OldRoads.com > Discuss: English 3-speeds
Discuss: English Roadsters Scroll Down For Messages


All pictures and text in these pages are (c)2010 Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm) and may not be used in any form without written permission from Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm).

Search 18 years of ARCHIVES:  


Disclaimer:
Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc. has set up this discussion area for the sharing of vintage and custom bicycle information. Anyone may add their opinions to this forum, as long as they follow the rules outlined below. We are not responsible for incorrect or misleading advise which may appear here.

RULES:

All pictures and text in these pages are (c)2010 Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm) and may not be used in any form without written permission from Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm).


Vintage Bicycle Discussion Area

English Roadsters


Post a new topic, or click an existing topic below:




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by: David on 5/28/2009 at 9:20:50 AM
OK, I finally have some pics of my 1931 Sunbeam for sale. The serial number (according to my Sunbeam bicycle book)dates around late 1931, although the hub is a Sturmey Archer original "K2" hub, meaning that the hub was built in 1932. The bicycle was probably built in fall '31 and the hub added in '32 when it was sold. Included are the original celluloid grips, Bluemels prismatic reflector, full "oilbath" chaincase (in which the chaincase is integral to the machine), original 4 1/2" rubber block pedals made of rare aluminium alloy that spin SO nicely, unique Sunbeam rod brakes, etc. The frame and forks has undergone a professional repaint (done in the UK by stove enameling the proper way), and new transfers have been applied. The handlebars and mudguards appear to have original paint. The paint is just about perfect on the mudguards, some wear on the handlebars. Everything is "blacked out," save the rims, which have quite a bit of wear. I have sanded off most of the corrosion (see pic). I will include a spare set of NOS Sunbeam brake blocks with the bike. It also comes with a vintage Miller chrome cycle bell and an Everready headlamp (you will need to supply your own battery). The bike is a 22" frame on 26 x 1 1/2" Westwood rims. The tyres are nearly new and have the correct block pattern tread. Everything is in near pristine condition. A rarity on this side of the pond for sure, but even on the other side it is hard to find Sunbeams in this condition. I am really sad to part with this bike, so contact me quick before I change my mind. I paid well over $1000 for this bike, had it shipped directly from England about 3-4 years ago. I should also mention that I have put in countless hours in putting everything in tip-top shape. New grease and bearings have been applied to the headset and bottom bracket. The chain is new.

Email me if you are interested in this bike.

http://picasaweb.google.com/dgposton/1931SunbeamBicycleForSale#
by: 166.127.1.222

  Replies:
           RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by Pete on 5/28/2009 at 12:18:59 PM
That sure is a pretty machine,hope it goes to a worthy new owner.
by: 78.33.123.28

           RE:RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 5/28/2009 at 4:56:32 PM
Good lord David... can't you like give up an arm instead of this machine?????

Absolutely a wonderful velocipede..... I wholeheartedly concur that it should go to an owner that's WORTHY.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - gotta re-hydrate (excessive drooling again....)
by: 4.154.218.194

           RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by mark H on 5/28/2009 at 10:33:34 PM
that is stunning.now that is a bicycle worthy of a cover shot!
by: 66.183.159.180

           RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by Pete on 5/29/2009 at 4:00:10 PM
Sell a kidney or other organ.....just keep your Sunbeam.
by: 78.33.123.28

           RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by sam on 5/30/2009 at 4:50:44 PM
Sometimes to really be alive,you gotta get a little farther out on the limb than what feels safe.By buying this bike,I'm sure David went more than most of us would.
David,You will never go their again.If you can,keep it and remind yourself,go for a ride , be alive---sam


by: 68.90.181.228

           RE:RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by David Poston on 5/31/2009 at 2:41:10 PM
Trust me, guys, I feel the pain...but I do need the room and I have other bikes I'll be keeping...I'd like it to go to one of you guys here before I post it up on ebay...However, I can't wait too long, so if you're interested please send me an email.

David
by: 98.194.172.115

           RE:RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by Chris on 6/1/2009 at 5:59:17 PM
Keep the address and name of the buyer and when things improve go and get it back, ...........again!!

One never knows what the tide will bring in.

I sold bikes and a Brown Brothers catalog and went back 3 years later and bought them ALL back and 2 bikes of his.
It was strange, running down the stairs into his basement lair and laying hands AGAIN!! on this same Humber bike that carried me to work and back, thru some scary times and it returned again into the fold. Just keep in contact with the buyer, leave the door open just a bit for the unexpected miracle to slip in.

