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English Roadsters


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AGE / VALUE:   Dutch Bike posted by: Stephen Hogben on 4/6/2010 at 7:26:50 AM
Sorry to have been away so long!Been out and about on my old Hercules(now done 1100 miles on it,and only one puncture)and have noticed a peculiar bike outside a shop with no front wheel.After 6 months went into shop and enquired about its ownership,don"t know mate,been there ages,if you want it take it,soI did.It is Dutch with a twin crossbar,28x1 1 3/8 rear wheel.Asked at the local bike shop about the price of a new front wheel £35 plus tyre and inner tube hmm bit steep for a bike that cost nothing!Of course the bike has its usual coat of hand painted black paint,so do not know the maker yet.I wondered how it rode,the only wheel I had spare was a rear 16 inch wheel from a B.S.A.shopper,saved for the 3 speed hub,wacked that in and it peddles a treat!However it needs a larger wheel,but in my travels have spotted a pair of wheels in a ditch,probably 26 inch but will go and get and see how it goes!Also spotted 2 mountain bikes 1 adult brand new in the river Bourne chucked off the bridge,stolen I suppose,and a childrens bike in the canal.
by: 86.0.50.167

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AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by: Chris on 4/5/2010 at 6:18:37 PM
Vin,

Please will you add another board here to oldroads.com

Call it: vintage German Roadster bikes

open up another whole another board for the German bikes the names the other readers here gave out.

the old stuff from 1885 to the current times

the whole shebang.

Where else has this been done on the net?

This in new territory and something I look forward to reading.

I think it's a good idea. My knowledge of the German stuff is almost zero. But others will be driving the bus and I look forward to looking out the window along the way.
by: 69.153.86.42

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by JS on 4/5/2010 at 9:51:50 PM
Why not just make this board the ROADSTER BOARD? Yes, there are some German roadsters, but there are also Dutch, Swedish, Indian, Chinese and Japanese (drool...) roadsters.

There are even the occasional American roadsters from the pioneer era.

-JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.com
by: 193.23.43.4

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by Chris on 4/6/2010 at 9:41:09 AM
It's too broad a scope, too confusing perhaps but you do have a point. What do you think, Vin?
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by Andy on 4/8/2010 at 11:19:56 AM
I totally agree with a pan-global roadster board, I don't think there's anything like it out there. The Nottingham diaspora stretches around the globe now, and now there are surely more "english-styled" roadsters out there than actual made-in-the-UK models.
by: 206.80.8.130

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles at OldRoads.com on 4/9/2010 at 4:10:24 AM
So, change the name and pointers to just "Roadsters"?
Easy enough. Everyone agree?
by: 71.184.108.33

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by Chris on 4/9/2010 at 4:37:32 PM
I was hoping for a seperate board for each country of origin. French bikes on a French board English mande bikes on an english page German stuff on a German page

Seperate pages so we don't mix it all up.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles at OldRoads.com on 4/12/2010 at 3:23:52 PM
I'm hesitant to add more categories of discussion. Also, a lot of people are not sure of their cycle's country-of-origin.
What if I add "German Roadster", "Dutch Roadster", etc. to the "Subject" dropdown?

Also, what do you all think of the new "Quick View" thingy? It shows a view of recent messages even if they've rolled off of the first page.

-Vin
by: 71.5.73.58

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/13/2010 at 5:56:32 AM
The "Quick View" ... er... "thingy" is excellent!!!!

Nice addition!

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - at-a-glance convenience!
by: 167.9.1.11

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by Geoff Rogers on 4/13/2010 at 11:35:05 AM
Most of the bikes we talk about here aren't even actual roadsters. They tend to be Sports bikes. But most of them are English, or copies of English cycles. My opinion is, let's continue to welcome people with "foreign" cycles but leave the category as English. Much of this comes down to semantics: what's a "roadster" and what's a "sports?" Is my '55 Raleigh Sports with locking fork, gearcase, Dyno-Four hub, mudflap, etc., a roadster? But it says "SPORTS" on the down tube and it has cable brakes. Hmmm. And what about my prewar single-speed with rod brakes? Not sure what that is, but I do know it's an old Brit and it's cool and we like to talk about cool old Brits here. Maybe the common thread is they are all English-style bicycles.
Geoff Rogers
by: 216.153.152.113

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Request for Vin posted by Chris on 4/15/2010 at 5:12:06 PM
I agree with Geof
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   First Ride posted by: Clint Flack on 4/5/2010 at 4:11:08 PM
Took my 1950 Raleigh Sports out for the first ride of the season today.


by: 71.225.49.69


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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   First Ride posted by Warren on 4/5/2010 at 6:19:21 PM
That's a pretty picture...
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   First Ride posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/6/2010 at 5:32:17 AM
Very nice indeed!

