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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Old American Magazines posted by: JDuck on 6/24/2009 at 7:53:00 AM
I was looking through a couple old magazines and came across these items of interest. I hope I get the images through.


by: 66.254.211.56


  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Old American Magazines posted by Keith Body on 6/24/2009 at 11:06:35 AM
Hi Jeff, Without your password I see 1 image. The Cyclo gear was made from 1932 to 1950 (from memory), I have one unused.
by: 92.20.123.205

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Old American Magazines posted by JDuck on 6/25/2009 at 6:59:01 AM
OK, try it this way. http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=726225012/a=164439177_100445001/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/COBRAND_NAME=snapfish/
by: 66.254.211.56




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by: Steve on 6/23/2009 at 3:06:46 AM
Strictly speaking not a Roadster...but it may as well have been.

We had some mutterings a few messages back re longest delivery in a day on a tradebike/cycle truck, I really haven't got a clue what it is, but would just like to mention that my model "U" Gundle delivered me in fine traditional style the 56 scenic (back route) miles from London to Brighton on Sunday June 21st, 2009.

I'm not really that interested in mileages etc, but was merely trying to raise the profile of the lesser spotted (and talked about) single speed Tradesmans delivery bike.
I was questioned endlessly throughout the day and had to shake hands with many admirers (of the bike, not me).

I won't bore you all to death with anecdotes received throughout the day, needless to say there were hundreds.

My wife accompanied me throughout on her 1962 Raleigh ladies three speed, she left me standing on the hills and level, but kept well clear of me on the downhills !

Great fun and highly recommended, but make sure you've got a good quality comfortable seat !

Steve - I got sunburnt (in England) !


by: 93.96.36.127


  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Kevin on 6/23/2009 at 4:08:49 AM
Congratulations, Steve. What an awesome story. I rode my 1939 Schwinn Cycle-Truck in our Christmas parade a few years ago. It is massive, with balloon tires and a very large, heavy steel basket that wraps around the head tube. Anyway, my bike seemed to attract more attention than the fire engines, Chevy Corvettes, Model T Fords and baton twirlers. People love clunky old delivery bikes. I rode maybe a mile, total. To do 56 miles is amazing.
by: 24.13.125.25

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Kevin on 6/23/2009 at 4:09:12 AM
Congratulations, Steve. What an awesome story. I rode my 1939 Schwinn Cycle-Truck in our Christmas parade a few years ago. It is massive, with balloon tires and a very large, heavy steel basket that wraps around the head tube. Anyway, my bike seemed to attract more attention than the fire engines, Chevy Corvettes, Model T Fords and baton twirlers. People love clunky old delivery bikes. I rode maybe a mile, total. To do 56 miles is amazing.
by: 24.13.125.25

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Steve on 6/24/2009 at 3:30:01 AM
Thanks Kevin,

I'm now working on next years Tradebike....a Phillips.

I'm on the look out for a 12/13 inch extender rod i.e. from handlebar rod linkage down to the bell crown (well it's actually a side linkage aka Hercules, Phillips etc as opposed to the more common centrally positioned down rod as seen on Raleighs) at the bottom of the headstock (in order to activate the rear brake from the downtube onwards).
Most rod brake bikes with 26" wheels have an extender rod that is approximately 5 to 6 inches in length.
The 20" front wheel dictates that a longer rod is required.

No doubt I could "bodge" something together, but I'd rather get the genuine article.

Steve

by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Steve on 6/24/2009 at 5:27:43 AM
Just to add to the above statement, I have an extender rod here that is as small as 3 inches !

Maybe I should have said....26" wheeled rod brake bikes tend to have extender rods ranging from 3 to 6 inches.

Whatever, I'm looking out for a 12 inch job (for a 20 inch front wheeled/26 inch rear wheeled low gravity tradebike).

Steve - hope that made sense !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Matthew on 6/24/2009 at 9:46:28 AM
Steve is now officially one of the world's long distance Trade cyclists. He has joined the honourable ranks of the Guild of Long distance trade cyclists.

He will be feted the length and breath of his street.

Matthew - honourably impressed.
by: 82.14.73.61

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Steve on 6/24/2009 at 1:39:31 PM
It's funny really....some days I whinge about having to walk down to the shop to get a loaf of bread !

Put an interesting bike in front of me, and I'll ride miles to get absolutely nothing !

Steve - sun (or wind) burnt knees !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Chris on 6/24/2009 at 3:21:10 PM
Neat! Do it again and pass out cards asking for people to call you when they want to sell their old bicycles.


by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Steve on 6/25/2009 at 12:43:23 AM
Nice one Chris, I hadn't thought of that, although I do have a similar idea for the next signboard.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Keith Body on 6/25/2009 at 12:32:34 PM
Great stuff Steve, some ride. Your brake rod, should it have a longer tube? The brake tubes were threaded either end, can't remember the size, but in the region of 5/16", with 26TPI, if you could get a bit of mild tube, you could make one.

by: 92.21.143.114

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Steve on 6/25/2009 at 2:56:34 PM
Hi Keith, are we talking about the same part ?

I'm referring to the usually chrome (if you're lucky) extender rod that sort of runs parallel with the front brake extender rod, you know what I mean...the one that attaches on to the bell at the bottom of the headtube.

I'm useless with parts description, I can't even remember my own name some days !

You'll have to excuse me, I'm in a state of euphoria here....I've just removed an ancient 3/16" freewheel off an ancient 26 x 1 3/4 wheel in one piece without (a)damaging the hub and (b) damaging myself.
My freewheel removal tool is about as much use as an ash tray on a motorbike !

I now have a choice of four replacement 3/16" freewheels here (Cross, Wiley, Sturmey & Unity), one of which does not have the usual two slots with which to gain purchase in order to remove it (should you ever want to).
Which raises the question....how the hell are you supposed to get it off after it's been on for a while and torqued itself up ?

