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AGE / VALUE:   Apologies! posted by: Stephen Hogben on 11/22/2009 at 3:34:06 PM
Sorry have not been in contact for a long time,but been doing a lot of overtime,need the money! Have a very very physical job,have to move 20 to 30 tons a shift.Knees are going home,not good!Now am 52 with arthritic knees,but have found if I can get out on my old Hercules and do at least 20 miles on my day off the pain is gone for about 5 days. Now done 1,000 miles. Got soaked today,absolutly chucked it down but knees better.Try it if your knees are bad.Be careful, take it easy walk up hills etc etc. It works for me!
by: 86.0.50.215

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Apologies! posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 11/22/2009 at 8:48:42 PM
Stephen! Good hearing from you! There's a product I absolutely swear by for this sort of thing. Curamin. For me it is a product that has simply changed my life and for the better.

Check it out here:

http://www.curamin.com/


I don't sell the stuff nor own stock in the company. It's just an amazing product that has helped me immensely. Arthritic knees, shoulders, neck and who knows what else.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - hopefully not being inflammatory...
by: 4.154.219.0

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Apologies! posted by Steve on 11/23/2009 at 2:42:44 AM
That's interesting Stephen, and I wish you well.

I say interesting because, I've had toothache of the right heel since last March (and it still hasn't gone), what I mean is....a simple "verruca" !

The only time I feel no pain at all, is when the nurse has just frozen it with Nitrogen for the umpteenth time or, when I'm riding a bike.
I find trying to look and act normal a challenging enough task as it is, walking (limping) in a defensive lobsided manner just makes the task even more challenging.

Yes, bikes are not necessarily for getting you from A to B....they can help relieve the pain too.

Nevertheless, common sense must always prevail, always consult with your doctor (or psychiatrist), before attempting to ride a single speed heavy duty rod braked bike up a mountain !

Steve - what goes up, must come down....in one piece (hopefully) !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Apologies! posted by Thom J. on 11/23/2009 at 10:25:48 AM
Stephen- Interesting to hear that riding helps with the knee pain. I was diagnosed with osteo-arthritis in the back and hips this year. My doctor highly recommended bike riding, along with pain meds, to help strengthen the muscles but I also found that the pain went down for a number of days after a ride; usually 10- to 25 miles depending on the bike. I've tried glucosamin-chondroidant (sp?) but found it to be of no use. Larry, the Curamin sounds good and I'll be looking into it further. It may seem odd to other main stream bike ridrs, but I enjoy the old roadsters and club bikes more that I ever did on my go-fast road bike or hybrid. Thom J.
by: 63.204.42.231

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Apologies! posted by Matthew on 11/23/2009 at 11:41:13 AM
Hi Folks,

Go with what works for you. I take cod liver oil and that has improved my joints and that early morning stiff jointed feeling. It took about a month to have any effect but it is worth the bother. Curamin; if it is good for you then go for it.

I find long distance (50 miles a day for a few days) painful on the second day but the third day onwards is usually okay. My right knee can be explosively painful on day 2.

Matthew - its a revolutionary thing
by: 82.3.241.236

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Apologies! posted by Chris on 11/23/2009 at 7:44:04 PM
Steven, good to see you return
by: 69.153.86.42




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MISC:   Pathe news posted by: Matthew on 11/20/2009 at 11:04:21 AM
http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=3932

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=14668

You'll enjoy these.

Matthew - nostalgia is a thing of the past
by: 81.109.186.22

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           RE:MISC:   Pathe news posted by Corey K on 11/21/2009 at 12:59:12 PM
Those were fun! Thanks.


by: 76.102.6.124

           RE:MISC:   Pathe news posted by JDuck on 11/22/2009 at 9:36:08 AM
Can we build a side-by-side tandem?
by: 66.254.211.56

           RE:RE:MISC:   Pathe news posted by Warren on 11/22/2009 at 11:55:10 AM
It's been revisited once...google buddy bike.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:MISC:   Pathe news posted by David on 11/22/2009 at 4:10:05 PM
A former neighbor of mine had a Buddy Bike. Very weird but fun to ride. It's possible to ride it solo, too - tilted over very oddly!
by: 216.15.114.27




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   4-Speed Sturmey Archer FW Indicator posted by: Dave on 11/19/2009 at 5:17:10 PM
I have a SA FW hub that is functional, but the chain on the indicator is starting to wear out (it is almost 60 yrs old), and I'd like to find a replacement before it becomes unusable. It sounds like, from looking through the archives here, that people have found these before, such as on the indicator chain discussion here: http://www.oldroads.com/arch/ENG2002_12_264_53_21_PM.html