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Keeping Westley's in business!
Dingmans Ferry, PA, USA
by: 167.9.1.11

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   First Ride posted by Warren on 4/6/2010 at 7:58:47 AM
...and your woodworking is wonderful. Very George Nakashima.
by: 24.215.80.230




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/5/2010 at 2:44:46 AM
As many here know, my first "Roadster" was a 1969 (or therabouts) "Sprite 27" that I rode EVERYWHERE as a kid.

So, I've this very tall framed 5-speed Sprite and I finally dusted it off and went for a nice 4 mile spin yesterday. Alas, the machine is showing some rather unsettling signs.

Actually... it's the RIMS. In spite of my best efforts, the chrome is getting VERY ugly looking. Blistered bigtime in many places. Front wheel actually JUMPS when the brake is applied. To the point of being unsafe I'm afraid.

A while back, a colleague of mine fished a later model Raleigh "Pursuit" out of the town dumpster and brought it in to work... "you want this thing"? Yeah, rather odd question. It's been in my basement for quite some time.

I actually rolled that out to the curb the other day and was going to put a "FREE" sign on it. It was out there for about an half hour before I looke... hmmm... 27" alloy rims....

Long story short... methinks I'm going to do a wheelset swap with the olde Sprite. It will then become a 6 speed with nice alloy wheels... and whilst I'm at it... I think I'll swap over the very nice Dia-Compe alloy sidepull brakes as well.

I should actually weigh the components I'm re-fitting... just for fun to see how much of a reduction I'm actually achieving.

Probably won't. Will just be happy to extend the life of the olde Sprite for now. Those wheels have me a bit worried.

LOL.. every time I ride that thing, I recall the "Sprite Hunter" (as I used to refer to him). Used to frequent this board... he would hunt down and cannibalize every Sprite he could find. You still out there?

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - "Rescuing Sprite"... I think Mark Levin would approve.....
by: 208.252.179.25

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by Christopher on 4/5/2010 at 6:17:49 PM
Yes, still here Larry. There may have been more than one like me who loves to take apart the sprite for it's parts and it's a shame because it is a wonderful little bike all by itself and I remember some folks who were agast because these bikes have a following all their own.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by Chris on 4/5/2010 at 6:46:08 PM
Your Sprites are safe from the Sprite hunter (for now) who is working 7 days in south texas and there are no old bikes to be found.

I have my tools and will resume canibalistic activities again in the future and then they will not be safe from my vulture talons bearing tools
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/5/2010 at 8:27:56 PM
Fun stuff that. I actually have one Sprite here that's just downright too ugly to restore. It's an all white unit and looks to have been ridden hard and put away wet one too many a time.

Still... if my alloy wheel swap doesn't work out I may snag the wheels from that one.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - It's a Sprite... and that's all right!

BTW... You wanna get me a ship-to address for them bars again?
by: 208.252.179.27

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by sam on 4/5/2010 at 8:45:31 PM
I like aloy(alum)rims.Like the bike just runs faster with them--less effort.Maybe I'm only fooling myself but i swar it's true.Sun makes alum rims in 26X1&3/8" and drilled 32/40 or 36/36.What ya'll waitin for?
by: 99.91.27.106

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by Chris on 4/6/2010 at 5:34:24 PM
Hey Gang, Sam is 100% correct

One of the first things to do is get yourself a set of aluminum alloy rims. It's the first stop, when you hop it up!
Mated with high pressure gumwall tires and it's like night and day. The high pressure 26 x 1 3/8 tires will take some looking I had to go across town to different shops looking for them but I found them.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/7/2010 at 2:34:43 AM
Yeah... it all has to do with "rotating mass" and a bunch of other engineering terms.

This is your favourite Chris... a Sprite... with 27" wheels. As it were, the machine has WHITEwall tyres that inflates to 70psi which is pretty robust.

Rode the motorbike to work yesterday... as a result was a bit tired out myself when I arrived home to potter around in the "shop"... I even snarfed down an energy drink.... did little for sure.

We shall see what happens this evening.

later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Alloy is our ally?
Dingmans Ferry, PA
by: 208.252.179.28

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by paul on 4/8/2010 at 7:33:17 AM
To Boneman...I would be willing to bet I can out-do your too ugly to ignore Sprite. I have a matched set of once white sprites that spent something like 10 hours totally submersed in the flood waters of Hurrican Ike. They were left in a backyard shed when the previous owner evacuated. After the flood, it got nice and warm for just long enough to REALLY cook the mix of salt water and who-knows-what-other chemicals. Maybe a UGLIEST BIKE IN THE WORLD discussion area?
by: 71.30.180.104

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by Chris on 4/8/2010 at 6:47:16 PM
Too bad I didn't get to it before the Hurricane! Now, not even a vulture will want it.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sprite Re-Visited posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/9/2010 at 9:51:03 AM
Eegad.... so... basically a PICKLED Sprite?!?!?!?!? And TWO of them nonetheless.

Sad to hear. Pictures????