The Sunbeam is precious enough to fight extra hard to keep it, if you can.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by steven boos on 6/22/2009 at 4:56:35 PM
Hi -

I'm in the middle of restoring a 1934 Golden Sunbeam and was wondering if you might be able to help with one or two questions. Is the placement of the decals/transfers original? It looks as though the chain case has been repainted and a new transfer added, but I'm more interested in the placement of the transfers on the head tube. Also, were you able to locate a source for replacement rubber parts? I have the same split pedals as on your bike, but the rubber parts are perished as they say in England. I have found one set of original Fibrax brake blocks, but doubt that a second is likely to come up anytime soon.

Any other tips or information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

regards, Steven Boos
by: 69.39.6.81

           RE:FOR SALE:   1931 Sunbeam roadster for sale posted by Dia on 9/11/2009 at 7:19:23 PM
Hi David,
Do you still selling this bike?
And how much are you asking for it?
Thank you,
Dia : )

by: 70.185.167.51




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

MISC:   Yard Sale Finds posted by: Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles at OldRoads.com on 5/28/2009 at 3:48:29 AM
No one here needs to be reminded of this, but never pass a yard sale without looking for bikes. And even if you don’t see any bikes, always ask.
My wife goes out every weekend and usually finds a few good commuter cycles for my shop, but recently she found a barn-fresh 1956 Raleigh Super Lenton (3-speed, leather Brooks saddle, chrome fenders, original frame pump, dynohub and light). It is maroon and crème and is from the year I was born. This one is a keeper.
They are still out there!
-Vin

by: 71.184.108.192

  Replies:
           RE:MISC:   Yard Sale Finds posted by Steve on 5/28/2009 at 9:17:56 AM
Seek and you will find (some better than others).

Steve - nice one
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:MISC:   Yard Sale Finds posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 5/28/2009 at 4:58:41 PM
Wow... Vince... I hope she wiped her feet before she came back in the house, eh?

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - I look too...
by: 4.154.218.194

           RE:MISC:   Yard Sale Finds posted by mark H on 5/30/2009 at 12:21:13 PM
salvation army story from thursday,i saw a 60s triumph sturmey equipped straight rims looked brand new.no price?asked the lady at the store she said ow flat tires 30 bucks!!i went out to my friends van to get my wallet.i was 30 seconds.when i walked in the door there it was in line with a proud new owner.damn i said gotta be quick sometimes.
by: 66.183.159.180

           RE:RE:MISC:   Yard Sale Finds posted by Warren on 5/31/2009 at 4:39:52 PM
I bought a 72 Triumph this week too. $25
by: 24.215.86.83




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   Looks like a match to the Mr. & Mrs. mystery bikes posted by: Peter on 5/27/2009 at 11:24:59 PM
Steve,
Saw this bike for sale on ebay
120424109853

COMRADE ROADSTER MODEL OLD BICYCLE MADE IN ENGLAND RARE
It has many of the same parts as my Mystery bike.
The Roadster Model font is the same although it is printed on the seat tube on mine. Perhaps your Mrs.is a Camarada?
The Fourth of July ride is more of a pub crawl at the beach in San Diego.
Cheers,
Pete

by: 76.212.155.228

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Looks like a match to the Mr. & Mrs. mystery bikes posted by Steve on 5/28/2009 at 4:07:38 AM
Thanks Pete,
Interesting and from what I can see very quickly...the chainguard is a later addition, the chrome fork cap is a little different from the norm, and the badge on the front looks as though it could read Barlaston, Staffs.

Sunbeam at one time were based in Staffs (Staffordshire)Wolverhampton, England before the border changes a few years ago !

I'll study this in greater detail when I return home from work.

Incidentally, I can't make the San Diego gig...not unless you pick me up from the QE11 cruise liner terminal at Southampton, England as you're passing by sometime !

Steve - gone
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Looks like a match to the Mr. & Mrs. mystery bikes posted by Steve on 5/28/2009 at 9:15:41 AM
For Barlaston above, please read Darlaston (they're both in the County of Staffordshire, the former is countryfied and the latter isn't) !

Darlaston is/was a very industrial area i.e. steel, coal mines, manufacturing etc etc and would fit naturally with all the other well known bicycle manufacturers in that part of the world...Sunbeam probably the closest at 2 to 3 miles away.

From what I can gather, Comrade supplied bicycles to Brown Brothers who sold them under the "Vindec" name.

Not sure if Roadster Model is technically correct, maybe Light Roadster...I always struggle over this point !

I'll try and see if I can find any other information on Comrade, if Vindec bikes were built to a competitive price...I think this more or less tells us a little bit more about Comrade.

If I've misread the headbadge...just ignore absolutely everything I've just said !

C'mon Keith...how bad were these bikes (don't hold back) ?