If anyone has one of these in good shape and would be willing to sell it, I'd be most grateful, since nobody makes the 4-speed indicators anymore. Thanks so much.
by: 137.53.68.93

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   4-Speed Sturmey Archer FW Indicator posted by Jeff R on 11/19/2009 at 7:15:36 PM
You can replace the chain with one from a 3 speed indicator. It is not the easest thing to do but it can be done. Use an older style 3 speed indicator with the smaller chain links. The end result works better. You may need to grind the tip of a punch smaller to push the pin through the chain link.
Jeff R
by: 64.12.116.69

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   4-Speed Sturmey Archer FW Indicator posted by Dave on 11/20/2009 at 9:34:16 AM
Yeah, I've thought about that - I'd probably rather replace the whole indicator if I can, but might try this if need be.
by: 137.53.68.93




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AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth dating and brake info. posted by: Kjell on 11/18/2009 at 12:22:31 PM
I need to find a website of database of some sort where I can look up the serial code. The # is starts with either RM or BM I can't tell definitively : RM65272.
It has Rudge Whitworth on the chain housing but I don't have the original wheels to tell if it was a Sturmey Archer hub. I want to say it was because they were at one time in my possession but again I can't say definitively. Its braking system is unlike anything I had seen before. It uses rods instead of wire and has this cool rocker device that controls the back brake. Does this style have a name? Does this help date it?
Any info will help.
Thanks
by: 24.21.222.94

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth dating and brake info. posted by Danny on 11/19/2009 at 8:18:16 AM
If it has rod pull brakes it would be anything up to mid 50s, as they were the standard for all British bikes until then. Spares for those brakes can still be bought new if you're thinking of restoration!
by: 80.239.242.93

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth dating and brake info. posted by Kjell on 11/19/2009 at 5:17:28 PM
Thanks, I have found some info and figured out the brakes. My rod breaks are in great shape actually, and I am thinking its a 1939 Rudge Whitworth. It doesn't have the white on the rear fender so it has to be pre war. I just wish i could verify its age by the serial number but I cant find any records or database that has this info.
by: 24.21.222.94

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth dating and brake info. posted by Matthew on 11/22/2009 at 1:30:14 PM
Hi Kjell,

Your statement 'It doesn't have the white on the rear fender so it has to be pre war' is rather self defeating. A pre-war British bicycle would have to have a white mudguard tail if it was ridden during the war because of blackout regulations.

Your bicycle may well be pre-1943 because that is when Raleigh took over Rudge Whitworth and maybe the time at which the Whitworth names disappeared.

Hope this is useful?

Matthew - no white tail for me.
Please search and read comments made over the years about blackout regulations and white mudguard (fender) tails. This subject has been much debated over the years.
by: 82.20.40.5

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth dating and brake info. posted by Kurt K on 11/28/2009 at 7:31:51 PM
"It doesn't have the white on the rear fender so it has to be pre war."

Ridiculous statement.

In the first place, white tails were deleted on U.S. models beginning in 1978. Some oddballs from the early '70s have also cropped up without white tails, with no explanation for the omission.

That said, the white tail is not a reliable identification feature.

-Kurt

by: 74.233.248.33




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tyres posted by: Dave on 11/17/2009 at 6:26:33 PM
Doesn't it seem as though everyone is stocking up on creme tyres? What ever happen to the all black look?
by: 76.94.138.205

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tyres posted by Jeff Bikeguy on 11/18/2009 at 8:21:49 AM
I see the creme Schwalbes are showing up at more and more retailers lately. They still offer the all-black and reflective sidewall tires (tyres) along side of them.
I bought a set of creme Delta Cruisers for my 72 Superbe and think they look classy on the bronze green bike. I've seen photos of the creme versions on black DL-1's and am not a fan of the way they look an the big black bikes. Gotta keep those bikes all black.
by: 75.147.73.37

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tyres posted by Chris on 11/18/2009 at 6:45:52 PM
My advice is to snap them up while they are about because like the Park Tool cotter pin press, Rigida bicycle rims, the Brooks b- 90/ 3 leather saddle and all the good stuff they go away into the great bicycle shop in the sky and are rarely ever seen again. Soon you'll hear "Ah lets see, no it's not listed in my new book and you look over his shoulders and the guy leafs thru the book and gee, it's not there anymore you call and it's not there not available anyplace

The Rigida factory was just shut down and other manufactuers are getting squirrely and strange like insisting that you buy a whole set of componet parts.