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Sprite fright.... that!
by: 167.9.1.11




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MISC:   fork tube bearings posted by: Law on 4/3/2010 at 2:49:07 PM
Hi,

I saved an almost complete 1968 Raleigh sport from the scrap yard and am cleaning it up. I have a question for you experts, The bearings in the fork tube, are they odd count for the top and bottom like motorbikes or are they suppose to be even-steven count? Second question if I may, are the bearings in the front hub suppose to have grease and oil or just oil ? I've worked on american middle-weight bikes but this is the first English, I really like it ! It has the nice condition Brooks saddle and the original tire and tubes from Dunlop. Tires are rough but usable and the tubes hold air. The SA hub is needing oil to function properly.

Im appreciate your help in getting this one back on the road and looking for a Tweed run ! Law
by: 98.121.183.188

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           RE:MISC:   fork tube bearings posted by Keith Body on 4/4/2010 at 12:38:46 PM
If my memory is OK, 22 5/32 inch top and bottom, a little light grease will hold the balls in place. Easiest with the bike suspended upside down, if you are able. Just fill up the top race until you have a little space, and you should have 22.
Grease versus oil, theoretically grease should be better, but in the UK most of the utility bikes never had any lubrication ever, tyres almost flat, and were ridden in rainy conditions once or twice a week. Owners were instructed to use a little light oil.
by: 92.22.82.2

           RE:RE:MISC:   fork tube bearings posted by Law on 4/4/2010 at 7:15:44 PM
Keith,

Thanks much for your info, I wondered if I did not have all the bearings for the fork tube but that's not the case. Thanks for confirming that!

What are the requirements for lubricating the other bearing points? Are some grease only, oil only or do both ?

Sorry for so many questions, I want to do a right proper job on taking care of this bike. I had fun taking down a 60's huffy with their Bendix hub and making it the family camp bike. This one is just a little bit different.

Thanks, hope to return the favor sometime. law
by: 71.71.4.177




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AGE / VALUE:   Easter angles? posted by: Chas on 4/3/2010 at 12:53:16 PM
Befittingly a time or resurrection; I took my machine out for it's first test today, this is only my 2nd project and I was really stoked to put it all back together again and ride out, something which would have been beyond me a few months ago. Honestly, it all seems to be in good order and wasn't so hard, not quite expecting that!

Can I ask about comments such as [nice angles, relaxed, etc].
Which angles are we talking about.. the apex or base, both?
What is actually the default for a roadster?

Happy Easter folks.


by: 62.49.24.58


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Easter angles? posted by Warren on 4/3/2010 at 5:04:55 PM
You measure the head tube and seat tube angles from horizontal. There's no real default...frame builders have always tweaked angles in search of a better design. Along with fork rake, trail, wheelbase, wheel size, crank length, spindle width and more.

The general trend was toward steeper angles as racing got faster. But bikes get very twitchy and unstable with steep angles.

Old roadsters like yours are often in the mid to high 60's. Fast and steep racing bikes are in the mid 70's. Everything else is in between. Classic brit road bikes were often 71 parallel. Italian lightweights were maybe 73 seat, 71 head. Lot's of variety out there for all types of bikes.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Easter angles? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/4/2010 at 4:42:35 AM
VERY nicely done, sir. I'm sure the machine was originally fitted with a full chaincase... which while I really like those, would utterly obscure that most excellent chainwheel.

As to angles, temrms such as "slack" or "relaxed" would be represented in a dictionary illustration... very nicely by your machine. My D.L.1 has simlar angles. It's kind of like the difference between driving a wee sports car like an MG Midget vs. a full size American car such as a late 70's Cadillac.

I'm sure you noticed the ride of the Roadster as being... "elegant" and / or "graceful". There's really nothing else like it!

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - two-wheel "slacker" by choice.
by: 208.252.179.22




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FOR SALE:   (Most of a) DL-1 for the taking posted by: Randy on 4/1/2010 at 5:49:41 PM
Free for the taking in Rio Vista, California (about 40 miles south of Sacramento) is a disassembled DL-1/"Tourist". Frame is 24" seat tube, missing the seat stay screws. Includes wheels (servicable rims, no tires or tubes), handlebar, crankset, brake hardware but no saddle, chainguard or fenders. Basically a project bike that never got to the working-on-the-project stage. Good at least for a parts bike, frame is straight as far as I know. If it's not claimed in the next week or so it will go on the skip. Email zephyr9900 (atsign) comcast (dotsign) net if you're interested. Thanks!

Randy

by: 98.210.86.134

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           RE:FOR SALE:   (Most of a) DL-1 for the taking posted by Chuck Meshako on 4/1/2010 at 6:53:50 PM
Hi Randy,
I live about north of Sacramento (Penn Valley, CA) but I have a 1973 DL-1 in my garage that I would love to get some spares for...if it is still available I would like to take it off your hands this weekend.

