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English Roadsters


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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Serial # posted by: Lee on 2/7/2010 at 7:55:54 AM
I 've checked this website pretty good trying to find some information on serial # locations for older Raleighs.
I have 2 older ones. One I can identify by date on Sturmey Archer hub and serial # on seat tube. Both reflect a 1974.
The other is a Raleigh Sprite. Probably the same year. It is a 10 speed. But I can not find the serial # anywhre.
Any ideas
by: 98.66.135.15

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Serial # posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 2/8/2010 at 9:46:30 AM
Check the dropouts... or... the top tube directly under the seat.

Sprites are neat machines. Just not too popular... at least the train-wreck versions...

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - I like my Sprite
by: 167.9.1.11




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MISC:   Chain Tension posted by: Lee on 2/6/2010 at 7:38:18 AM
How much crank chain tension should there be on a sturmey archer AW. If I tension as tight as a normal single speed there seems to a click noise while turning the crank. Almost like a bad spot on a chain would make but more than once per revolution. If i back it off enough to be quiet it seems it might be too loose and rubs against chain gaurd.
by: 71.199.171.36

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           RE:MISC:   Chain Tension posted by Warren on 2/6/2010 at 8:59:07 AM
Grab the centre of the bottom of the chain and tug up and down. I like to have about an inch of play, tops. You should not be able to push the chain off the rear cog when turning the crank. The chainguard is flexible and adjustable enough to be made silent

A fixed gear would have half the slack depending on the uniformity of the crank.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:RE:MISC:   Chain Tension posted by Lee on 2/6/2010 at 9:10:26 AM
That's about how much slack I have now. As far as the chain guard goes , I have a little adjustment but not much. It is on a Pashley that has a fully enclosed guard.
I'll just have to tinker a tad. As far as the noise goes when the chain was taught is that typical. Probably putting too much pressure on pawls ?
Thanks
by: 71.199.171.36

           RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Chain Tension posted by Warren on 2/7/2010 at 6:58:55 AM
Sorry I wasn't considering the enclosed chainguard...I've only ever owned one of them and it was fussy.

Check the axle to see if it's a little bent...this puts uneven pressure on the internals and can make noise.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Chain Tension posted by Lee on 2/7/2010 at 7:54:57 AM
The axles look good. If anything I might replace the chain. It seems like it might be a tad longer than needed.
Back tire almost touching back inside of fender. Also excessive fender clearance on fender behind the seat tube. If the chain is shortened just a tad that might give me more clearance internally in the guard. Maybe.

by: 98.66.135.15




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Crafty reflections. posted by: Chas on 2/5/2010 at 10:03:54 AM
I fitted a white reflector under the glass of my front lamp
to give it a new purpose.(couldn't source a battery so no good as a light).. What do you think?


by: 62.49.24.58


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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Crafty reflections. posted by Matthew on 2/5/2010 at 10:43:46 AM
Brilliant!

Matthew - a bright spark
by: 86.23.86.173

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Crafty reflections. posted by JDuck on 2/6/2010 at 9:33:18 AM
Chas
What a great idea.

Jeff - Not as bright
by: 66.254.211.56

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Crafty reflections. posted by Chris on 2/9/2010 at 4:50:39 PM
There was a article written up on one of the larger Raleigh Chopper websites and it tells how to make up a working battery with modern batteries and a bit of bridge wiring available at Radio shack to make these old Eveready British/ Pifco lamps still usable. The Raleigh Chopper devotees prize these lights and the article tells you how to make up a battery kit.

Don't remember the exact web site but I'm sure it's still up on the net.

I love these lights especially the black enamel ones from the 1940's
by: 69.153.86.42




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WANTED:   Indian or Chinese Brooks B33/b90/3 knock off wanted posted by: Erik on 2/4/2010 at 1:56:18 AM
I posted this in the wanted area but, thought I would try here as well. I am looking for a Chinese or Indian Brooks B33 or B90/3 knock off saddle. Preferably with a hard plastic top but leather will work too.

