard I presume was deemed no longer valid.... at least for export to US machines.

Of course, that's just my thinking on the matter.... could be there were other reasons as well... but knowing manufacturing processes, etc., as I do... that seems to make sense.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Those machines.... don't match my local ruminant woodlant creatures at all....
by: 4.248.91.230

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports posted by Jerry on 7/12/2010 at 6:22:13 PM
Thanks, Guy, for the info. Makes me feel better about the bike.
by: 66.20.185.205

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports posted by Chris on 7/15/2010 at 5:21:05 PM


Larry is correct well he is !

Except that..............the two bikes myself and a pal got from Raleigh these were two out of the VERY LAST seven left in the wharehouse these were green powder coat paint wearing 28 inch wheel, rod brake, 22 inch frame, full enclosed chaincases westwood rims not westrick either and these had the white tail patch on the rear fender or mudguard with the round reflector and the English mudguard stays with the rods not the alloy flexiball wire type U.S.A. type mudguard stays.

each bike was about $1000.00 before transport/ e.t.c.
The other 5 were reserved for Derby bigwhigs corporate/ company people and were not for sale.

I was buying from the factory and these were not even in the computer inventory squirreled away I was scraping the barrel's bottom.

I sold this bike to the fellow who got the other one they are together the both of them and he not interested in selling either of them.

this was in 1987 seven years after Raleigh stopped shipping these to the United States and those were all black colour but those had no white patch on the mudguard.
One dealer I knew, kept his inventory of Raleigh tourists D.L.1'S for a bed and breakfast home he was going to run in retirement years. He loved these graceful bikes so much he wanted people to enjoy them in leisure at his next business.

Truly wonderful people they were. kind, honest, hard working, top shelf all the way.

Once again,
I would not have missed discovering the rod brake Raleigh bicycle and all the magic, wonder, fun and well all of it not for all the world.

The toumbstone rear reflector Larry mentions I have seen this rear fender reflector. So he is not incorrect.


I am starting to believe that some of the production of the black raleigh tourists with the 28 inch wheels and rod brakes maybe was undertaken outside the Nottingham factory
perhaps.
Somebody mentioned that these bikes were what he or she called "Cottage industry"

As for the two Raleighs, I will wrestle them away from the guy, but it will be in the future and some time from now.


by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports posted by Matthew on 7/16/2010 at 10:06:34 AM
No white tails on UK bikes after WW2 as a rule. This has been the subject of vast debate and obviously state and federal laws are vastly different from the Construction and use regulations which govern those sorts of things here in the UK.

If you search this site for white tails etc you'll find lots of info.

Matthew - shake that tail feather!
by: 86.23.111.20




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by: Kevin J on 7/10/2010 at 3:50:49 PM
Greetings again,
About 3 weeks ago on my daily rider '67 Sports, I noticed my crank arm on the chain side was making a slight noise and giving a little/slipping as I pedaled. I figured the cotter pin/bolt was worn. I never had this problem before on a Raleigh. I did on other bicycles. I took a spare cotter off another Raleigh that I use for parts. It came right out. On my Sports, I haven't been able to loosen it and ease it out. I've banged a lot more that you should for a bike. I've drilled about a 1/2" or more into the nut side (a piece of the bit is broken off inside)and some on the top of the cotter. I've put WD40 on it and let it sit a day or so. It won't budge. I may have gone about this the wrong way. I was pretty certaing from past experience that the cotter needed to be replaced. Now I have no choice. Any ideas?
by: 24.185.84.239

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by chris on 7/10/2010 at 5:14:34 PM
You will likely need to replace the crank arm now. The spindle may be ok still.

Don't feel bad about this, really I have done the same exact thing with some of my bikes.

Start fresh with a new crank arm and cotter pin e- bay has these parts.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Keith Body on 7/11/2010 at 3:08:57 AM
Kevin, If you have a worn cotter, you will only feel the movement on the left side. The best way now is try to drill out as much of the cotter as possible, the maximum drill size is probably less than .25 inches. Try a slow speed if you can, and use a little oil on the drill, (not WD40). (Cycle theory, any oil is better than none) The objective is to remove as much of the cotter (mild steel) as you can. You will not harm the spindle as it is case hardened.
The idea is to stamp on the left pedal, in both directions, which might loosen the thing.
I wish I was with you, with the tools in my hands.
Keith
by: 92.8.10.251

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Kevin J. on 7/11/2010 at 5:44:43 AM
Thanks, Chris and Keith. It's always great to check in here for your knowledge and encouragement. I have to go buy a new drill bit, but I already have the cotter,and even a crank if need be. I wonder, when I get it all back together, will I have fixed the problem. I was pretty certain I was getting a slight squeaking noise from my right crank as I pedaled. It reminded me of cotter problems from a long time ago on a Japanese Royce Union 3- spd and then on a French 10-speed. Now that I think of those 2 cases, Keith, the movement was on the left side as you say. I don't have the time that I used to have back then, and I don't have your expertise. Maybe I'll get to it today, even if I overlap a little with the World Cup final. I'll report back here.
by: 24.185.84.239

