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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Araya rims posted by: Al on 3/1/2009 at 4:18:14 PM

I'm building a Raleigh 3 speed wheelset to ride in the inclement weather. I figured alloy rims, kool stop pads. I've used Sun CR-18's in the 590 bead size. Nice rims, but rather modern looking. Then I stumbled across these Araya rims for 3 speeds:

http://www.araya-kk.co.jp/rim/catalog/56_wo-3.htm

They're stainless, not alloy. But they look great. And what's really cool is that Araya still makes a Westwood style rim for 26 x 1 3/8, too.

Too bad they don't build 'em in the 28 inch size.

Here's the alloy box-shape rim:

http://www.araya-kk.co.jp/rim/catalog/51_asb-90.htm

Anybody used them? And where did they get them?

Next, I'll check with my LBS to see if they can order them. Lately, the shops near where I live - Berkeley, CA - are only willing to order from QBP, the bicycle parts distributor. I have to ask really nice to get them to special order for me.


by: 71.135.52.33

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Araya rims posted by Tom on 3/2/2009 at 11:09:49 AM
36 hole only, no 32 or 40 listed.
by: 142.161.161.162

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:���Araya rims posted by James on 3/3/2009 at 3:28:04 PM
http://www.cyclesgrandbois.com/ might be able to help.
There's also the uppity Jitensha, but he probably wouldn't lower himself to sell anything for an english 3 speed.

I've order from I's bicycle, very friendly people. They sold me some Col de la Vie 590 tires before Harris stocked them.
No one imports Araya rims anymore. I had a Rivendell Quickbeam that was made by Panasonic and had Araya rims, the best rims I've ever had and the best looking modern rim I've ever seen.
Maybe you should get just get over the aversion to the CR18s, esp. if you are planning on using it in bad weather. Have you ever used ss rims with caliper brakes? I haven't. I've only seen them on dutch bikes and those rims were machined to a mirror like finish, probably not the best thing when using brake pads.

If you are going to actually use the bike in the rain, the rims will quickly turn grey with brake dust runoff. No one will notice they don't have an obsolete rim profile.


by: 71.214.90.103

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:���Araya rims posted by James on 3/3/2009 at 6:45:44 PM
Maybe you should try one of the dutch bicycle importers. They still use stainless 590s, but I have no idea if the bikes imported use that size. The danish Sogreni and Velobris may use 590 as well.
by: 71.214.90.103

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:���Araya rims posted by Al on 3/4/2009 at 12:20:23 AM

Good leads. Thanks James.

Yeah, I wasn't thinking of using stainless steel rims for bad weather riding. That's asking for it. I just thought it was cool that someone out there still made a rim profile close to the ol' Sturmey Archer profile.

Van Schothorst stainless rims have the same old school profile. But I can't find them locally, either. The Dutch Bicycle Co. puts 700c versions on their bikes.

Right now, I ride a single speed, Dutch-made Gazelle in the rain because it has fore and aft drum brake hubs. And a nice big mud flap at the bottom of the front fender. My feet stay dry!

3 speeds would be nice, tho. Even with kool stop pads on my Raleigh 3-speed, I have to brake early, brake often in the rain.

Great photos on your blog, by the way. I just restored a 50s Hercules. Great bicycle. Enclosed chaincase, rod brakes. I love the club-wielding Hercules transfers, even small versions on the fork blades.




by: 71.135.52.33




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey AW 3 Speed problem after rebuild posted by: ben on 3/1/2009 at 5:48:15 AM
hi folks, i just got back together my wife's '72 Breeze with Sturmey 3 speed, AW type hub. i completely disassembled the hub, cleaned it well, and reassembled. nothing looked like it needed replacing. i followed closely the directions from Sheldon Brown and the Sturmey website. everything was quite easy it seemed. now installed, i adjusted it and it seems to shift through all 3 speeds appropriately. but there seems to be a lot of chain noise. so i looked carefully to make sure that my rear sprocket was lined up well with the crank (considering that i may have mixed up the order of the sprocket, spacers, etc)......it seems to be okay; but there is quite a bit of movement in the rear sprocket. it just feels sloppy. and when under load from the crank via the chain i think its moving a little and causing some noise.
so i thought, well, i did not get the cones tightened enough, despite spending a great deal of time making sure it was done right. so i took the wheel off and evaluated the cone tightness. they seem to be okay. but when you grab the rear sprocket with your hand and try to wobble it back and forth, it has some slop in it. and its not just the sprocket, but the whole driver that goes down into the hub that has excessive movement. when i tighten the cones, it makes that slop go away, but then the wheel seems to have entirely too much resistance in spinning from the cones being too tight.
do i need new cones? do i need a new driver?
anybody have any ideas what's going on here?