It is amazing that I can't buy just one of these saddles on the net anywhere. If I needed 500 of them I would have no problems but one, that is a hard find.
by: 24.124.81.137

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           RE:WANTED:   Indian or Chinese Brooks B33/b90/3 knock off wanted posted by Erik on 2/5/2010 at 3:13:07 PM
Never mind, found a new Brooks B67 for $65 shipping included at chain reaction cycles. :)
by: 24.143.43.61

           RE:WANTED:   Indian or Chinese Brooks B33/b90/3 knock off wanted posted by Dave on 2/9/2010 at 2:05:31 PM
Erik-
How do you go from a B33/90 to a B67. Two totally different saddles.
Sounds as if your advertising for Chain rxn. Hmm...
by: 76.94.138.205




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Type posted by: Jerry on 2/3/2010 at 7:36:06 AM
I'm in the process of rebuilding a 1977 Raleigh Sports. It has a black vinyl saddle on it which is in pretty good condition but I was thinking of replacing it. Would anyone recommend which Brooks saddle would be best? I will probably ride the bike only a few hours at a time. Or would you leave the black vinyl saddle on for authentic reasons?
by: 168.251.194.25

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Type posted by JDuck on 2/3/2010 at 8:07:06 AM
Jerry
In 1977 in the US, you could buy a Sports with the vinyl saddle or for more money, a Brooks B-72.
by: 66.254.211.56

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Type posted by Jerry on 2/3/2010 at 8:40:25 AM
Thanks for the reply. Was thinking about comfort. B72 or B66. Do you know if one is better than the other.
Thanks
by: 168.251.194.24

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Type posted by Warren on 2/3/2010 at 11:57:51 AM
Totally personal preference...I like a B72 because there's less springs to squeak.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Type posted by Chris on 2/3/2010 at 6:09:45 PM
Try to find a Brooks B-90/3 on U.K. e-bay these are discontinued or a Brooks B- 66 with the springs these are more comfortable
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Type posted by David on 2/4/2010 at 5:27:31 AM
I find the B66 is a bit too springy and the B72 is just right.
by: 216.15.114.27




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MISC:   Installing Hub Bearing Cups posted by: JS on 2/2/2010 at 8:16:36 PM
Just sent a bunch of drum brake hubs out to the chromer. In order to clean out all the grease before the hit the acid vats of course the bearing cups were removed to facilitate degreasing.

So, how do you reinstall them? I think hitting the hub with a torch (which is how they were removed) is just going to blue the chrome and therefore ruin the whole thing.

Any ideas?

JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 193.23.43.4

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           RE:MISC:   Installing Hub Bearing Cups posted by Keith Body on 2/3/2010 at 12:37:18 PM
Depends on how tight they are. If they came out with a little heat, try chilling them, and possibly pull them in with a nut and bolt through the hub. You may have a better tool, a press.
by: 92.22.100.187

           RE:RE:MISC:   Installing Hub Bearing Cups posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 2/3/2010 at 12:48:00 PM
My thoughts too Keith. Throw the cups in the FREEZER... heat the hub with a hair dryer... see if then you can slip them together.

Offhand... did you mask off where they seat? I would hate to se an over-ambitious re-chrome lay even .001" in there.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - runnin' hot AND cold!
Dingmans Ferry, PA
by: 167.9.1.11

           RE:MISC:   Installing Hub Bearing Cups posted by Matthew on 2/3/2010 at 2:26:12 PM
Don't tell the Missus and put them in the oven on a low heat for 30 mins!

