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English Roadsters


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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rod brake linkage & the kickstand posted by: Steve H. on 1/22/2009 at 7:23:28 AM
I recently received the gift of a disassembled Raleigh DL-1 Tourist. As received, there was a Pletscher kickstand installed an inch behind the bottom bracket. The rod brake linkage passes under the bottom bracket and on to the rear U assembly. It was so tight against the underside of the kickstand bolt mount region that it actually wore a groove in the alloy. Clearly, this is not as it should be!

I know that a rear chainstay or axle mount kickstand might be more appropriate, but given the weight of the bike, a BB area mount might be more stable. And I've seen plenty of pictures with conventional kickstands on DL-1's. Can anybody please post / send me a picture showing how the linkage clears the kickstand? I was thinking that perhaps with the old style kickstands with the exposed spring that maybe the brake rod passes 'thru' the shell of the kickstand?

Thanks for the help,

Steve


by: 129.42.208.172


  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rod brake linkage & the kickstand posted by Chris on 1/22/2009 at 10:22:57 AM
The Esge kickstand was made to accomadate this rod brake linkage. May I see a picture of the top or the other end I need to see the kickstand's mounting top piece.


I leaned across the guys desk and bought the wooden carving that had a guy on a highwheel bike it said "Esge" the supplier was going out of business it was an awesomwe addition to my collection. I love their kickstands that go to the D.L.1'S.

Esge is still around.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rod brake linkage & the kickstand posted by Chris on 1/22/2009 at 10:24:08 AM
Still Esge is German and nowheres as magical as the alloy Raleigh kickstand with Sir Walter on it.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rod brake linkage & the kickstand posted by David on 1/22/2009 at 3:38:24 PM
I use one of the stands that clamps to the frame end. It's worked fine. I think it's more stable when I have something on the rear rack.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rod brake linkage & the kickstand posted by Steve on 3/21/2010 at 6:06:12 PM
I ran across two Raliegh English Touring bikes with rod brakes in excellent condition. I believe they are mid 1970's. Does anyone know how much they are worth?
by: 71.115.36.50




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phil Woods BB posted by: Caleb on 1/21/2009 at 7:18:36 PM
I have a Raleigh Tourist (I believe, only indication is the wheel size) and I am going to use a Phil Woods BB in order to convert to Cotterless Cranks. I am concerned about spindle length and crank clearance. Does anyone have a recommendation on determining this measurement? Thanks.
by: 71.62.148.85

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Phil Woods BB posted by Al on 1/22/2009 at 1:05:51 PM

Hey Caleb,

I'm working on this, too. I think it's a cool way, albeit expensive way, to keep an old Raleigh pedaling when you don't have the original parts. The new spindle has to be long enough to accommodate the Tourist's wide 71mm bottom bracket shell. Check out the late, great Sheldon Brown's site if you haven't already. He came up with a couple options to go cotter free.

http://sheldonbrown.com/raleigh26.html

I decided to go with a Shimano UN71 and Phil Wood 26 tpi cups. I'll look up the spindle length if you want. It was long, like 125mm. Maybe you don't need it that long. I like using Phil Wood cups, because you can adjust them inside the bottom bracket to get the right chainline. If you come up with a better way to go, let me know.









by: 71.135.58.254

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phil Woods BB posted by David on 1/22/2009 at 3:43:47 PM
Taiwanese YST threadless BB might work (and is MUCH cheaper than Phil!!) See http://tinyurl.com/clmx2v

by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phil Woods BB posted by Caleb on 1/22/2009 at 4:25:16 PM
Al, that would be great if you could look up the spindle length. i have looked through the Sheldon Brown Articles but found no mention of the spindle length for the Tourist. Also, am I incorrect in my understanding that spindle length is reliant on crank specifications?
by: 71.62.148.85

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phil Woods BB posted by Chris on 1/23/2009 at 7:43:24 PM
I don't understand why somebody doesn't take a spindle out of the d.l.1. and take it to the machinist and alter it so it resembles a cotterless crank spindle on each end. Keep the original Raleigh bottom bracket cups.
by: 207.69.137.8

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Phil Woods BB posted by Al on 1/24/2009 at 1:23:18 PM


Caleb, I'll dig around my bike barn this weekend. Still haven't finished the project myself.

Those threadless BBs look cool. Anyone use one?

Chris, sounds like you might want to invest in a nice Mori-Seiki high speed lathe... Around here, Oakland, CA, nearly all the machinists shops have closed up. I bet there's one lying in a warehouse just waiting to get to work.

New cranks usually sit outboard the old Raleigh cranks. No frame clearance problems, but now you have the goofy sounding "Q factor" to worry about!

http://sheldonbrown.com/bridgestone/1991/pages/bridgestone-1991-13.htm

Does just seem easier to use original parts. But I don't have any! Just a DL-1 frame, headset and bars. And a lot more respect for the Raleigh engineers who I'm sure consulted James Bond's esteemed colleague Q on the whole Q factor.






by: 71.135.50.226

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phil Woods BB posted by Caleb on 2/2/2009 at 8:59:07 PM
I have found some cranks that I like but they require a 108mm spindle in order to achieve the 42mm chainline I am going for. Is this unreasonable? Am I completely wrong in thinking this will work? Also Sheldon mentioned that one still use the 68mm Phil BB in order for the cones to sit flush? Help, I really want to finish this bike.
by: 24.125.36.42




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AGE / VALUE:    posted by: mark H on 1/19/2009 at 5:02:11 PM
putting a enclosed chaincase was quite the undertaking,i remember someone here saying,if it doesnt fit dont force it!well i forced a few things and had to take my crank off 6 times.and then i tried to bend the sprocket cover plate a bit,boy did i pay for that.i have about 30 hrs in this,but in the end no rubbing and now a proud chaincased bicycle owner!!


by: 66.183.152.3


  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 1/19/2009 at 5:08:23 PM
i will touch it up on the bike,i wouldnt want to do all that again.


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 1/19/2009 at 5:23:47 PM
1 more.this really changed the look of my bike.now i can post in english roadster ,without thinking,no enclosed chainguard?


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/19/2009 at 6:42:51 PM
Very nice! Is that an original chaincase... or one recently manufactured o'erseas someplace? I can't quite tell from the pics but it sure looks new.

30 hours.... Wow.... I daresay, at least for your efforts the results are extremely gratifying!