fyi. i don't know the last time this bike's 3 speed hub worked correctly. i bought it for 20 bucks in non-working condition. but the bike has been taken care of well it seems. the inside of the hub looked to be in decent condition. no obvious abuse.

please help.
many thanks in advance.
by: 208.102.84.3

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey AW 3 Speed problem after rebuild posted by Vin on 3/1/2009 at 6:53:30 AM
Try backing the cones off just enough so the wheel spins freely. There should not be any slop.
I wonder, is the chain too tight? Are you setting the wheel too far back and creating too much tension with the chain?


by: 71.184.108.192

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey AW 3 Speed problem after rebuild posted by Keith Body on 3/1/2009 at 12:05:35 PM
When I last did these (in 1966)the ball bearings in the right hand end plate were 3/16, held in by a tin can plate.
The rear cog if a circlip type, would at standard have a 1/16 inch washer either side, which would hold the cog firmly on the driver. Have you got the ball cage under the driver the right way round? Obviously the balls have to run on the cone, not the cage. If this does not help, can I blame my ancient memory?
by: 92.19.217.204




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What's this? posted by: Zach Mathews on 2/28/2009 at 8:37:10 PM
What on earth is this?

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Antique-Trademark-Mister-Bicycle-with-Sadar-Lmp_W0QQitemZ270351600621QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item270351600621&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1205%7C66%3A2%7C65%3A12%7C39%3A1%7C240%3A1318%7C301%3A0%7C293%3A1%7C294%3A50

by: 75.1.5.214

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What's this? posted by Zach Mathews on 2/28/2009 at 8:57:40 PM
I am going to guess Indian.
by: 75.1.5.214

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What's this? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 3/1/2009 at 5:46:53 AM
Methinks Zach might be correct. Surely not of British Manufacture... nor would it appear to be European?

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - I like the style though...
by: 4.154.217.151

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What's this? posted by mark H on 3/1/2009 at 6:28:14 AM
hhmmm,looks indian manufactured to me.for sure the chaincase is indian,i just put one on my bike and has the same bolt holes and symetry.and the rear dropstand looks indian.

i guess indian manufactured.not bad i say.
by: 75.155.177.92

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What's this? posted by mark H on 3/1/2009 at 7:36:50 AM
after a closer look,i think 70s paint on frame and fenders,chaincase is not matching more powdery black,dropstand doesnt match.carbide lamp aftermarket,as well as the holder.cheap 70s cottered crank arms.i could go on but im getting bored.they made these indian bikes back in the 50s but this doesnt look like one.
by: 75.155.177.92

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What's this? posted by Matthew on 3/1/2009 at 9:34:10 AM
Modern and Indian.

Matthew - enough said.
by: 82.13.21.217

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What's this? posted by Keith Body on 3/1/2009 at 12:15:49 PM
Carbide lamp with a wick???? Its oil.
Surely Indian (or Asian) imitation of a 1920's English cycle.
by: 92.19.217.204

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What's this? posted by Zach Mathews on 3/2/2009 at 11:14:17 AM
I just noticed the Phillips pedals. Nicest thing about this bike, other than that tidy little Indian headlamp.
by: 75.1.5.214




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AGE / VALUE:   Where's the logic in all this ! posted by: Steve on 2/28/2009 at 10:19:38 AM
Went into a major bicycle retailers in the UK today.

New bikes with 18 gears were available for £79.99 and for good measure, Thomas the Tank Engine kiddies bikes (with stableisers) were available for a "price busting" £99.99 !

Obviously...you pays yer money, you takes yer choice !

Maybe I'm just not hip, awesome, cool or hop...it just strikes me as odd that you can get a used, solid, better quality, traditional three speed bike (or five speed) for much less outlay than the above, and if fed and stroked occasionally it will last forever and never let you down, yet people go for poor (but theoretically modern) quality.

I've recently dismantled two or three worn out £79.99 bikes...they're £79.99 for a reason (although they should really be £29.99)!

I don't know anyone in these parts that needs 18 gears (apart from truck drivers), it sort of falls into the same category as four wheel drive vehicles in the middle of Europes largest traffic congested concrete city...what the h*ll is the point of that !

O.K., that's that of my chest, I feel much better now.

Someone please feel free to correct me if I'm missing the point somewhere.