Steve - two steps forward, one step backward.
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Kevin on 6/26/2009 at 8:13:15 AM
One question, Steve: Does the pipe insulation on the basket frame keep the basket from bouncing or shifting, or is it there for some other reason?
by: 72.12.200.38

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Steve on 6/26/2009 at 9:44:58 AM
Well, it's a bit of both really, it does make the basket nice and snug, but it also protects the outer frame from getting scratched against walls....I'm a bit fussy like that !
Funny thing is (I always seem to be saying that), I found it in the street being blown around by the wind and it was only a matter of time before it got run over and wrecked by traffic....so I rescued it, cut it in half and used it on the bike.

If I was at a Steam Fayre or Country Show etc, I would probably remove it.

One thing I did do before setting off on the long ride was, seriously padded my tool box (inside and out), the thought of it rattling all the way would have driven me mad (madder).

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Keith Body on 6/28/2009 at 12:46:45 PM
Steve, brake rods: the rod goes from the handlebar through the adjusting eye bolt and into a tube. I thought you wanted a longer tube. These were normally threaded both ends, but screwed into the top and bottom machined parts before paint or chroming. If this is what you need, the only problem is finding the threading die.

We used to remove freewheels by either dropping them apart, left hand thread end plate, or using a small round punch in the opposite direction. Either method can damage the freewheel, not a problem in the 1950's. Hold the punch in a mole grip, and use about an 8 ounce hammer, not too hard, but very rapid (you are hitting the end plate). Vocal expressions are said to help. If you have a coach trip to Tetbury I could demonstrate. (not the vocals)

by: 92.19.223.140

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Gundle Tradebike in 56 mile delivery drama ! posted by Steve on 6/28/2009 at 2:13:55 PM
Keith, this may sound really dim, but for some reason I'd presumed that both ends (of the 12" chrome plated extender rod) had been brazed on....I hadn't realised that they were screwed on before chroming.

The two 12" extenders I do have (on other bikes) are both luckily in good condition and you can't really tell how the ends were attached, the third extender that I require (for the Phillips) is looking as though it's going to be a home made job....I don't particularly want yet another doner bike (if you can get one at a sensible price) around the place, just for the sake of a rod.

I will have a look at one of my spare "rough" standard size extender rods to see if I can get the ends to unscrew....sounds like a heat treatment job to me.

As regards the freewheel, I did resort to the punch method, it makes me cringe to deform (only slightly) the endplate....but needs must, it was so bad, it sounded like "a bag of nails" coming down the street !
As you say "not a problem in the 50's", these things were growing on trees, nowadays one has to be a little more conservative (especially with the 3/16" stuff) !

Coach trip to Tetbury, I could ride it....piece of cake !

Steve - I'll set-off after I've finished me cup o' tea !

by: 93.96.36.127




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by: keith on 6/22/2009 at 11:18:08 PM
Hey there all,

I'm thrilled to have found this great forum -- I have been soaking up archives all day!

I have looked here and elsewhere - Sheldon Brown's wonderful site, as well as the videos on ehow created by (I believe) the owner of this site - for info on a pair of bikes I recently purchased. They are a pair of his and hers Sunbeam bicycles.

They are both the same color and have a decal from the same bike shop in Colorado so I assume they were purchased as a set. The date on the S-A hubs is 71. I have read that Sunbeam was purchased by Raleigh in the early sixties - so if this is the original hubs they must have been manufactured by Raleigh? This is confirmed by the Raleigh logo on the bracket which attaches to the handlebars. What is confusing though, is that neither of the nuts attaching the front wheel are cone-type as the Sheldon Brown site indicates they should be. Is there a place that lists either Sunbeam serial numbers, or Raleigh numbers including those made under other names? The serial number is imprinted on the lug beneath the seat - is that consisent with the 1971 date? Also the tires on the bikes (which could be original as it was garaged for some time) are labeled "BATES DUNLOP LIGHTWEIGHT" but I read somewhere that Dunlop ceased makng tires for Raleigh in the sixties - weird?

Additionally, I read somewhere that Brooks only made leather saddles, and not the vinyl mattress type, yet one of these bikes has a Brooks label on the back of the saddle -- is this also inaccurate information?

In the videos on the ehow site, Vin? mentioned that for a brief period in the 70s, the lugs were glued instead of brazed. I have noticed that on one of these bikes (the ladies model) the edges of the lugs have a whiting material coming out, whereas the mans bike does not -- is this an indication of a glued frame, or would it have already failed if it were glued?

My last question (and most practically important) regards tube valves. The tubes on these bikes appear to be Schraders, but they differ in that the entire valve is threaded, and they are secured to the rim with a small nut. I purchased a replacement tube, but this valve stem does not want to fit into the rim. I have read that some of the 3-speeds used a distinct Dunlop valve, but this does not appear to be the case -- they take a schrader pump fitting fine -- and yet, why cant I fit the tube in?

I apologize for inundating you with so many questions. I have only recently been bitten by the 3-speed bug, and the fact that I have so many questions so soon may be a bad sign (at least for my family). In anycase, if you guys could help me answer some of these questions, or just as good, point me to more great resources such as this, I would be immensely appreciative.

Keith

Also,

by: 76.115.224.232

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Steve on 6/23/2009 at 1:24:39 AM
Hello and welcome Keith,

You've entered a fascinating world of many many many questions, most (if not all) people here will sympathise with your questions and know which angle you're coming from.

This site has taught me a great deal (and re-kindled my interest in traditional bicycles) in such a short notice of time.

I myself have a basic and oldish Sunbeam (amongst many other types), and I can't even find the serial number (well not until I strip it down completely).

As regards tube valve not fitting the rim, well sometimes I have been known to cheat a little by gently enlarging the hole ever so slightly with a shall semi-circular file, some purists might hate me for that....oh well, such is life !
Most of my tubes are on Woods valves, but recently I have been forced to use other types (especially on the Tradebikes/Cycle Trucks).

I'll leave the others (who have far more knowledge than me) to answer some of your questions.