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - You got that covered!!!!
by: 4.154.218.206

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 1/19/2009 at 8:09:46 PM
thanks boneman!i dont actually know,the only thing different on this case is the back bolt holes,there in different spots.compared to 30s 40s raleigh or hercules?this is the case bytheway.and im happy with it.at least i know how to install one, because i have a sweet phillips lookin for the same.its jealous now!


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 1/19/2009 at 8:14:36 PM
ow ya the newer ones dont have the bottom buldging belly,well not as much anyway.i looked at one in town here.it was from india.and not as nice as this one.
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark h on 1/19/2009 at 9:31:16 PM
i found where it came from,india. but i think the guy said it was antique.they have been making bicycles for 50 years.the one i could have bought looked alot different,anyways there you have it.


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/20/2009 at 3:30:56 AM
The guys at yellowjersey sell them new. Eastman is the branding I believe. They're a bit pricey as well.

I've pondered getting one for the DL-1 but would have to do something to weather it in order for it to match the 34 year old paint on my machine.

That being the case, I have to wonder also how much clearance I would have around that 23T sprocket on the back. I'm sure there's room... but less so than say the stock 19T units.

Perhaps I'll just for the moment have to be quite thrilled with the installation of the wonderful SS wheels I procured from Geoff. At least for the time being. ;-)

Still... there IS something about a full chaincase.... that if nothing else... just might prove motivating....

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - CAD (Chaincase Acquisition Disorder), anyone?
by: 4.154.220.72

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Stephen Hogben on 1/20/2009 at 8:53:07 AM
Enclosed chain cases!what a nightmare,did one on my Rudge Whitworth,think it was an oilbath as it still had oil in the bottom,chain was oily and all parts inside were perfectly preserved!Went out for a ride today down Basingstoke Canal towpath,went about 4 miles then realised that front tyre was a bit flat(This was on the Hercules Popular)went to pump it up then noticed all the spokes were loose.Took wheel off and went to local bike shop,Yes sir we can do that for you,not today,leave wheel with us will cost you £20.Bike only cost 50p! How much for a spoke spanner I ask £3.99 he replies,give me the spanner (wrench) then please!Tightened spokes lovely apart one which snapped! Still going to be cheaper than the shop!
by: 86.0.56.31

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 1/20/2009 at 7:22:37 PM
i had a flat monday,i couldnt believe it.it was the front i had punture resistant tube,kevlar cover.my back tire has nothing but a crappy tube with patches from the 70s on it,bad tire and all.i thought i broke a spoke couple of mnths ago,as i was riding i heard clip clip clip,pulled over a bent finishing nail,i was a block from a bike shop so i pulled it out.no flat.im putting a crappy tube in the front this time.


boneman.... you talkin stainless steel?cuz i have 2 28 inchers with bad hubs ccm,there is no rust on them,i suspect there from the 50s?i dunno.
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Warren on 1/21/2009 at 6:24:12 PM
If the hubs are CCM then the 28 inch rims are likely canadian size and fit a 700c size tire. I don't remember seeing CCM's with stainless rims but it's possible. The chrome Dunlops were very rust resistant as well.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark H on 1/21/2009 at 10:39:12 PM
hello warren.i have a rear dunlop on one of my phillips,its very hard to find a tire to fit,its a 26,i forgot the size,and if it wasnt so dark in my shed i would run out and get it.there was only 2 tires in my town of 300,000 .ccm-the stainless rims have no markings,there flat in the centre also,they were on a 50s ccm.with a kickback brake,and the bike sat outside for years.i thought the rims looked funny,they were just dirty,and a swipe of my finger and just like new.i will get pictures in the next few days.there quite heavy.maybe someone got aftermarket for the bike?i dont know.ow i think i have a picture of the bike,im gonna look.
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by markH on 1/21/2009 at 10:41:37 PM
heres a pic of the bike.ccm unknown year with stainless rims.


by: 66.183.152.3





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AGE / VALUE:   Albert Einstein rode a Raleigh? posted by: Chris on 1/19/2009 at 8:47:14 AM
Saw a documentary on Albert Einstein on T.V. it talked about how he sat and worked on theory on his deathbed and about his reaction after Hiroshima. They show a genuine Raleigh 28 inch wheel Tourist bike on his porch. It was a recreation however and not an actual picture of his porch and his bike. There is a famous poster of him riding a bike at Cal Tech but that bike was not a Raleigh.
by: 71.40.121.165

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Albert Einstein rode a Raleigh? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/19/2009 at 1:07:54 PM
This would be the pic. And no... not a Roadster methinks.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Not everyone's smart enough to ride a Raleigh. ;-)


by: 193.38.170.65


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Albert Einstein rode a Raleigh? posted by David on 1/20/2009 at 11:38:05 AM
I always thought it was an American bike in the photo. That seems most likely, given the time and place. Einstein famously wrote to his son "Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving."

by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Albert Einstein rode a Raleigh? posted by Chris on 1/20/2009 at 6:35:49 PM
The bike in the photo is an American bike. I saw a piece on him on the History channel and they showed a Raleigh Tourist D.L.1. as if it were Einstein's.
by: 209.86.226.11




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AGE / VALUE:   tri-coaster posted by: sam on 1/18/2009 at 7:00:54 PM
Anyone ever open a Tri-Coaster?
by: 68.93.140.67

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   tri-coaster posted by Chris on 1/19/2009 at 8:46:56 AM
Yes, the old ones from the teens. My mechanic found it interesting how beefy and well built it was.
by: 71.40.121.165




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by: JS on 1/18/2009 at 3:33:15 AM
I am doing a bit of research. Can anyone tell me if the Raleigh DL-1 from say 1949-1951 was a center-pull or side-pull? The majority of pics I can find on the web indicate that DLs are always Center-pull...but there is this one bike claimed to be from 1951 that is clearly a side-pull. My guess is that this particular bike was an assemblage of parts and so probably was changed at some point, but I need to be certain.



by: 210.82.65.25

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by Kevin on 1/18/2009 at 2:40:11 PM
Neither one. They had rod brakes.
by: 205.188.116.199

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by Matthew on 1/18/2009 at 4:03:19 PM
Some clarity is require here.

Side pull, cable operated, brakes are usually called Caliper brakes and act unevenly on a radial surface of the rim..