Steve - three speeds on my wagon...and I'm still rolling along comfortably thank you very much !
by: 93.96.36.127

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Where's the logic in all this ! posted by mark H on 2/28/2009 at 4:04:09 PM
i have tried fixing 100-200 dollar variety store bicycles,and they dont fix well, unless i put a 50-70s part on them.they charge alot because people are lazy and dont complain or wont quit buying the junk.theres plenty of used bicycles around but people are lazy and would rather spend 300 on something shiny,terrible situation. im glad i dont live that way!give me a single sp 1930s bike and it will outlive me if i take care of it.
by: 75.155.177.92

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Where's the logic in all this ! posted by Kevin on 3/1/2009 at 4:27:37 AM
An old neighborhood used-bike man told me that he couldn't GIVE nice three-speeds away to college students. They all wanted mountain bikes, even if they were junk. The situation is even worse with children -- they always want NEW bikes and their parents are silly enough to play along. The market for old three-speeds is pretty limited, despite the quality, charm, history and utility that we see in them.
by: 205.188.116.69

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Where's the logic in all this ! posted by Vin on 3/1/2009 at 5:48:46 AM
In my shop (Cambridge, MA) I cannot give away mountain bikes and I cannot keep enough 3-speeds in stock...
by: 71.184.108.192

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Where's the logic in all this ! posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 3/1/2009 at 6:05:17 AM
Well... not for nothing, but to me it's all a product of the modern "End Of The Month Bottom Line and we see NOTHING ELSE" business model. Or perhaps a corollary thereof.

I had a number of friends that years ago spent considerable time and money learning to become electronics technicians. In what became the age of throw-away Televisions.... none of them pursue that avocation. There's really a VERY limited market for their skills.

It all has a lot to do with simple appreciation.... Look at the machines our friend over at the Flying Pigeon Project has posted pictures of. They are quite literally the lifeblood... or at least main mode of transportation for their owners. Much like what our Roadsters and Sports were originally designed and used for. Hence, whilst bearing the many and obvious signs of long term use, they are still being ridden and used daily. In fact... pursuant to the info on the site... there are "Bike Doctors" profligate throughout the realm!

Today's modern "Wal*Mart" bicycle... many wearing such venerable brands as "Schwinn" and "Huffy".... are quite typically and literally "Toys". In an age where everything is given in copious quantity to today's youth, you're actually better off having cheap crap available. I had given a rather expensive GT MTB to a young fellow in the neighborhood.... The machine has spent not one 1 overnight indoors in the four years he's owned it. Yes... what was originally a $300 (1993 dollars) machine has spent the balance of it's life in rain, snow, sleet... whatever.

Now... compare that to my first Raleigh.... that I sweated for two entire summers for mowing lawns... to save up the princely sum of $100 (1970 dollars / eleven years old) to procure.

It was revered... meticulously maintained and looked after. NEVER left outdoors unattended never mind in the rain, etc. It was, as a teenage lad, my primary means of transportation and it took me everywhere.

I recall when I procured my daughter's first "decent" bicycle... I went to all the department stores at the time and could not find one single machine... that had brakes that would properly stop the bicycle. I ended up getting her a rather pricey Nishiki... but that thing would STOP lemme tellya....

SO... we're back to the "you get what you pay for" deal. Go to one of the websites that has an inflation calculator.... and see what one of these $99 marvels would have sold for during the golden age of Raleigh....

I bet it was for next to NOTHING....

Later!!!!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - wow... that became quite the rant... :-S
by: 4.154.217.151

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Where's the logic in all this ! posted by Matthew on 3/1/2009 at 9:42:34 AM
When folks are chucking away bicycles I usually intervene, as I do when they have a bicycle needing repairs. However I never ever get involved when the bicycle is a 'Universal'. My experience of this brand is appalling, quality, finish, build etc.

Cheap bikes are as we say 'cheap and nasty'.

I would rather restore a complete wreck from an English maker than pump the tyres up on a supermarket horror.

Matthew - bah humbug!
by: 82.13.21.217

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Where's the logic in all this ! posted by Steve on 3/1/2009 at 10:32:42 AM
That was going to be my next question...what was £79 equivalent to in 1960 !

Seems convenience, shininess, laziness and/or ignorance wins through with the majority of folk.

Funnily enough (Matthew) I did have a Universal drop into my hands recently, and guess what...it was so bad, it was undismantleable (in the conventional manner), I've managed to make good temporary use of it though as part of a security fence...that is until, it rots away in about two years time !

Now for something completely different, I saw a man as tall as a lamppost yesterday !

Let me explain, I've noticed one or two new well equipped double top-bar traditional Dutch style bikes in the London area recently, they're very similar in dimensions to a 28" Roadster, funny thing is, when you get a very tall man riding one of these (with the seat raised to its maximum height)...you could easily mistake him for a mobile lamppost maintenance engineer !

O.K., that's something else off my chest, I feel even better now.