Steve - welcome
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by David on 6/23/2009 at 11:25:15 AM
A rubber rim strip and one of the newer rubber valve stems can often make it difficult to get the valve stem thru the rim. You might try lubricating with some soapy water.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Warren on 6/23/2009 at 12:06:08 PM
Hi Keith, I think the lip for the front hub should be on the cone, not the nut, which was a much earlier design.It's possible that the lip is not present as well. The Dunlop tires could easily have been new old stock in '71.

Trust the SA hub dates to give you the approximate bike date...late 71-72? Raleigh serial numbers are difficult to decipher in later years.

Brooks sold millions of vinyl mattress saddles. Sometimes they are even comfortable, for awhile anyway.

I think glue only applied to composite bikes. I've never heard of a steel Raleigh fork ever coming unglued.

As David suggests, a little lube should help you wriggle the tube valve into place.

Enjoy your bikes!
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by keith on 6/23/2009 at 8:51:06 PM
Thanks for the advice David, I used a bit of dish detergent on the stem on it slid in like a champ. Also thanks to Warren and Steve for helping me out with some of my other questions and welcoming me to the group. I got the tube on, so now I am slowly going through the bikes, tightening and loosening things, mostly just for kicks. Internet searches did not reveal many details on Raleigh made Sunbeams though, were the different brands under Raleigh's banner built sort of like separate models? Or were they all distinct? I am assuming the Sunbeam was near the lower end based on the features it lacks (leather seat, dynohub, etc), but I love them anyway!

Thanks again,

Keith


by: 76.115.224.232


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Steve on 6/24/2009 at 1:15:12 AM
The original Sunbeam (Marston, Wolverhampton) bicycles were at the top end of the market and are now very sought after machines.

I've not seen a 70's Raleigh produced model close-up, but I suspect it would be nothing at all like the original.

If you Google Sunbeam bikes/bicycles, you should find quite a wealth of information.

Sunbeam also produced cars and believe it or not....trolleybuses, some of which are preserved in the U.K.

A very famous name, and like so many others, has a strong following in it's homeland as well as further afield.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/24/2009 at 2:32:13 AM
Absolutely. "Sunbeam" to us anglo-velo-philes, is high church, eh?

Did not Don Adams, in the original role of "Maxwell Smart" not drive a blistering red Sunbeam Tigre?

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Amen!
by: 4.154.217.136

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Matthew on 6/24/2009 at 9:52:56 AM
Hi Keith,

Brooks made allsorts of saddles including vinyl topped mattress type saddles.

You have assumed the Dunlop tyres are original, which may not be the case. However the original owners may have selected Dunlop as tyres of choice.

Welcome on board.

Matthew - beaming in a sunny manner
by: 82.14.73.61

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Keith Body on 6/24/2009 at 11:29:15 AM
I sold Sumbeam cycles in the mid 1950's, the name was owned by BSA, and they did make a line of sunbeams which retained some features of the Marston models. As is well documented, the rapid collapse of UK cycle manufacturing (1956-1960) meant that Tube Investments owned most of the previously well known brands. Utility (ride-to-work) bikes were almost forgotten, replaced by mopeds such as NSU Quickly, and motor scooters (Vespa/Lambretta) etc. This left what I called the "Junivile" bikes, and under 16 year olds.

The Sunbeam Alpine and Tiger V8 were Rootes Group, owned by Chrysler, who could not believe the ancient machines used by Rootes when they bought it.
By the 1970's Raleigh (Sunbeam via BSA) were part of Tube Investments, who had made Phillips some years previously, and collected probably 100 different names. I don't recall ever seeing these in the UK. There were many bikes made for export only, including the 28" wheel Raleighs so favoured here. Their outdated 1925 design was unsaleable in the UK.
I had a 1931 Sunbeam 3 litre car in 1971.
by: 92.20.123.205

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dunlop ceased bicycle tire production posted by Chris on 6/24/2009 at 12:54:47 PM
Dunlop was sick and tired of Raleigh bashing them in the head every time a negiotating seminar meeting took place over the prices Raleigh wanted to pay Dunlop.
Finally Dunlop told them where to go. Dunlop would quit producing bicycle tires altogether. Raleigh didn't believe it but Dunlop actually did as they said they would, they stopped.
Today original Dunlops tires in good condition are prized by collectors.

People had to scramble and it was a real inconvience until foreign makers took up the task to fill the void Dunlop left.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Chris on 6/24/2009 at 3:19:13 PM
Keith, please e- mail me. clarencekokkkinis@aim.com
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Chris on 6/24/2009 at 3:22:33 PM
that is: clarencekokkinis@aim.com it's cold here and it's affecting my typing.
thanks!
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by ken on 6/25/2009 at 2:57:49 PM
keith body: congrats on JuniVile!
keith: I add my welcome.
by: 209.7.150.163

           RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dating / Re-tire-ing a Sunbeam posted by Chris on 6/25/2009 at 6:45:37 PM
Thanks for the e- mail, Keith.
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by: Ata on 6/19/2009 at 8:24:40 PM
Hi there! I have an Armstrong bicycle that I am interested in finding out more information on. How do I find out what year it is?
by: 98.167.175.40

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/20/2009 at 3:40:00 AM
Not a lot of information provided... so I'll start with the old standby.... if it's a three-speed machine with a Sturmey-Archer hub, clean any and all grease off the hub an look for a date code. Usually two numbers representing month and year of manufacture such as 10 68 (Oct 1968) or 5 71 (May 1971).

If not a three speed machine.... then I suggest you find the serial number on the frame and check the cross references on this website.

Pictures would be helpful for us to peruse as well. I have a 1963 Armstrong mens 3-speed "Sports" machine that's pretty nice.

Welcome to the fray... careful... them Britbikes are known to have bugs that "Bite", eh?

;-)

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
Dingmans Ferry, PA
by: 4.154.222.216

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Ata on 6/20/2009 at 11:37:52 AM
Yes, I love my britbike! I bought it off of Craigslist about 3 years ago, just to get a bike to ride and it was cheap. It definately needs work, but it is useable. There is an issue with bike. It is a 3 speed. When I change to the middle speed it feels the chain stops working. However it works on the first and third.