Matthew - cycling gormet
by: 81.107.133.48

           RE:MISC:   Installing Hub Bearing Cups posted by Kevin on 2/3/2010 at 6:23:24 PM
... And if she thinks her next cake tastes a little odd, ask for seconds.
by: 98.226.154.146

           RE:MISC:   Installing Hub Bearing Cups posted by Steve on 2/4/2010 at 9:10:01 AM
Well, I was going to ask if anyone had access to (or knew where I could acquire) a 12" diameter rim (Westwood or Westrick) that would take something like a 1.75 to 2.25 tyre (approx 1 3/4 to 2 1/4 inches in old fashioned talk), but the mention of cake knocked me off course a little.
Sorry JS, I should have started a new topic for this.
I'm still searching for a rod brake rim for my old Hopper tradebike (the one with very small forks), I almost solved the problem with a 14 x 1.20 moped rim....but it was just too big, when the tyre was fitted.
The search goes on and on and on !
Steve
p.s. A 12" diameter rim takes a 16" tyre....this subject has been an education for me !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:MISC:   Installing Hub Bearing Cups posted by Matthew on 2/4/2010 at 11:25:10 AM
Yes Steve and 26" wheels are 23" diameter

Matthew - I get a round.
by: 82.31.6.68

           RE:MISC:   Installing Hub Bearing Cups posted by Steve on 2/4/2010 at 2:10:45 PM
That's the problem when you starting mixing moped wheel sizes with bicycle wheel sizes, my head was spinning....but not the wheel !
JS, good luck with your bearing cups.
Steve
by: 93.96.36.127




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wartime colours posted by: John on 2/2/2010 at 7:42:53 AM
Hi, I'm hoping that someone can help me with some advice about a bike I'm about to start restoring.

It's a 1940 English 3 speed, which has been in the same family since new. The guy I bought it from said that it had a respray back in the 60's, and he remembers it having black rims. The bike now has heavily tarnished chrome handlebars. What I need to find out, as I want to get it looking as authentic as possible, is, if it had black rims, would it have had black handlebars, cranks and spokes as well, or would these parts still have been chrome?

It's an English bike in England, so really I need to know what bicycles in the UK looked like during the war.

Many thanks!
by: 195.194.187.132

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wartime colours posted by Matthew on 2/2/2010 at 11:19:09 AM
Hi John,

Welcome. The 'All weather' models were generally equipped with no chrome. However a 1940 bike was possibly built in the first few months of the war and might not have had 'All weather' specification as the stock of standard parts were used up. Painted rims were not that uncommon; for example trade bikes pre-war didn't often come with chrome rims.

A good photo will tell us a great deal more.

Matthew - a real 'All weather' model.
by: 86.29.123.176

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wartime colours posted by John on 2/2/2010 at 4:05:22 PM
I'll work on a photo, it's buried in the shed at the moment but probably wouldn't show a great deal. It's definately had new rims at some point but looks to have the original components, including handlebars with makers name. I think you could well be right that they were using up old stock but when I have the wheels built (I have a knack of spending too much on my restorations!) I'm wondering whether to use black spokes or chrome. More to the point, what's everyones opinion on which would look best on the basis I rent my bikes to tv companies and this would become my 'stock' ww2 bike complete with blackout light! :-)
by: 80.239.242.112

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wartime colours posted by John on 2/2/2010 at 4:16:50 PM
Just to put an image in your minds by the way, it's a rusty dark blue Phillips ladies sit up and beg. It has its original Brooks saddle which is badly worn and will have to be repaired or replaced. It's complete from what I can tell except it has no chainguard so will probably end up with an oil bath. Single speed, rod brakes, lots of rust :-) Needless to say I like a challenge!!
by: 80.239.242.123




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AGE / VALUE:   They never believe you, until posted by: Chris on 2/1/2010 at 7:25:22 PM
I showed off some of the pictures and stuff over the weekend and I don't think they believed me at first so I pull out the death certificate and I pointed

Draftsman, Engineer, General Motors

followed by two more letters, photographs

I thought the guy was gonna have a heart attack! We went for a drive in the car afterwards.
by: 69.153.86.42