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by sam on 7/11/2010 at 6:58:08 PM
Kevin,before you go to all that troble drilling---Get a piece of pipe just a bit larger than the cotter and long enough to support the crank arm solid to the cement floor.Get a buddy to help hold it.Use a BIG hammer--a 2 pound sledge is about right and a drift pin(like a punch with a flat not pointed end)Try one or two really good whacks.If it doesn't work---drill baby drill.
by: 99.104.89.129

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 7/12/2010 at 4:14:01 AM
All good stuff. The addition of some carfully applied HEAT can also greatly aid in the removal of stubborn parts. If you have a propane torch, adjust it as fine as you can and very carefully heat the area... then do the double wach that Sam refers too.

Sometimes that wee bit of expansion can make an huge difference.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Stubborn with age..... ;-)
by: 4.248.91.119

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Steve on 7/12/2010 at 3:56:59 PM
Had the very same problem yesterday. Tried all the usual tricks, but had to resort to the painfully tedious way of removing cotter by drilling carefully (and straight), then finishing of with an hours filing.
I start by dot punching the centre of the cotter, drill all the way through, then work up from small to "reasonable" sized drill from both ends, before swapping over to my good old faithfull small semi-circular shaped file for a while, then (as mentioned above) a stamp on the appropriate pedal to snap what's left of the cotter.
It's very boring and time consuming, but needs must. I have snapped one or two drills in the past (probably on the hardened steel axle or by pulling too much at a silly angle), managed it yesterday without breaking any.
I hardly ever seem to get the perfect size replacement cotter pin though, nine times out of ten I usually have to file the face of pin a little to get it to fit snugly.
Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Kevin J. on 7/12/2010 at 7:57:47 PM
Wow! I haven't gotten to it yet, but I'm glad I waited. I've got the tools on hand, including a new drill bit. It sounds like I'm in for an adventure. I'll report back. Thanks all.
by: 24.185.84.239

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Steve on 7/13/2010 at 9:29:44 AM
Might be wise to invest in a quality set of drill bits, ranging from say 1mm to 6 or 10mm.
They're always useful to have around i.e. removal of seized rear mudguard lower nut & bolt to frame, especially if it's very old (slightly eroded) and you don't want to disfigure the original guard.
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: broken cotter won't come out! posted by Al on 7/13/2010 at 3:44:10 PM

A stuck cotter pin, ugh. I can't tell from your post if any of the threaded end of the pin is exposed. If so, file it straight and use one of these:

http://bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/index.html

Yep, it runs 55 bones. But that's a small price to pay in the long run. I just squeezed out two cotter pins yesterday on a 40-year-old Triumph, a sad neglected 3-speed. Smooth as butter. And the best part is I can usually reuse the pins.

When it's time to re-assemble, there's no hammer pounding. Just squeeze 'em back in. One of the most satisfying parts of the bottom bracket service.

I also enjoy Sheldon Brown's old cotter pin page:

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cotters.html

Good luck!
by: 71.135.35.100

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Steve on 7/14/2010 at 3:28:37 PM
I have the bikesmithdesign.com cotter press tool and wouldn't be without one....it's marvellous, and saved me lots of time over the past three years or so.
But occasionly I come across a real "pig" of a pin, and the press simply deforms (mushrooms) the exposed area of the pin, leaving me with no option but to saw off the deformed section and drill the remainder out.
Steve


by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Chris on 7/15/2010 at 5:29:01 PM
So, whomever decided to use cheaper, softer, steel. Whomever tinkered with the specifications and made changes to whomever messed with chemicals that hardened the steel, whomever turned dials on the tooling.

Heres thinking of you!
You caused the customers who love their Raleigh bikes
thousands of people you caused them a lot of heartache.

But we are dealing with it.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   broken cotter won't come out! posted by Kevin on 7/16/2010 at 6:38:32 PM
I have a bikesmithdesign cotter press, too. What a wonderful tool. It has paid for itself many times over. I bought it when restoring a couple of neglected Raleigh Twenties, and didn't mangle a single cotter. The man who makes them also stocks some Sturmey-Archer parts.
by: 98.226.154.146




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynohub ball bearing replacement posted by: Roderic D. Schmidt on 7/9/2010 at 7:30:17 AM
Greetings All
So I'm elbow deep in disassembling and cleaning up a '62 Rudge Sports, and I've got the front Dynohub apart (except for the magnet and armature). I'm getting ready to replace the bearing in retainers with loose balls, but keep having the nagging memory of reading something about the Dynohub being the one place one can't make that swap. I've searched here and the Harris Cyclery site for a couple hours and can't find what I'm looking for. Can anyone corroborate/allay my suspicion?