Oh, here is a picture.


by: 98.167.175.40


           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/21/2009 at 4:36:01 AM
Nice looking machine... I'm guessing 1970's vintage. The date on the hub will confirm actually. As to shifting issues, sounds like possibly simple lubrication and adjustment required. Lots of excellent info and how-to stuff (including spotting hub date codes) here:

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english-3.html

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - No, it has nothing to do with Lance!
by: 4.154.220.25

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Warren on 6/21/2009 at 5:44:30 AM
The lack of pedal reflectors makes me think 60's. Looks like a Raleigh to boot.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Ata on 6/21/2009 at 8:08:04 AM
According to the code on the hub, it is March 1962. It has an emblem on the front that says Armstrong.

Its been sitting in the garage for awhile but I recently bought one of those bike trailers for my 21 month old. Yesterday I hooked it up and off we went!
by: 98.167.175.40

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Keith Body on 6/21/2009 at 11:18:43 AM
1962 looks about right. Armstrong were part of TI/Phillips before they took Raleigh. So probably a Phillips frame.
Armstrong used to supply me in the late 1950's (as part of TI) with some fine lightweight hand built silver brazed frames with high specifications for a very reasonable price.
Have you tried a few drops of light oil in the AW? Also check the adjustment, (details on here) there is a point between high and medium gears where there is no drive. You might not be getting the low gear. In the high gear the cable will feel a little slack.
by: 92.19.51.18

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/22/2009 at 2:21:38 AM
Hmmmm... I wasn't quite sure about the pedal reflectors... what threw me was the lack of "ARMSTRONG" being emblazoned in the chainwheel. Perhaps it had been replaced at some time.

My 62 is most assuredly pre-Raleigh so perhaps that was a pivotal year for Armstrong. Either way, a nice machine. I wish that my chrome mudguards were that well preserved. Actually... it is my experience in most cases that the Ladies' machines seem to stand up to father time better than the Mens'

A trailer, eh? Sounds like a most interesting combination!

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - The eyes... didn't quite have it.
by: 4.154.223.209

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Warren on 6/22/2009 at 3:39:22 AM
If that bike is pre-Raleigh, why are the rear mudguard stays behind the axle? I thought Phillips bikes had the "over" braze-ons. The front fork crown looks old style. Maybe this was a transitional bike?
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Ata on 6/22/2009 at 12:24:29 PM
Wow, thanks for all of the info! The bike is in good condition for its age for sure. My plan is to cosmetically fix it up, maybe paint it. Does anyone know what colors this bike would have come in?

Also, here is a picture of numbers I found on the frame. What do they mean?


by: 98.167.175.40


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Keith Body on 6/22/2009 at 1:02:54 PM
Manufacturers often put numbers on a fork end, smaller makers under the bottom bracket, but always before painting.
Is it possibly a University identity?
by: 92.1.132.139

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Steve on 6/22/2009 at 3:26:07 PM
Makes you wonder how many people are still out there (alive), that you used to have the job of manual frame number stamping.
My dad (aged 127) talks about his Rudge 14 tooth fixed wheel and BSA Golden Flash as though it was just yesterday, it's a pity no one knows an ex-stamper !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/22/2009 at 6:24:41 PM
Aged 127?!?!?!?!?!?!??!?! WOW.

God bless him!

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Suddenly... not feeling as old as I did earlier....
by: 4.154.218.10

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by mark h on 6/23/2009 at 12:53:15 AM
127? did you make a typo?i thought the oldest human ever was 123..im amazed.holy cow.
by: 66.183.159.180

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Steve on 6/23/2009 at 5:47:59 AM
No I didn't make a typo, but I have been known to exaggerate ever so slightly.

My father (with very dodgy knees) keeps surprising me, he hasn't spoken about bikes for donkeys years....then dazzles me every now and again with some little gems of information.

I was almost tempted to buy him a Rudge Roadster the other week so that he can sit there and admire it, but I was frightened that he might attempt to get on and ride away....at the ripe old age of 142 !

Steve - "you cannot be serious" !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Keith Body on 6/23/2009 at 11:35:24 AM
Warren is correct about the rear fork ends, definite Raleigh pattern. So the frame should have 26 TPI, it does look like a raleigh head set. When I was able to zoom it (can't from Linux) and I sharpened the white stick then it was obvious.

by: 92.22.95.205

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Ata on 6/24/2009 at 6:57:19 AM
So my bike is a Raleigh frame, but also an Armstrong?
by: 98.167.175.40

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Jgodsey on 6/24/2009 at 8:51:40 AM
Yes your bike is a Raleigh and an Armstrong. I refer to My 69 as a "Raleigh Armstrong". If it came out of the Nottingham factory, its a Raleigh regardless of the model.

CAAll the Armstrong and Phillips frames I have seen of similar vintage are nearly identical. But I found my Phillips Master Model frame looks like my Armstrong but is slightly lighter in weight.

I am more concerned with the lack of chain guard. You may want to look into slapping one on. Perhaps a generic metal one to match the fenders. Can't imagine why you would paint her, she looks dandy to me.


by: 75.68.231.176


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Ata on 6/26/2009 at 4:20:50 PM
Just wanted to show a picture of my bike hooked up to the baby trailer. My baby loved it!


by: 98.167.175.40


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by Suz on 6/27/2009 at 5:59:14 PM
I'm looking to buy a 3-speed ladies frame Armstrong bike off Craigs List. I already gave it a test drive and all seems to be well. The seller is asking $125 for it and I'm trying to find out if that reasonable. Unfortunately, I don't have much info on the bike. I really like the way it looks. You can see it at http://santabarbara.craigslist.org/bik/1242863540.html . Should I purchase at this price?
by: 68.106.187.114

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Info on Armstrong bicycle posted by jj on 6/28/2009 at 4:46:51 AM
Looks good to me! I'd go for it.
by: 71.184.108.192




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I want to commute 25 miles a day on one of these things posted by: Stephen on 6/19/2009 at 3:11:44 PM
I have a fairly flat, 25 mile/day commute. 1 day per week it is a 50 mile commute. I ride a 2003 retro-cruiser Bianchi Milano with the nexus 8 internal hub. I roll about 15MPH on the thing and total out around 5,000 miles/year. The Milano is nearly trouble and maintenance free.