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   They never believe you, until posted by Chris on 2/1/2010 at 7:46:25 PM
It's all totally awesome and American but still I get nervous having the tail end of the car hanging out of the garage and it's so long that you can't close the garage door cus the car is too long with every body seeing you own a Cadillac and a vintage one at that and today it appraised at $108,000 so it's a worry, need storage and the attention it draws works both ways.

restoration can be a pain if the Pierce's prior owner was so difficult and irksome that finding some one with the needed parts will sell you what you need. They know him or of him and he's on their shit list and no matter that he's gone and we want to get this car finished and authentically done it's causing problems. I wanted to strangle him over the bikes. Sebastian Kresgee needed safety glass in the car yee gods!
by: 69.153.86.42




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AGE / VALUE:   Why I'm so thrilled about Keith being here posted by: Chris on 2/1/2010 at 7:04:47 PM
Read the post below what Keith said about the lady chain checker!

Keep up the excellent contributions, Keith
by: 69.153.86.42

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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by: Luciano on 1/30/2010 at 12:28:02 PM
Hi!!! I am restoring a PHILLIPS bicycle 1939 gent's Roadmaster model. 22 frame. 28 x 1.1/2 Dunlop Westwood rims. 32 holes (front) and 40 holes (rear) Phillips Celtonia large barrel hubs. Bayliss Wiley 18T freewheel. Bayliss Wiley bottom bracket. Hockey stick chainguard.
I do not possess the original chain and I would love to know what is the most common chain brand in this bicycle model.
I would also like to know about the kind of prop stand that came with these bicycles. They were Phillips brand?
I will appreciate your help. Thanks. Luciano.
by: 200.61.25.1

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Warren on 1/31/2010 at 8:13:29 AM
A Renolds Coventry or Elite chain would be a perfect match for this bike.

Here's picture...http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2388/3537188822_d9f8a21a2f.jpg
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Bill on 2/1/2010 at 7:51:07 AM
I’ve worked on a number of Phillips Roadsters from the late 1930s and 1940s, own three of them (including single speeds with freewheels), have a pile of catalogues from the period, and can tell you the following things about them.
Though Phillips did offer their own branded chains in the 1930s, I have always found them equipped with Renolds chains as the previous correspondent suggests.
Phillips also offered their own kickstand (described as a “parking stand”) but not until the early 1950s as far as I can determine. The roadsters I have come across usually have aftermarket kickstands attached to the rear hub if they have them at all.
The Bayliss-Wiley hubs were especially characteristic of the export models. My two South American roadsters (with decals on the steering tubes rather than badges) were assembled with Bayliss-Wiley hubs and I suspect that many of the Phillips roadsters shipped across the Atlantic were so outfitted. As long as their parts originated in Birmingham, they were good to go.

by: 205.188.116.69

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Keith Body on 2/1/2010 at 10:24:08 AM
Prop stand: In the UK these were early 1950's, cast alloy and and bolted between the chain stays behind the bottom bracket. Surely in Brown Bros 1950's catalogue.
By the mid 50's Phillips in UK were known more as a replacement component maker. I would doubt that they exported bikes without their own make parts. More likely sold just frames, even without the bottom bracket fittings, and left it to the local company to build wheels etc. This would have been so much cheaper for shipping. BW were good standard component makers.
Chains: Renold were accepted as best chains, the Renold Elite had shouldered rivets, always pull the sideplate off the rivet, don't push it through, as you can on almost any other chain. All Renold chains were checked literally by hand. They had an elderly lady whose job was to run lengths of chain through her hands, she could feel if it was correct.
by: 92.23.84.15

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by MArk on 2/1/2010 at 2:49:21 PM
Bill or Keith--did the Phillips make kickstands--esp. 50s-- have identifying marks on them? thanks Mark
by: 205.127.245.41

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Chris on 2/1/2010 at 7:32:33 PM
mention is made of the "worlds largest chain combine" in one of my books when mentioning Phillips