More folks need to know about Mark and his BikeSmith design Co. and that they offer a cotter pin press tool that is a worthy sucessor to the park tool co.

You all know I am right about this!
by: 69.153.86.42




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WANTED:   Hercules chain guard posted by: mark on 11/17/2009 at 4:13:07 PM
Anyone have a hockey stick (pref black) Hercules chainguard to trade for my Humber (black) hockey stick chain guard? i found this at the collective, hope the rest of the humber has a nice home! but need above for 48 Herc. mine has no fittings, mine is well-used but serviceable, decal intact
by: 205.127.245.44

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           RE:WANTED:   Hercules chain guard posted by Peter on 11/21/2009 at 9:02:39 PM
I have whole ladies 1950s framed hercules with chainguard.
IN NZ.
by: 202.49.0.2




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MISC:   Raleigh front wheel lacing posted by: Mark on 11/17/2009 at 4:08:37 PM
Should Raleigh and other 3 speed wheels that are laced cross three for front wheel...i am looking at 3 wheels i own...all 3 are laced with the crossing spoke NOT going under one of the 3...i believe Sheldon Brown's instructions have you weaving the spoke underneath, a bike shop here told me this also. mix up on my part or Opinions?
by: 205.127.245.44

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           RE:MISC:   Raleigh front wheel lacing posted by David on 11/18/2009 at 9:04:18 AM
I think the factory wheels generally were built without the "weaving" that Sheldon recommended. Cheaper to build that way.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:MISC: Raleigh front wheel lacing posted by mark on 11/18/2009 at 10:25:38 AM
thanks, so it would be best to lace one under if relacing? i assume spoke size stays the same
by: 205.127.244.102

           RE:MISC:   Raleigh front wheel lacing posted by Keith Body on 11/18/2009 at 12:20:26 PM
David is correct, factory time to lace a 40 hole wheel would be about 2.5 minutes. If they laced the top cross under it would probably scratch the rim. Most French and Italians also laced the top cross under.
by: 92.22.117.36

           RE:MISC:   Raleigh front wheel lacing posted by Iain on 4/11/2010 at 1:24:26 AM
You're correct. I've rebuilt about 10 Raleigh wheels and all of them were originally made with no lacing. For originality, I lace the same way as the original and, if the fact that the wheels have already lasted 50 years without failing, I can't see any mechanical advantasge of changing the build pattern.
by: 86.180.100.183




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by: Danny on 11/17/2009 at 5:38:41 AM
I restore 1950's Norman bikes, and keep reading that their export versions to the USA and Canada were known as "Rambler". Normans in England now are getting fairly scarce, but can anyone tell me if Rambler are just as hard to come by in America? I tried ebay, but didn't see one.
by: 195.194.187.132

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by David on 11/17/2009 at 8:44:29 AM
I've never seen a "Rambler" in the US. In the 50s to 60s, there was a quite un-cool car called that. I'd think bike distributors would have shied away from the name at that time, even if there were no trademark issue.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by Dale on 11/17/2009 at 10:59:24 AM
I have a mid-50s Norman, ladies, blue, here in the States. I'd say it's in "restorable" condition - has all its parts, could probably be ridden with a couple hours work and a pair of tires.

It's a project that, honestly, I'll probably never get around to. If any of you want it, you can have it for shipping costs.
by: 74.43.149.123

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by Danny on 11/17/2009 at 12:09:09 PM
I live not far from where they were originally made in England, and there's a pretty devoted club. I have three of my own and a website about them, but I keep reading about their Rambler export brand. Once a year the club holds a big show with bikes coming from all over Europe, and I think it would be unique in the UK if I could get one of their export ones! Out of interest what do 50's bikes tend to sell for in the states? A good Norman/Phillips/Raleigh here is around $150-$200.
by: 80.239.242.121

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by Danny on 11/17/2009 at 12:15:35 PM
Oh, also are brakes on that age bike the opposite way around to UK ones? We have back brake on left and front brake on right. Curious as rod brake sets here are still fairly easy to buy new if you know where to go, but it could be hard to find parts to restore an export one!
by: 80.239.242.121

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by Warren on 11/17/2009 at 1:15:11 PM
There were many other brands that used the model name Rambler. I've only seen a few Normans and none went by that moniker.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by sam on 11/17/2009 at 8:39:26 PM
Rambler was a very old name used by the G&J company(1880s)Around 1903 it was sold to Pope(columbia bicycle)after that the name was used on a lot of bikes

by: 99.70.104.93

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by Geoff on 11/18/2009 at 2:30:43 PM
Rear brake on left so you can signal with the right hand. Handy if you ride on the left. English bikes sold here in the US retained this configuration until the early 1960s, and rod brake models even later, I believe.
Geoff Rogers
Shutesbury, Massachusetts USA
by: 216.153.152.113

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Rambler? posted by Al on 11/20/2009 at 12:15:47 AM

Thomas B. Jeffrey started out making bicycles in Chicago from 1878 to 1900 under the Rambler name. He went on to build motorcars. But not before patenting one of the first wire-bead clincher bicycle rims.