Am I wasting my time considering commuting on a true classic?
What machine should I be looking for?
Oh yeah, I have a 1963 Austin Healey 3000, so I'm used to using spanners and I even have whitworth sockets and open end wrenches!
Thanks! Stephen in Denver
by: 66.224.240.102

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I want to commute 25 miles a day on one of these things posted by Matthew on 6/20/2009 at 2:30:49 AM
Hi Stephen,

A British roadster will give you thousands of miles of trouble free riding. If you enjoy the Milano then stick with it and get a roadster to enjoy as well.

Matthew - enjoy the experience.
by: 86.26.86.169

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I want to commute 25 miles a day on one of these things posted by mark h on 6/20/2009 at 4:09:08 AM
i think that getting a classic will be great thing.i have 6 from the early 1900s to 1969.they all are very different but i can ride what my mood dictates.some are faster some are slower some more comfortable.plus if your main ride breaks,get out the classic.there are quite a few raleighs around for good prices still.i just saw a superbe in my town for 125.00.and looked very good.
by: 66.183.159.180

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I want to commute 25 miles a day on one of these things posted by Dale on 6/23/2009 at 11:28:12 AM
Do it if you want to! It will certainly debunk the need-expensive-new-bike myth to some. And yes, they are quite reliable and durable machines.

My son is considering riding a seven-day supported ride on the Raleigh Superbe that I gave him. (new enough to have 26" wheels and caliper brakes, old enough to have dual-end brake cables.) Said ride is largely flat to rolling, and the bike is a 3X2 (Cyclo 21/24 dual sprocket with derailleur on the hub). He regularly takes it for 40-mile rides.
by: 74.43.149.123

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I want to commute 25 miles a day on one of these things posted by Lawrence P Bradley on 6/23/2009 at 4:15:11 PM
I love my Milano. I have a 1952 Raleigh Sports that is fun to ride to the shops but I'm not sure I'd commute on it. I'd love to see a pic of your "Big Healey" one of my favourite sports cars!
by: 24.16.249.101




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 wheel conversion posted by: greg on 6/19/2009 at 12:51:53 PM
I recently bought an English Robin Hood bike that has been converted to an adult tricycle. The rear wheels have Sturmey Archer SC hubs and 26x13/8 tires. The rear rims match the original front wheel exact. Does anyone know or have any information about this conversion unit? Thanks.


by: 65.26.232.228


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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 wheel conversion posted by Warren on 6/19/2009 at 1:20:05 PM
fwiw, it looks like a high quality unit.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 wheel conversion posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/20/2009 at 3:45:48 AM
Wow... can't say as I've ever seen anything quite like that before. It appears to be an one-off fabrication. Looks to be stainless steel.... A rather expensive undertaking at today's materials prices.

Thanks for sharing it with us!

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - It's not "Stainless"... It's "Corrosion Resistant"...
by: 4.154.222.216

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 wheel conversion posted by Matthew on 6/21/2009 at 1:58:27 AM
Wow, Wow!

As Larry got the first Wow in.
I was expecting a Hetchins conversion or similar but this is almost certainly unique. Great finds, enjoy it.

Matthew - tri tri tri again.
by: 86.10.4.24




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WANTED:   28" Rims posted by: Cory on 6/18/2009 at 9:48:49 AM
I bought an old English 3 speed cruiser but the front rim is almost bent in half and the back rim is so corroded that im not sure if its worth saving.. I like the bike a lot so Im trying to find a set of decent condition 29" rims. Can anyone help me out?
by: 75.42.113.21

  Replies:
           RE:WANTED:   28 posted by Matthew on 6/18/2009 at 2:37:38 PM
Hi Cory,

That would be 28" rims you need as per the title of your message and not 29" as per text?

Matthew - easily misled.
by: 86.31.34.174

           RE:RE:WANTED:   28 posted by Chris on 6/18/2009 at 3:06:28 PM
Be patient, you can find 28 inch rims with a bit of looking

they were used on the Raleigh, Phillips, B.S.A. and other models and makes of bikes. Dunlop, Raleigh sand others made the rims. How about a picture of the bike?
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:WANTED:   28 posted by Ed on 6/18/2009 at 3:14:47 PM
If you are using rod brakes the choices are only original rims. Try Yellowjersey.org Ed
by: 72.228.180.106

           RE:RE:WANTED:   28 posted by Chris on 6/18/2009 at 4:49:54 PM
there are enough of these bikes about you can find original rims/ wheels take yout time the bike is well worth it
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   S A 3 speed trigger shifters posted by: Ed on 6/16/2009 at 6:44:04 PM
I did not know after all these years of bicycle repair that SA made a change in cable diameter. I'm not exact on what year this happened. The old all metal shifters won't work with a newer cable because the slot is just a tad too narrow. I thought I had maybe an after market but I found a 1956 cable and that is thinner than late 60s & 70s. I often make my own cables but i now must find a stock of thin cable. Ed
by: 72.228.180.106

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   S A 3 speed trigger shifters posted by Chris on 6/18/2009 at 9:23:45 AM
You get brass tubing at the model train hobby shops and slip the cable through the tube and you crimp the tube this is the way cables were made originally . You now have cable in any length, the end where it goes in the
hub is you use the universal slip piece that you save from other cable packages. Or you can measure the length and use the brass tube on the barrel adjuster at the end where it goes into the hub it is time for a you tube video on cable making.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   S A 3 speed trigger shifters posted by Ed on 6/18/2009 at 3:09:23 PM
Well, I have no problem with making the end fittings but the wire is too wide. The old shifters from the 50s are narrow in the slot where the cable rides on the trigger. I should make a video! Ed
by: 72.228.180.106

