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AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by: Derek on 4/15/2010 at 2:46:26 PM
I have my mothers bike when she was a girl which should put it around 1945 ish It sats Cadet on the badge and has two rifles crossed. Anyone know what brand this is and really how old? I posted a pic of badge that I found that is the same.


by: 216.169.224.181


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by Warren on 4/15/2010 at 3:48:56 PM
If you post some pics and describe the bike and it's components you'll get a worthwhile opinion. It's all guesswork at this stage.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/16/2010 at 6:23:35 AM
Agreed... pics of the machine would be most helpful. Meanwhile.... I'm thinking... are not two crossed rifles also BSA-ish in nature? Perhaps a sub-brand of BSA?

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Sense.... it makes it.
by: 167.9.1.11

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by Derek on 4/16/2010 at 6:55:42 AM
What is BSA? I found something that says it might be a reference to a West Point model
by: 216.169.224.181

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by derek on 4/16/2010 at 6:56:58 AM
Did you look at picture of front badge that is attached on first post?
by: 216.169.224.181

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/16/2010 at 9:16:29 AM
Ah... Birmingham Small Arms actually... they made... well... Rifles and such... Motorcycles and Bicycles.

Actually... the tripod of rifles was one of their logos. As seen on a rear mudguard here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bikerescue/4327791992/in/pool-594829@N23

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Rifles.... yeah......
by: 167.9.1.11

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by Derek on 4/16/2010 at 2:56:17 PM
how do you attatch a pic to this web sitecat
by: 216.169.224.181

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by derek on 4/16/2010 at 5:23:34 PM
Larry can you open the pic of the badge and see if you recognize it? It is on my first post
by: 216.169.224.181

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/17/2010 at 11:16:05 AM
Yes, the crossed rifles is what got me thinking BSA.

Would like to see pics of the machine. Upload to a site such as photobucket of flikr and link us to it.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - cold here today... goin' for a ride anyhow.
by: 208.252.179.28

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by Matthew on 4/18/2010 at 10:14:00 AM
Hi Folks,

That is most definitely not a BSA badge. The BSA badge has three rifles stacked in a tripod arrangement and it would say 'Birmingham Small Arms' on it too.

Larry; I can see where you got your inspiration, as not doubt did the designer of this 'faux' headbadge.

Matthew - particular regarding detail
by: 86.29.242.41

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   cadet bicycle posted by Grant on 4/18/2010 at 8:52:19 PM
Jim Langley has one on his siteand lists it as an American brand.

http://www.jimlangley.net/brake/usplatesrightdetail13.html

There was also a Canadian Cadet made by CCM. See thread: http://oldroads.com/tool_date_rss3.asp?QuestionID=29609&db=eng


by: 99.163.178.82





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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by: Law on 4/15/2010 at 11:32:13 AM
Have to ask.... just so ya know, a 5 yr old was involved

I was being really good about order and fit when I was taking apart the back hub. When it came time to put the cog back on,my little one had picked it up and now I don't remember, is the concave side out or facing the hub? I need the help here to put it right. I know, take notes but I didn't count on the extra help !

Thanks for responding, everything else is coming together and cleaning up nice. Law
by: 169.130.156.230

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Warren on 4/15/2010 at 2:39:51 PM
Whichever way gives you the straightest chain line with your crank.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Law on 4/15/2010 at 4:27:06 PM
Thanks for the reply.... what I would like to know is how it came out of the factory. Did the concave side face out or in. If someone took a glance at their hub, how does it go?

Thanks again.

2nd inquiry..... How much oil do you give to the rear hub?
by: 71.71.4.177

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Chris on 4/15/2010 at 4:59:09 PM
Warren gave you the best answer, the same answer the bike repair books give you. But if you want to know the way it usually is on the bike, as we generally see them, imagine the sprocket as a saucer as in a tea cup and saucer.

Now flip it over as it is when you use a cup and saucer that is the way we usually see the sprocket on the bike.

Still, it is all about chain line and the sprocket is made to be flipped over one way or the other whichever gives you the straightest chain line as warren said.

Feel free to ask us anything but I still wanna urge you to go to the used bookstore and pay like 5.00 for old 1960 and 1970's bike repair books there are real gems like Glens bicycle repair book Sincere's bicycle repair book just buy them all and start your own home library of bike repair books.

The proper term is sprocket people like myself say cog but the proper term is sprocket
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Law on 4/15/2010 at 6:24:01 PM
I'm with you on the bike library,used to have some but as we moved alot they got left behind. There is a killer used book store down the road in another town called Edward Mckay that will get raided when I get the chance. I also need tools and a good bike repair stand. I look at craigslist alot these days. These things will come. Right now I'm just trying to do what I can do with what is there. I mean it when I say thanks to you guys, Warren and Chris for your help. I appreciate the effort to educate a novice to these great bikes.

Chris, your example, though a good one, requires prior knowledge of table manners. There are no tea cups, cups or saucers in the mines where I work and my table is the playground for a 5 yr old. Could you give me a different description. Is the sprocket concave surface facing out or in on the hub?

2nd question too, how much oil in the rear hub?