Steve - Five foot twelve.

by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Where's the logic in all this ! posted by Chris on 3/3/2009 at 9:51:12 AM
Ignatz and his son hated, detested- to their very marrow, the chain stores, but today, you'll see the Schwinn bike at Walmart anyways. This is a recent thing, long after Ignatz and his son had passed away the Schwinn company has been sold at least 3 times. Read the book: No Hands the rise and fall of the Schwinn bicycle company. by: Judith Crown and Glen Coleman the book is some years old itself now too.
by: 69.153.86.42




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by: Bill on 2/27/2009 at 8:31:13 PM
I have a Windsor Super Carrera purchased in 1979. I pulled it out of storage last year and started riding it again. I've broken 3 spokes so far. My LBS says the tensile strength of the spokes is gone and I should replace the entire wheel but I like having the original rims and hubs. Does anyone have a similar experience and what did you do?
by: 65.190.223.50

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 2/28/2009 at 5:18:29 AM
Uhm... perhaps this might seem obtuse... and I don't at all mean anything pejorative but to me a simple solution, if the spokes have lost all their "tensile" strength as your LBS said, would be to re-lace the wheel with new spokes?

That would pretty much ensure you're retaining your hub and rim.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Every onc in a while I actually DO see... the obvious. ;-)
by: 4.154.216.102

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Kevin on 2/28/2009 at 9:58:18 AM
You nailed it, Boneman.
by: 64.12.116.69

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Keith Body on 2/28/2009 at 12:33:13 PM
Probably the spokes were never very good. I used 80 ton tensile spokes, used to build about 1500 wheels a year in my retail shop (in the 1960's) tension around theoretical 200 pounds. One of the many reasons I don't like the cycles you people love is typically and needlessly poor construction. Most production bike hubs have spoke holes far too large, so that the bend in the spoke is pulled straighter, and breaks. One reason for the large clearance for 14G (2mm) spokes plus rolled thread was to make the assembly quicker. I could loose assemble a 40 spoke wheel in 3 minutes, a decent large scale factory time would be 2.5 minutes. Also the hub flanges are too thin. If you look at a decent Campagnolo hub you will see the thicker flanges, holes that you can just get a 15G (1.8mm) spoke through with a bit of effort, and alternate countersink to support the bend in the spoke. I used to build anything from 8 ounce rims with 24 spokes to take racing stresses, to your 32 ounce types.
Its easy enough to rebuild with new spokes, best way forward.
by: 92.21.44.208

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Steve on 2/28/2009 at 3:32:46 PM
Keith, you obviously speak with great knowledge (and experience).
I like your line "I don't like the cycles you people love".

I would love to hear your comments concerning build quality surrounding todays mass produced imported £79.99 (and cheaper) 18 speed jobs from a major High Street retailer probably not so very far from you.

I can't understand why an average fair weather cyclist would ever want 18 gears, surely three or five is ample.

Steve



by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Matthew on 3/1/2009 at 9:46:22 AM
There you go Steve, exaggerating again. There is a great deal to be said for a single speed bicycle. Who needs gears? They just complicate matters.

Who am I to say such a thing? A man who has cycled hundreds of miles on a single speed bike up and down hill.
(and a friend of Steve).

Matthew - one speed; flat out!
by: 82.13.21.217

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Steve on 3/1/2009 at 10:40:54 AM
Shhhhhh.....but my favourite bike is a single speed..it's in bits at the moment, but don't tell anyone !

Steve - no speed, worn out !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Keith Body on 3/1/2009 at 12:42:36 PM
Hi Steve, As someone has already said, those cheap bikes are regarded as toys, not likely to be ridden much, and in any gear that happens to be stuck. To the child, 21 is bound to be better than 18, and fashion dictates the look, not the quality. I spent some years improving the rideability of all sorts of bikes, rather than let the brakes and chain rust solid.
However, as a cyclist covering more than 15000 miles a year in the 1950's, the bike and riding position were important. First shoes were firmly attached to the pedals, weight distribution between saddle pedals and handlebar, (not right over the back wheel) light rims, and tyres as near to a solid block of air as was practical. Then you can feel the gear spacing, around 5% to 7%, so 10 gears all used. Also important to have 3 or 4 different positions on the handlebars. And the lower centre of gravity, bottom bracket centre about 10 1/2 inches above ground. The range of 10 gears would be slightly wider than the AW 3.
If you roadster lovers want a really comfortable and efficient bike, then get a 1950's to 1960's Rene Herse or Alex Singer, and you would throw away these antiquated Raleighs. (1925 type, which were disappearing rapidly in UK in the 1930's). I would welcome your comments, email if you like.
by: 92.19.217.204

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Steve on 3/1/2009 at 1:29:51 PM
Keith, that's an impressive average of 41 miles a day (every day), I'd be ashamed to confess to my daily riding mileage.
Thanks for the technical/practical information, and look forward to observing the riot that you may have caused amongst the Antiquated Raleigh Owners Club !