Many Thanks,
Roderic
by: 207.246.218.205

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynohub ball bearing replacement posted by Keith Body on 7/9/2010 at 12:24:19 PM
Roderic, I can't see any reason why not. Plain .25 inch balls, and a little grease. I think the cages were only used for easy assembly.
Everyone disagrees on my view of the magnet, a long time ago it did not seem to make any difference whether I used the keeper or not, but the magnets were a lot newer then, perhaps more critical 50 years on.
Keith
by: 92.6.121.79

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynohub ball bearing replacement posted by Roderic D. Schmidt on 7/9/2010 at 1:59:41 PM
Hi Keith,
Thanks for the reassurance. I get nervous sometimes working on a new system. Have a dandy weekend!

Roderic
by: 207.246.218.205

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynohub ball bearing replacement posted by Chris on 7/9/2010 at 4:26:13 PM
if it had caged bearings originally then put those in upon servicing it.

Funny I say this I am no fan of caged bearings either. I am nervous changing things in the hubs scared it could go wrong I don't want anything to go wrong or anybody end up getting hurt. Keith is correct as usual, still.

Try loose bearings and let us know. If you want to.

I like this Keith Body fellow here because he is so experienced as a shop owner back in the day all the customers and experiences he has had. I wish I was there, seeing what he has seen and I wish I met the people he has met and I think of the questions I would ask things I would snoop into and get into. e.t.c. you understand what I am trying to say.
He was first on, right there at the times, he gives a unique perspective dare I say, more pure and real?
I don't want to put anybody else here down either. I'm looking for something here in all this and Keith never fails to answer right on the money.

I wish I could go and shove a computer into the hands of the people who also were there and say type! teach!
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynohub ball bearing replacement posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 7/10/2010 at 3:51:31 AM
With experience... comes WISDOM. With schooling... comes EDUCATION.

A goodly combination of both... along with that rarity, COMMON SENSE.... is a dear and invaluable commodity these days.


That being said... Chris... keep in mind the words of that wise sage Frank Zappa... who put forth the proposition that:

"It isn't necessary to imagine the world ending in fire or ice. There are two other possibilities: one is paperwork, and the other is nostalgia."

;-)

Meanwhile.... I'm not an huge fan of caged bearings either... and if they can be properly replaced sans the cage, absolutely. This is where Keith's EXPERIENCE and WISDOM comes into play. :-)

The cage, like many other things, is actually an aid to the assembly of the machine. Well... OK... dis-assembly and re-assembly too.... but one can't help but wonder what the difference in friction and bearing life is.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - uncage the BEASTIES!

by: 4.248.73.17

           RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynohub ball bearing replacement posted by Chris on 7/10/2010 at 5:11:03 PM
The cages have gives vintage bicyclists trouble- broken cages unleash bits of metal in the races and that causes heartaches. Not too common but I do remember past posts here mentioning broken cages.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynohub ball bearing replacement posted by Roderic D. Schmidt on 7/23/2010 at 12:29:18 PM
Greetings All,
So replacing the bearings in retainers with loose balls has gone smoothly. The dynamo side was a little tricky, as there is quite a bit of space around the axle, but tweezers and grease were enough to keep everything in its place until is was sandwiched in. Now for the rest of the bike...

Rod
by: 207.246.218.205




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AGE / VALUE:   Drum brakes on a 26" rim posted by: JS on 7/1/2010 at 9:37:57 PM
Trying to fit drum brakes on a 32 hole-26" rim. Brakes are 90mm and exterior size of the wide flange is similar to the Sturmey Archer.

So my question is what size spokes go with the wide flange (drum side)? Stock spokes fit the small flange....

..AND MORE IMPORTANTLY ARE they the same as stock 24"rim spokes (can't find that length measurment anywhere.)

Seems to be a bit of mystery here. Your help appreciated.

-JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org.
by: 193.23.43.5

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drum brakes on a 26 posted by Keith Body on 7/2/2010 at 4:30:38 AM
Old Raleigh spoke chart on here http://oldroads.com/mn3.jpg
Should be an indication, depends on what spokes you can get.
Lace up the brake side first.
We used spare spoke nipples to hold the spokes in temporarily on the keyhole side.
by: 92.20.206.50

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drum brakes on a 26 posted by JS on 7/2/2010 at 5:42:56 AM
JKeith-

Sorry, but your link doesn't work. The chart listed below does NOT have 24" listed.

http://oldroads.com/oldroads_files/329_1.jpg

This is important. I am dealing with something of a language barrier here, and the depot only knows 28", 26" 24".