Centre Pull, cable operated, brakes have a central pull to a pair of crossed fulcrums providing equal force to each side of the rim on a radial surface.

Rod brakes pull above the centre of the rim and operate toward the rim acting upon an axial surface, each side of the spokes.

Cantilever brakes are operated by cable pulling centrally and acting upon two fulcrums at either side of the rim, exerting considerable and effective force upon a radial surface.

Matthew - he's breaking up!
by: 81.109.209.130

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by Warren on 1/18/2009 at 5:22:54 PM
Can you post the link to the side pull roadster? Maybe it's a retro fitted drum brake? And here's the 51 catalogue...not sure what a DL-1 was back then...a Popular Tourist?
http://tinyurl.com/78ojjr
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by JS on 1/18/2009 at 5:27:24 PM
Let me clarify:

Mmy thought is that all DL-1s had center pull ROD brakes where the rear brake pivot straddles the diamond frame, not the side pull Phillips rod brakes, where the rear brake pivot and rod run down one side.

Can anyone Clarify which type the DL-1 and Popular had in 1949-1951?
by: 210.82.65.25

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by Matthew on 1/19/2009 at 3:13:05 AM
The brake pivot which straddles the down tube is a Rudge design, which of course became a Raleigh piece of equipment. Much earlier Raleighs would not have this style of pivot but would have some thing like the 'Phillips' style of pivot.
Without doubt a pivot supported through the down tube and acting centrally is more efficient. It is also more asthetically pleasing too.

Matthew - let's all pull together.
by: 86.0.125.221

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by JS on 1/19/2009 at 5:40:35 AM
The link that Warren posted shows all Raleigh bikes with brake rods having a centerpull rather than the Phillips type dsign. The catalog is 1951. Does anyone know when this center style of pivot was adopted?
by: 210.82.65.25

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by Chris on 1/21/2009 at 8:44:21 PM
the ladies 1948 Raleigh 28 inch wheel rod brake bike I had, I can't remember for certain what style of rod linkage it used.
by: 207.69.139.141

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh DL-1 Roadster posted by Dale on 1/23/2009 at 8:38:07 AM
Matthew, side pull cable brakes also apply equal force on both pads. It doesn't matter where the cable attaches, as long as the lever length on both cable attachment points are the same and it is in good repair (calipers move freely, the spring is symmetrical and the cable is not constrained somewhere). Both calipers will rotate the same angular amount and apply the same force.

The only claimed advantage to center pull cable brakes was higher mechanical advantage, but the difference was usually offset by its inherently higher flexibility. In the long run, side pull cable brakes won in the market because of their lower cost to assemble and lighter weight.
by: 74.43.149.123




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AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by: Kenneth on 1/17/2009 at 4:24:44 AM
I purchased an old Hercules. The head badge says "Hercules Motor &... Britannia Works Birmingham." I'm told its a Popular. Can any advise the age of this bicycle? She has a very interesting rear parcel shelf and kickstand. A front 'spring suspension' is fitted. The original paint is black.



by: 218.186.12.220


  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by Kenneth on 1/17/2009 at 4:31:32 AM
Another pic


by: 218.186.12.220


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 8:15:26 AM
wow,nice bicycle first thing in the morning!very unique.definitley worth time and effort.i think i have a pic of a hercules with a springer,but im not sure.i will look.looking for serial frame numbers has gotten me nowhere.good luck and enjoy that hercules!
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 8:20:56 AM
coffee,,,now that my brain is working,i see that someone has added spring struts to the original fork.hhmm im still looking for the pic i have of a hercules with a springer,i dont think they came from the factory with them.
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by Kenneth on 1/17/2009 at 9:47:10 AM
Thanks for looking for that pic. The plan is for a full restoration, including re-chroming the springs, along with most of the brightwork. They will look nice with the frame and mudguards in their original black. Some of the original brown paper wrapper - from Britannia Works! -was found peeking from under the rear mudguard clip when I dismantled the broken lock!

I found this bicycle locked up outside a lottery shop. Although I purchased it from the lottery shop owner, it was originally owned by an elderly Indian gentleman, an ex-employee of the British Malayan colonial government. He was a regular visitor to a lottery shop for many years, and befriended the shop owner. About six months ago, he gave it to the shop owner as he 'could no longer use it'. He has not showed up since. I was hoping to let him view it once more (or perhaps even ride it if possible) after the restoration is done, but the lottery shop owner couldn't reach him anymore...

Any information on the age and model based on the pics would be deeply appreciated. Thanks very much again.


by: 218.186.12.220

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by mark hercules on 1/18/2009 at 10:06:33 AM
well i thought i had a pic of a hercules with a springer,but could only find a raleigh.im still looking.


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by Matthew on 1/18/2009 at 4:06:22 PM
The springer fork appears to provide no suspension for the frame but only a sprung effect for the handlebars. Is this correct?

The forks are not Earles Pattern forks which have leading link suspension and were fitted to some bicycles.

Matthew - boing!
by: 81.109.209.130

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by mark hercules on 1/18/2009 at 4:24:41 PM
they;re added for strength and some absorption to potholes!to keep the fork from collapsing!quite an elaborate setup for not much effect?i could be way off i hope so.
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by sam on 1/18/2009 at 6:59:50 PM
Some kinda hanging or storage device(I'm told)but never seen any bikes hung/parked/or stored using one---sam
Have seen Palco springs you added to the bottom of fork legs,and webb springer forks
by: 68.93.140.67

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by JS on 1/18/2009 at 8:39:32 PM
It's just a set of trusses to strengthen the fork. Mark has it correct....but it's not elaborate at all, quite simple actually.

Fork trusses are common as water in here in China...in fact my bike has them.

You ahve to remember that bike forks are designed to flex somewhat. If you have a heavy load they may flex too much and crack. The truss crorrects for that without making it.
by: 193.23.43.5

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/19/2009 at 3:37:40 AM
So... like underwires then eh?

Sorry... couldn't help myself there....

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - If a fork gets a truss... does a seatstay get a girdle?
by: 4.154.220.190

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by Kenneth on 1/19/2009 at 6:01:28 AM
Thanks everyone. That rear rack/parcel tray, has anyone see it before? I'm beginning to suspect that its a locally made accessory or even imported from China... probably 1940s-1950s. Someone told me that accessories in the 70s and later weren't so elaborate and didn't use so much steel or other raw material.