I've seen a few Rambler bicycles, mostly at Rambler car rallies. The earlier bicycles were quite well made. The frames were brazed by immersing the tubing in molten brass. Imagine filing all that smooth for painting.

David, I will now go sit in my un-cool turquoise 1964 Rambler American 330 sedan and wish I had the bicycle version instead...


by: 71.135.34.0

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Rambler? posted by David on 11/20/2009 at 8:17:17 AM
Now, Al, I said that the Rambler was uncool in the 50s and 60s, when it seemed all my great-aunts drove them. Of course the story is different now!
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by ken on 11/20/2009 at 2:57:11 PM
At least four or five different American manufacturers used the Rambler name before 1910. Columbia built a Rambler into the 1960s, when it was a middleweight. Note to Geoff: I use my left hand to signal left turns, and my right to signal right turns, and brake with the other hand in both cases.
by: 70.105.103.88

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rambler? posted by june on 11/25/2010 at 3:30:16 PM
I have an old Rambler bike of my dads trying to sell but have no idea of the value in the shape its in its rusty but chain turns and tires are if but hold air. REALLY need ADVISE ASAP..Have photos too I can email someone can anyone help me??? It says Canadian cycle motor company weston ontario canada
by: 24.57.180.223




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by: Ben on 11/16/2009 at 8:14:28 AM
What is the message board's opinion of the Flying Pidgeon Chinese bikes? Seems to be the only place I can get Phillips style bars...
by: 99.141.170.99

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by I see worms crawling out of the can... Ken on 11/16/2009 at 8:10:03 PM
Chinese roadsters and sports models are viewed with derision by some forumers here. These bikes are in no way comparable to the English originals, even if they may follow similar patterns. Their quality of materials and build are undoubtedly inferior. Despite that, they get the job done well enough as regular work and commuter bikes - tasks they were designed for anyway. Beware of poor rust resistance and prepare for a less planted ride.

Having said that, there are some vintage Phoenix bikes from the 60s that were very well built, with components that came close to English standards. These are almost impossible to find anymore today. The modern FPs that you get in America/Europe is as shoddy as the stuff we get here in Asia.

You are better off searching for a bike with a Phillips type handlebar than settling for a pigeon. I sold mine (pictured) and am glad I did. The only advantage to it was its lack of value - and that was in itself a good theft deterrent.


by: 164.78.248.57


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by Ben on 11/17/2009 at 6:26:21 AM
I kind of expected such. Given that most, if not all modern versions are woeful, where can I look to find a used barset for my wonderful '57 Phillips roadster? I have emailed Cycles of Yesteryear a number of times, even called a bar down the street from them to see if they were even open, with no response. Now I see on their site that the bars I need (curiously labeled "Raleigh style") are sold out...Sheesh!


Thanks in advance for all attempts to help. I miss riding this wonderful bike.
by: 99.141.170.99

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by JS on 11/17/2009 at 6:35:26 AM
Ben-

For more info on Chinese roadsters than you probably want, just go to my blog.

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org

If you want Phillips type bars you can also buy an Indian roadster or lay down some real money for a Dutch Gazelle.

Ken-

Phoenix bikes from the 60's are not notably different from the other Chinese brands in terms of quality, and they are still manufacture en masse.

One of the most popular brands in China, in fact.

As to the rest...

I have often said that the key difference between Chinese bikes and the western counterparts was the finish. For sure.

Why don't the manufacturers go the extra yard? Not sure, but in the developing word where these bikes are still sold, they are REAL transportation. So getting there is more important than looking good. Having a low price is ALSO more important than looking good. And let's face it, in an Indian monsoon, any real hope of rust resistance is a dream anyway.

I have seen several Dutch Gazelles and Batavus here in Beijing...rusted. It goes with the territory. If you ride your bike as anything other than a plaything, it will get rust.
by: 64.237.34.131

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by Ken on 11/17/2009 at 7:36:35 AM
Hi Jeff

I was told by the senior gent who owns an old bike shop that the first batch of Phoenix bikes exported to this part of Asia had far superior quality than later batches. In fact, I've recently come across a set of early batch Phoenix components - e.g. chainrings and cranks. It was much closer in fit and finish to English parts, certainly better than any modern Chinese parts. Perhaps It was a special series meant to pave the way to future exports? We may never know for sure.