Steve - straight from the Herses mouth !


by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Popping spokes on my Windsor Super Carrera posted by Steve Whitting on 6/13/2009 at 10:43:26 AM
The problem with most of the modern lower-priced (and even some higher-priced) that boast "18-speeds" is that they don't have 18 USABLE gears. For starters, some derailleurs can't handle the largest freewheel sprocket and large chainring combination. Then there's the matter of gear-inches: are there duplicated (or almost duplicated) gears? I set up my 1977 Ciocc San Cristobal with a 13-15-17-19-21-23 freewheel and 52-41 chainrings so that it has eight usable gears with an easy shift pattern that my early 80s Campy Super Record derailleurs handle effortlessly.
by: 66.186.227.123




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by: greg on 2/26/2009 at 6:21:01 PM
Here's the Handsworth DL-1 I bought last December. It's a single speed, a '75 with an enclosed chain. So far all I've done is proofhide the seat & shoe polished the frame while compiling a list of things that will need tending to.

I have a few questions before I start in: The seat is a Brooks B66L. What does the L stand for? Did the DL-1 cotters have the Raleigh "R" bolt? I have a 3-speeed woman's I'm going to flip & it has the "R" bolts.

I want to use it to run to the store for milk & bread. Any suggestions for a period correct (looking) source for a front basket?

My first post was about the missing fork crown thimble. The solution was literally under my nose. On the Raleigh Record I bought in 1971 & has been sitting on an exerciser for 2 decades. I ride it when snowbound.


by: 65.96.144.65


  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by mark H on 2/26/2009 at 10:48:53 PM
nice bike but a bit to fuzzy fer me eyes.one thing ive learned over the years about milk and bread-have a rack for the milk and the bread goes in the basket.i figured that out after squishing bread a dozen times.
by: 75.155.177.92

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by greg on 2/27/2009 at 6:16:11 AM
Picture looked fine until I put my glasses on. Will do over after work.
by: 70.91.132.129

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by chris on 2/27/2009 at 8:44:34 AM
the l stands for ladies you have a ladies model seat on the mans bike a mix up it happens should have a gents model seat on the bike
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by greg on 2/27/2009 at 7:32:52 PM
lets try again...


by: 65.96.144.65


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by greg on 2/27/2009 at 7:57:06 PM
one more time...


by: 65.96.144.65


           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by Matthew on 3/1/2009 at 9:54:20 AM
Hi Greg,

Nice looking machine. Chris is correct about the saddle but if its comfy don't worry about changing it.

You obviously meant to write 'R' nuts not bolts. I don't sign up to the fascination with these fittings and they post date your bike so don't worry about them either.

A wicker basket rather than a wire one will be just the job for your bread and the milk can go on a pressed steel or tube steel rack at the back. Of course the bread could go in a large saddle bag such as a Midland.

Matthew - because opinions matter.
by: 82.13.21.217

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by Chris on 3/2/2009 at 6:07:39 PM
yes, if it's comfy keep it, nobody will know.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tourist Questions posted by greg on 3/8/2009 at 10:49:45 AM
Thanks for the replies. I figured the L meant ladies. It is comfy & not going anywhere
by: 76.19.23.157




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AGE / VALUE:   Columbia of Birmingham? posted by: Ken on 2/26/2009 at 5:37:20 PM
Hi everyone, a buddy of mine found an old Columbia bicycle. It is an English roadster with a 21" frame for 26x13/8 tyres. The headbadge has a globe that has Columbia and Birmingham on it. On the frame, it says Made in England. There is an oil port on the bottom bracket. Does anyone know of this company. We only see information on US Columbias on the Internet. Thanks in advance for any advice.

by: 164.78.248.57

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Columbia of Birmingham? posted by Chris on 2/27/2009 at 8:54:30 AM
Columbia wanted a English lightweight bike of their own to sell under the Columbia name so they had another company make the bike for them and they stuck the Columbia name on it.

I think Phillips from Birmingham made the bike for Columbia. This was common practice and it still goes on.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Columbia of Birmingham? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 2/28/2009 at 5:21:16 AM
Chris, I was thinking the same thing but was unsure as to the actual history. Huffy did the same when they had the "Sportsman" built by Raleigh.