Chuck
530-329-3025
email: chuck@dextopian.com
by: 75.45.107.85

           RE:FOR SALE:   (Most of a) DL-1 for the taking posted by Randy on 4/2/2010 at 3:12:17 PM
Bike is claimed, thanks.
by: 98.210.86.134




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AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by: Chris on 3/31/2010 at 6:00:57 PM
Saw the Sound of Music on D.V.D. and the one scene got me thinking where are all the German rod brake roadster bikes (there is one in the film) Rolf the Telegraph delevery boy soon to be amateur Nazi rides one and it's got rod brakes.

All these years, all the shops and all the collectors and other bike owners and in all my travels I only saw one Durkopt.

So where are the German rod brake bikes the stuff the Germans rode before and during, and after the Nazi years. What exactly did the S.S. ride? what brands.

They had something called a stretching chain it's mentioned in "the dancing chain" book. never saw one.

Rerally it is peculiar they are not around and being traded and discussed like these English and now, Urp... Ug....... (forgive me)
the Chinese Flying pidgeon ( dove) bikes are.

It's strange, it all really vanished. I've served abord the Flying Dutchman as a cook where I found the rare and magical in English and American and Canadian and Dutch sand other oddities but where is the German stuff?
by: 69.153.86.42

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by Chris on 3/31/2010 at 6:18:10 PM
I understand that everything changed forever during W.W.1 and during w.w.2 but I'll be investigating the German bicycle industry and it's export habits and the brands shown.

All those dark basements, all the shops really I've been Indiana Jones with this stuff and I''d ring up the biggies in this and ask questions, end up selling stuff for less than I should have but I met people and rooted thru and really, I just have not found it in America or Canada either. No matter it was not my tastes I still would have seen it if it was there so why not where has it gone to?

Did German companies ever export bicycles to the U.S. ok what about before W.W.1? The really, really old stuff?
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by sam on 3/31/2010 at 7:53:19 PM
Did German companies ever export bicycles to the U.S
Sure they did,and lots of parts too.Even bicycle people---Like SCHWINN!Yes,old papa Schwinn was a forman in a German bicycle company before comming to america.Take a look at the 1959 Toranado hubs---German Built.Ever Drive an OPLE---yea a german bicycle company.Are all those Sears Austerian(German)3 speeds.Union pedals and hubs(German built)Or should I talk about the longest running coaster brake hub ever built---1905 till ---well it's still being built---the F&S Torpedo hub.Much of Germany's plants moved to Poland during ww2.The Torpedo(3speed) hub---much better than the sturmey archer---is still being built in Poland.Much more ---Victoria,Express Works,Sudbracik
by: 99.158.4.244

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by Matthew on 4/1/2010 at 10:26:10 AM
Hey Sam,

Keep on a roll, I like it!

Matthew - loving the enthusiasm
by: 81.107.129.189

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by JS on 4/1/2010 at 6:50:30 PM
There are plenty of German brake rod roadsters still around. Right where you would expect them: In Germany.

Usually, chained up and rusting in the streets of Munich, etc. Monark, Adler, NSU...there are lot's of brands.
You can scan German Ebay if you are really interested, or check out the Estonian Blog All-Steel Bicycles.

Here in Beijin you can ocassionally come across old Eastern Block bikes. I recently photo'd one an old Diamant (Karl-Marx Stadt) rodder.

Even though it was from the east-zone, I would put the quality above western offerings from England and Holland...but nowhere near as good as Japanese rodders. They are the best.

JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 193.23.43.4

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by sam on 4/1/2010 at 7:09:43 PM
the photo shows a "Latvello Ladies Bicycle 1939"Isn't this little girl just the prettiest little girl ever.

"In June,1941 the Jedekin family was in saldus visting reatives.On the nite of june 13 Red Army troops arrested Jedeikin's family--his wife,daughter and two sons.J.Jedeikin was separated from his family and deported to Siberia.On March 14,1942 at a court hearing at Solikamska prison camp Jakov Jedeikin was tried and sentenced with the death penalty.On april 9,1942 he was taken to the NKVD prison where he was executed.
When the second WW was over the bicycle manufacturing business was not resumed and the former "latvello"premises were occupied by an engineering plant.
The Jedeikin family returned to Riga from Siberia in 1956 and emigrated to Israel in 1971"(from the book Leutner to Erenpreis,100 years of bicycle manufacturing in Latvia,By Edvins Liepins & Janis Seregins)
Buy the book the people,the stories and there faces will stay with you a lone time---sam


by: 99.158.4.244


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by Steve on 4/2/2010 at 3:29:23 AM
" fahrrad " is bicycle in German. Search on Germany's E Bay.
http://shop.ebay.de/?_from=R40&_trksid=p3907.m38.l1313&_nkw=fahrrad++old+timer&_sacat=See-All-Categories
by: 209.26.58.179

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by Andy on 4/5/2010 at 10:42:56 AM
I found a neat German small roadster for my girlfriend called an "Express" - not rod-braked, but with a sachs torpedo 3-speed hub, and a cool hood ornament that looks like a greyhound, and a neat metal tool box between the downtube and the rear mudguard. It clearly looks like somebody brought it over, as all the markings are in German - not sure if they were ever imported. It's heavy, but she loves it.
by: 206.80.8.130