It would be fascinating if you could track down and interview some retired Phoenix executive on your very nice blog... :)
by: 218.186.12.253

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by Ben on 11/17/2009 at 7:38:32 AM
It seems I am not being very clear, please excuse me if that is the case...I am looking for JUST bars that are Phillips style, as shown in the pic below. I unfortunately bent my beautiful original, story to follow if anyone shows interest...


by: 99.141.170.99


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by JS on 11/17/2009 at 8:07:31 AM
Ben-

If all you want are the bars, than I would give a call to Joe Bike in Portland or Flying Pigeon LA. Both shops do a fair business using Flying Pigeons as a basis for custom bikes. As such, they probably have a few sets of discarded Phillips bars lying around which they may be willing to sell to you.

Let us know how it turns out.

Ken-

We may never know indeed but there is a lot of interesting old stuff out there for sure. :-D

-JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 64.237.34.131

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by Ben on 11/17/2009 at 9:02:52 AM
So what IS the story on Cycles of Yesteryear?
by: 99.141.170.99

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by Chris on 11/17/2009 at 7:37:41 PM
I don't know what their problem is but I'd dearly love to go there and run the place and be the driving force that gets their crap together
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Flying Pidgeons posted by kenny on 12/6/2009 at 8:20:10 PM
I have a set of those bars in new old stock... contact me
by: 67.193.97.167




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MISC:   Bavarian Bicycles posted by: Chas on 11/15/2009 at 2:14:14 PM
Like to share a few random photos taken on hols in Germany this week; some roadsters included, sorry if not all on topic. It's such a bike-friendly place; very few are locked even when left at the rail station all day. I even saw a handbag left dangling from the handlebars where the owner had gone into the shops!! They all ride nice and slowly too (not only the oldies).


by: 62.49.24.58


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           RE:MISC:   Bavarian Bicycles posted by Chris on 11/18/2009 at 6:48:53 PM
Thanks Chas
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by: Steve on 11/15/2009 at 11:45:48 AM
Having ventured off down slightly different bicycle avenues in recent times (Roadster related of course), I've come across things like solid tyres, unusual rim sizes, less spokes etc etc.

Now rather than go "all around the houses" in explaining things, I'll get straight to the point/s.

1. Is it possible to remove a solid tyre from a Westwood rim, and then drill a hole in the rim and use for a conventional tube/tyre set up.

2. Is there a chart available (or a formula) stating maximum weight load/ pressure/ stress etc that a front hub/axle can endure before it becomes prone to failure.
I suspect this question is dependent on amount of spokes and size of axle (and quality of rim).

I only ask the above quesion out of desperation in trying to acquire a 16 x 1 3/4 Westwood rim for a "half Roadster" i.e. 1940's tradebike with the smallest frontwheel (and forks) I've ever known on this type of machine.

It's probably 45 years since I touched a solid tyre, so I can't remember anything about them, but I've noticed one or two recently attached to old childrens bikes (that nobody appears to want), that have got me thinking !

Has anyone been down this road before ?

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Keith Body on 11/15/2009 at 1:05:12 PM
Hi Steve, The junevile bikes we sold in the 1950's had sizes like 16, 18, and 20 by 1 3/8 inch. All pneumatic. Very cheap bikes could have had solid tyres. If the rim looks like a westwood then it could have had a pram tyre fitted, we used to make these with a spiral wire through the middle. (Look for the join) The next problem is the tyre size, then the number of spokes. Back in the 1950's we did load a 13 ounce Mavic 36 hole front wheel and it collapsed with a half ton static load. A 16 x 1 3/8 20 spoke would probably take similar, and could be built on a 32 hole hub, but allow off for age and corrosion. Probably be stuck with the 1 3/8 tyre, if you can find it. What sort of loading do you need.
Just saw a friend's pictures of a trip to India, pedal transport is still the main local goods distribution system.
by: 92.22.17.89

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Steve on 11/15/2009 at 2:58:27 PM
Hi Keith,
Thanks for your usual in-depth response, how you remember these things is beyond me !