Interesting to see that Columbia did the same. Odd too... as both Huff and Columbia did manufacture their own "Light Roadsters" in the US.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - "English" meand made in England
by: 4.154.216.102




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MISC:   sw axle nuts same as Aw's? posted by: mark on 2/25/2009 at 9:29:58 PM
hi folks-- my 58 raleigh sports has a rear sw --i wantto put on an AW--are the lock nuts, washers etc the same--that is could i use these SW items on an AW that lacks sam4? thanks
by: 166.70.39.73

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           RE:MISC:   sw axle nuts same as Aw's? posted by David on 2/26/2009 at 4:05:49 PM
I'd be VERY surprised if they were different. The indicator rod may be different, however. (Anyone have an SW parts list?)
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:MISC:   sw axle nuts same as Aw's? posted by Chris on 2/27/2009 at 8:42:32 AM
same nuts but yes, the indicator chain parts are unique to the s.w.
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AGE / VALUE:   Phillips Bicyle posted by: Ian on 2/25/2009 at 7:21:31 PM
I have a Phillips bicycle, the rear hub is a 3 speed "Sturmey-Archer" Model - AW. The year on the hub says 55 so i think it is a 1955. Thing is i am not sure, i would like to know a rough value and age. Thanks for anyones help.


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Phillips Bicyle posted by Warren on 2/25/2009 at 8:39:06 PM
It's a Raleigh made Philips, '55 is likely correct, missing the original saddle, pedals also look like 70's, the rear mudguard stays are odd (maybe replaced), the reflector seems too low, the stem looks like an SR alloy replacement, the chrome looks good. Maybe original tires and tubes with metal valve stems. Paint should shine up with some wax. Ballpark value between $75 and $300.

by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Phillips Bicyle posted by Kevin on 2/26/2009 at 5:24:56 AM
Around here (Indiana), it might bring $25 to $50. The small frame size also hurts the value. It would be too small for most men, and most boys have no interest in old three-speeds.
by: 205.188.116.69

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Phillips Bicyle posted by Geoff Rogers on 2/26/2009 at 11:18:34 AM
Your bike appears to be a late 60s or early 70s Raleigh-made Phillips. I agree, the stem and saddle are recent additions, made in Asia. I suspect the rear wheel has been changed if it's dated 55. Raleigh did not make Phillips cycles until 1960 or so. Check the bottom bracket. If there is an oil port, the bike is pre-1964. If not, it's '64 plus. Also, if it was made in Nottingham, it's Raleigh made and therefore post 1960. If the badge reads "Birmingham," it's made by Phillips/TI, before 1961. I can't read the badge.
Geoff
by: 216.153.152.113

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Phillips Bicyle posted by Chris on 2/27/2009 at 8:55:47 AM
funky down tube decals
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AGE / VALUE:   Senility at age 40 posted by: Chris on 2/24/2009 at 6:29:32 PM
Moving day was yesterday and the truck was waiting outside and those lovely rod brake handlebars with that rare 3/4 speed shifter got left on the box by the window back at the house. Totally no excuse for that!


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Senility at age 40 posted by Chris on 3/2/2009 at 6:10:41 PM
Arrangements are made for the recovery of handlebars, my 3 speed coaster brake, a fork, and other bits I left behind.
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MISC:   New Rims? posted by: Keith on 2/22/2009 at 9:40:37 PM
I've been commuting daily for several months on a 1964 "Royal" by D.P. Harris English 3 speed. People on this forum graciously gave me info on this bike when I bought it last year. I really like the bike and think it's a good commuter. I live in a hilly town and all my local utitity cycling is within 5 miles of my house. The original rims look good, but have dents and even a puncture that cause clunking when I brake. Of course there's also the dismal wet weather braking that you all know about. I feel that replacing the rims with Sun CR-18's would be a big improvement and I really don't have a problem going a bit modern with the wheels. I am very hesitant to spend over $200 for new wheels on a bike that I paid $40 for. So far most of the money I've spent on the bike has been for components that could be moved to another bike, like saddle, pedals, etc. I imagine that I've already put way more money into this bike than I could sell it for. If I invest in new wheels, I feel like I'm making a very long-term commitment to keeping the bike and using it every day. I love the nostalgia of riding a 45 year old English 3 speed, but also want to be practical as a utilitarian cyclist. Any advice out there or recommendations? My options seem to be to get the new rims, leave the bike as is, or possibly save for a modern touring type cycle. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Keith
by: 70.144.80.158

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           RE:MISC:   New Rims? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 2/23/2009 at 3:27:49 AM
Sounds like you're on the right track in a way. What I might be tempted to do is perhaps look for a spare wheelset on Ebay, etc. and possibly find an additional set of alloy wheels and lace those up.