Phillips was Huge
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Bill on 2/1/2010 at 11:16:47 PM
Mark, Went back and looked at the 1950s catalogues again, and see three kinds of prop stand, parts numbers 484,485, and 485, but the photograph does not show that they are branded like the saddle bags, bells and inflators on the same page. I've never actually seen one so I can't tell you about identifying marks,
by: 205.188.116.69

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Keith Body on 2/2/2010 at 11:33:14 AM
Bill, memory gone, I suspect the prop stand makers did them in any name, for a fair quantity. Can't remember who really made them.
by: 92.9.225.213

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by mark on 2/3/2010 at 12:52:55 PM
Bill--just had a look at my 1960 B'ham Phillips propstand, presume original--anyhow, No maker or other marks whatever
(and curiously the same's true on my 48 Herc brakes)
by: 205.127.244.102

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Chris on 2/3/2010 at 6:14:11 PM
these numbers are patent numbers and you can look it up on the internet I do it all the time
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Chris on 2/9/2010 at 4:53:07 PM
opens the door to all of it you can see other things the men made, other things the company did. I have spent hours looking up patent stuff
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   PHILLIPS 1939 gent's Roadmaster posted by Luciano on 10/26/2010 at 11:29:32 AM
Hello Bill, could contact me? I am very interested in getting a copy of Phillips catalogues (period 1900-1935). My e-mail: lmolinalp@gmail.com
by: 190.193.28.252




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AGE / VALUE:   identification help, age and model posted by: Tim Griffin on 1/26/2010 at 10:04:10 AM
Hello, I have what appears to be a BSA roadster, my closest guess in age in from the early 30's judging by the equipment. It has a Bayliss Wiley single speed coaster brake and no provisions for a front brake can be found. On the hub reads the numbers 36-14. Some of the original equipment is missing. I'm besotted with this old bike, it rides perfectly. Front forks are a slim cast iron like material. Where are the markings on the old BSA's that would determine the age?
Thank you in advance,
Tim Griffin


by: 65.34.6.39


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   identification help, age and model posted by sam on 1/26/2010 at 2:00:51 PM
The 36/14 I think refer to 36 spokes at 14 gauge.
Your bike does look old.And I think the bolt tru the fork that is holding the fender brace is also where the brake would go---sam
by: 99.70.107.178

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   identification help, age and model posted by Steve on 1/27/2010 at 5:49:19 AM
Most likely " rod brakes, ", Do a search
by: 209.26.58.179

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   identification help, age and model posted by Matthew on 1/28/2010 at 12:03:38 PM
Hi Tim,

Hard to date this bike. The front fork is quite an old design and certainly much older than the head badge whihc is quite modern, as are the pedals. The headbadge is post war by quite a margin. Those forks ? Much older.

Matthew - 'tis myst'ry all.
by: 82.26.181.154

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   identification help, age and model posted by Warren on 1/29/2010 at 12:45:51 PM
Is it possible that this is an original headbadge and BSA issued the same design later on in their history? That badge looks old and worn from way over here.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   identification help, age and model posted by Keith Body on 1/29/2010 at 3:05:24 PM
Hi Sam, If you look under the bottom bracket, and see "BSA" in raised letters you have a cast bracket shell, which is probably pre WW2. If you have a pressed shell and lug set, then post 1938ish. Look under the joint where the down tube goes into the bracket shell. With pressed lugs the tube was retained in place during brazing by banging a large dent in the lug. I saw them doing this in the factory.
Obviously not a UK model, we need 2 independent brakes and used 32/40. Was this possibly export locally assembled during a shortage of parts? I have never seen a cast iron fork, (apart from cheap small children's bikes and very old stuff) and certainly would not trust it with a front brake.
It would be interesting to see how the fork column (steerer) is fixed to the fork.
by: 92.1.237.9