Steve - Mine's a good'un (even if it is a ladies model).
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Looks like a match to the Mr. & Mrs. mystery bikes posted by spfldken on 5/28/2009 at 10:00:58 AM
I sent the following to the seller the second day of the auction: "Hi....check this out on ebayUK: item #220418633340 It's a Comrade delivery bike made in Alma Works,Darlaston, West Midlands, England. Good luck with yours." Too bad he didn't add the info to the listing.Looks like a good strong utilitarian bike.
by: 71.161.160.95

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Looks like a match to the Mr. & Mrs. mystery bikes posted by Steve on 5/28/2009 at 10:40:30 AM
Seems like Alma Works existed in 1888, and is still around to this day, but in the guise of an industrial unit complex now...just like so many others.

Does one presume that Comrade exported in smaller numbers than the big boys, and finally...does anyone know what happened to them ?

Absorbed, BCC, TI etc...the delivery bike mentioned above looks quite young in comparison to some of the relics I have.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Looks like a match to the Mr. & Mrs. mystery bikes posted by Keith Body on 5/28/2009 at 12:27:53 PM
Hi Steve, luckily I can't remember Comrade, but used to get some supplies from Brown Brothers, who were wholesale suppliers to retail trades. So if you repaired cars, and bought parts from them, when you needed a bike for christmas it was a Vindec, because of the 25% discount. With the wholesaler probably on 20% you can see that manufacturing had to be cheap.
Some people have old wholesale catalogues, often showing retail prices, there is frequently a simple code listing the trade prices. Must have a look for one.
Keith
by: 92.22.1.117

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Looks like a match to the Mr. & Mrs. mystery bikes posted by Keith Body on 5/28/2009 at 2:10:39 PM
Steve, just found a page from Brown Bros 1939 showing carrier bikes. Retail price shown is £8.14s.0d equals 174 shillings. The ref number ends 126 02 which is trade price 126 shillings and 2 pence, showing a discount of about 27.5%.
Similar codes apply on other pages, mostly between 25% and 33.3%.
by: 92.22.1.117




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   Dry chains posted by: Chris on 5/26/2009 at 6:22:06 PM
I never see oil or any kind of lubricant on the chains of bikes that folks ride by on. The chains are always dry bone dry and the derailer cluster is always dry and dirty.

I know so many of the mountain bikes out there are not worth the oil one would put on it, but still!!
by: 69.153.86.42

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dry chains posted by Steve on 5/27/2009 at 1:30:42 AM
Majority of people around my (£69.99 to £99.99 a bike) neck of the woods simply :-

(a) "don't give a stuff"
(b) wouldn't know to put oil on !
(c) certainly wouldn't think of buying oil.
(d) will probably have the bike stolen or,
(e) will dispose/lose the bike before noticing that it needs oil.

Quite a few even ride around with one "V" brake hanging off !

You're right, most are cheapo mountain bikes with the all important flashy paint job that children/youth admire...and not much more (apart from 18 gears, of which 3 will possibly see regular use...if lucky).

I was offered a used one for nothing yesterday, but declined the offer because my daughter prefers her 20 year old Raleigh Twenty (copy) !

I'm now just off to clean a 30 year old "caked up" chain !

Steve - honest
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dry chains posted by mark H on 5/27/2009 at 3:03:23 AM
drives me crazy.i live in victoria bc canada and there is alot of bicycles on the road.and i hear the out of tune creaky derailers,in between gears....no oil,ill fitting,usually to small.bad seats.makes me wonder if they need to ride my 52 phillips to work.and see how nice bicycle riding can be.perhaps a roadside tune up station?like i said drives me crazy!




becoming derailed.
by: 66.183.159.180

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dry chains posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 5/27/2009 at 5:38:50 PM
LOL... I can see it now... a FARK.COM headline...

Man arrested for lingering around bicycle rack with oilcan....

Yeah... I hear ya.... It's not limited to bicycles either... the other day I was in downtown Milford, PA and a fellow came up in his SUV and had to brake for the stop light... it was BLATANTLY apparant that he was metal to metal....

THAT... is downright scary...

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - I hear the machines scream in pain..... and wax lugubrious pursuant to their suffering....
by: 4.154.221.34

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dry chains posted by Keith Body on 5/28/2009 at 12:33:37 PM
Users of roller chains were advised to boil them in tallow (animal candle wax) in the early days. I had to pack the water pump bearing with the same on a 1931 car I had. That's why most cars of that time had thermal circulation.
by: 92.22.1.117

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dry chains posted by Bicycle Mark on 5/29/2009 at 6:17:24 PM
Hey, I still boil chains in candle wax (we call it paraffin here in the colonies). Works great, stays clean, doesn't attract dust at all. No water resistance though, have to reboil right away after riding in the rain (happens about once or twice a year here in sunny Arizona).
by: 68.226.98.232




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   1963 Montgomery Ward Hawthorne posted by: NunHugger on 5/25/2009 at 8:02:05 PM
This is my first vintage bike. It's a M/W Hawthorne three speed. The stamp on the Sturmey Archer hub leads me to believe that it is a 1963. It's grip shift works smooth. I am new to the vintage bike scene and am interested it's value as well as what to do about general maintenence. Is it ok to change the cable housing...or should I leave it original and simply change the cables? Also, is there a general rule of thumb about changing tires? These tires have some cracks, but are still road worthy. I would like to purchase some new tires, but want to keep the integrity of the bike.