Also, a question for you Hercules experts... does this bike fall into the 'Popular' series? Or is it another Hercules model?
by: 218.186.12.220

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by Stephen Hogben on 1/19/2009 at 8:30:08 AM
My "regular" ride is a Hercules Popular bike also made in Birmingham,however it does not look like yours!I also do not know the age of my Hercules of course it has the white paint on the rear mudguard.Have not done it up as it is a bit of a dog,but have done 125 miles on it now,all down tow paths,public footpaths etc,cost me 50p so good value!
by: 86.0.56.31

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by Chris on 1/19/2009 at 8:53:10 AM
Wow! Loved the pictures awesome bikes!

I had a green Hercules like this.
by: 71.40.121.165

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by mark hercules on 1/19/2009 at 9:00:01 AM
of all the pictures i have to compare your bike to,the popular doesnt fit,with other populars,but im finding more and more that,so much is changed in original [tagged]hercules bicycles.i am still trying to place the years on the rod brake rear pivot.in the bottom bracket,and clamped on to the seat post bottom.maybe there is not much info on hercules because of mass production and ease of parts interchangeability.looks as though the bike was fitted locally.could you tell me how many teeth are on your rear sprocket?that will be an indication of fittment locally,if it was used to move goods.the more i get to know of hercules the less i know!
seems strange.
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Popular? posted by Kenneth on 1/23/2009 at 8:59:01 AM
Hi Mark

Thanks again fr the help. Im afraid I cant check the rear sprocket as the bike is already at the workshop. Will ask when I next visit. Im told by an elderly bicycle shop proprietor that the Hercules bikes came to Singapore disassembled, 25 to a crate. They were locally assembled and fitted. The only clue to its heritage is the Hercules Birmingham head badge riveted to the frame- and the way it rides. Heavy, very planted and confident. Unlike any Chinese bicycle. The original frame was black and it had a white painted tail too.


by: 218.186.12.220





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AGE / VALUE:    posted by: mark hercules- aka mark on 1/17/2009 at 1:04:04 AM
well i never got a response to my lucifer generator,so i thought,i might as well restore to the original look and take some pictures,i know you all like pictures!and i think it looks great,i cant imagine why someone would paint it?


by: 66.183.152.3


  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 1:08:33 AM
these are before pics


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 1:09:37 AM
after...


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 1:10:46 AM
after


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 1:12:12 AM
after looks like a old dental instrument.


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 1:13:34 AM
anyone ever see one of these?


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 1:28:50 AM
the camera was dying,i thought you might like a look inside,and yes it does work.


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Steve on 1/17/2009 at 3:12:57 AM
Your Lucifer looks interesting, but I've yet to venture into dynamo rebuild territory, although I do have two cobweb lined water stained "Millers" waiting in the attention pile.

Come to think of it, a lot of my stuff is water stained, cobweb lined and mostly reacts to heat, hacksaws, chisels, hammers, grinders and small scale explosives before I get anywhere !

Enjoy it.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Keith Body on 1/17/2009 at 1:26:13 PM
Lucifer, I remember post WW2 the neat 8 pole dynamos which were better than the 2 pole Lucas and Millers. Although I have never seen one like this, it is probably from the 1920's. Cycle dynamos are simple alternators normally with a magnet revolving in a field, with a single winding.
The post war 8 pole Lucifer was smoother running, and had less tyre wear, also lighter weight. Is this old one 8 pole?
by: 195.93.21.98

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 1:51:14 PM
im pretty sure its 2 pole?would there be 8 windings inside or 8 magnets?this is something i would have to learn about,i should know this.it looks very simple inside,one winding only in the middle,of wire.hope this helps,i will get better pics today,my batterries died.
funny batteries died while taking pics of dynamo!
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Keith Body on 1/17/2009 at 1:54:42 PM
Mark, 8 pole means that if you turn the drive pulley you can feel it go through 8 magnetic fluxes in one turn. A miller has only 2. The old Lucifer could be totally different.
by: 195.93.21.98

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Keith Body on 1/17/2009 at 1:58:45 PM
Mark, The revolving magnet has 8 changes of polarity in one turn. Long time since I had one apart.
by: 195.93.21.98

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 2:59:28 PM
i feel like thomas edison,i got ahold of cloth wiring,for aesthetics,and the lights front and back worked!!!!i couldnt beleive it.i didnt even check for bulbs.spun the tire and the nicest orange flame i ever saw.ha doesnt take much to get me excited.its 2 pole,i spun it and it shows resistance 2x.im gonna spin it again haha.
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by jj on 1/17/2009 at 5:43:39 PM
Is it me, or is that just too small to be a generator?
by: 71.184.112.235

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/17/2009 at 6:42:14 PM
its actually cast iron,it weighs alot.its 6 inches high by 2 inches wide.if you threw it at someone they would end up in the hospital.i dropped it yesterday,and it put a dent in the floor. i found out a bit about these.they were built from 1913-1932.
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by sam on 1/17/2009 at 8:00:13 PM
Now that's what WD-40 is really good for---cleaning generators.
by: 68.93.140.67

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Keith Body on 1/18/2009 at 11:49:46 AM
Hi Mark, I thought Lucifer started about 1920.
When I was young (UK) we still used oil lamps and calcium carbide, I also had a bicycle candle lamp. These were left over from the previous generation, but the calcium carbide (acetylene) was the brightest. I still have somewhere my dynohub with BH quick release and tubular tyre.
by: 195.93.21.98

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/18/2009 at 12:27:04 PM
im just going by hearsay,but someone chimed in on another site,with photos and said the following lucifer gens were built from 1913 to 1932?dont know where the info came from but he had ads.