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   S A 3 speed trigger shifters posted by Chris on 6/18/2009 at 6:15:19 PM
derauiler cables are the same the older cables available at the bike shop will do
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Bike pulls to the right part 3 posted by: Dave Fish on 6/14/2009 at 8:05:21 PM
I pulled the fork off the bike and put it in my wood vise. I attached two bolts to the dropouts to check alignment and of course, we had problems. I then constructed a simple lever out of wood scraps and Kreg screws, and pulled it back into alignment. It may be slightly off center alignment, I'm going to check that too. I haven't had a chance to try it out yet, but hope to possibly tomorrow night. I just wanted to share the outcome of my previous posts, I hope that's okay.


by: 67.233.233.85


  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Bike pulls to the right part 3 posted by Dave Fish on 6/14/2009 at 8:12:52 PM
The bolts sure aren't matching up:


by: 67.233.233.85


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Bike pulls to the right part 3 posted by Dave Fish on 6/14/2009 at 8:13:43 PM
The lever:


by: 67.233.233.85


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Bike pulls to the right part 3 posted by Dave Fish on 6/14/2009 at 8:14:25 PM
Looking much better:


by: 67.233.233.85


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Bike pulls to the right part 3 posted by Kevin on 6/15/2009 at 6:24:25 AM
It looks like you're where you want to be. Nice job.
by: 72.12.200.38

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Bike pulls to the right part 3 posted by mark h on 6/15/2009 at 12:19:16 PM
excellent work!!great pics also.im thinking that most production forks would not line up that good...
by: 66.183.159.180

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Bike pulls to the right part 3 posted by Keith Body on 6/17/2009 at 2:02:28 PM
Nice work Dave, if you have a good eye, you can get the forks near enough, certainly a lot better, without exact measurement. If the fork offset (rake) is less then before, probably up to 1/2 inch would not be too bad, as long as the brakes reach.
by: 92.18.189.177




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   amazing OG 1936 Hercules LOOP frame for sale posted by: noel on 6/13/2009 at 4:06:25 PM
Anyone interested in an amazing condition all original and complete 1936 Hercules Loop frame roadster 3 speed, this ones up for sale. Best offer takes it. Located in Chicago. Thanks!


by: 76.16.40.20


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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   amazing OG 1936 Hercules LOOP frame for sale posted by noel on 6/13/2009 at 4:32:34 PM
heres the correct picture post for the HERCULES. sorry!

http://docs.google.com/View?id=dhkbz52g_62fqrpv6ht


by: 76.16.40.20


           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   amazing OG 1936 Hercules LOOP frame for sale posted by Chris on 6/15/2009 at 5:55:19 PM
Beautiful bike!!
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Larz Anderson Bicycle Swap Meet & Show 2009 posted by: Peter Naiman on 6/13/2009 at 3:53:54 PM
It's official. The 2009 Larz Anderson Bicycle Show & Swap Meet is scheduled for Sunday, August 9th at the Larz Anderson Museum of Transportation @ 15 Newton Street., Brookline, MA. As of last year the Museum of Transportation has agreed to let us open a full swap meet as well as a concourse for the show bikes, so we look forward to having a fun event this year.

Sign up time for the swap meet will begin at 8:00AM, and the bicycle concourse sign up time at 9:00AM. Show time will be from 10:00AM-2:00PM. As in the past this is an all encompassing event with cycles ranging from early antique period, early to modern lightweight, balloon tire and more. If it's anu intersting cycle no matter what period, you're invited to bring it along to show.

The swap meet spaces are the same as always, $25.00 for a 10X10 foot space, with an extra charge of $10 for table rental if you need one. Each space includes two passes to the show. There will be no charge to enter the bicycle concourse other than the entry charge to attend the show.

We are dedicating this years show to two very special people who past away within recent times, Sheldon Brown & Jack Kroll. Most CR member know of Sheldon Brown, Jack Kroll was a very good friend of the Larz Anderson Show. He was the sole proprietor and restorer of the Columbia Bicycle Museum in Westfield, MA. We usually give out best of show trophies as a Chairmans Award. From this year forward two Chairmans awards will be given out in memory of both Sheldon Brown & Jack Kroll.

For the swap meet we encourage Pre-Registration. Dale Brown of the CR List will be updating the website that he created for our show with an up to date registration sheet within a few days. We will publish the websites URL within a few days. A special thank you to Dale Brown for all of his help !!

We are looking for a few volunteers to help out with show registration, and also to do a few interesting lectures. If interested please contact me by email @ hetchinspete1@yahoo.com.

Thank you,
Peter Naiman
Glendale, WI USA


by: 69.210.41.136

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WANTED:   26 x 1 5/8 tires posted by: Scott on 6/13/2009 at 8:17:27 AM
I am looking for information on replacing 26 x 1 5/8 tires off an old royce union. The bike was a gift and i do not know the year. When i got it everything was original including the tires which were extreemly dry rotted. the only markings on the rims are the size and every bike shop ive tried has no tires that will fit them. The bead seat is either too big or too small. I have been searching online for this tire size and have found no reference to the 1 5/8. Does anyone know if there are compatable tires that i can use and if so where i can find them. if it helps i measured the old tire and the bead seat is 22 1/8 and the lip it must streach over is 22 7/8. any information would be greatly appreciated because it is my wifes favorite bike thanks Scott
by: 74.44.87.192

  Replies:
           RE:WANTED:   26 x 1 5/8 tires posted by David on 6/14/2009 at 6:42:33 AM
Your measurement of the bead seat diameter is 2mm from the BSD of mountain bike tires (26" x decimal sizes). Have you tried these? Look at Sheldon's article on tire sizing: http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:WANTED:   26 x 1 5/8 tires posted by Matthew on 6/14/2009 at 10:57:22 AM
Hi Scott,

Do you mean 26 X 1 3/8" ? This would be the norm. I haven't come across 26 X 1 5/8" tyres before.

No matter the important thing is to realise that rims size is paramount in this situation and don't expect MTB tyres to fit at all. The 26" refers to the rolling diamter of the tyre and has nothing to do with the rim size which is possibly an E.A.3 rim.

Go to http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html and if it isn't there then the likelihood of ever finding help is slight in deed.