Here is a link to my photo gallery with more pics.
http://cid-03c8425cb89100ea.skydrive.live.com/browse.aspx/My%20New%20Ride%20-%201963%20Montgomery%20Ward%20Hawthorne?ct=photos


by: 75.162.24.92


  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1963 Montgomery Ward Hawthorne posted by Thom J. on 5/26/2009 at 3:49:09 PM
Nice looking bike....and welcome. To coin a phrase, it's only original once. Pretty much answers your questions. First order of business is to clean, lube and oil the bike. Replace any parts if it's absolutely necessary. The tires should be fine. A product similar to Armour All will help to keep the sidewalls pliable but if you use it on the tread make sure you wipe it off completely. Once it's cleaned, lubed and adjusted for your riding style, sit back and enjoy days, weeks, months and years of cycling pleasure. These bikes may be old but with a small amount of care they'll last another 20-30 years plus...long after the latest and greatest wonder-bike cracks and ends up in the junk heap. Enjoy your bike. Thom.
by: 63.204.42.231

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1963 Montgomery Ward Hawthorne posted by Warren on 5/26/2009 at 5:32:23 PM

It's a nice Raleigh rebrand. The parts are threaded with 26 tpi so don't let any ham-fisted amateur bike mechanic try to swap any parts out on it. Read up on Raleigh 3 speeds at Sheldon Browns Raleigh page and you'll know everything you need to know to keep that bike happy.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/raleigh.html

Keep everything, especially the cable housing. I'd run the tires until they call it quits. When you change them, don't use those fugly cheap gumwall tires if you can help it. Kenda used to make a decent blackwall tire.

by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1963 Montgomery Ward Hawthorne posted by Chris on 5/26/2009 at 6:10:55 PM
the original cable housing is ribbed and it is valuable, keep it use new cables but keep the housing the new replacement stuff has no ribs and it is ugly.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1963 Montgomery Ward Hawthorne posted by NunHugger on 5/26/2009 at 7:33:32 PM
Thanks for your helpful advice. I am just planning on enjoying this one for a while. I picked it up for $60...and after looking around, I am thinking I got a decent deal. I think that I am only going to need to change the brake cables at the moment (they are a little spongey). I plan to keep it as is. The only thing that I am thinking of adding is maybe a rear rack or getting some kind of bag to attach to the saddle...and maybe a headlight. Can't wait to take it out for a long ride.

Thanks again!!!
Jason
by: 75.162.24.92

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1963 Montgomery Ward Hawthorne posted by Noel Mathis on 8/30/2009 at 7:26:37 PM
I have a Wards Hawthorne buicycle serial number D53946. have been checking the internet to try to find out what year it is and any more information about it. Anyhelp would be appreciated.
Thanks

by: 69.145.123.25




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by: Phil R on 5/24/2009 at 8:45:46 PM
I picked this up and can't figure out the what it is or its origin country. I presumed it was British, but now I'm thinking otherwise. Anyone got a clue?

The only markings are a worn down decal in place of a head badge. The hubs are marked in cursive "tel" or "elt." The chain and rear sprocket is marked "Mulgur" and "s.i.c.c." The handlebars have a piece of plastic on them marked "amba." Interesting wood and plastic grips, along with wool and leather seat.


by: 24.19.135.55


  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Phil R on 5/24/2009 at 8:58:26 PM
More Pics


by: 24.19.135.55


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Phil R on 5/24/2009 at 8:59:27 PM
More


by: 24.19.135.55


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Phil R on 5/24/2009 at 9:02:18 PM
More


by: 24.19.135.55


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Matthew on 5/25/2009 at 12:56:59 AM
In the words of the song 'its continental'.

By that I mean main land Europe, possibly a latin country?

Other than than I am puzzled.