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/18/2009 at 12:28:13 PM
another ad


by: 66.183.152.3


           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Keith Body on 1/18/2009 at 1:00:24 PM
Hi Mark, the second one looks older, if the bike in the ad has chrome plate then the picture is after 1930, but might be nickel. Never seen either, probably didn't get imported to UK.
by: 195.93.21.98

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Keith Body on 1/18/2009 at 1:14:19 PM
Hi Mark, best I can come up with, 1937 Gazelle (Dutch Make)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/9623863@N04/703721689/
Looks right to me.
by: 195.93.21.98

           RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by mark hercules on 1/18/2009 at 4:17:55 PM
thats it,it gets me closer to figuring out the year of my hercules,i really dont care... but it would be nice to tell humans when they ask.i bought my bike because it felt right,and i ride it.the marks left on the fork from my generator show its been there along time.and i recently scratched off a bit of paint on my fork crown and found silver plating.so studying a dynamo gets me more info on my bike.no lose situation.thanks for the gazelle pic,what a beauty!
by: 66.183.152.3




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   leather saddles Pearsons APOLLO posted by: Ed on 1/16/2009 at 4:24:58 PM
What do you think of permaco.com? They have a tensioned leather saddle selection that looks very nice. I have not seen one in person and was wondering if anyone has looked at them? This website is listing Sturmey Archer hubs and Brooks saddles. Ed
by: 69.207.104.111

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   leather saddles Pearsons APOLLO posted by Chris on 1/16/2009 at 4:42:33 PM
I take it this is the old Persons Magestic company, now renamed? I have not see their site and will look it over.
by: 207.69.139.147

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   leather saddles Pearsons APOLLO posted by Ed on 1/16/2009 at 4:44:39 PM
Yes, this is their website.
by: 69.207.104.111

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   leather saddles Pearsons APOLLO posted by David on 1/19/2009 at 7:32:06 AM
Charlie Persons is reliable, tho' in the winter he's often out of town at trade shows. I've heard that the new Persons saddles are not bad (and the new Brooks are reported to be worse than old ones).
by: 216.15.114.27




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by: Steve on 1/16/2009 at 8:41:52 AM
Currently working on a stuck seat post.

This seat post is stuck all the way down to 7.5 inches within the seat tube, my fingers aren't long enough to feel the inner ridge, so I used a piece of wire with a hook on the end in order to measure it.

Tried a variety of tightly secured seats (with heat treatment) plus vibration, lubrication etc etc in an attempt to get the best possible purchase....no use.

Seat post top now shiny from slipping seat clamps.

Out with the angle grinder, cut slot in top of post in order to slide a bar through for purchase and twisting force...no use (top of post now deformed) !

Top of post now trimmed off and the hacksaw method has commenced...

I take my hat off to anyone that's been down this route and succeeded.

Many years ago, I had to saw through a piece of full size railway track (it was a bizarre college challenge)...it took forever, this seat post reminds me of college !

If I ever catch anyone putting a seat post in position with no grease, I will ******* them !

Steve - wound up, frustrated, overheated, aggrivated, annoyed, tired and hungry !
by: 93.96.36.127

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by Dale on 1/16/2009 at 10:34:54 AM
I once freed a fairly stubborn one by removing the wheels and seat, and sticking the post in a pipe vise that my grandfather had attached to a post in his barn. After getting some penetrating oil around the post, I grabbed the head tube and rear dropouts, and twisted+pulled on the frame. Eventually I got it out.
by: 74.43.149.123

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by Kevin on 1/16/2009 at 10:50:23 AM
It's possible that seat post was slightly bent and someone drove it into the frame. Cutting the post from the inside with a hacksaw blade is a slow, aggravating job, but it works. An electric reciprocating saw (Sawzall) would be faster, but more risky. Another approach: take a two-foot long piece of threaded rod, put a nut on one end, and run the end with the nut down the seat post, so the nut catches on the edge of the seatpost. Then clamp the other end of the rod into a bench vise. The frame can then be pushed and pulled, hard, to create enough impact knock the seatpost loose from the inside.
by: 205.188.116.199

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/16/2009 at 10:59:30 AM
If there's enough of the post protruding and it's not overtly deformed... try first inserting some rod stock insid... then... drill a hole through the post and rod... big enough to maybe get a bar in and use that for leverage etc.

Mostly though... walk away from it for a while. I know I've oft come off the handle and in order to teach such stubborn things a lesson..... I've utterly destroyed them.

;-)

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - I OWN it... therefore it should conform to my WILL dammit!!!!!
by: 193.38.170.65

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by mark hercules on 1/16/2009 at 3:03:26 PM
damn things,i was successful after 2 days on a 40s phillips,i punched a small punch in between the seat post and tube,letting wd40 slip in down the crevise,the seat post was weaker than the tube.just put a clamp on the seat post tube first.using the frame as leverage is the best but you probably dont have the height to grab on anymore.its the kinda thing 3 guys drinking beer will fix.ha
by: 66.183.152.3

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by Chris on 1/16/2009 at 4:30:45 PM
ammonia. frees rusted parts. Good luck.
by: 207.69.139.147

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by Steve on 1/16/2009 at 5:14:21 PM
It's midnight here, I've had enough for now !

I'm about one inch down into the seat tube bracket, it's a long and tedious job. Hacksaw and long nose pliers are about the only thing you can use. Might try some form of long narrow chisel tomorrow to help things along.

God knows how many fragments of seat post metal are in the bottom bracket !

Steve - six inches to go !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by Steve on 1/16/2009 at 5:19:17 PM
Sorry, meant to say hacksaw blade (not hacksaw), you'd need one heck of a seat tube to get a hacksaw in there !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by Matthew on 1/17/2009 at 4:57:32 PM
Gun powder, wadding and good insurance.

Only kidding Steve!

I am currently (since late Nov.) working ona stuck aluminium seat post in a steel MTB frame. Heat, release oil, more heat, stilsons, heat, oil, etc etc.

Matthew - keep you posted.
by: 82.3.88.27

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   The Last Post ! posted by Steve on 1/18/2009 at 6:19:01 AM
I've currently removed seat post metal to the base of the inner seat lug...this is very awkward (and very delicate) !

I really do not want to damage the original seat tube, reamers, drills, files, even crescent shaped hacksaw blades have all gone through my mind...then there's the ultimate.....remove the top seven inches of tube and replace with new metal (and re-attaching the original seat lug which incidentally has the frame number stamped into it).

I don't like the final suggestion above, I'm only going to these lengths because it's a rare elderly low gravity Phillips tradebike (with no brakes).

I hereby promise not to talk about anything else until this matter is sorted !

Steve - famous last words !



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MISC:   Not in many years... posted by: LlLlLlarry "BbBbBboneman" BbBbone on 1/16/2009 at 3:27:11 AM
-3 degrees F here at the moment.

Pursuant to that... I'm in pain from head to toe....