I think 24" will work on the drum side flange, but I need to be certain, and for that I need the 24" length vs a 26" length.

-JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 74.115.160.171

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drum brakes on a 26 posted by Keith Body on 7/2/2010 at 8:59:43 AM
I pasted the link into the browser, OK. 3 files, so change the name, 3 to 2 to 1.
24 x 1.375 crossed 3 (32 hole) it says 10.25 inches
26 x 1.375 crossed 2 (32 hole) 10.125, which should do.
All in inches

Does this help?
Keith
by: 92.9.59.198

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drum brakes on a 26 posted by JS on 7/2/2010 at 2:53:28 PM
Awesome Keith!! Will keep you posted
by: 70.32.33.163

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drum brakes on a 26 posted by JS on 7/2/2010 at 2:54:08 PM
Awesome Keith!! Will keep you posted
by: 70.32.33.163




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Year? Backgound? ID - 2 Old Roadsters posted by: kim on 6/29/2010 at 3:12:40 PM
Hi All - I am an English 3 speed enthusiast who has bought a couple of old bikes these last few years. This weekend, I reached into my wallet at a country auction and bought a couple single speed English roadsters. I have been researching them on the internet and found not much. One is a Humber, a men's bike, not sure of the year - guessing the 1950s. I'd love to know more about Humbers in general and this one in particular. I will try to post a link to some pictures. I know some folks here don't suffer fools gladly but I have little techincal knowledge or interest (I am about the aesthetics) and I hope you will forgive me if I didn't photograph the right details. I can take more pictures if that helps. The other bike is a woman's model - a "Speed King" about which I have been able to learn absolutely nothing. The auctioneer thought it dated from the 10s or 20s. The saddle is unusual. It (the seat) has an impressed mark I can't quite read. Speed Kings anyone? Thanks.


by: 69.54.5.178


  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Year? Backgound? ID - 2 Old Roadsters posted by sam on 6/30/2010 at 2:05:35 PM
The Speed King bicycle is interesting---it being a coaster brake it will be harder ti pin a date on if it had a S/a 3 speed we could have dated it by the hub.It had skirt strings at one time,and would look really good with a new set---check Frenck ebay and you might find a set.Is the reflector Glass? seems to be.It has some lettering on it---can we tell the date by the reflector?
by: 99.104.90.87

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Year? Backgound? ID - 2 Old Roadsters posted by Chris on 7/1/2010 at 6:30:32 PM
The saddle seat is wrong Its a Troxel od Persons magestic and is not correct for this bike proper saddle would be British make I love that rear fender mudguard with the holes in it those are for a string skirt guard to keep the ladies skirt from getting caught in the rear wheel

I look forward to seeing more pictures and we are all here to help you
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Year? Backgound? ID - 2 Old Roadsters posted by Chris on 7/1/2010 at 6:32:01 PM
there should be a bracket on the rear axle it is the other point on the bike where the string goes too.

The Germans had wild and different patterns of string skirt guards
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Year? Backgound? ID - 2 Old Roadsters posted by chris on 7/1/2010 at 6:45:28 PM
yup, the loops are where the string skirt guard goes

nice bike love the paint colour
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Year? Backgound? ID - 2 Old Roadsters posted by kim on 7/4/2010 at 3:51:29 PM
Thanks for all these responses. I wondered what those holes were for on the Speed King! I never heard of string skirt guards and I will go look around the internet ASAP for more info on those. Regarding the seat (I assume the response was for the Speed King seat). The impressed mark says B. Mesinger Deluxe - or something close to that. (I am not near the bike right now as I am visiting relatives in another state. I found I could read the impressed mark if the sun was at a certain angles). I will have a closer look at the reflector when I get home again and see if I can find a date. I believe it is glass. Thanks again.
by: 74.70.146.183

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Year? Backgound? ID - 2 Old Roadsters posted by Steve on 7/5/2010 at 5:15:14 AM
Look at the 3rd pix down to see how they were done.

http://www.copenhagencyclechic.com/2008/09/red-light-activities-embrace-skirtguard.html
by: 216.255.254.172

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Year? Backgound? ID - 2 Old Roadsters posted by woolfoot1 on 7/6/2010 at 9:23:10 AM
Thanks for the link to cycle chic. I can't believe I haven't stumbled across that sooner. I would be hopeless at restringing this thing. Maybe my stepmother the quilter/knitter/sewer could help me out.

BTW, I also wanted to ask some advice about the wheels on the Speed King. The rims look almost as if they had once been painted with radiator paint that is now flaking off - underneath it is all rust. Does anybody know what sort of finish might have been original to the wheels on this bike? Any hope of restoring them at home? Thanks again. (See the link to the pictures at the original post).
by: 74.70.146.183

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