Law


by: 71.71.4.177

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Warren on 4/15/2010 at 7:09:24 PM
On single sprocket hub I think that most will mount with the teeth further to the outside. It is a guess so you need to check and make it right. Mount the sprocket without the damnable finger pinching circlip and slide your wheel into the dropouts and centre the wheel and snug it down, don't worry about the chain. Holding the sprocket in place you can stand, sit or lie down behind the cog and accuractly eyeball it. Is this orientation good or will you be better served by the flip which will bring the chainline inboard? Take the wheel out, execute you choices, insert the circlip and pinch your fingers (I use 2 medical quality pliers...easy)

If your hub feels chunky and sloth, start with 10 o drops of light non detergent motor oil. Ride it. If it works nicely, ad 3 or 4 drops and check it in 6 months. At the end of a year you can add 3 or 4 drops anually and that's it, ces't tout pour le prochane annee

If it never gets loose than a rebuid is in order and there;'s lots of help out there.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Warren on 4/16/2010 at 5:15:41 AM
bad spelling...bad grammar..bad french. oh well
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Keith Body on 4/16/2010 at 2:08:39 PM
Hi Law, British roadster bikes had a chain line of 1.5 inches, that is the offset from the centre line of the bike. If the bike is still fairly straight the (reasonably true) chainwheel should be 1.5 inches from the centre of the seat tube. Also the cog should be 1.5 inches from the centre of the rear fork ends.
You can get a fair approximation by lining up the top tube by eye with the line of the chain.


by: 92.9.232.97

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Law on 4/17/2010 at 5:24:53 PM
Thanks again to all the experts,great to have an information source to fall back to..... till I get the library and experience.

Nice find A bike shop that has been in business for a long time and has tons of stuff everywhere in the back. Totally disorganized but cool about letting me sift through the bins and draws for parts. Have to go back there when I have more time. First item turned up is a mint sear bolt with the red Raleigh " R " nut also. Plus they let me have a period saddlebag ( not Raleigh ) that has seen better days that they were throwing away, it still has some life to it.

This might not be much to some but around here I have found this bikes parts are scarce. Happy when I can find them. I still need a pump though I think I will order it from Menotomy, I would rather have a new unit to rely on. Has anyone gotten the frame pump from them? Who makes it? Does it pump a good volume of air?

Later, Law
by: 71.71.4.177

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by Roderic D. Schmidt on 4/17/2010 at 7:50:44 PM
Greetings Law,
I picked up the frame pump that Menotomy sells and have been happy with it, although I don't know the make. I've used it 5-6 times since purchase and it works nicely. I have a smaller more modern one, and I definitely prefer the older style; I particularly like the hose part.

Roderic
by: 98.116.33.238

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by chris on 4/18/2010 at 9:54:02 AM
Make the time to go thru that shop with as much cash as you can bring. This place will disappear be shuttered up and somebody else will be there and have loaded it all up. Some collector or worse yet, it'll go to landfil because somebody did not know the value of it all. I have seen it happen make time hate to be blunt or sound rude but please make time! the sound of the approaching hoofbeats is Hillary Stone mega collector extrodiare!
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Back cog posted by chris on 4/18/2010 at 9:56:07 AM
Ah a frame pump is good to make the bike look complete they work about 65% effectivness enough to get you rolling. They are not the best but they work
by: 71.40.121.165




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AGE / VALUE:   nifty bike posted by: Andy on 4/14/2010 at 3:19:43 PM
Just noticed this on the San Francisco bay area craigslist - on sale for $500. Cool machine!
http://www.sciencemonster.net/machines/rudgesports/rudgesports.html
by: 206.80.8.130

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   nifty bike posted by Corey K on 4/18/2010 at 6:52:39 PM
I saw that, too. He is very active on one of the big forums.
Threads on this bike are *all over* that particular forum.
It is surprising that he is letting it go-it's definitely a rare bird for the region, and in great riding shape. If I had the do$h...


by: 76.126.56.178




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MISC:   Goner roadster rim? posted by: Roderic D. Schmidt on 4/14/2010 at 2:59:43 PM
Greetings All,
I just salvaged some parts off a cruelly treated '59 or '60 ladies DL-1. The rim seems to be of no use to anyone- about 1/3 of it is pinched badly, some rust, and at least one spoke nipple pulled though the metal. Before I chuck it in recycling, I figured I'd check here in case it is resurrectable for someone with greater skills than my own. Anyone interested?
The TCW hub that was on the bike it the more interesting find. It is pretty beat but might be good for parts. Can't wait to have a look inside!

Roderic
by: 98.116.29.159

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           RE:MISC:   Goner roadster rim? posted by chris on 4/20/2010 at 5:56:48 PM
sounds still usable and fixable
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:MISC:   Goner roadster rim? posted by Chris on 4/20/2010 at 6:01:24 PM
my heart beats faster when was the time I found a ladies d.l.1. to rob parts off of. I never did rob parts off of a d.l.1. This is why I took apart Sprites to feed the ailing rod brake D.L.1'S

I love the D.L.1. Raleigh's it was the object of the pursuits, all of them.
by: 69.153.86.42




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AGE / VALUE:   How to accurately date a Rudge All Weather? posted by: Tony on 4/14/2010 at 9:19:35 AM
I have a Rudge-Whitworth Gentleman's All Weather which I have been told is c.1929, however, following an internet search I have seen pics of the model dated 1926. When were they produced & how can I date mine more accurately?
by: 86.186.54.170

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   How to accurately date a Rudge All Weather? posted by Tony on 5/3/2010 at 1:15:49 PM
Still hoping for some help on this one. Some further info - Sturmey Archer 3-speed hub is type K7 but doesn't display any date marking. Frame number is A505515. Bike is equipped with Lucas King of the Road lighting set (etched on headlight glass) powered by a Lucas C25M dynamo with an integral rear light set in its base.
by: 86.186.52.211

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   How to accurately date a Rudge All Weather? posted by Ortega on 6/2/2011 at 7:22:46 AM
Hello Tony,

The frame number A505515 correspond to first half of 1937! I am interesting to see your bike, if you have some photos, bcause I am searching one !