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   identification help, age and model posted by Tim on 1/29/2010 at 7:03:00 PM
That front fork looks too big for 26" wheels, it looks a lot like a 70's Schwinn varsity fork for 27" wheels. Tim
by: 75.93.4.109

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   identification help, age and model posted by mark h on 1/31/2010 at 5:01:49 PM
my friend has a 30s beezer and his bike has true 28 inchers and a different fork than yours?sure would be fun to look at your bike.his headbadge is not like that one on your bike.hhmm
by: 96.50.9.94




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AGE / VALUE:   anyone near plainville CT. posted by: sam on 1/26/2010 at 7:52:45 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Selling a James Arrow Ace tandem frame and components. I believe the bike is from the 1950's. Frame features a rear top bar that drops down for easier seating for ladies. Components include front and rear rims, handlebars, two Wright leather saddles, pedals, front and rear cranks, and a box of other parts. I have not tried to assemble the bike, so I do not know if all of the components are there or in operable condition. Asking $100 for everything. Local pick up only. I am located in Plainville, CT.
View more photos at:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/danbutl...7623274915244/

by: 99.70.107.178

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   anyone near plainville CT. posted by Chris on 1/27/2010 at 6:52:20 PM
Did you move?
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   anyone near plainville CT. posted by sam on 1/28/2010 at 8:58:43 PM
Now I ask ya---would I be selling that if it were mine?
Just thought someone up that way might take advanage of the post---sam
by: 99.70.107.178

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   anyone near plainville CT. posted by David on 1/29/2010 at 7:55:25 AM
Here's a link to the Craig's listing:

http://hartford.craigslist.org/bik/1556652347.html
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   anyone near plainville CT. posted by Chris on 2/1/2010 at 7:08:27 PM
No, you would not. You're right.
by: 69.153.86.42




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AGE / VALUE:   J. Lucas posted by: Dave on 1/25/2010 at 6:45:24 PM
Q: Why do the British drink warm beer?
A: Because Lucas makes their refrigerators
-the Prince of Darkness

So, I am trying to locate information regarding Lucas cycle bells. Perhaps some of the knowledge driven gentlemen of this forum could give me a hand.

I have a multitude of Lucas brass ringers that all have their unique model number (Ex: No. 61, No. 32, No. 29, No. 58), but do these model numbers signify a production date by chance? Every cycle I've acquired, came with their own Lucas ringer. Though, some ringers look older than their cycle.
Thanks a lot fellers.
by: 76.94.138.205

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   J. Lucas posted by Mark on 1/26/2010 at 6:27:02 AM
Sorry I can't help but I also cannot pass up the chance to make another Lucas joke:

Q: What are the switch positions on any Lucas lighting system?

A: Dim, Flicker, and Off

(I am a classic motorcycle and car fan too)....
by: 99.224.221.154

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   J. Lucas posted by Chris on 1/27/2010 at 7:00:34 PM
Well, there is pictures of the Lucas factories that were dismantled actually the whole Lucas empire went to pot thery sold off tooling and took the buildings apart and when I asked where the expensive bricks that made up the main building went to when I asked who got them, the people that put up the photos on the site took down that picture as it was causing somebody trouble.

Lucas was huge and totally magical a look thru an old Brown brothers catalog will showe page after page of Lucas Bells

I have information on Adie Bells from private coorespondence I have not shared here I don't think and I want Classics Rendezvous to print it but I have to get the fellow who sent it to me to coroporate with the effort.