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   where are the German Roadster bikes? posted by JS on 4/5/2010 at 10:26:07 PM
I believe Express also manufactured lightweight mopends

JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 193.23.43.4




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AGE / VALUE:   Canadian Cadet posted by: Grant on 3/30/2010 at 3:24:50 PM
I recently bought a Canadian Cadet loop frame roadster. It looks old to me, but I'm unable to get any info on this marque. It seems to be an early CCM product, perhaps from the time when the brands of CCMs merged companies were still being used. Any definitive history and dating would be appreciated.
by: 76.254.137.51

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Canadian Cadet posted by Warren on 3/30/2010 at 3:59:33 PM
I once owned a Cadet. The CCM affiliates usually used one piece hangers and when they didn't, they were branded CCM. My Cadet had a standard English made bottom bracket.I think they were made in England (Birmingham type) and imported by the Robert Simpson Company (Simpsons) back in the day. My bike was also a women's loop frame, black with a blue-ish undercoat. It had a nice feel on the road.

What are the rest of the details...hub markings, bottom bracket, crankset, detailed pictures always help.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Canadian Cadet posted by Warren on 3/30/2010 at 4:26:21 PM
Now my memory is failing...maybe it was a Comet imported by Simpsons. I do vaguely remember seeing a Cadet and maybe it was CCM-ish. Diamond shaped headbadge? Pics would be great.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Canadian Cadet posted by Grant on 4/6/2010 at 11:27:57 PM
Warren, your memory may be better than you think. It has a cottered crank, Williams pattern chainring, instead of the CCM chainring that became ubiquitous in the 40s. The bottom bracket and axle were made by Bayliss Wiley in England.

It looks like a lot of other CCM bikes, except the head tube seems to be cast as a single piece, with lugs and tube all as one unit. The badge is pierced metal oval with band across the middle. There's a beaver on top, the word Cadet on the middle and Made in Canada on the bottom.

It takes a 13/16 seat post, and the brake bridge and chainstays were tack welded, probably with a stick welder before they were brazed. The latter facts are inclining me to think it is post-war, maybe made for a department store?
by: 76.254.137.51

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Canadian Cadet posted by Grant on 4/6/2010 at 11:52:48 PM
Some photos at http://www.flickr.com/photos/7920394@N04/?saved=1
by: 76.254.137.51




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What is it? posted by: Trevor on 3/30/2010 at 8:48:03 AM
I have recently acquired an old Raleigh Roadster with Rod brakes, but am having some trouble with model identification. Here is what I know. It has 'roadmaster' rod brakes, is a single speed, the chainring has three heron heads on it, the seatstays are the bolt on type. The fork has a chrome cap over the crown, and is not the tube type crown so common on older raleighs (adding to my confusion). The serial number is stamped on the lug connecting the seat tube, top tube and seatstays. I have had trouble looking up the serial number becasue it is 7 digits (very clearly stamped) with no letter anywhere. I don'thave a picture of it yet, but I will put some up soon. Just wondering if anyone has had any experience with something similar, or if it might be a bit of a mut, cobbled together at some point in the past from spare parts. Thanks for the help!
by: 142.46.209.194

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What is it? posted by CHRIS on 3/30/2010 at 6:06:46 PM
YOU HAVE COME TO EXACTLY THE RIGHT PLACE!
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What is it? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 3/31/2010 at 2:42:37 AM
What he said! PICTURES... whilst a thousand words download faster... pictures tend to be a bit more helpful when it comes to this sort of thing.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - All I got is a photograph.....
by: 208.252.179.28

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What is it? posted by Chris on 3/31/2010 at 5:59:32 PM
We have exploded phantom diagrams of this bike here under: resources

it's labeled: Raleigh Rudge Humber exploded diagrams

we all have these bikes ourselves different variations of the same general thing
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What is it? posted by Chris on 3/31/2010 at 6:00:52 PM
not just is it that photographs help us immensly in answering your question but those of us who love these. like to see photographs.
by: 69.153.86.42




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AGE / VALUE:   Ishibashi/Bridgestone "Tease" posted by: Steve on 3/29/2010 at 7:55:11 AM
Hello. I found your site and it contained information about Ishibashi/Bridgestone bicycles. My father owns two, light weight 10-speed racing bicycles. We do not know which year they were made. The only defining marks on these bikes are the serial numbers, stamped on the seat lug, and the word "Tease" painted on each. From what little I have been able to gather, that is the model name. We have the owner's manual but not much information is provided.

If it is at all possible, could you provide us with more information about these bicycles? We would greatly appreciate any help you can provide.
by: 75.45.242.106

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ishibashi/Bridgestone posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 3/30/2010 at 5:34:30 AM
If you've not done so already, perhaps posting to the "Vintage Lightweight" discussion board might yield a better responce.

Sounds like a very interesting machine... and to have the owners' manual is an huge plus!