Anyhow, this is partly Matthews doings as he sent me a message last night that set me thinking even more on this subject.
As I openly admit to be struggling to obtain a 16" x 1 3/4 Westwood rim for a 1940/50s Hopper "cross-frame" tradebike (cycletruck), he happened to mention a 16 x 1.75 Westwood rim available with solid tyre.
I fully understand that a 1.75 rim is slightly different from a 1 3/4 rim BUT...I can live with that and fit the appropriate tyre.
I just wondered if it's easy to remove the solid tyre off the 16 x 1.75 rim, then adapt the rim for conventional tube/tyre use....I can't imagine what a solid 16 x 1.75 solid tyre would be used for....a trolley ?

If the hub/axle, spokes etc are strong enough for tradebike use....great, if not, then erm, I'll have to have a re-think !

I'm not sure how a static load would compare to a moving load as regard stress pressures etc....this is getting awfully technical and I only got a "B" in physics !
Being realistic, the most weight I'll ever have on the front of the bike is a basket full of the relevant emergency tools for next years ride from London to Rome via Tetbury and Boston !

I've currently got a 16 x 1.something Endrick rim on the bike, needless to say the "home made shaped" rod brake blocks run extremely close to the spoke bases hence most of the braking is done on the rear 26 x 1 3/4 rim.

It's interesting that you mention India because I'm pretty sure that the conventional 16" Westwood rim for heavy duty delivery bikes are still in production there.

Just to finish off with, I could easily put a 16 x 1 3/8 rim and tyre on the bike BUT....it looks oh so wrong !

Anyone going to India (or possibly China) soon !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by JS on 11/15/2009 at 7:08:50 PM
Steve-

I live in China and have been to India. If you go to my blog you can see pics of lot's of Indian roadsters and Chinese trade bikes.

however, I have NEVER seen a solid tire.

JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 193.23.43.4

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Matthew on 11/16/2009 at 2:36:01 AM
Hi Folks,

JS; I think Steve was hinting that a chap like you might be able to come across a suitable 16" westwood rim and then an arrangement for shipping etc could be negotiated (excuse me Steve if I got this wrong). We know that Indian companies make 16" westwood rims but getting one to the UK migh involve ordering 300 units!

In addition to Sheldon's most excellent tyre / wheel size charts I have found this;
http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/'pattle/ddgcs/tyres.htm
It is very British and tongue in cheek at points but accurate and inoffensive.

Keith; The load test. Was it static? I wonder what would be the dynamic load of say 28lb load in a trade bike carrier on a rough paved surface? The static load on a lightweight rim just goes to prove the strength of a circle.

Matthew - getting a round tuit.
by: 86.31.149.49

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Steve on 11/16/2009 at 3:30:45 AM
Good morning all, it's wet, windy and sunny here (London), but I've just got in from my morning commute on the winter bike (Raleigh Misty mixte) and am now feeling quite smart with myself as I must have overtaken hundreds of vehicles on their regular bumper to bumper crawl to work.

Anyhow, less of that nonsense, lets get back to the real deal....the wheel !

JS. Thanks for your reply, but have you ever seen a 16 x 1 3/4 or even a 16 x 1.75 rim fitted with a "bog standard" pneumatic tyre on either a Chinese or Indian low gravity tradebike ?
Most low gravity tradebikes here tend to have 20" and occasionly 18" front rims....it just had to fall to "muggins" here to find the only one in the land with a 16" rim.
Would seriously be interested to hear your findings, I must stress that I don't want a solid tyre....single speed heavy bike with solid tyre on a long distance journey would be an unbearable endurance test.

Matthew/Keith, this load test circle stuff reminds me of the dynamic load "egg test" !
Nevertheless, it's an interesting one, I have a trike here with seriously caved in bent steerer/forks....but perfectly round 22 x 1 3/8 front rim !
There's going to be a good looking equation lurking around somewhere out there that answers this question....but I haven't found it yet !
Erm....26" x 32 **gauge spokes x 3/4" rim x **axle x bumpy road surface (laced with the occasional redundant tram line) = xyz Nm

I'll now check-out the above website.

Steve

by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Keiith Body on 11/16/2009 at 12:52:40 PM
Hi Steve, I suppose you can't tell if the 16" rim with the solid tyre takes a known pneumatic. Easy enough to saw through the tyre, if a bit of manipulation didn't work.
Ideally you need a 16" x 1 3/4 rim from India with tyre and tube, if it exists.
It was so easy to bend the forks on the UK general purpose bikes, and people could not understand why the forks went but not the wheel. I used to explain that a wheel was able to take bumps from the road, and bumps from the front. But the frame was not designed to take bumps from the front, usually with an extra stress of the front brake.