Just thought I'd post a succinct rant whilst the fingers are still functioning.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Global Warming my @$$....
by: 4.154.216.247

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           RE:MISC:   Not in many years... posted by Steve on 1/16/2009 at 4:53:42 AM
-3 degrees F.....crikey !

What's that in real money....(apart from rediculously cold) !

Wrap up warm, this is serious Global cooling.

Steve - centigrades "r" us !


by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:MISC:   Not in many years... posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/16/2009 at 6:28:46 AM
Ah.. that would be -19C. Whilst inbound to work, the coldest temp I saw on the dash thermometer was whilst passing through Layton, NJ where it was -11F (-24C).

GAH!

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 193.38.170.65

           RE:MISC:   Not in many years... posted by JDuck on 1/16/2009 at 8:58:28 AM
Not to play "can you top this" but it's -20F here this morning. The coldest day in 15 years in southern Wisconsin! I won't be riding today.
by: 64.201.65.22

           RE:RE:MISC:   Not in many years... posted by Chris on 1/16/2009 at 4:40:47 PM
40 degrees today in San Antonio, Tx. Paradise.


by: 207.69.139.147

           RE:MISC:   Not in many years... posted by sam on 1/16/2009 at 5:58:06 PM
That's right Chris,another 5 degrees lower and we'll have to shut down the city!
by: 68.93.140.67

           RE:RE:MISC:   Not in many years... posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/17/2009 at 5:44:34 AM
MINUS EIGHT here this AM. To say the dogs were a bit fashed whilst out for their AM perambulation would be an understatement.

To say the poor fool walking them was a bit fashed....

Well... you get the idea.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Where's Al Gore and all his hot air when you need him?
by: 4.154.216.4

           RE:MISC:   Not in many years... posted by Matthew on 1/18/2009 at 2:59:31 AM
Sorry Larry. Transatlantic translation needed; Fashed?

Matthew - a bit duzzy
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AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by: Chris on 1/13/2009 at 5:58:17 PM
I told the G.M. heritage folks to go jump in the lake and the collection remains still in the family safe deposit boxes. It's family history I told them. I was sure it would not stay with G.M. no matter what they said about preserving it properly for others to see. How it "would never be sold" and all that garbage.
"No, Sorry." I told them. You see,
I remembered all the folks who donated things from their families collection(s) and the fine folks who ran/ run the Greenfield Village- Henry Ford Museaum in Dearborn, Michigan assured them it the same words it will never be sold off, added to our permanent collection... yada yada. Well don't you believe it! Keep your goodies and to hell with them!! The donors found their items quietly sold off and quietly removed from display. Oh sometimes it's a replica. Interesting that all we get to see so often IS ONLY A REPLICA.
I grew up and we haunted the Greenfield Village Henry Ford Museaum now called "The Henry Ford" and I saw things disappear like crazy!
So, it's interesting to be watching the Barret- Jackson auction from Scotsdale, Arizona on Satalite T.V. over dinner where some of the G.M. Heritage collection will fall under the hammer of the gaudy Barret Jackson's auctioneer's hammer.

Yes, the very same fine folks who assured me, this would never, never happen. We are going to see a lot of historic and neat things appear for the first time after many, many years of hidden slumber.

Museaums go bankrupt all the time. The Canbera bicycle museaum in Australia was just sold ahwile back and I shudder about that. Things vanish and they tell you they never had that in stock. They sell and forget rather well.

A few pieces of Lincoln history went to a collector in Farmington Hills and I was sorry I let that go and then I stopped selling anything else and locked it up. The minor things mind you, I used it to meet people and you are expected to tell everything to them but they won't tell you anything! However They knew that name, that they did!!
I had them nearly faint before me. "This is very rare," he whispered in a creepy way.
Anyway's the G.M. Heritage collection (or really a part of it) is going to get run thru Barret- Jackson's I knew this would happen!

Joe Dimaggio used to say "Why should they make money off of me? Who is this (explitive)? Joe knew how to keep his mouth shut too! Can you imagine what secrets he took with him?

He'd get really mad. You were expected to pay every bit of what it was worth and he did his best to prevent folks from making a buck off of him and if you did, you were going to pay handsomly for the priveledge.

He fell victim in the end to a Florida Lawyer who waited for about two minutes after Joe Dimaggio died and then, he snapped his fingers at a nurse to lube up Joe's hand and "Get that thing off of him"
The rings was pried, pulled off with some kind of lubricant. The fellow pocketed the ring and left the room.
(One heck of a good book!)
It was Joe's World Series ring, Diamonds and Gold.

There are many good reasons why things remain hidden in the Alladins cave's of the owners. People think a museaum or a preservation society is safe and so they open up the vault and donate things. Huge mistake! Either sell it or keep it. Never ever, donate things.

Don't you do it. Keep it. Keep it properly, from the elements and preserve it properly but you keep it.

And when you walk thru and see things that are on display don't be taken or fooled but rather ask ok, Where is all the really good stuff?

Everything is still corrupt. I hear things and still marvel.
by: 207.69.137.34

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   off topic posted by Chris on 1/13/2009 at 7:10:34 PM
I sat with a bike distributor in his car and showed him the "No Hands" book on Schwinn and it was still "just a window display with a bit of auroma to lure the reader in a bit." The real stories, the best parts are left out or never revealed to folks who come knocking and researching their books.

He said "Now , let me tell you all the stuff they couldn't put in the book!" He was old and didn't care anymore. People I visited after that, their eyes widened and they demanded "Who are you? Who told you that? You ain't seeing anything until I find out who sent you here who told you about that and about me!
The collector is only as good as his sources.

The movie "Hoffa" was interesting. I wish Jimmy hadn't taken his lieutenants gun from him. The guy goes to use it when it's needed and here Jimmy had it in the car. He's reaching for a empty holster and I sat there moaning "Oh, No!! The movie would have turned out differently had DeVito had his gun. Sometimes I root for the bad guys.

I worked at the Machus restaurant where Jimmy was last seen that day and "the roadhouse" as in the movie, does not look anything like it at all.

Yes, Detroit, the Paris of the Midwest was something else!

Jimmy gets shot and Devito's character as well and a truck pulls up and they clean up everything taking all of it away for parts unknown.
by: 207.69.137.34

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Steve on 1/14/2009 at 3:54:38 AM
Refering to Chris's above warning re museum donations, I suppose it's just a fact of life that bankruptcy (if not backed by the tax payer i.e. government, but reliant solely on takings at the gate), area redevelopment, change of curator, greed etc etc can and does happen.