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - So... if you were to strip it down for restoration.... would it become... a... strip tease?

(sorry... I couldn't help it)
by: 167.9.1.11

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ishibashi/Bridgestone posted by David on 3/30/2010 at 7:57:58 AM
You can probably determine the approximate age fairly closely by listing the components found on the bike; brand and model of derailers, brakes, hubs, rims, etc. and asking about them. Except for a few brands, serial numbers are not usually much help.
by: 216.15.114.27




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AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by: David on 3/24/2010 at 9:56:37 PM
Gents (and ladies):

What's the latest story on grips? I'm looking for black, 3-3.5" correct roadster grips (c. 1930s-50s style), preferably in rubber. I've thought about ordering from Dial Patterns UK from time to time (they do celluloid but not rubber), but never got around to it.

Any suggestions? Are there aftermarket ones floating around or am I best off just trolling ebay uK for months until an NOS pair turns up?

by: 98.195.149.133

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by David on 3/25/2010 at 5:51:43 AM
I'll bet Peter Kohler, in Washington, still has repro Dare grips.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by David on 3/25/2010 at 1:56:18 PM
Actually, I still have a pair of those...grey for 1950s era "Sports" type bikes. But I'm looking for the stubbier, "Roadster" style for 28" wheels, etc. They seem to be as rare as hen's teeth.

Now about removing those grips that have been stuck there for 60 years...
by: 98.195.149.133

           Trading in old bikes in County Mayo, Ireland posted by Kevin on 3/25/2010 at 2:50:43 PM
I heard a story on RTE radio (Ireland) about a program in County Mayo that is designed to encourage more people to start riding bikes again. The bike shops are asking people to bring in their old, rusty bikes, for proper disposal, and buy new ones. Hmmm ... sounds like some nice pieces may soon be heading for the scrap heap (or maybe the collectors' market).
by: 72.12.200.38

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by chris on 3/25/2010 at 6:28:23 PM
u.k. e- bay am i the only one who buys a bike for uit's parts to put on another bike

removal of grips use hot water soak the grip in hot water
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by David on 3/26/2010 at 4:04:47 PM
I'd normally try hot water (it works when installing new grips), but these plastic grips seem glued in place. They've probably been there since the beginning. I don't think they'll come off unless I cut them off.

Maybe boiling water with a pair of pliers?
by: 98.195.149.133

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by David on 3/26/2010 at 4:16:02 PM
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/VINTAGE-STYLE-HANDLE-BAR-GRIPS_W0QQitemZ290381005056QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_Bikes_GL?hash=item439c0e8100

I see these Dare-type grips constantly on old bikes with some ads saying they are correct for 1950s cycles, but that just doesn't seem right.

Am I correct in stating that nearly all pre-50s cycles (28" roadsters, anyway) had stubbier, "torpedo" grips made from rubber or celluloid around 3 1/2" long rather than the longer, skinnier variety?
by: 98.195.149.133

           RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by chris on 3/26/2010 at 4:24:51 PM
Be patient the hot water loosens the glue and you carefully twist them back and forth let it sit in the hot water
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by JDuck on 3/27/2010 at 9:29:13 AM
Use an open end wrench that is slightly larger than the handle bar, but smaller the grip. Put it over the bar against the end of the grip and pull towards you. The grips will pop right off. I have never had it fail with the hard rubber or plastic grips, even if some idiot used glue.
by: 66.254.211.103

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by Chris on 3/29/2010 at 6:26:04 PM
Yes, after the hot water good advice
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   What's the latest on grips? posted by Chris on 3/30/2010 at 6:35:16 PM
I see the copies of dare grips on wheel chairs all the time the top part is a different pattern and they are uncomfortable but
bottom part where your fingers are it is exact as the Raleigh / dare pattern

the handlebar grips on later day raleigh's said dare on them.

I'm a John Bull man myself
by: 69.153.86.42




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AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by: Chas on 3/24/2010 at 11:37:19 AM
I'm having some trouble sourcing a replacement headset nut for a 1936 Rudge Roadster and would appreciate any helpful advice...


[IMG]http://www.flickr.com/photos/8728562@N06/4413519149/in/set-72157623572509816/[/IMG]

Despite cleaning up the old thread with a wire brush and greasing, have tried three replacements, the first two were 24TPI , then what I'm reliably assured was a 26TPI (found after much rummaging and which was the last in the shop as these are no longer available).

The nuts do go on but after 5 or 6 turns then bind hard and I fear damaging the thread (or possibly already have done with the last nut).