Best regards

Jean-Marc
by: 82.235.126.58




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   SPORT2000 GX2000 Men's Bike posted by: Jeff on 4/14/2010 at 8:47:41 AM
I originally posted the following in Age/Value:

Not sure what I have here. I am assuming that it is a late 60's, early 70's vintage department/discount store brand. Brand is SPORT2000. Model is GX2000. Made in Germany. Twist-grip 3-speed. Chrome 26x1 3/8 wheels. Blue frame with white painted fenders. Found it in a thrift store this winter exactly as you see it. Aired up the tires and it rides like a new bike! Thanks in advance to anyone who may know anything about this brand.


by: 160.93.46.220


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AGE / VALUE:   Humber /english posted by: Tim on 4/14/2010 at 2:18:38 AM
Does anyone know anything about Humber bicycles? I`ve got a chance to pick up a Humber english roadster circa 50`s at a good price ( I think) but I really don`t know anything about this style bike I`m more into ballon tire bikes but something about this bike sparked an interest. Any help?
by: 205.188.116.138

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Humber /english posted by David on 4/14/2010 at 8:23:36 AM
Go to www.sheldonbrown.com and look for info on English 3-speeds. It'll tell you a lot of what you're after, I'm sure.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Humber /english posted by Warren on 4/14/2010 at 7:19:22 PM
Look for the cool bifurcated fork. Humbers were premium bikes and it's worth getting.
by: 24.215.80.230




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Pashley Clubman Redux posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/13/2010 at 8:44:27 AM
Very.... nice!

http://www.pashley.co.uk/news/2009/10/pashley-returns-to-the-club/

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Exactly whom must I club to get one?
by: 167.9.1.11

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Pashley Clubman Redux posted by Thom J. on 4/13/2010 at 3:08:37 PM
Oh dear.....'tis ever so nice. I particularly like the country Clubman set-up. One bike to "do it all" is most appealing. Guess I'll have to sell a couple of the old Raleighs and some cash to afford one. Thom J.
by: 63.204.42.231

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Pashley Clubman Redux posted by Darkwater on 4/13/2010 at 6:25:38 PM
Not a Clubman, but here's a Pashley work bike (I think a Classic No. 33) with its person. Alan sells ice cream from it at the Oxford rail station during the week, and on Port Meadow (the old commons, think public park) on weekends. Last year he dreamed up specs for the grill in the photo, contracted to have it custom built, and now he sells baps in the winter months. He handed me his mobile so I could copy down Lee Pashley's phone number--"Ring him up and tell him Alan said to give you a factory tour," he urged. Next trip over, I intend to.


by: 72.145.218.79





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AGE / VALUE:   Hercules hubs distinctions posted by: Darkwater on 4/10/2010 at 6:45:06 PM
I've done my diligence with narrow and wide Google searches; now it is time to ask the experts. What's the difference between Hercules A Type and B Type hubs? And what's the significance of the single numeral that often (but not always) follows the word "type"? Ours, by the way, is fitted to the Lady Eliza, late of Oxford, England, now of Athens, Georgia, who to the best of our knowledge is a late 1940s-early 50s Ladies' Safety "CA." The brushed-on paint job obscures the transfers, but cannot hide the bones. Cheers and thanks!


by: 72.152.233.218


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules hubs distinctions posted by Warren on 4/11/2010 at 11:48:15 AM
I dunno the difference but I had the same bike!


by: 24.215.80.230


           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules hubs distinctions posted by Warren on 4/11/2010 at 11:49:59 AM
Except the original crankset spelled out Hercules instead of the H pattern.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules hubs distinctions posted by Darkwater on 4/11/2010 at 3:08:47 PM
Thanks Warren, they do look like a match. In my searches, the spelled-out HERCULES cranks were appearing in pre-WWII catalogs and on bikes identified as pre-war.
by: 72.152.233.218

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules hubs distinctions posted by Warren on 4/11/2010 at 5:09:09 PM
That's very possible. I doubt that there were any design changes between the start and end of the war so we'd be looking at the same basic bike. My crank was so sawtoothed that the chain was starting to skip. The rear wheel wasn't original and the mudguards had been replaced with Bluemels.

These bikes are pleasurable to ride...very slack angles and a real "sit up straight" posture. The brakes are iffy as usual!
by: 24.215.80.230




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AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by: Mike on 4/10/2010 at 5:41:03 PM
I just bought a Rudge today and want to know the year. I looked on the rear rim's axl and see the name Sturmey Archer Above that it says England. Below the Sturmey Archer name it has 6I 5. Below that it says Three Speed. It has big beach cruiser type handlebars and says Made in England on the top of the frame. On the back of the big banana type seat it says Lowell. Just trying to determine the age/value. thank you


by: 69.86.206.74


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Steve on 4/11/2010 at 3:59:30 AM
Wrong seat, an original type seat will increase value. date is May [ 5 ] 1961 [ 61 ] Value is according to market area, but with original type seat, good, ready to ride condition, $150 + -
by: 209.26.58.179

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/11/2010 at 6:05:31 AM
Yeah... good lord lose that seat and get a correct set of northroad bars for it.

My guess... looking at the rear mudguard affixment and lack of "HAND" chainwheel that this is a Raliegh built machine.

Still, I like it. A nice paint scheme!

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
Dingmans Ferry, PA
by: 208.252.179.22

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by curtis on 4/11/2010 at 11:59:57 AM
http://OldRoads.com/d_eng_ra.asp?OQID=29322&QuestionNum=29322&RID=0
^^ That's the same paint/color scheme as this bike..

Does anyone know what that burgundy is called?
by: 24.42.78.53

           RE:AGE / VALUE: Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Al on 4/11/2010 at 4:06:27 PM
Glorious Rudge Maroon, no? Still found on restored Rudge motorcycles as well as bicycles. However, I have a 1950s Raleigh that color. I suspected the color had simply faded that nice burgundy. Sure enough, under a cable clamp the true color turned out to be more candy apple red than burgundy. I like the fade better.