Thusly you could retain your original wheelset to re-install should you perhaps move on to another machine.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - rolling cloud? NEVER! ;-)
by: 4.154.219.172

           RE:MISC:   New Rims? posted by Warren on 2/23/2009 at 10:50:11 AM
There's nothing wrong with making "long term" commitments with your bikes although it's real easy to be unfaithful. (I'm a polygamist with my rides) Putting money into wheels will give you better brakes and keep you riding. The bike is not going to be devalued, really. It's not about recouping money, the things you get back from cycling are far more valuable than the money you put into it.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:MISC:   New Rims? posted by Stephen on 2/24/2009 at 8:05:07 AM
Keith,

As a utility cyclist, I think the question "What is your alternative to $200 wheels" is more relevant than the amount you paid for the bicyle.

In the past, I've paid $100 for Brooks saddles to put on 3 speeds I bought for $20, but if this gives me a comfortable and rideable bicycle for $120, this is cheaper than a month's car insurance in Philadelphia, or 2 months's parking costs in Wilmington. In this case, the alternative cost far more than $120.

If you don't have much rain or snow, and the $200 is signficant, it may be easier to drive a few days a year, or buy a cheap alternative bike with better rims for bad weather.

Another cheaper alternative may be to use KoolStop/Scott Matthauser brake pads with your current rims, and see if they give acceptable performance.

Depending on your mechanical skill, you might be able to reduce the price to $100 or so if you are can just buy new rims and spokes, and build the wheels yourself. It can be faster to do your own work, but it depends on your interest and ability, and how significant the $100 is to you.

I don't think anyone is concerned with devaluing a $40-$100 3 speed, but you are correct, you wouldn't use these rims on another bicycle, and they are unlikely to increase any resale value it is likely to have. If you've found the bike easy to ride for the past year, $200 for wheels you'll use for another year doesn't sound too expensive compared to transportation costs near Philadelphia, but you could start with better brake pads or look for another cheap bike if cost is an issue.
by: 69.141.165.135

           RE:RE:MISC:   New Rims? posted by Chris on 2/24/2009 at 6:28:10 PM
Go for it and when you find a different bike, something more valuable or something that will be an improvement or something that calls to you to be bought, worked on and also ridden and enjoyed remember that these wheels can be put on that bike.

Componet parts are carried along with you on the journey until you arrive at the frame of all frames and then you are "there" You will find another frame that you will like better than this one and then you'll want those awesome wheels on that bike.
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AGE / VALUE:   raleigh tourist posted by: mike on 2/22/2009 at 7:42:59 AM
I have an old raleigh tourist that is in rough shape but very restorable. It has all the parts except air pump,taillight and nuts for front wheel. It has a dynohub and light setup, also a full chainguard, and rod brakse. PLease let me know if you want pics and I will send them out ASAP I cant get pics to work on here.I am selling it for $125.00.
by: 71.10.252.110

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   raleigh tourist posted by JDuck on 2/22/2009 at 8:36:44 AM
Mike, I might be interested. What is the frame size and where are you located? Also what year?
by: 66.254.211.56

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   raleigh tourist posted by mike on 2/22/2009 at 12:58:04 PM
I am located in uxbridge MA. You can call my cell @617-538 9974 if you are interested.
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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26" Men's bicycle posted by: Brad from Greenacres, FL on 2/21/2009 at 7:04:15 PM
Hey guys, I haven't posted for quite awhile, new job and very busy ! I did a small job for a retired 90 year English Teacher earlier this month and when I had to find something for her in her garage I noticed the telltale shape of an old English bicycle in there. I got my flashlight out and saw that it was an old Triumph bicycle. When I finished the job for her on my next day off, she asked what she owed me and I asked if she was willing to give me the bike as my payment. She said it had once belonged to her late husband and hadn't been out of the garage in years. She did give me the bike and I took it home. I haven't been able to find out very much about the bike. I know more about Raleigh's than anything else. I have a 1961 Ladies Colt, a 1963 Colt, and a 1964 Colt. I ride the 63 Colt most of the time.
The rear hub is a 40S S/A SC, and the only numbers I can read say "10" but no year. I was not able to find any serial number anywhere on the bike. My best guess would have to put it in the mid to late 60's due to the type of chainguard on it. It does not have the braze on's like the 68 or newer Raleigh's. I've seen a few early 1970's Triumph's on the internet. They all seem to come in black. It still had the original Raleigh Record tires and matching Raleigh "Foreign" tubes in the tires. I replaced the tires with new Kenda tires and tubes (I've stored away the original tires and tubes) I've been riding the bike around a bit and it rides quite nicely. I like the 23" frame, it fits me pretty well. Is it worth holding onto this one or should I sell it ? I've been looking for a Raleigh with a larger frame (like a Superbe)


by: 72.144.99.182


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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26 posted by Matthew on 2/22/2009 at 3:23:05 AM
Keep it. It looks like a good'un.