As the original (cracked) nut will still screw fully down can I supplement it with a jubilee clip as shown?


http://www.flickr.com/photos/8728562@N06/4460557588/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/8728562@N06/4460557368/

Not pretty but don't know what else to do.



by: 62.49.24.58

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Chas on 3/24/2010 at 12:06:24 PM
Whoops. Let's try that first link again..

http://www.flickr.com/photos/8728562@N06/4413519149/in/set-72157623572509816/
by: 62.49.24.58

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Keith Body on 3/24/2010 at 1:52:51 PM
Your old nut looks rather tall, most top lock nuts would be shorter. To define whether you have 26 TPI, if you have an old british hub spindle you could use it as a 26 TPI thread guage. If you have 5 good turns this should be enough, use a spacer under the lamp bracket.
Certainly if continuously used with the top race loose the fork column thread will be destroyed.
I would file a very small "V" down the crack and silver braze it.
by: 92.0.111.133

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Tim on 3/24/2010 at 4:43:10 PM
It looks to me that your fork column/steer tube is too tall, ie, too much of it is above the headset. That would cause your lock nut to hit the top and "bottom out" before it's tight on the lamp bracket. I have the same problem on my Phillips. The fix, spacer like Keith said, or remove steer tube and trim length by thickness of washer.
by: 75.93.4.109

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Warren on 3/24/2010 at 4:49:16 PM
I've researched this subject in different venues and have only been met with cynicism or disbelief but here we go again. I have 2 bikes in my collection that don't have standard 24 or 26 tpi headsets. One is a Hercules and the other is an unkwnown German bike and the two headsets interchange with each other. I've always thought they might be the obsolete Whitworth threading. Rudge bicycles used to be Rudge-Whitworth.
Keith, do you know of any old bikes that had these threads? Sheldon wasn't clear.
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_w.html
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Chris on 3/24/2010 at 6:37:19 PM
Ask Jim Cunningham of Cyclart bicycles in Vista, California

Jim restores bikes and sells parts and it's a good place to start. He has sources and people sell him parts and things he needs.

A smaller version of this nut appeared on the Raleigh Winkie trike however that bit of info won't do you any good
and Raleigh was 26 t.p.i.
I would silver solder it as Keith said. If the headset race below it is threaded and I'm sure it is, I would not worry too much about it just keep an eye on it. the handlebars are secured in the forks steer tube because of the way it is designed.

You want to look in old shops in the drawers and at the bike swap meets and autojumbles and other places where old bikes are found. old shops

After all these years and we still don't have a network of collectors dealers and shops and still, there is no list
of people to ask. This part is out there, it didn't disappear completely these were made in the tens of thousands and headsets and parts for this are out there.

Don't ride it hard and fix it as Keith said.

Then find a new headset for it.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Chas on 3/25/2010 at 8:57:52 AM
Well thank you _all_ for the positive response;

Yes it is a taller than average nut, I will try offering up again with the newer nut to see how much packing out is needed but I think it will be a lot. Maybe too much so
unless something else turns up I will stick with the original.

Tim, nut feels exactly as if it were bottoming out but don't think it can be so soon, shouldn't this just hand tighten anyway?
I'm using a big old wrench to get those 4th & 5th turns in
on all other nuts that I've tried.

Now as to silver brazing... is this something that would mean clamping in a vice, filing and fill/brazing; or is it a job to be done when positioned, i.e. mounted on the forks?

Either way surely the thread will be compromised on the reverse and prohibit re-threading on the forks!?

Lastly, if all else fails how much faith in the jubilee clip as an ongoing stop gap?

Chas



by: 62.49.24.58

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Tim on 3/25/2010 at 3:26:19 PM
Chas, The nut 'should' go on by hand. Are the threads clean and even or buggered up? The 'clip' you show (a hose clamp in US) is at best a temporary fix.
by: 75.93.4.109

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Tim on 3/25/2010 at 3:55:29 PM
Back again, the nut would have to be brazed off the bike. It sounds like the spare nuts might ALL be 24 tpi. You may have to beg/buy/borrow a thread pitch gage. Do you have another bike that you KNOW is 26tpi, you could try the nut off of?
by: 75.93.4.109

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Keith Body on 3/25/2010 at 4:05:12 PM
Warren: The only other fork thread we had that was finer, was for the head clip type of head set, which has a top locking nut only. Some europeans had 25mm fork columns, but the original standard was 1 inch outer, 7/8 inch handlebar stem. Bicycle standards were mostly created by the Birmingham and Coventry machine tool makers, like BSA. So the 1/2 inch chain and 24 / 26 TPI was standard throughout the metric areas. Campagnolo hub axles were 9 and 10mm x 26 TPI.
The top screwed head race will move backwards and forwards as you ride, and get looser on the threads. For silver braze I would file a very small "V", use very little silver and a small amount in the threads could be chased out.
by: 92.18.175.78

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by chris on 3/25/2010 at 6:39:37 PM
yes, the top screwed race will move back and forth and I take back what I said.

search about for another top nut
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Chas on 3/26/2010 at 10:56:54 AM
Two words: 30 TPI !!!

I am truly indebted to A W Cycles Ltd of Merton South London.

Only 10 miles from home yet stepping through their door was like stepping back in time 60 years!

The current owner told me his father co-founded the shop just after WW1 in 1918 and they had a factory across the road building frames until the 1940's. [Waklings].