Sometimes you can remove the fork to see an original paint color oversprayed (overdipped?) on the steerer tube.

by: 71.135.35.2

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Warren on 4/11/2010 at 5:14:24 PM
CF8 Maroon?

http://picasaweb.google.ca/lh/photo/bFP_8MnHveT0lN1bnuzcXw?feat=directlink
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Warren on 4/11/2010 at 5:15:07 PM
sorry...here


by: 24.215.80.230


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by David on 4/12/2010 at 9:09:42 AM
Interesting. It has the thick mudguard stays but lacks braze-on mounts for the chainguard and has the low-end chainwheel. My wife's 67 (I think) Rudge has those things and is labeled the same; e.g. "Rudge Sports."
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by curtis on 4/12/2010 at 7:38:31 PM
Al, Yes! I had the same candy under my cable clamps! It's beautiful fresh or faded..
Warren, I think that's it!
Thanks..
by: 24.42.78.53

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Geoff Rogers on 4/13/2010 at 11:09:30 AM
Right, it's 5-61 on the hub, May of 1961. The scalloped lugs tell us it's a '61 or newer. I think in 1960 Raleigh lugs were still the plainer style. There should be a bottom bracket oiler on a pre'64 bike, and I think by 1960 it was a plastic cap, not a steel one. And I agree, change those 70's musclebike bars and saddle for a proper set of North Roads and Brooks leather saddle (B66 or B72) and you will have really lovely old machine. It will last forever if you keep it out of the weather.
Geoff Rogers
by: 216.153.152.113

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Kevin on 4/16/2010 at 4:09:31 AM
If you want to sell the seat and sissy bar, let me know. I could use them. I have the proper handlebars for your bike if you would want to trade. Thanks. irishhiker@aol.com
by: 98.226.154.146

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Mike V on 4/18/2010 at 4:19:27 PM
Hi all....stumbled across this thread after looking for any info on this Royal Prince Hercules bike I found at a thrift store. I am very new to any type of vintage bicycle collecting, but I think it is Pre-1960. It is a womens, black, and a tad rusty but she rides pretty nice for only costing $20. If anyone has any other info that could help or lead me down the right path, I would appreciate it.
Also, at the same spot I saw another bike...red with the name "Tubor"(?) on the frame as a decal. Also has a Lohman seat made in Germany..white wall tires Made in Holland...Sturmey Archer gear shifter. If anyone could help me identifying it I would be forever grateful? THANKS!
by: 71.2.35.2

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by chris on 4/21/2010 at 3:13:41 PM
Did you type in "Hercules Royal Prince" in the google archives here at oldroads.com?

we have written about this bike before
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help me ID my Vintage Rudge Sports posted by Stephan on 4/27/2010 at 9:28:12 PM
first off I didn't really know where to put this message. second, I found a bike in a farmers field last week and it looks just like the one on the home page. Second in from bottom left corner, the red and whiite one. Its alomst identical minus some accessories and the handle bars are slightly different. Just wondering the name of the bike so I can look up what I got.
by: 174.3.22.227

           Bike in a farmers field. posted by Stephan on 4/27/2010 at 9:31:29 PM
first off I didn't really know where to put this message. second, I found a bike in a farmers field last week and it looks just like the one on the home page. Second in from bottom left corner, the red and whiite one. Its alomst identical minus some accessories and the handle bars are slightly different. Just wondering the name of the bike so I can look up what I got.
by: 174.3.22.227




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AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by: Chris on 4/10/2010 at 11:36:57 AM
I guess this car is my personal "Rosebud" from Citizen Kane. Tell me what yours is. I'd like to hear about it.
Working outdoors has its benefits. I looked up and pulling into a lot was a 1967 Rambler American. I stood there in disbelief, I haven't seen one in twenty years. The last time I saw one it was in Detroit, it had rust and was missing parts and wasn't close enough. This one is exact.

Well, I look up and there it was I walked over to see it closely. Same tail lights, same curve of the rear window, same headlights same body style, same everything except for color. This one is in amazing shape, complete down to every hubcap. I walked up and introduced myself , told the guy this was something special and wonderful from childhood and I wanted to ride in it and buy it and here is $40.00 lets go get burgers before I have to work. It was strange to get in it. My heart beating with excitement and off we went. I sat in that backseat and closed my eyes and the last 36 years slipped away, washed away. The pain, suffering, weariness, washed away. Remembering back to happier places and better times time so far away. You just stop and sit and close your eyes and you leave. He ain't asleep, he's not dead, not drunk call it meditating. It's just a good place to step off from. A friend has died and you haven't been there in years but you played there and worked for them and it's a beautiful place the yard and the house has memories. The daughter is there to sell the house and you return to sit on the porch and close your eyes and you step away , step back for a bit. It's as close to time travel as you can get. This can be be from a place or in something special a bicycle, a car, some place special to you. I can't describe how restful and beneficial it is. The way the car moved out of the lot , the bounce and sunspension the unique way these cars handled. This is not like a Ford Falcon, or the other similar cars of this period, so it's not sougnt after, or restored or souped up. Just a cheap, four door, common little car that faded into the mist of car history. These are not easy to find. There is no demand for them so they are gone.

It's simple, quiet and discreet and wonderful. Not overpowering the tires are not monstrously expensive. It's a straight 6 and they run forever. I snapped out of it long enough to pay for lunch, and buy the car. Thank heavens the magic of Texas provided a seller with a nice spirit along with that well preserved little car. It just needs a good cleaning. If ony it were red, red like Campbells tomato soup.
by: 69.153.86.42