Matthew - in a spin
by: 86.26.61.54

           RE:WANTED:   26 x 1 5/8 tires posted by Bicycle Mark (Mr. X) on 6/16/2009 at 3:47:07 PM
The only 1-5/8 I ever saw was a 26 x 1-1/2 x 1-5/8, also known as 650B (584 mm). Schwalbe makes very good ones, most bike shops have a Kenda in this size (made in China, not very good)
by: 68.226.98.232

           RE:WANTED:   26 x 1 5/8 tires posted by Bob on 8/22/2009 at 3:37:48 PM
I have the same issue. I have a old pair of his and her Raleigh bikes that have the original 26 x 1 5/8 tire on them. I need to replace one blown tire. The rim size is different then either the road or mountain bike rims. Both are too large for the rim. Any help would be appreciated.
by: 156.34.206.123




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AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by: Bruce Ketchum on 6/13/2009 at 4:40:56 AM
I have recently completed a tune up from the ground up on my 1965 Raliegh DL-1, and it is ready to ride except for the cotter on the left side. I have now tried four times to to replace the orignal, unsucessfully. A local bike shop had one that was the right size, and the others came from an internet store. I have tried tapping them in with a hammer, and pressing them in a clamp(per Sheldon Brown). I have tried using them as they came, and I have filed them to match the angle of the original. Also, I have tried reversing the the direction of the left and right bolts, but of course that made no difference. When I take the bike for a test ride it rides smoothly, and the cotter bolt does it's job until I put some real force on it, as in when I stand on the pedal to ride uphill. At that point the cotter bolt gets crushed between the crank and the shaft, forming a nice little notch on the flat part of the bolt. I am starting to run out of ideas on where the problem lies, and I was hoping that you might have some insight into this problem that you would be willing to share. Thanks. Bruce
by: 64.223.234.56

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Keith Body on 6/13/2009 at 7:19:18 AM
Hi Bruce, The british cotter pin is 3/8 inch, inserted downwards (essential) when the crank is pointing to the rear.
If the crank has stretched you will obviously need pins with less flat.
If you can find a piece of tubing to support the crank, or anything suitable, get 2 hammers, one about 4 ounce, the other larger. Rest one hammer on the pin and hit it with the other, not too hard. You will find your hands are well out of range. The nut is to hold it in, not pull it tight.
Tap the cotter pin in gently to see if it needs filing.

by: 92.19.194.53

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by JDuck on 6/13/2009 at 7:42:22 AM
I had a Sports where I could not get the cotter to stay tight, no matter how hard I pressed it in. I finally determined that the hole in the crank arm was oblong. Probably from the previous owner riding it while loose. I changed the crank arm and had no further trouble.
by: 66.254.211.56

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Bruce Ketchum on 6/13/2009 at 10:14:27 AM
Thank you both for your response. I spent some time this morning comparing how the left and right crank fit onto the shaft and there is a small but noticable difference(left side is looser). Also, I noticed that the new cotters are slightly smaller in diameter than the original. I think that the combination of these two things may be the root of the problem, so I will buy a replacement crank. I have noticed a couple of vendors on ebay that have a lot of Raleigh parts, so I thought I would start there, unless someone here can point me in a better direction. I really appreciate your help. Bruce
by: 64.223.234.56

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Mark Stonich on 6/13/2009 at 8:09:39 PM
Almost all cotters for British bikes made lately will be labeled 9.5mm not 3/8" but for all practical purposes they are the same. the most recently available ones are truly poor quality
See: http://www.bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/cotters.html and scroll to the bottom.

From a strength standpoint it makes no difference whether the crank arms are facing forward or back when you insert the cotters downward. The only advantage of one way over the other is which way is the cotter more likely to snag a trouser cuff. Usually you want the nut down when the crank is forward.
by: 209.162.11.193

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by David on 6/14/2009 at 6:46:00 AM
Why is it that the English mfrs generally (but not always)installed cotters so that they WOULD snag cuffs?
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Matthew on 6/14/2009 at 11:05:35 AM
Hi Mark,

Whilst I agree that 'From a strength standpoint it makes no difference whether the crank arms are facing forward or back when you insert the cotters downward' I would have to point out that from a mechanical point of view, regarding torque etc it is advantageous to insert the cotter pins (not bolts folks) threaded end upwards on the forward facing crank arm. Or as per Keith's instructions.

Bruce; It sounds like a new bottom bracket spindle is the way to make progress.

Matthew - oops up side your thread


by: 86.26.61.54

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Mark Stonich on 6/14/2009 at 9:01:47 PM
"I would have to point out that from a mechanical point of view, regarding torque etc it is advantageous to insert the cotter pins (not bolts folks) threaded end upwards on the forward facing crank arm."

How do you come to that conclusion? Whenever torque is being applied to the spindle through the cotters you are loading the nut end of one cotter and the fat end of the other. How does it matter which of these is on the left or right side?


by: 209.162.11.193

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Matthew on 6/15/2009 at 11:34:37 AM
Hi Mark,

Firstly I hope you haven't taken offence at my remark. I didn't intend or hope to cause any offence.

Secondly; to my mind the torque of the downstroke, which on cranks without cleated pedals is the power stroke, should, theoretically, work to force the cotter into the axle. However I am willing to be proven wrong.

I have never had a crank work loose. As Keith said the nut merely stops the cotter dropping out.

Regards,

Matthew - mechanically disadvantaged.
by: 86.0.99.203

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Mark Stonich on 6/15/2009 at 2:22:27 PM
I guess I need to explain this in more detail.

When the right pedal is on the downstroke, torque path goes from the pedal to the arm, to the chainring. There is not significant torque being applied to the spindle.

When the left pedal is on the downstroke the torque path is from the pedal to the arm, to the left cotter, to the spindle, to the right cotter do the base of the right arm to the chainring. When this happens both cotters are loaded by the bottom edges of the spindle slots. One at the fat end, one at the nut.