Taking one look at my frame, Ted told me not only the year, 1934 (OK he was two years out), what angle it was.. and that it was a 30TPI thread that Rudge used.

Then he pulled out a shoe-box sized drawer full of hold headset parts, rummaged around for a few seconds before reaching over the counter and screwing his first choice on to the forks; Amazing!

Any readers in the London or South East should take a visit to see his amazing shop while it's still here. Ted kindly gave me a tour and pointing to one dark corner said his own 1913 Sunbeam was buried deep and hadn't been out for many years, I also saw an ancient 'Swift' Roadster. Take out the modern stock and it could have been 1920!

http://www.classiclightweights.co.uk/builders/walklings.html

http://www.allinlondon.co.uk/images/venues/images_all/10045791.jpg

btw He charged me a quid!
Today was my lucky day or what?
by: 62.49.24.58

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Tim on 3/26/2010 at 4:17:20 PM
That's good to hear. I think you did get lucky. The 30tpi is interesting all by itself!
by: 75.93.4.109

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by chris on 3/26/2010 at 4:26:39 PM
a perfect resolution magical and marvelous really good!
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cracked headset nut driving me Nuts! posted by Warren on 3/28/2010 at 3:49:30 PM
Hmmmnnn
by: 24.215.80.230




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AGE / VALUE:   john bull flap installation posted by: Zach on 3/24/2010 at 8:40:06 AM
Hello. I have just acquired a pair of NOS John Bull clip-on mud flaps from an ebay seller in Canada. They are the sort with the pivoting clips on each side. Do any of you have such a flap attached to your mudguard? I am unable to find a guide to clipping them on, or any photos on line that feature the flap. I would really appreciate some close photos of the flap in place if one of you has the time.


by: 75.1.248.23


  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   john bull flap installation posted by Zach on 3/24/2010 at 8:47:29 AM
Please ignore the broken link.


by: 75.1.248.23





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AGE / VALUE:   "Crate "springer on a 28" Roadser posted by: JS on 3/23/2010 at 7:06:57 PM
I've seen a 28" Raleigh Roadster from Malaysia with a fork similar to the Schwinn "Crate" springer.

http://www.chainganglowrider.com/AS%20FK0065%20BLK%20Springer3_MKD.jpg

I say it is similar, because the ends were lugged together so the fork legs were one piece.

MY QUESTION: does anyone know if the Schwinn fork will fit on a 28" roadster FOR REAL? The Schwinn Crate fork is usually sized for 26" Schwinn wheels...not 28"

The Indonesian Raleigh is is odd, as most of the old roadsters there are Dutch: Fongers, Gazelles, etc. So it maybe that this fork is also Dutch. And as I said, the fork was not EXACTLY like the Schwinn part. Looks can decieve.
by: 193.23.43.5

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by David on 3/24/2010 at 3:31:04 PM
Are you sure it was actually a springer on the Raleigh? I've seen, in Asia and Africa, "truss rods" running up from the axle. I guess they're intended to strengthen the fork, but there's no springing involved.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by JS on 3/24/2010 at 5:09:04 PM
Yes, I am 100% sure it was a Schwinn type springer.

MY own bike has truss rods, so it is quite easy for me to tell the difference. :-)

JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 74.115.160.21

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by chris on 3/24/2010 at 6:40:17 PM
perhaps the steer tube was changed out by a bike builder
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:  ?Crate posted by JS on 3/24/2010 at 9:40:42 PM
Again, the question is will a Schwinn Krate springer fork work on a 28" Raleigh?

I'm gathering from the responses nobody has tried this.

Seems a bit incredible given all the time both the fork and the DL have been around that nobody has been curious to give it a shot? Well, nobody outside of Indonesia anyway, and like I said, I'm not convinced that was a Schwinn fork because the fork legs were lugged rogether at both ends which is something (to my knowledge) Schwinn never did.

Possibly some ultra rare Dutch accessory.

Looking at the various reproduction Schwinn forks around they come in both 1" and 1" 1/8th diameter so the steerer is not what I am concerned about but rather clearance with the tire.


I asked this in a different way a while back and there was no answer : What is the outer diameter of a schwinn 26"1 3/8ths tire vs. a 28"? I also asked this from several tire manufacturers but also no answer.

-JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 193.23.43.5

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:  ?Crate posted by Chris on 3/25/2010 at 6:33:25 PM
I have seen this before somewhere, I think.
The threading would be incompatable. I will need to chew this one over in my mind
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:  ?Crate posted by chris on 3/25/2010 at 6:43:01 PM
the 28 inch wheel would not fit in the front fork. with all my tinkering I don't remember ever doing this with one of my bikes
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Matthew on 3/26/2010 at 11:30:33 AM
I have come across 26" wheeled bicycles with an Italian springer fork using one central spring and leading link forks.

I have not seen this on a 28" cycle but no reason why they couldn't have been made that size.

Matthew - its been a while
by: 86.29.246.179

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