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by chris on 4/10/2010 at 1:52:06 PM
Whatever it is, The important thing is to get it in running shape and out there and enjoy it. Sure it may be a Cord, Duesenberg, or Auburn boat tail speedster and it's fine to be a proud owner but these things were meant to be driven and enjoyed. Not to be worshipped in the privacy of a secret lair. I've met people that have some wild stuff hidden away. Hidden away is fine until it's ready to roll. One has to be brave enough to get it together and open the barn doors and run the thing. Original parts, paint, or motor I don't care, lets run it, drive it! How long has it sat here? 60 years? What do we need to get it running? what parts do you need? No restoration or rebuild should take 60 years. It's not stolen, he's rich, so what is the problem? I asked him why he would not get it running and have fun with it. He just looked at me. I have heard stories of collectors who keep stuff in wharehouses and don't enjoy or drive it and then something happens like a fire. No, get it up and running and go see the world in the thing. The grim reaper or the flatbed tow truck cannot be stopped from eventually appearing so why not enjoy it? People get sidetracked. Woodworking and bike collecting and cleaning out other folks attics is great but to ignore a Chariot from the gods is a sin. Collectors have to acquire, it's part of the mindset but every time I see something hung way up and covered with dust. I wonder why it was hung up and forgotten in the first place. Whay wasn't it used? The reasons vary. Perhaps they went off to war and never returned. Perhaps they found something more magical and that called them on to something else. Perhaps they never got around to it or never got back to it. Perhaps it's a contest to see who could amass more stuff like it before the other guy and this runs on until somebody dies. Touching the thing and getting the 50 years worth of dust on your clothes is wonderful and also spooky. I show up at a friends with the thing and say it's ancient, all covered with dust and he had rows upon rown of them all lined up, piles of them. It's not about enjoying what they already have, it's about collecting every one of them, conquest after conquest and onward looking for something more magical and rarer. "I'm only pausing long enough to buy another barn!"
A good cartoon would show the devil appearing at the autojumble and the guy behind the table is scared but the devil says "Oh it's cool, no, I'm not here for you. Not yet, not today, "No Dude, I need parts for my motorcycle!" This one shop's basement held an absolute gold mine of ancient pedal car parts. The guy should have made me buy the pedal car collectors book and then let me in the basement. "Oh Wow! Now I understand!" I can go shop to shop for the next 200 years and never stumble upon such a stash. I bought and re sold it. It was not my bag but he grinned at me "Now it is!" I got to see a lot of folks collections and it was neat having the thing they wanted and needed to finish a project. I like the rat rod car stuff. The old, rusty, original paint bodies with usable, practical, modern motors breathing life into the thing. Nobody spends time labeling parts or tools or things in ones collection so whomever will eventually get ahold of it will know what it goes to, or what it is for. That would be silly, nobody does that. It's enough if you know what it is for and how to use the tool the proper way. So stuff goes to scrap, landfil or to somebody at a flea market who holds it up and wonders what it is used for what it is supposed to do? I've mailed tools to collector friends asking what is it supposed to do? Um don't know, it's cool, I have heard of that company but I have no idea! The knowledge gets lost. That's a shame. Now it's in a frame in the kitchen! People die and you want to ask them questions like: What did you do with that generator or where is the title?"
I don't want to fry the wiring! help me!! and they can't help you because they are dead. Often they would not want you having it or working on it and they'd say Oh, get out of my barn!"

"No! Youre dead! "
Some help they would be! and here you've called them up from the dead for their help. I have always been sad when a pal has died and I walk thru their stash.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/11/2010 at 6:17:19 AM
My first car was a '63 Plymouth Valiant. Pushbutton auto trans, 171cid Slant Six. I had it fourteen days before I fell asleep at the wheel and took out a telephone pole with it.

That was 1977.

Fast forward 20 years.... I stumble upon a '65 for sale. Bought it on the spot for $75! It was a red four door and that year they went from the pushbutton to the on-the-column.... but it didn't matter. Basically, it was the same car.

This one had the 225 slant 6. The auto trans was the ONLY option... well, that and an AM radio.

MANUAL steering. MANUAL (drums!!!!) brakes. Torsion bar front suspension though!

Drove it for two years as purchased. Finally started to run a bit rough... so I went to tune her up... one of the plugs was rather dubiosly moist and oily... Yep... compression test proved out that cylinder was down tremendously. At 260K miles... it made no sense to re-build so off she went.

If I were to find another, I would buy it just the same. There's nothing like them!

It's actually the same experience I get when I ride that 5-speed Sprite of mine. Takes me back to my first Sprite in 1970 - 71. There's nothing like it.

Unless what you find should be in a museum some place.... USE it for cryin' out lout. OK... don't ABUSE it... or anything.... like my 65 Valiant... no way it would EVER be a show car. Not without dubiously prohibitive restoration cost... and then, a four door?

It was my daily driver for two years. People would slow down... honk... wave.... slack-jawed gawkers would gather around it in parking lots and would be amazed that it was not owned by some silver-haired fossil (though I'm getting there!) that only drives it to church on Sunday....

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - we all have that "holy grail"...
by: 208.252.179.22

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by MikeB on 4/12/2010 at 8:00:05 PM
Enjoyed the story about the American. My dad worked at the AMC plant in Kenosha, WI for thirty years, retiring in 1985 at the ripe old age of 52(2 years younger than I am now and I see no end in sight). All of us kids were expected to own at least one AMC product before we left home. After that, dad didn't care what we bought as long as it wasn't a VW Bug.
Being the oldest, I started with a 67 Ambassador DPL 2 door hardtop, 290v8, Flash-O-Matic, power steering, manual brakes, AM radio, and, I swear this to be true, a factory Motorola 8-track player mounted on the tranny hump. I replaced the doors with doors from a 73 Matador(had the fancy recessed door handles), replaced the Carter 2bbl with a Motorcraft spec'd for a 304, ran H78-14 PolyGlas whitewalls instead of the skinny Fs and sported the Turbocast wheelcovers. The car was black on black on black. It was one of two AMC cars at my high school to be considered 'cool'. The other was another 67 Amassador, a white convertable with a red interior, 4 speed and a 390. I had the car for 5 years before loosing the rear end in Virginia in 1975. On my honeymoon, no less. Whenever I see a 67 or 68 Ambassador at a car show, I make it a point to speak with the owner, probably boring them with my memories.
If I could find another that wasn't rusted out in the trunk or rear quarters, I'd probably snatch it up.
by: 68.99.73.140

           RE:AGE / VALUE: The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by Al on 4/13/2010 at 12:38:55 AM
Great Rambler stories. I drive a '64 American 4-door almost every day. It's turquoise. That's why my wife bought it. She didn't realize how much love and care it would take to bring back to life. That was 12 years ago.