I love these Bells, I have wrote a lot here about my passion and love with the British Bicycle bells or ringers as you say but I don't know much to say to except that you already k now they are marvelous

Hey! Keith Body please chime in tell us all you know about Lucas bells

Stay searching there are a book or two on Lucas but these bells may not be mentioned in the book as other things will get mentioned instead please preserve and collect these while we search for information.
humberchristopher29@hotmail.com
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   J. Lucas posted by Keith Body on 1/29/2010 at 3:24:22 PM
Hi Chris and all, I can't really add anything here, I would have said the best source of information is the Brown Bros as you say.
In the UK (1950/60's) our bikes had a few legal requirements, like 2 independent brakes, and an "audible warning of approach", which was subject to interpretation. Entrants to road time trials were required by their organisers to have a bell, which explains some of the minimal cheap aluminium things. There was a large market for these various Lucas type clanging bells, usually brass domed and heavily chromed. Also cheaper bells which spun a couple of weights inside the dome.
Keith
by: 92.1.237.9

           RE:AGE / VALUE:���J. Lucas posted by Geoff Rogers on 2/1/2010 at 1:07:00 PM
Lucas products are much-maligned, but in fact, most of what Joseph Lucas made, at least up until the 1970's, was nice stuff, and some of it was absolutely beautiful. Their principal products were automotive electrical items, but they also made accessories, mirrors, horns, badge bars and the like, and of course, cycling accessories such as lights, bells and odometers. My 1960 Dunelt Fleur de Lys has such an odometer, and I know that Lucas bells were standard equipment on Raleigh Superbes in the 1950s (I have a couple of those). The car stuff all bears dates, at least up through the 70s, and I am told that Lucas bells are also dated, although I have yet to find a date on one. By the way, Lucas Electrical is back in business selling some of the vintage car stuff, which I stock, by the way. It's allegedly being made in Birmingham, like the old stuff, and some of it is nicely made, although other bits are not finished as well, I have to say. The other Lucas switch, by the way, is marked "SMOKE-SMOLDER-IGNITE."
Geoff Rogers
Shutesbury, Massachusetts, USA
by: 216.153.152.113




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AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by: Dave M. on 1/23/2010 at 6:19:42 PM
Some years ago I purchased three old English made bicycles: one was a Dawes track/fixed gear with leather racing style saddle, (not a Brooks), and the cycle had "huge" diameter beautiful hubs, wheels were laced with very thin stainless spokes, the frame was Reynolds 531 DB tubes, fully chromed steel fork, with a lantern bracket on the right side of the fork. The second cycle appeared to be a late 1940ish Raleigh 3 speed men's model in fair to poor condition. The third cycle is a 19.5 inch seattube men's Aberdale/London No.18 (on the headtube), side pull cable brakes, 3 spd SA rear hub (no date on the hub) with toptube mounted SA quadrant type shift lever, full enclosed chainguard, fully functioning Miller large front light with fork mounted generator, with the front hub mounted odometer, and the front wheel held in place by very large chrome wingnuts. The front and rear rims are chrome steel with center stripe painted black, in only fair condition. The seat tube has the name ABERDALE in script (faimt but visible) the color is black, with overall very good - excellent paint quality (possible a lacquer type paint). The rear fender has complete decal with the coat of arms type of logo, and the tail end of the rear fender is bright white with metal encapsulated rear reflector. The bike came with the original hand grips, and the original pedals - fairly worn but other wise in fair operating condition. The saddle was a badly beat up horsehair/leatherette model which I discarded, and replaced with a Brooks B72. I did some low level research on the Aberdale Co.Ltd. founded in 1919 by a Mr. Levy, later joined by his two sons, in the "mass production of cheap bicycles for the economy market". From what I can gather, their business grew to the point where in 1934 they built a "new modern plant at Bridport Road, Edmonton, North London. During the years of WWII, the firm built products for the War effort including "small generating engine sets for use on aeroplanes. After the War they responded to the demand for economical personal motorized transport, by introducing a gasoline engine powered "autocycle" or Moped. It appears at some time they also operated a factory in New South Wales for the purpose of bicycle manufacturing, and possible manufacture of a new improved engine model of their JDL Autocycle. It is also noted that TI or Tube Investments acquired the company in 1954, with the Aberdale Directorships being formally relinquished in Jan of 1959, as part of the new buildings of the British Cycle Corp., (sharing the same address as Hercules and James Cycles - brands. This is all of the info that I could obtain from a nice article in Out of the Blue by Author Mark Daniels, published in October 2007 in Iceni CAM Magazine. IN ALL OF THE YEARS THAT I HAVE BEEN COLLECTING AND "SYMPATHETICALLY" RESTORING OLDER BRITISH CYCLES, I HAVE NOT SEEN, NOR HAVE I SEEN REFERENCE TO ANOTHER ABERDALE CYCLE. Can anyone shed further light on this brand?? Thank you in advance for any additional info.
by: 173.76.68.37