Matthew - off to Church.
by: 82.13.17.220

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26 posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 2/22/2009 at 6:57:11 AM
I would agree as to the approximate age. Early 60's. A very nice example of a basic, single speed light sports machine. Seeing as you're in the land of "flat" down there, I daresay you can get away with a single speed.

Not here... in fact... I couldn't get away without SNOW tyres at the moment.

Nice find!

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Winter BLUNDER land. THAT's what it is.
by: 4.154.221.109

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26 posted by sam on 2/22/2009 at 6:03:42 PM
I couldn't get away without SNOW tyres at the moment.
I got a set of those.Snow tyres for a 28" raleigh.
by: 69.152.138.177

           RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26 posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 2/23/2009 at 3:30:40 AM
I can't imagine you getting a lot of use out of those in your locale, Sam... but I suppose one never knows, eh?

Meanwhile... I don't think I would ever take the DL-1 out in this weather. My car looks like a salt lick at the moment... I sure don't need the bicycles looking that way.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - waiting for spring!
by: 4.154.219.172

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26 posted by Geoff Rogers on 2/23/2009 at 12:28:50 PM
Brad,
It's definitely early 70s, but the single speed hubs did not have dates, I believe. Try a little car wax and you will be pleasantly surprised at how nice that black enamel will come up, a little chrome polish on the rims, and I would use #0 steel wool (I know-- alot of people are afraid it will scratch the chrome, but I have been using steel wool on British chrome for over 30 years now, and have not seen it cause a scratch--it's VERY hard stuff, is British chrome!) on the rusty chrome bits, followed by wax to keep it from rusting again. As to the desirability of a Superbe over the single-speed Triumph, well, that is a different animal altogether. The Superbe is the top of the line, three actual gears, two brakes, bynohub and lights, locking fork. Early ones had FOUR gears and a Lucas bell, as well as an enclosed gearcase, not to mention saddlebag, tools, pump, and a leather Broosk saddle. Three speeds are great, but fewer than that seems like not quite enough, to my mind. But the 23" frame is a little unusual, and the Triumph is s fine bicycle, no doubt of that.
by: 216.153.152.113

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26 posted by Brad from Greenacres, FL on 2/23/2009 at 1:05:51 PM
Guys,

Thank you so much for the responses and the advice. You've all been a great help. I'm certainly going to keep the Triumph. I'll be adding a Brooks saddle and seat bag to it shortly. I've just sent a set of fenders (mudguards) to the metal restoration shop for sandblasting. Once I get them back I'll paint them up with some primer and a few coats of gloss black and a new white triangle on the rear. I'm real proud of my English roadsters !
by: 72.144.99.182

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26 posted by sam on 2/23/2009 at 8:05:30 PM
Larry your so right about the salt---I once saw a 3 year old bike ridden on the beach regularly!poor bike
by: 69.152.138.177

           RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Triumph 26 posted by Chris on 3/2/2009 at 6:16:26 PM
Oooohhhh, those are the studded tires from Mexico.
by: 69.153.86.42




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AGE / VALUE:   OLD Raleigh tourist for sale posted by: Kevin on 2/21/2009 at 5:47:56 PM
THe "for sale" section of oldroads has an ad for a Raleigh Tourist, asking $125. I just got the photos from the seller. It's probably 1940s, 3-speed with quadrant shifter, Dynohub, both fenders, full chaincase, rod brakes, large men's frame. It's very rough but restorable, and a good deal for someone who could pick it up in Massachusetts.
by: 205.188.116.138

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   OLD Raleigh tourist for sale posted by Hal on 3/3/2009 at 8:42:00 PM
I bought the bike today. The rear has a rod acuated drum brake. Plan on replacing front brake pads, new tires and tubes, a good cleaning, lube, and ride it.
by: 68.14.65.41

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   OLD Raleigh tourist for sale posted by Chris on 3/8/2009 at 11:32:47 AM
ohh, nice bike I had some of those in my collection the rod threads into the drum hub that's a bonus!!
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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   phillips manhattan any other info out there posted by: mark on 2/20/2009 at 11:46:19 PM
Hi, I am looking for any additional info on the phillips Manhattan--i think i have seen the few posts there are in this site--the rear dynohub on mine indicates an aug of 1960 date, badge on front and also rear mudguard seems to be brass and says Birmingham. this one has full chain case. Cranks are Williams, just saw the reference to those..Can anyone recommend period magazines that might have carried ads for these? thanks
by: 166.70.39.73

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