I was thinking yesterday how much work has gone into this car. Worth it? Hmm. Then I stopped thinking and just drove listening to the old overhead valve, six cylinder motor. Yeah, worth it.

Without all the other AMC car owners I've met via the internet, I never would have been able to do all that work. Just like all y'all here at the bike forum. Sure makes keeping these great old vehicles (4 and 2 wheeled) possible. Hats off!

Altho, sometimes I simply want to drop all the bike repair and constant looking for parts. I start thinking how these old bikes (and car) keep me tethered. To what? A bunch of metal. They are ephemeral in the end. And keeping them in stasis forever seems wrongheaded. I feel like instead I should let the bikes age gracefully and disappear. Well, that's what I think this week, anyway.
by: 71.135.35.2

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by Geoff Rogers on 4/13/2010 at 11:20:02 AM
Chris, I speak that lingo. I have a couple of old cars and more than a couple old bicycles and I prefer to use the stuff. This Friday after work, for instance, I will drive my '67 Volvo 122S wagon (original paint, funky and not perfect and never will be but I drive it) to Copake, NY, sleep in it, and be on time for the bike swap meet the next morning at dawn. I'll bring my '60 Dunelt Fleur-de-Lys in case there's a ride. Besides, you might be amazed at how many old bicycles will fit in the back of a 122 with the seat folded down.
Use it and enjoy it! We had a '61 Rambler when I was a kid. It had cool little fins but the ball joints kept popping out, which was inconvenient at best. Luckily nobody was killed.
Geoff Rogers
by: 216.153.152.113

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by Patrick on 4/14/2010 at 7:43:00 AM
Great read Chris,I put my childrens stuff away when they outgrew it,figuring they may want it for their kids someday.My basement closets and shed rafters are my time machines. I look through them once in a while and that takes me back to a time/place when I was a new dad and how much I loved being him. It's been a little tough having my kids grown and not wanting to spend the time with me they used to. I guess we all go through this.

Patrick
by: 198.208.159.18

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by Patrick on 4/15/2010 at 11:39:10 AM
I sometimes think like Al, I wonder why I bother with this old stuff? I use to have selling sprees when that kicked in,I now know to just put the junk aside and wait a while. I'll feel like it again.

Patrick
by: 198.208.159.18

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by Chris on 4/15/2010 at 5:32:59 PM
The back window is gonna have a decal sticker of a little old lady waving a closed umbrella in a circle as if at any given moment she's gonna bring in down over my head

She is exclaiming: " No! Dammit! not for sale"

As with the bikes People will stop and want to buy it.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by Chris on 4/15/2010 at 5:45:08 PM
I still love the idea of a secret lair a basement beneath the barn the barns the sheds the huge lair filled with old bikes as I walk thru it all with the guy I tell him "You have saved these from landfil and they are preserved and rescued and contained and you are a guardian of history." As we walk thru the place I am taken thru history he explains things as he points the various models out.

I remember the time he called me up all upset, not wanting brake tube eyebolts or more fibrax brake pads, or another car load of 24 inch frame Raleigh Tourists but he had gotten mixed up with a gal and she was there wanting stuff, using him, and wanting stuff sold. You gotta underatand he was a loner, not with anybody just working and collecting and nice guy, not into any relationship(s)

He must have let the lonliness get to him him because a she devil had latched onto him. I drove up there and we ran her off. Come to think of it, so many of my collector friends have not been married, nor with anybody, gar or straight just alone. It's because a woman would make me sell everything "Do you think I'd have a Duesenberg back here if I was married?"

Anyways, he's fine and will be at the swap meet all by himself. "More room in the car to haul things" he grins.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   The benefits of finding your own time machine posted by Chris on 4/15/2010 at 6:46:53 PM
Off topic, way off topic but true. I called a friend of mine. I have not spoken in two years to him. Dispite a lot of differences, and sometimes heated discussions in the place. I sat and listened to him for hours. He is a brilliant master mechanic and he also is an inventor and I've watched him test the prototype stuff for companies.
People show up and ask to have him go over it.
We discussed a friend of mine and when his business went under as I had lost touch with him also.
Here is where I went into shock!
"Oh, I got it done, I discussed your questions with a author I know and he traveled to Morocco and Tunisia and he's written a book and a d.v.d. and there is an upcoming special on P.B.S. public television. I told him it was K.L.R.N. where I am and he told me to look for it. It was gonna show in one month. He said. A few days ago I saw it .

It has taken three years.

My Question (s) was: Do you know of any "Righteous Arabs" who, during the Second World War risked themselves to hide, rescue and save the persecuted Jews against the Germans who occupied their Kingdoms?

Also, What did the Arabs do during the Second World War and the Holocaust?
He got quiet and listened at the time. I said "It has not been done, not mentioned or written about Sombody ought to...... type discussion."
Oh, our talks and discussions were interesting to say the least. An excellent source the leads I chased had people asking Who told you this? People still living don't want it discussed. A lot of learned history not in the books,

"How do you know about him?" As a source of information he's been good as gold.
There was Oscar Schlinder, subject of "Schlinder's List" (Catholic) and Corrie Ten Boom (Dutch Christian)
Find me an Arabic version, I asked.

Well three years later a fellow has done it.

One Arabic leader told the Nazis, "You'll need twenty more stars of David to add to the 20,000 because those extras are for my family." Another fellow resisted saying "He would wrap his arms around the Jews as if they were his own family." An elderly woman is visiting the place where she was hid as a girl. The author went looking and did write about the few who went against the current (so to speak) to do what they felt was right dispite the risk.

There were not too many, these are the few and not the overall picture. The over all picture was different.