Matthew - Plus ca bicyclette.
by: 81.109.245.177

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Steve on 5/25/2009 at 1:05:46 AM
Never seen one of these before, has one or two nice touches to it though.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Kevin on 5/25/2009 at 3:58:50 AM
Very nice brake levers -- I've never seen any like them.
by: 24.13.125.25

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Kevin on 5/25/2009 at 4:01:42 AM
What is that clamp-on thing above the front sprocket?
by: 24.13.125.25

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Warren on 5/25/2009 at 5:05:29 AM
The little details may suggest french...what size are the wheels? Looks like a Solida crankset. A swiss BB may also back this up.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by mark H on 5/25/2009 at 6:00:05 AM
very nice.i really like the fenders,the frame does not slope down from the seat post,like a english roadster.ii like the frame stabilizer.early- late teens perhaps?
by: 66.183.159.180

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Steve on 5/25/2009 at 6:30:34 AM
Possible a Dunelt ??
by: 138.210.101.170

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Phil R on 5/25/2009 at 7:44:38 AM
I dont' know what the clamp or stabilizer above the crank is, but it is marked "BREVET 229243." The tires are marked 26 X 1 1/2 X 1 5/8, which I understand are not easy tires to find. If anyone knows of a readily available tire that will work on this type of rim, let me know. I'm tempted to repaint the fenders and chainguard and enjoy the ride. I wish I could read that decal!


by: 24.19.135.55


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Phil R on 5/25/2009 at 9:14:09 AM
Another of the decal


by: 24.19.135.55


           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Warren on 5/25/2009 at 11:00:00 AM
French or Belgium it is and you can find those tires under the 650B name. Hi end shops can likely help. There are a number of builders making the french constructeur style of bike these days and the tire size is being reproduced in limited numbers.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Keith Body on 5/25/2009 at 2:17:45 PM
To me this bike looks Italian. The cranks may have been made in France, but typical of Italian use. Well made, mudguards later, but still Italian style. Logo in the lamp bracket seems to say "MU", can't put a name to it.

by: 92.21.163.120

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by ken on 5/25/2009 at 7:03:56 PM
I have the same handlebars on my Vadilonga from Sardinia Italy. Google "biciclette antica" and you will hava some fun and feel lika you found lost relatives! Don't forget-google will translate too.
by: 71.161.159.40

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Warren on 5/25/2009 at 7:10:07 PM
If it's Italian maybe the BB and headset will have that threading...I don't know anything about their roadsters. Maybe a 70 mm bottom bracket shell?
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Phil R on 5/25/2009 at 7:41:25 PM
Thanks guys for all your comments. My goal was to obtain a prewar British bike, but I guess French, Belgian, or Italian will do. Either way, when I get it up to speed and looking good, I'm sure it will turn a few heads up here in Seattle, Washington.
by: 24.19.135.55




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   Acetylene lamp for sale posted by: David on 5/23/2009 at 9:59:16 PM
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=190309839920

Just posted up a Lucas carbide / acetylene lamp if anyone's interested.

thanks
David
by: 98.194.172.115

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   90% complete (?) DL-1 on Fleabay... posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 5/23/2009 at 4:02:20 AM
Item 180359815756

Needs.... brakes.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - percentages.... so doggone misleading
by: 4.154.219.115

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by: Steve on 5/22/2009 at 2:13:18 PM
Went out for a ten mile test ride today on a bike that I'd recently fixed up just to make sure all was functioning properly, got home and noticed a loose spoke (no tension) just hanging in position.

To cut a long story short, someone had attempted a previous fix by cutting a spoke to size and forming a hook at the hub end in order to anchor into the hole and "tension up" in the usual manner.

As you no doubt know, the hub end of the spoke usually has that nice circular profile that sits snuggly in the hole, the home made hook did not sit snuggly !

Anyhow, I've got many spare spokes of various lengths from stripped wheels but...not this size !

I've been caught out like this before, the outcome is that I have to purchase 12, 20 or 32 etc although I only really want one or two.

I have a tap & die set here, but nothing as small as a spoke thread.

Question: What is the standard spoke thread size.

I haven't gone looking for a specific tool yet, but is there anything on the market that will suffice without the need to stare at eBay for the next three months in order to "win" a 2-ton cast iron device that looks something like my great grandmas old sewing machine !

I usually like heavy cast iron devices, but not on this occasion...I need to get moving !

Steve

by: 93.96.36.127

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Matthew on 5/22/2009 at 3:01:41 PM
Hi Steve, what size wheel and what length of spoke?

Matthew - Bumble Crust Engineering
by: 82.9.29.53

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Steve on 5/22/2009 at 3:27:34 PM
Hi Matthew, don't tell anyone, but I've acquired some 1970's Raleigh Twenty's, these are chunky (and good in my opinion) bikes.

I think I like riding them...more than the Moulton !

Anyhow, as you know, the good ones have SA AG hubs and that's where the problem spoke is i.e. shorter side spoke equals approx 198/200mm (with the final 10mm threaded...or should I say rolled).