If your bent fork job is not kinked, you could try my "quick and dirty" method. You lie down with the front wheel on your chest, and feet against the chainwheel. Grab the front wheel and pull. You need someone watching from above to tell you when to stop. Believe me trade bikes were not always as strong as you might think, but the short fork blades need a bit more pull.
by: 92.21.134.226

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Steve on 11/16/2009 at 2:58:37 PM
Thanks Keith, I've put out one or two feelers concerning the acquisition of a Westwood 16 x 1 3/4 rim from far away lands (or even a 16 x 1.75), a low key BMX type tyre I suppose could then be attached and do the job in hand.
Just for the record, I currently have a 16 x 2 (54 x 305) tyre fitted to the 28 spoke 16" Endrick rim (of unknown parentage or exact rim width).

I'm now curious to get any old solid tyre wheel (probably off an old unwanted childs bike), just to see how they're attached and how they come off....even if it was probably never meant to !

Bent fork/steerer job is also in hand, but that's an interesting method of repair you mention....lying down on the job !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by JS on 11/17/2009 at 6:49:41 AM
Steve-

I will keep my eyes peeled for a 16" Westwood, but I am not hopeful. In mainland China there are no delivery bikes. Instead there are delivery TRIKES. which of course carry a lot more and have a contraction band brake on the rear axle, therefore, not requiring Westwoods at all.
by: 64.237.34.131

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Steve on 11/17/2009 at 9:21:58 AM
Thanks JS
I hadn't realised that China was an all Trike republic, I'd sort of presumed that there were tradebikes mingled in with allsorts of moving devices.
I've since had a 16 x 1.75 Westrick (20 spokes) offered to me, I'm now wondering which way to play this....would have preferred 28 spokes.
Beggars can't be choosers !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by JS on 11/18/2009 at 6:34:48 AM
Steve-

There are work bikes in China, but they are not "Delivery" bikes in the sense that you mean. They are usually double-bar 28" bikes with panniers and odd equipment hanging off, not low gravity bikes You can see examples of this on my blog if you look under the category "Utility Bikes". Still, most of the real lifting is done by trikes.

In Hong Kong they have Butcher bikes like what you are thinking, but they are old Pashley's. It maybe easier for you to just contact them rather than route through the far east. Have you tried that?

-JS

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org
by: 174.37.245.155

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Chris on 11/18/2009 at 6:53:12 PM
16 inch westwood rim, I had one once, but not any more.
Sorry.

It's interesting as you hold the strange bastard stuff that you just brought back and you sit there sorting thru it remember that ALL of it is something that somebody, someplace would dearly love to have because they need it to finish a project, get a beloved bike back on the road, round out a collection, or all of the above.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Solid tyre removal off Westwood rim ! posted by Steve on 11/19/2009 at 1:29:43 PM
That's exactly why I hang on to the weird and wonderful stuff, some of which I'm not 100% sure what it actually is....or what it's for !

One day, I will sift through this stuff and hopefully make someone a very happy person.

Meanwhile, the cross-frame Hopper (with front temporary wheel) is only for show (no load bearing jobs) until I solve this problem.

I wonder if a 20 spoke 16 x 1.75 Westrick would be o.k. if it had super strength spokes ?

Steve - still minus 16 x 1 3/4 Westwood or Westrick rim, will even compromise with a 16 x 1.75 as long as it takes rod brakes !

by: 93.96.36.127




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Eland posted by: Bruce Cammack on 11/14/2009 at 8:36:59 PM
I bought this bike at a garage sale thinking that it was a Raleigh. When I got home I discovered it was an Eland. It looks like my 1972 Rudge, but with a lockable front fork and it had a Shimano 333 10-speed derailleur and controls. I have not been able to find out anything about an Eland branded Raleigh, but after reading about Japanese, etc. knockoffs, I think that is what I have.

This is the first time I have attached a photo to a discussion, and it appears I have to do it one at a time, so please bear with me.

Bruce


by: 75.16.169.89


  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Eland posted by Matthew on 11/15/2009 at 10:44:19 AM
Hi Bruce,

I think you have worked it out for yourself. If you like what you have and if it ride pleasantly then keep it and enjoy it, after all it may be more rare than a Raleigh.