My friend told me with a grin why the Fez hats are red. The Christians lost a battle and were slaughtered en masse the Arabs dipped the hats in the blood and then changed the hats to be red in remberance of that battle. As a Christian I got quiet upon hearing that. I nearly got myself killed afgter expressing an opinion/ belief he didn't want to hear and he reached for a machete on the bench I had always overlooked before. He put the word out he didn't want to work on the English Raleigh stuff and the flow of them into the shop almost stopped totally and I could not get him to undo his attitude. This and also, because I had bought all of the parts needed for repairs crippling the shop but he disliked repairing them. He'd tell me where to look though all the stuff the others didn't. Things forgotten, the real stories he was generous with the teaching and tips for a collector.
I remember hearing about a king who cooperated with the Allies who wanted permission crossing his country and he pledged his assistance but he did have a strange request that was honored. He wanted an 28 inch wheel rod brake, Humber bicycle or was it a pair of them, he wanted them finely made, decorated and gold plated. Um, we are not making them right now we are concentrating on munition work and so many of our men are away at war but we'll se what we can do and they did produce and ship the bikes to the king. Who was the king and what country and what happened to those bikes? I don't remember. Anyways, crazy but true. He remembered me telling him how busy I was and how crazy things were for me at the time
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Lite Sprite project continues... posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/9/2010 at 9:42:52 AM
OK, so moving the project forward. I've removed from the Pusuit Donor bike the wheelset and brake calipers. Removed the tired gumwalls from the rims. Wheelset is in exceptional condition... but being alloy, I suppos that's not uncommon. Though that they're as true as can be is a good thing.

Meanwhile, I cleaned all that stuff up nicely. Bright white aluminium. Very pretty. I was aghast at the weight difference in the CALIPERS. I pulled the front caliper off the Sprite. The chromed steel units. The heft of them compared to the Dia-Compe seemed rather exagerrated to me so...

Yeah yeah... I know, I'm getting stupid now... but I brought them to work. The Steel caliper and pads weighs in at 260 grams whereas the Dia-Compe alloy caliper? 123 grams.

That's over an half pound of weight savings just in the calipers alone.

Not that I'm out to make a rolling cloud out of it but that's a considerable difference!

Stay tuned!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - That Sprite... is all right!
by: 167.9.1.11

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Lite Sprite project continues... posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/10/2010 at 5:17:49 AM
OK, she's all decked out with the "new" wheels and brake calipers. I also pulled off the boat-anchor hairpin saddle and put a more suitable Brooks on there.

Meanwhile, pondering the nice alloy "gooseneck" (I think that's what we used to call this type of stem back in the day) that the Pursuit has I was thinking, gee, if I could get a nice set of alloy Northroad Bars...

Yep... found a nice one on Amazon of all places for thirteen bucks. So that will go on there once it arrives. As to the brake levers themselves.... We'll see what kind of mood I'm in when all the bars arrive.

For now, it's time to go for a RIDE... too bad it's like 35 degrees with howling WIND here at the moment...

:-|

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - maybe I could mount a sail on it?
by: 208.252.179.28

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Lite Sprite project continues... posted by Warren on 4/10/2010 at 5:10:26 PM
You must live near me...awful day for a ride.

"Post pictures or it never happened" as they say.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Lite Sprite project continues... posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/12/2010 at 2:08:21 AM
Northeast PA Warren. Yesterday was excellent to ride. I put 10 miles on her. The gears barely needed adjusting and the bike rides wonderfully. The brakes aren't quite as effective as I thought they would be... I may have to replace the shoes.

I have pics... I'll try and load them up soon. Mind you, this is a "rider" and not a concourse machine... though I do plan on cleaning her up in the not too distant future, I basically wanted to try this "experiment".

Bars are also on their way and that's the final detail.

Later

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Spritely..... Spritelier?
by: 208.252.179.27




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AGE / VALUE:   Single speed freewheels posted by: David on 4/9/2010 at 9:44:21 AM
http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/singlespeed.html#freewheels

Will the ACS freewheels fit standard English single speed rear hubs, such as this one:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180491785516&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT
by: 129.7.185.3

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Single speed freewheels posted by Keith Body on 4/10/2010 at 1:00:35 PM
Hi David
I believe these are made in 1.37 inches x 24 TPI and 30mm x 1mm, so best to specify the thread on the order, or request clarification.
Keith
by: 92.20.58.8




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AGE / VALUE:   Not a good place to ride a bike posted by: Chris on 4/8/2010 at 5:37:02 PM
I read the paper (s) and watch the news and I can tell you in San Antonio, Tx they are really outrightly hostile when it comes to cyclists and their rights.

Cyclists have no rights. period. That's the attitude between peoples ears. And it's just a annoyance that is brushed away with a wave of the hand if the law says a cyclist has rights and I hear often of "No charges were filed against the driver" little phrase said by the news announcer this is after somebody has been killed. They had a picture of a little girl now orphaned because her parrents were on a tandem.
One reader wrote in and said "I was gonna say something harsh about cyclists until I saw this picture."
Well, they really do have really horrible and murderous ideas and sentiments and feelings about cyclists here in San Antonio.)
They are voting today actually it was this morning about requiring lights front and rear on a bicycle. I have not heard the outcome of that vote. But in this town, it's possibly the beginning of restrictions to come and that will turn out badly for a cyclist and ones rights as a cyclist.

Don't get me wrong EVERY BIKE SHOULD HAVE WORKING LIGHTS FRONT AND REAR but I personally stop short of allowing the law to make it mandatory and enforce it.

That is up to the cyclist to do.

They really will run you over and deliberately refuse to give you and room , just to be crappy about it.

Makes no difference if you have lights or not.