It's a lovely thought to have your pride and joy kept in a secure environment protected from the elements.

The words "temporary custodian" spring to mind (and I'm pretty sure we're all in this category).

I spent some time in my garage yesterday attempting to unseize a bike that I guess had stood outside unprotected as a static display enduring the elements for thirty plus years or so.

Nuts rounded off, bolts shattered (and that's with plenty of prior lubrication, heat treatment and half decent tools) but...one day this bike will ride again and I will park it in my garage (with all the others) and admire it all to myself (although others with similar interests are very welcome).

I have to confess that I enjoy nothing more than to go to MY garage to choose MY bike to ride by MYself...to a museum concerning transport related issues.

I don't really think about the financial value of the bike, I just enjoy the honour of riding something that is steeped in recent social history from an industrial era that will never be seen again and is quite simply very special in its own way.
Having made the above statement, I suppose everything has a financial value...but it would have to take a very substantial offer to prise something special away from me...also one must not forget all those enjoyable hours spent learning new swear words in the workshop, scourcing replacement (or making new) parts for your elderly pride and joy.

Speaking from experience, the big plus with bicycle renovation/preservation...call it what you like, is that it is for the most time practical and containable (I hesitated slightly on the latter word) !

The serious housing problems arise if one ever gets into large scale machinery preservation...but that's another story.

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   off topic posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/14/2009 at 3:58:04 AM
In the age of "WE SEE NOTHING BUT THE BOTTOM LINE AT THE END OF THE MONTH" business model.... Many, MANY things.... will be "liquidated" in order to prop up that bottom line.

EVERYTHING will be target. The place I work, internation multi billion dollar organization... has cut budgets so much it's now seemingly impossible for them to even find anyone to replace washers in the faucets in the rest rooms.

It does make me sick.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - we can't afford to do it RIGHT... but we can afford... to do it over... and over... and over....
by: 4.154.218.45

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by sam on 1/14/2009 at 6:33:19 AM
The serious housing problems arise if one ever gets into large scale machinery preservation...but that's another story.

Steve,No fair not giving at least some details!
sam(looking to build a room to display a 1905 Cresent woodworking machine)
by: 68.93.140.67

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Kevin on 1/14/2009 at 7:19:54 AM
I agree in principle, Chris, but the fact is, museums are good and worthy institutions. Most are strapped for money and few can outbid collectors. Most museums have no interest in bicycles, anyway. Certain things belong in museums. I have donated items of local historical value to our local museum, so that they can be seen by the public and used for research. I will take my chances on them being preserved and not sold. I could never sell such things, but I know that there's a good chance that my children would have unwittingly thrown them away or taken them to Goodwill if I were to die. I am labeling valuable pieces, and pieces that have family histories, so that my children will have some guidance when I am gone.
Steve -- I know the feeling about saving these neglected old bikes. I am sure that I get more real satisfaction from getting a battered old roadster going again than most business tycoons get from closing a big deal.
by: 64.12.116.199

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Steve on 1/14/2009 at 9:32:51 AM
Sam, I have a great interest in the tracked machines that Holt and Best designed many many years ago, these machines (amongst others) went on to build the main infrastructure of the American freeway system and much much more...clue...large feline with er upright structure !

I have the old English version here and whilst not quite as well engineered as the American version, it manages to keep me amused (or confused) when I fancy a break from bicycle matters.

Kevin, I've just come in from the freezing cold outside having spent the best part of two to three hours gently persuading the handlebars out of an old wreck of an ancient trade bike/cycle truck without deforming (a)the bars (b)the forks (c)the gap and the exterior brickwork between the two houses and (d)myself !

I'm now very satisfied and look forward to pitting my wits against the seized in seat stem tomorrow, the problem now is that I'm not sure it is removable...it's so old, it looks like an "all in one" seat post ?
Has anyone ever come across an all in one seat tube before ? i.e. you attach the saddle to the post and that's it...no vertical adjustment !

Steve - tea time
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by ken on 1/14/2009 at 1:53:28 PM
right on, Kevin. Museums have costs, and they have old grandpas giving them what THEY think is important. They do the best they can. Each of us acts as a museum when we provide precious storage space for something WE judge significant. And each of us decides what to keep and what to sell/throw away/give away to make room for something better. When you give something to a museum, better choose one that knows what it's getting and will make an intelligent choice. Nobody can keep everything.
by: 209.7.150.163

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by sam on 1/14/2009 at 3:51:53 PM
Steve your goin love this,my wheel guy works for Holt.Robert,who is on this site regular,does all my wheels.

Sam Bartleet's bicycle collection became the British Museum of Transportation.
by: 68.93.140.67

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Kevin on 1/14/2009 at 4:32:10 PM
I've never seen a seatpost that was not adjustable. But I have seen a couple that were so rusted tight that I had to slowly, slowly cut them half-way through, vertically, with a hacksaw blade before I could finally crush them with my giant Channel Locks and pull them out. Thet Sheldon Brown website has a whole section on removing stuck seatposts.
by: 205.188.116.199

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Steve on 1/14/2009 at 4:39:03 PM
I've been wanting to move house for quite a while now, one of the problems (amongst many) is the fact that I can't get a house complete with aircraft sized hanger and three acres of land for a sensible price.
I have it all planned out inside by head, the exhibits, the layout, the guests by invitation or pre-arranged special appointment for groups with similar interests and understanding. I actually know of someone (very private person) who has a full scale railway, station and rolling stock in his own back garden !