Matthew - always amazed at what we find.
by: 82.20.47.232

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Eland posted by JDuck on 11/16/2009 at 8:59:12 AM
Eland makes one think of South Africa.
by: 66.254.211.56

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Eland posted by Christopher on 11/17/2009 at 7:40:26 PM
How?
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Eland posted by JDuck on 11/18/2009 at 8:02:44 AM
The Eland(Taurotragus oryx)is a type of antelope native to southern africa. Maybe a local company would have used that name.
by: 66.254.211.56

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Eland posted by Chris on 11/18/2009 at 6:55:02 PM
thanks, but I don't think Eland is a brand made in or made for the African market. Do keep investigating and I will also
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by: Jerry on 11/13/2009 at 6:50:08 PM
Recently bought a 1977 Raleigh Sports and want to clean and relube the bottom bracket, but the cotters are scaring me. Can I do this, or should I take it to a bike shop?
by: 72.154.13.17

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by Matthew on 11/14/2009 at 3:45:41 AM
It is a case of attitude, having the right skills and most importantly the right tools. You can do it without a cotter press (I have managed 35 years without). Search on this site for cotter removal or cotter press. It has been thoroughly discussed here.

Matthew - pressing on.
by: 82.27.249.154

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by David on 11/14/2009 at 8:11:44 AM
Bike shops that have been around a while will have a cotter press and you can ask around; perhaps someone in your area has one that you could use or would do the job for you. (I'm in Boston)
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by Chris on 11/14/2009 at 9:33:18 AM
don't get scared of this you can do it. if the bike finds out you are scared of it it'll run all over you!
look up cotter pin removal in the archives
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by JS on 11/15/2009 at 1:26:19 AM
Matthew-

This is not a problem. If you search the web Sheldon Brown gives advice on how to do it with a cinderblock and a hammer. I live in China. Every street corner bike doctor has driven in and driven out cotters with a hammer for probably 100 years. I have never seen a cotterpress here, but if you are concerned about it you can buy them on the web as well.
by: 64.237.34.130

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: cotters posted by Al on 11/15/2009 at 4:17:34 PM

I can't think of many other bike repairs as satisfying as using this cotter press:

http://bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/index.html

Every cotter pin comes out clean and re-usable. Smooth as butter. I nearly look out for cottered cranks to purchase now...

Alright, oiling and adjusting a Sturmey Archer hub is pretty satisfying, too. That click, click that's not too bright, not too dull. Just right.



by: 71.135.34.0

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by Jerry on 11/16/2009 at 9:30:30 AM
Thanks, guys for all the help and advise. Will go ahead with this.
by: 65.80.151.134

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by Danny on 11/17/2009 at 5:17:04 AM
I restore 1950's English 3-speeds, I'm now on my 8th. Cotter pins can be awkward, but the trick I use is... a blow torch. Take care not to overheat, but heat up the crank around the cotter making it expand, give it a sharp knock with a hammer, and hey presto.
by: 195.194.187.132

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by Dale on 11/17/2009 at 11:05:50 AM
I've never used a torch and have always gotten them out. BUT occasionally you end up breaking off the threaded part and replacing the pin.

Do look up the advice (there are important steps you should not skip) and try it yourself. Unless your LBS is experienced with cottered cranks, they are likely to mess up the job.
by: 74.43.149.123

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   cotters posted by Kevin on 11/17/2009 at 4:49:09 PM
I have a Bikesmith cotter press, too. It's worth every penny. I haven't screwed up a cotter since I bought it.
by: 98.226.154.146




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Queen of the Raleighs posted by: Christian Westberg on 11/13/2009 at 9:04:00 AM
I hope that my picture is getting through this time, cause
I want to share with you a picture of my wife's 'new' Queen of the Raleighs, a DL-1 with rod lever and drum brakes from 1967 that I came across at a bicycle auction here in Copenhagen.
The beauty is in almost mint condition.
Best regards
Christian Westberg
Copenhagen
Denmark


by: 83.89.97.221


  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Queen of the Raleighs posted by JDuck on 11/14/2009 at 7:49:04 AM
Great find! I am very jealous. Nothing like that here(Wisconsin)
by: 66.254.211.56

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Queen of the Raleighs posted by Mark on 11/14/2009 at 9:38:27 AM
Fantastic looking - but we need more picture (close ups!) Your wife must be very pleased.
by: 99.224.221.154




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AGE / VALUE:   Murray Cadet Flite posted by: Sean on 11/12/2009 at 10:13:35 PM
I found an old Murray Cadet Flite. Its a small bike I want to know how old it is. It has a 3 piece sprocket and the pedals are pieces also its not in bad shape at all just needs some tlc and paint. Can someone tell me about what its worth? thanks
by: 173.170.223.175

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Murray Cadet Flite posted by Matthew on 11/14/2009 at 11:20:04 AM
Try the balloon tire and middleweight discussion board.

Murray cycles were generally cheap run of the mill nmachines.

Matthew - too good to hurry
by: 86.10.24.75

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