They are just plain intolerant and it's like a sport here to mess with a cyclist. I am collecting articles in a scrap book and it's scary, chilling and frightening. I'm not a part of the cyclists rights groups here and don't hang with bike buddies here but somebody will get my scrap book and well, perhaps the issue needs an Erin Brockovich on the case. Too many folks are dying out there and it's not like the driver is running up after having stopped her car in the street and screaming and crying because of their grief at running over and killing somebody dead away because it was a genuine accident. No, the attitude (s) is different here and it's overdue for adjustment. To change public attitude on this is going to require a huge amount of work but that is what it will have to take.

If you say: "I take it the odds are against us and the situation is grim" my answer is: "Yes that sums it up."
I'm collecting articles on this subject and it's chilling.

I was not going to bring this up here but I was moved to
write about it and in closing I want to again ask that everybody wear a reflective vest and have good lights on the bike and be careful and take precautions in this world where folks just don't give a damn. In fact as I have said harrasing a cyclist and denying them the safety they are entitled to as a human being is thought of as fun.

People keep on driving after hitting somebody. It happens all the time. I just wanted to ask everybody to be careful on their bike and I have done that. The issue remains and looms.
I just cannot fathom the lack of baby seats in use. It's got to be simply the most behind the times state in the entire country. It's like it's 1962 here as far as baby seats go. One would have to see it to believe it.

You walk into a gas station and there are huge rectangular tubs filled with cold icy water with tall cans of assorted beer and it's priced right too. Same laws against drinking in public, while driving all that as other places yet, it flourishes. Strange to see.

They will throw the ever living book at you for D.W.I. and on this they are quite strict but it does not serve as a deterrant and they are doing a nice brisk business in writing tickets. I don't have the answer there on this one they ain't gonna ban beer.
by: 69.153.86.42

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Not a good place to ride a bike posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/9/2010 at 6:11:14 AM
Glad I don't ride there! I suppose as with anything else, there's good... bad and downright ugly. That someone can hit a cyclist, technically a motor vehicle accident, and blithely leave the scene is beyond criminal. In the parlance of our times, I daresay that behaviour is "not sustainable".

I always have thought that Motorcycling was the last true bastion of "Darwinism".... apparantly in some areas it is extended to bicycling as well.... though I've heard of some pretty deplorable anti-bicycling acts here as well. It would seem to be great sport to hurl beer bottles at cyclists in Sussex County, NJ.

Meanwhile, I've come across some pretty obnoxious cyclists as well. When I'm on a 2-lane county type road, come around a blind curve and have 3 cyclists riding side by side and I have to lock up the brakes in order to avoid running them down... and having them not yield an inch... forcing me to either follow them or... illegally pass them.... it's just plain discourteous.

As mentioned... good, bad and ugly on all sides of any argument.

Thing is.... when on a cycle... be it motorized or not... in an "argument" with a moving car, truck, etc., you're ill-equipped for such a confrontation and hence will lose.

I for one... don't care to have "I Had The Right of Way" emblazoned on my tombstone.

So yes... in the open forums available, absolutely fight the good fight. Out on the road remember what I consider to be the two IRREFUTABLE RULES... of Motorcycling:

1: You ARE invisible.
2: They ARE out to get you (even if they aren't).

Those two rules have saved me many a time.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - You can't see me......
by: 167.9.1.11

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Not a good place to ride a bike posted by Chris on 4/15/2010 at 5:10:47 PM
They passed a resolution requiring head and tail lights on the bike.......
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Not a good place to ride a bike posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/16/2010 at 9:22:56 AM
To make them easier to spot... and target? ;-) One oft has to ponder why it is that they feel compelled to legislate what anyone with a brain should know to do anyhow?

Though I have to say.... whilst I have headlights on the machines I ride at night... the only one with a tail light currently would be the DL-1.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - I see the light.....
by: 167.9.1.11




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Purpose? posted by: Paul Kirwin on 4/7/2010 at 6:13:33 PM
I sent the following note to the main inquiries page, and it was suggested that I ask the same question on the Enlish Roadsters page...so....
I have run across what seems to me to be an unusual Hercules bike, and am curious to know if anyone there has seen something similar. I have searched internet sites and images for months, even scanned catalogs for older Hercules bikes, and have yet to find a photo of another “factory” bike set up quite like this. Mostly I am curious as to what an expert would think the intended purpose of the bike is? Commercial working bike, or some sort of racer? The double top tubes make me think heavy weight hauler, but this is (so far) the only rod-brake bicycle I have been able to find with down-turned sort-of ‘racing” bars. The fork is also quite different from my Raleigh DL1, with less forward projection which I am thinking will make the steering quicker. It appears to have the original, but un-marked free-wheeling single speed hub. Any idea when Hercules quit making the stamped logo chainring? Strange bike, no? I am thinking it will make an interesting rider.
Unfortunately, I do not have a web address to post photos to, so I am hoping someone can reply with a photo address showing a rod-brake bicycle with down turned bars???????
by: 71.30.183.100

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Purpose? posted by warren on 4/7/2010 at 7:34:52 PM
at the top of this page under readers rides, you can make an account and post pics.We need to see it to assess it.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Purpose? posted by Warren on 4/7/2010 at 7:36:04 PM
Sorry under General Resources tab first

or go here...http://oldroads.com/rrdown.asp
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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Purpose? posted by Paul on 4/8/2010 at 6:15:11 AM
Took a shot at creating a site under readers rides. Called Hercules Oddball.
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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Purpose? posted by paul on 4/8/2010 at 7:49:55 AM
Also added a shot in the picture database. HERC1.JPG
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           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Purpose? posted by Warren on 4/8/2010 at 6:06:07 PM
Can't see it...do you have a url? The pics need to be under 500kb
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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Purpose? posted by paul on 4/8/2010 at 7:25:32 PM
When I made a page in Readers Rides, my first photo was rejected for being too large, so I reduced the sizes and the next 4 were accepted. I guess it just takes awhile? Later, after I posted the photo in the picture database, I got a message that said it may take a few days for the photo to appear. Maybe somebody has to approve of the image?
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