Steve - rolling, rolling, rolling...yee haa !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Warren on 5/22/2009 at 3:58:33 PM
If you like to collect vintage bikes, you'll use a wide assortment of spokes lengths ranging between 10 and 12 1/2 inches. I bought 5000 chrome and galvanized 15 and 12 gauge spokes out of a closed shop 10 years ago and it's been the most useful purchase ever. Yes there are standard lengths for SA hubs and Dunlop rims but that doesn't cover enough.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Steve on 5/22/2009 at 4:24:39 PM
I'm fairly confident that I've got most of the 26 to 28 inch vintage rim range covered with the appropriate size spokes.
It's when you acquire something outside of this range...(to good an opportunity to miss kind of deal etc), that you realise you've got a problem when you notice you've got knackered 8 inch spokes.

I'll keep my eyes open for a batch of smaller various length spokes or better still an inexpensive spoke threader (if such a thing exists), which would allow me to cut the longer spokes to size and thread accordingly.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by sam on 5/22/2009 at 8:20:26 PM
What you need is a spoke rolling tool.Hozar(is that the correct spelling?)at about $100.Sounds expencive till you compair it to a Phil woods tool at over $3000!
The $100 tool is OK for a few spokes--the Phil tool will do several wheels worth of spokes in an hour.
by: 68.90.181.228

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Steve on 5/23/2009 at 6:17:17 AM
I had done a spot of Google'ing and came across these Hozar & Phil devices, I then realised that I was "just a frustrated bloke in a shed" with a bunch of ramshackle old bikes !

I slept on the problem and woke up this morning to glorious sunshine, hence I decided to take the seriously well patina'd 1930's Sunbeam on a tour of local bike shops in an effort to find the correct length spokes...or someone with a machine that could "roll" a cut down spoke.

I kept away from the chain store, glossy, plastic, £69.99 18 gear bike shops with limited knowledge attendants (and no tools), and aimed for the spit and sawdust shops with blokes that smell of oil with 1950's dirt protruding from their finger nails (together with a plethora of the most sexiest of tools from the golden age of cycling)!

Anyhow, I got lucky at my second port of call...shop was an independant selling upmarket good quality (expensive) gear, but had had the common sense to hang on to some old tools/equipment.
The rolling machine was very tired, but still managed to produce two perfectly threaded spokes for me.
Total cost...£1 (50p a spoke).

I suspect that I will one day need a 20 x 1 3/8 tyre, can you guess which shop I will go to ?

Funny thing happened, a "posh" racing cyclist in the shop was lost for words when he saw the Sunbeam...quadrant gear change, very little paint, oil bath chainguard, BSA hub, Terrys seat and tennis racket holder/clip etc etc, he then asked how good the brakes were...I said " they're hopeless" but that's what makes it so much fun !

Steve - not so frustrated.
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Keith Body on 5/23/2009 at 11:49:53 AM
Hi Steve, Spoke threads were rolled, I used to have a hand roller with a gear train. Cyclo used to make a handy roller tool, OK for a few spokes. I seem to think 56 TPI, not sure. The method of putting a double bend on the hub end of a spoke does work, but make the bends sharp. I have done this on many occasions, typically when someone has ripped a few out on the rear, gear side, and no tool to remove freewheel block.
If you removed the front mudguard you could always try the old racers brake, foot behind the fork crown, and yes, I have done this.
Electrified Keith
by: 92.20.13.252

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Matthew on 5/23/2009 at 12:47:45 PM
'If you removed the front mudguard you could always try the old racers brake, foot behind the fork crown, and yes, I have done this.'

So have I Keith; and I did it so well I went over the handlebars! This was not good because..... I wasn't sure how to tell my Mum that I had done this with an arm already in plaster. I was 13 at the time and that is a long time ago.

Steve, glad you got it sussed. Good bike shops are out there.

Matthew - flying with no safety net.
by: 82.20.37.252

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Steve on 5/23/2009 at 1:49:56 PM
I'm a very sensible "sit up and beg" cyclist who would never try such shenanigans...honest ?

I could see that the double bend on the spoke end would work to get you out of trouble, but I would want to change it to the original set-up when the opportunity arose.

I was "chuffed to bits" to get the issue sorted so quickly, later on when I was eating my dinner...the rear tube exploded, what I didn't tell you above was that I'd attempted to fix a puncture of rediculously large proportions earlier on in the day, I knew it was touch or go...well it touched for twelve hours or so, then it went with a bang !

Glad to see you're obviously feeling better Keith, none of that mumbo jumbo hard to understand electro stuff, for one moment I though you were going to start talking about capacitors, electrolysis, diodes and the like.

When you get a minute, just have a rummage in your shed and see if you've still got that old hand roller, I know someone who will use it !

Like Matthew, I've done the circus act handlebar trick...wished I'd worn a helmet.