Note that in my 2nd posting I wrote "Whenever torque is being applied to the spindle through the cotters". I believe that when cotters are sufficiently tight they are loaded in compression, evenly across the face. And friction between the spindle and the side of the bore opposite the crank is what is resisting movement between the spindle and the arm.

If this were not the case, I do not believe they could mechanically resist the forces involved for very long. Cotters are very soft. As soon as they loosen a little, they get deeply grooved. When removing a cotter that has remained tight, the face is in good condition. These cotters are no harder than those that have gotten grooved.
by: 209.162.11.193

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Kevin on 6/16/2009 at 1:40:15 PM
By the way, Mark's cotter presses are awesome. Highly recommended.
by: 72.12.200.38

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Steve on 6/16/2009 at 3:37:37 PM
Whenever I'm changing cotter pins, I'm usually thinking about what's for tea tonight, from now on it's torque patterns and trouser legs...interesting stuff.
Yes, the cotter press is a good tool (probably the dirtiest in my tool box).
I had no choice but to drill two cotter pins out recently...a tedious, time consuming and delicate job.
Steve - playing with "noisy" old freewheels at the moment !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Keith Body on 6/17/2009 at 1:55:32 PM
Although it is fairly obvious that either direction of insertion should have the same result, I have tended to accept for 60 years that the british cycle makers knew something I didn't. It would seem more sensible to insert cotters backwards when the left crank is stretched, (nicklin/raleigh are quite soft), the old manufacturers didn't have this problem.
Your bikes were utility "ride to work" types, and riders had spring clips to restrain flapping garments.
Anyone got a valid reason for the original direction, cotter downwards when the crank points to the rear?
by: 92.18.189.177

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Matthew on 6/17/2009 at 2:25:05 PM
Interesting point Mark,

We are actually talking moments and levers here. Thus my whole 55 Kilos placed on one pedal which is say 175mm long. I am applying a force (torque) of 9.625KgM or 94.42Nm to the cranks. This force should technically be distributed evenly through the components. Obviously weaker components will show the results of applied force more readily. The cotters are, as you rightly say, softer material than the axle and cranks. It is not impossible to shear a cotter, but it is unusual.

Matthew - its all science really.


by: 82.25.186.97

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Steve on 6/17/2009 at 3:41:39 PM
Matthew, impressive figurework, can I borrow your slide rule when you've finished with it.

It's an interesting statistic, but taking into account torque/pressure/stamina etc, I just wonder what percentage of your natural body weight is actually transmitted through the pedal, if fifty percent (ignoring the natural body swaying motion of bicycle riding) of your body weight is having a free ride on the other side for half of the time ?

This could get really heavy !

Anyhow, I stripped a Tradebike/Cycle Truck recently, someone had used a type of giant size nail as a cotter pin, must have used some torque (or hammer) to get it in...needless to say, there was no nut to deal with, but "surprise surprise" there was lots of play in the B/B !

I got it out eventually, I'm now minus two drills and a file, but the axle appears to be fine !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Bruce Ketchum on 6/18/2009 at 6:30:33 AM
I have examined the spindle and crank bore with a magnifying glass and can see no sign of damage there. When I measured the bore of the left crank with a vernier calliper it turns out that the hole is out of round by an infinitesimal amount(too small to measure for my calliper) on the pin hole axis. It's not much, but there it is. Also, the original cotter pin is a full 3/8 in. in diameter and it fits in its hole fairly snug. Th modern cotters I am trying to work with measure 1/64 in. less, which makes a pretty loose fit by comparison. I would have thought that when these three parts were pressed together it would have made this little bit of looseness still within tolerence. Now I am thinking a miss is as good as a mile. This a great discussion board, I don't think you can get the kind of information that you have contributed anywhere else. Thanks.
by: 64.223.234.56

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Cotter Bolts posted by Keith Body on 6/18/2009 at 1:21:37 PM
Hi Bruce, The bracket axle would be case hardened, and the crank stretch elongates the crank bore. If you have to hammer them in, try my 2 hammer method, much less chance of damaging anything if you're not too confident. Tap the cotter in gently but firmly, screw on the nut, and then give it 3 or 4 more hits, if the nut is loose do it again.
by: 92.1.152.35




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Malvern star paintjob resoration posted by: Ned on 6/11/2009 at 10:05:17 PM
Hey I have a 1942 Malvern star ladies roadster I am reconditioning; I don't want a perfect restoration, just something relatively stable and rideable.

The chrome bits have come up really nicely so far.

My problem is the frame; there are little bits of the original dark blue remaining, and the original stickers are in good nick.

But the paintwork is covered with a very thin layer of rust...if I scrub much more, I will break through the paint. Can the paint itself "rust" on these old bikes? I have read of something similar on rat-rods.

I don't really want to repaint, as I don't mind a bit of rust, and I like the stickers. But is there some kind of primer or other substance I can apply to retain what is left of the original delicate paintwork and protect it from further degradation?

I have pictures if this message is not clear enough.

by: 115.130.13.120

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Malvern star paintjob resoration posted by Epicycler2 on 6/12/2009 at 7:22:46 AM
Dear Ned,
Try rubbing the rusted areas with a ball of aluminum foil lubed with a light oil, kerosene or water. This has worked really well for me. Be careful as the action of the aluminum on the rust produces aluminum oxide. This is the same principal that is used in the Kool Stop brake pads
by: 128.210.117.192




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AGE / VALUE:   Off topic, but too cool to miss! posted by: Chris on 6/11/2009 at 4:35:38 PM
Go to you tube:
Unveiling of Dymaxion car
Bucky Fuller

That gorgeous little sweetie in the back seat is the famous avaitrix, Emelia Earlhart!

She was excited about the car and wished to assist in it's promotion. The only surviving prototype out of the original three, will be shown again, in New York
June 26 th!
by: 69.153.86.42

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Off topic, but too cool to miss! posted by Matthew on 6/14/2009 at 11:07:30 AM
Chris,


Wonderfully off topic and as one of Mr Disney's writers put it, 'its a whole new world!'

Matthew - Dynamic
by: 86.26.61.54

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