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by Chris on 1/24/2010 at 6:09:57 PM
I don't have the time to read your post but I will pass along something I read in one of my bike history books and that is a lot of companies that "were launched in the froth of good times and bicycle booms have sunk without a trace"

that puts it accurately keep looking this will take time to uncover the myteries please post some pictures here we'd love to see this and i will read your post and take some proper time to mull it over and look in my material.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by sam on 1/25/2010 at 4:11:48 PM
Aberdale,that was EZ---first out on the list---sam


by: 99.70.107.178


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by sam on 1/25/2010 at 4:17:23 PM
AND:
http://www.thebuzzingclub.co.uk/archive/arc0214.htm
by: 99.70.107.178

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by Dave M. on 1/26/2010 at 12:07:21 PM
Thank you Sam & Chris for your comments and info, and taking the time to respond. I will attempt to include detailed photos in a follow-up msg.
Dave
by: 71.174.172.215

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by Matthew on 1/28/2010 at 12:07:27 PM
Probably not No. 18 but rather N18 the London postal district where the cycle was built.

Matthew - PoCo
by: 82.26.181.154

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by Chris on 2/3/2010 at 6:20:30 PM
I think that you did rather well for low level research!

Thanks for passing along the info other bikes just like yours are out there bearing the same name and from the same place and people.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by Bill Lorenz on 8/9/2010 at 1:12:38 PM
I have an Aberdale 3-speed that seems to have beem made late 50's. Guaranteed Aberdale Frame-Made in England decal on the down tube, The Aberdale Cycle Co. London N 18 on rear fender and The Aberdale on chain guard. It has Brampton-rear hub and shifter, Brampton-lugs,BB,and crank, Bramton-headset. British Hub-froht hub. Monitor "Sheerlive" sidepull brakes and levers. Dunlop 26x13/8 rims. APEX-Made in England pump. I would like to know what kind of saddle it had and has anyone ever seen a headbadge or was that also a decal?




by: 198.69.162.66

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by Sb on 10/11/2011 at 12:00:09 PM
I have seen a black Aberdale similar to the last posted. There is one for sale on Craigslist in WA state too though blue with a similar-year SA hub and trigger: http://pullman.craigslist.org/bik/2560718291.html
The headbadge was not a decal - stamped metal. Don't know if the pictured saddle is original - is that what is meant by 'horsehair/leatherette'?
by: 151.201.141.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1937?? English Aberdale roadster posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 10/12/2011 at 6:19:59 PM
Wow... is that cleaned up nicely. Hmmmm..... OK, horsehair / leatherette... I get it. What I've always known as a "Mattress Saddle"... and all mine have been Brooks. That one, I daresay could be original given it's condition.

What I find immensely intersting are the handlebars... and how they're integral with the stem... very much the same way a rod-brake set of bars is.

That... and the swaged fork. Unusual.... I would defintely be interested in the date-stamp on the hub. Hard to say if it's truly thirties vintage.

Very cool... You procuring it, or just perusing?

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Blue.... like the sky!
by: 24.102.170.149




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AGE / VALUE:   what year was this model made posted by: brado on 1/23/2010 at 3:07:32 PM
I have a Dayton Consort with a aurther strumey three speed hub and and front internal generator hub this is a women bike. Iwonder if anyone could tell me the year it was made or the range of year the paint looks to be aqua marine with a brown or red base coat.
by: 209.56.118.3

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