It's a Bank Holiday weekend here in Old Blighty, get out on ye olde bikes and enjoy them !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by sam on 5/23/2009 at 7:51:41 PM
I forgot to say---there was once a device---called a spoke vice I think---that you clamped the spoke in a with the correct punch formed the spoke end.I've set steel rivets---maybe 40 years ago with a rivet punch---same way.But I've never seen the spoke vice or the punch---never---sam
(Got a friend with a Hozar and another with a phil)(good to have good friend!)
by: 68.90.181.228

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Steve on 5/24/2009 at 12:16:34 AM
You lucky thing.

I was going to say that I'd got a friend named Phil with a hose, but that would be silly.

Truth is, that's about as close as I could get.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Keith Body on 5/24/2009 at 2:34:34 PM
Steve, first, anyone trying to roll spoke threads, remember to oil the rolling head. second, stainless spokes tend to be tough on the rollers.
I used to make quite good tyre patches from old light tubular tyres, had a lot of them. Also in my light tyres always pumped an ounce or two of water into the tube, it's 800 times as dense as air, and will usually stop small punctures.
The old thread roller went 40 years ago.
Also, I did AC theory before transistors were out there.
Now I practice data recovery on hard discs, it's what I call "terminal idleness".
I was going to mention the Y***** again but thought better, perhaps there's a swear filter switched on.
Keith - yes, glorious summer day today, and most UK residents spending the weekend on the motorways.
by: 92.23.196.235

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Steve on 5/24/2009 at 3:40:45 PM
Well, I managed to keep off the motorways today by taking to the runway at Biggin Hill...work not pleasure.

Anyhow, if I ever see acquire a rolling machine, I will view it in a completely different light than what I might have done pre broken spoke episode.

I hadn't heard of the water in the tube tip on bicycles, but I have known it to be used as ballast in tractor tyres though !

You can use the Yamaha word if you want to, but only if it's something to do with organs...because I like organs.

Well it's getting late here, so I'm now going to light my candle and listen to Reginald Dixon on the wireless !

Steve - hopefully, a full day on the Phillips tradebike tomorrow.
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke threading device posted by Chris on 5/26/2009 at 6:17:40 PM
The cyclo spoke threading rolling tool was a joke and I don't recommend venturing there. The other cyclo tools are awesome.
by: 69.153.86.42




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

FOR SALE:   English 3-speed parts for sale posted by: David Poston on 5/21/2009 at 6:44:58 PM
I'm listing a bunch of English 3-speed parts for sale. Hard to find! Check my other auctions as well. Take a look.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=190309383204
by: 98.194.172.115

  Replies:
           RE:FOR SALE:   English 3-speed parts for sale posted by David Poston on 5/21/2009 at 8:01:53 PM
Any one looking for a box of NOS touch-up paint, BLACK?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=190309397130

If you guys need stuff, email me. I'm trying to clear out some of my stash from the last 7+ yrs of collecting English 3-speed stuff.
by: 98.194.172.115

           RE:RE:FOR SALE:   English 3-speed parts for sale posted by brooks on 5/22/2009 at 5:43:49 PM
Yes...would you happen to have a black Raleigh fork? A 1950s would be great. Many thanks. Please contact brooks at brooks saint ives at aol dot com.
by: 63.88.115.34




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   safety on the roads for cyclists posted by: Chris on 5/21/2009 at 5:33:37 PM
Excerpts from Cycling magazine 1912
"We have seen in leaded headlines the figures showing the sacrifice of life and limb upon the alter of the speed fetish- a grim toll, leaping upward year by year. Where will it end? And how does the cyclist read the portents of the modern traffic problem? The motor pearl is no imagining of a predjudiced mind."

"Cyclists are put in grave peril by the 40- miles- per- hour car that flashes past side turnings with a discordant hoot. Their lives and limbs are menaced by the motorcyclist who loves to pass at express speed so closely that a swerve of a few inches would mean serious accident."

I ran across this today and thought about the article that I shared here a few days ago.
by: 69.153.86.42

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   safety on the roads for cyclists posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 5/21/2009 at 7:08:51 PM
Hmmm... with all these interesting discussions of late... and the fact that finally I'm rolling on the motorbike once again... perhaps I should share with the group "Boneman's Cardinal Rules of Motorcycling".... as they can apply to bicycling as well... Quite simple really as there are only two rules:

1.: When you ride a motorcycle, you are INVISIBLE.
2.: If you're riding a motorcycle, and the driver of a car appears to be looking directly at you, refer to rule number ONE.

I daresay absolutely, the same rules apply to the velocipede pedaler as well.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Ride SAFE!


by: 4.154.220.208

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   safety on the roads for cyclists posted by Matthew on 5/23/2009 at 12:52:26 PM
Wear a helmet and you may be more reckless and more likely to have an accident. That doesn't work for me but some 'experts' say that.