Steve - I can but dream !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Steve on 1/14/2009 at 4:44:03 PM
Kevin, re the seat post...I think you're probably right, I'll have a look at Sheldons stuff once I get a minute.
Oh the joys of working on seriously old weathered (and seized) wrecks !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Warren on 1/14/2009 at 6:20:02 PM
Hopefully someone didn't weld the post in place...I've seen it before.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Stephen Hogben on 1/14/2009 at 6:38:47 PM
Once ANYTHING gets in my sheds,especially old push bikes,motor bikes,etc they will never ever leave them,no matter how much people want them,because in future years when i have popped my clogs, you will never ever hear Bloody Hell you will never guess what I found in this old shed today! Thinking forward!
by: 86.0.56.31

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Kevin on 1/14/2009 at 7:38:06 PM
Steve --
We would welcome you in Indiana. There are lots of three-acre parcels, with houses and barns, cheap.
As for the stuck seatpost, here's the link: http://sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html
Kevin
by: 64.12.116.199

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by PATRICK on 1/15/2009 at 8:54:50 AM
Chris, Do you have some cool GM artifacts? Why don't you post a few pics. of your stuff? i work for GM and I'd like to see it. I don't understand what that Hoffa movie has to do with donating things to a museum. I do understand the part about these places seemingly breaking a trust and selling items they got for free,maybe that shouldn't happen,but once you donate anything,it's not yours anymore anyway! I just hope my children will keep a couple of things that we enjoyed together,the rest is unimportant and should be sold to make their lives easier.Too many of us get too caught up in this material stuff,it's supposed to be fun not a ball and chain. My two cents.Pat
by: 198.208.159.18

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Steve on 1/15/2009 at 11:10:04 AM
Thanks for the Indiana welcome Kevin, it sounds ideal, I would make the move...but the cat wouldn't approve !
Thanks for the stuck seatpost link.
Getting back to the seatpost issue, the weathering effect has made it very difficult to distinquish how the final six or so inches is actually formed, interesting Warren that you mention what was in the back of my mind, I've never seen a welded post and in some respects I'm glad you have...it proves it's possible !

Steve - thanks
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Chris on 1/16/2009 at 4:37:47 PM
I will contact you via e- mail. As for Jimmy, I jump around onto other subjects and didn't mean to confuse you. I just saw the movie again and as I said, I worked at the restaurant years later after he vanished.
by: 207.69.139.147

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Just like I predicted! it's at Barret- Jackson's auction posted by Chris on 1/16/2009 at 4:48:03 PM
When the Schwinn family auctioned off the companies 100 year old collection of bikes and stuff, the people attending were stunned and quietly sickened and what all was dumped as well. "They let this go?" "Wow, look at this!" A lot of things you would think somebody would wanted kept were there as well.
blueprints, prototype stuff, it was strange.
by: 207.69.139.147




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   All Steel Bicycle posted by: Steve on 1/13/2009 at 9:43:23 AM
It's funny how the mind can play tricks with you !

I have a range of elderly non racing bikes dating from the early thirties upwards and if I was to attempt a land speed record on one of them, I would probably choose the 1958 three speed Raleigh "All Steel Bicycle" or a trade bike/cycle truck descending a hill whilst fully loaded.

In order to hopefully continue my time on this planet, the sensible choice would have to be the "All Steel Bicycle".

Hold on a minute, "All Steel Bicycle"...what's that supposed to mean ?

Were the previous bikes made out of wood, rubber, Bakelite ?

This hobby always provides me with yet another question, just lurking around the corner.

I confess to visiting Sheldons site (once again) for a "cast iron" answer !

Apologies to you thorougbreds that knew this snippet of information, but any newbies wondering why a bike is so heavy might want to question...the cast iron content within a non "All Steel Bicycle".

So, all those years ago an "All Steel Bicycle" was a good selling point for Raleigh...couldn't really say that nowadays could you...or could you ?

Steve - that's a weight off my shoulders !
by: 93.96.36.127

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   All Steel Bicycle posted by Chris on 1/13/2009 at 11:13:34 AM
"Edward Glover designed a process for making bicycle frames from a single piece of sheet steel giving the Raleigh the name The all steel bicycle."


by: 207.69.140.35

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   All Steel Bicycle posted by Steve on 1/13/2009 at 2:25:06 PM
Must have been great to work in such a "hands on" industrial period of time.

Thank you Mr Glover for designing the process for what is probably my most "together" bicycle.
I'm going to relax in the parlour now and listen to the wireless with my toes up against the fireplace whilst supping a bottle of stout.

Steve - Friday Night, Saturday Morning.


by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   All Steel Bicycle posted by Steve on 1/13/2009 at 2:33:07 PM
Or was it Saturday Night, Sunday Morning...Albert Finney

Steve - A Classic
by: 93.96.36.127




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Marathon 28" tires posted by: Dale on 1/13/2009 at 9:21:49 AM
Is anyone else having a problem with 28 x 1 1/2" tires blowing off the rims when the car is stored in a car on a warm-hot day? The tires are Schwalbe Marthons inflated to their rated 70 psi. Maybe Westwood rims aren't designed to handle those pressures in a hot environment? It happened twice, the second time it was only about 70F outdoors...
by: 74.43.149.123

  Replies:
           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Marathon 28 posted by Dale on 1/13/2009 at 9:25:50 AM
I mean, when the BIKE is stored in a car.
by: 74.43.149.123

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Marathon 28 posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/13/2009 at 9:29:25 AM
70psi seems a bit high for 28 x 1 1/2" tyres. As I recall... I think mine call for 55psi....

Perhaps that could be a contributing factor?

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Just like David Bowie.... Under Pressure.....
by: 193.38.171.31

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Marathon 28 posted by Brian on 1/13/2009 at 4:29:54 PM
I dont know the answer but it reminds me of the time about 10 years when my Dad was delivering a bicycle he had just repaired. It was in the back of his van and he made a stop along the way at a drive thru bank. While in line, both of the bikes newly installed 27 inch tires blew off the rim and the bank's tellers thought there was a robbery going on as it sounded like gunfire.
by: 74.178.1.124




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WANTED:   Front Mudguard wanted/trade? posted by: Dale on 1/13/2009 at 9:15:38 AM
Looking for a front mudguard for a '70s Tourist. It needs to be the simple round cross-section, i.e. no raised rib or point on the front.

I saw somebody riding one with no REAR mudguard one day, but I was in a car and couldn't catch up with him to ask him if he'd sell the front, or let me buy him a pair of plastic fenders...

Oh, and some years back I bought one from someone on this forum, but it turns out it wasn't the round cross section. Should have asked to return it. So I have that mudguard for swap or sale too.
by: 74.43.149.123

  Replies:
           RE:WANTED:   Front Mudguard wanted/trade? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 1/13/2009 at 9:35:14 AM
Dale, if you're interested I have one from an Indian machine that would fill the bill if nothing original turns up.

Let me know if interested.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - it's not proper sans mudguards....
by: 193.38.171.31

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