Wear hi viz clothing and cars get nearer to you, thats a fact, use flashing LEDs and they will get closer still, that's a fact.


Wobble about, look vague and dizzy, most cars will avoid you like the plague.

Get fit well and you too can pound up a mile long climb with a 1 in 8 start as I did yesterday. Oh yeah the boy is back!

Matthew - chasing the butchers dog!
by: 82.20.37.252

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   safety on the roads for cyclists posted by Steve on 5/23/2009 at 1:58:39 PM
I hope you're chasing it with a Butchers bike !

Steve - according to my wife, I always look vague.
by: 93.96.36.127




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   Mister Cycle posted by: Al Smith on 5/21/2009 at 2:47:47 PM
I have a bike called Mister Cycle, dose anyone know information about one, and what it is worth here are pictures is a 28" bike
by: 75.120.49.142

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

FOR SALE:   Raleigh R20 folder. posted by: Thom J. on 5/21/2009 at 11:15:51 AM
For sale notice. I've posted details in the For Sale discussion section. Putting this notice here in hopes of drawing more attention. Thx, Thom.
by: 63.204.42.231

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:   More info on my mystery Roadster posted by: Peter Zale on 5/20/2009 at 10:27:08 PM
Hello,
After cleaning I found a few hints on my bike.
"Roadster Model" stenciled in yellow on the front of the seat tube.
40178 is stamped vertically just in front of the chain side dropout.
There is an Oil Hole with a spring loaded cap on top of the non-chain side of the bottom bracket.
The 18T single speed freewheel is stamped "Made in England
T. D. Cross & Son LTD."
The hubs were Made in England and the name starts with Phill...
I would like to know what make and year this bike is.
Please let me know if other photos or information would help with Identification.
Steve, I plan to ride her on the 4th of July. You and the Mrs. should join us.
Thanks for your help,
Pete


by: 76.212.158.93


  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   More info on my mystery Roadster posted by Steve on 5/21/2009 at 2:07:15 AM
Pete, I've just checked my unknown (GKW) bike again, the serial number is stamped vertically in the same position as yours (03306), oil hole same, but mine is an undated SA all black three speed hub with a chunky all black hub on the front.
Could your hubs be Phillips, could the bike be a Phillips, the closest suggestions towards mine were...Phillips !

The chainguard is very Phillipsish, the "rear brake" down rod at the front side could very well be Phillips.

But that's not to say it is a Phillips !

T.D. Cross is pretty standard for the era (I've got one or two here, one is so chunky it looks as though it's come out of a spitfire...plane not car) !

Are there any clues on the pedals ?

Where are you riding to/from on the 4th July.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

AGE / VALUE:    posted by: mark H on 5/20/2009 at 9:54:04 PM
well i tried to make some cork and twine hand grips,for my 1923 massey harris.i saw a pair from a early teens bicycle and thought i would give it a-go.they actually match the bike and look very old.i had my lady friend who was gardening rub her dirty hands on them.ya gotta start somewhere? when i find the price for the grips i want was over 120 dollars!this cost me 12 dollars total and i have a quart of shellac leftover.i had a laugh making them and thought i would share,if ya cant buy it make it.haha


by: 66.183.159.180


  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 5/20/2009 at 10:03:46 PM
another


by: 66.183.159.180


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 5/20/2009 at 10:04:40 PM
another


by: 66.183.159.180


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Steve on 5/21/2009 at 2:11:25 AM
Good try.

Is this the same Massey-Harris as the one time tractor maker ?

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 5/21/2009 at 3:50:35 AM
yes it is,they were quite the bicycle maker.here it is.


by: 66.183.159.180


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Steve on 5/21/2009 at 5:00:52 AM
Have you tried it with a single furrow plough, and 26" spade lug wheels !
Massey Harris tractors are quite sought after by collectors in England.

Massey Harris bicycle...you live and learn !

I have a bicycle here that's green with yellow wheels...can you guess what make it is ?

Steve - only joking.
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by David on 5/21/2009 at 6:49:53 AM
Did the carbide lamp come with it?
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 5/21/2009 at 2:55:37 PM
no it did not,but i have cataloques showing all the different models and aftermarket lights and this was one i found locally for sale.it was more money then a i paid for the bicycle,but in the long run seems to be the only way to bring it back to the way i want it.
by: 66.183.159.180

...>>>>>>>> MORE MESSAGES >>>>>>>>



HOME (OldRoads.com) Discussion Areas Literature and Price Guide Cleaning Kit Glossary
Stat and Feature Database Picture Database Serial Number Charts General Resources