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English Roadsters


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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   My back is aching ! posted by: Steve on 9/24/2008 at 2:00:45 AM
My back is aching and I'm getting tired of balancing bikes on the kitchen chairs, not to mention holding bikes in the air with one hand whilst trying to perform highly complicated technical operations (undoing nuts) with the other hand.

My wife and children are not too pleased with me as they eat their spaghetti bolognese standing up whilst staring at a rusty old bike spread across the kitchen table with the life saving surgical tools of a magician precisely positioned on each kitchen chair...they think I'm being unfair !

I advised them that they have a shed with a bench out in the garden...and all of a sudden I was covered in spaghetti.

No, the time has come for serious action, and I'm thinking...cycle maintenance stand.

I've never had one, I've always struggled (and succeeded).

Am I going soft or am I maturing (at long last) and doing the sensible thing (I suspect a bit of both) !

What is the consensus on these, I have seen them advertised in various places (as well as in shops), will the free standing type have the stability and strength to hold a fully loaded 28" Roadster or a Trade bike (cycle truck) firmly, without fear of collapse or do you have to go the "whole hog" and bolt one to the ground ?

I do have a somewhat congested garage where I could secure it to the ground if I had to, but I do like the idea of a stand that is "mobile", that would allow me to bring it down to the house on cold winter evenings and set it up in the kitchen whilst keeping an eye on the spaghetti to make sure it doesn't boil over...no no no no no !

Steve - my backs aching !
by: 93.96.36.127

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: My back is aching ! posted by Warren on 9/24/2008 at 4:55:25 AM
I used one of these Park bench mount stands...

http://tinyurl.com/52j492

You can fix it permanantly to a wall stud in the basement or bolt a piece of hardwood blocking on the bottom and mount it in a bench vise or one of those portable workmates if you want to move outside. Mines lasted 15 years and still going strong. Make sure your blocking gives you enough clearance to rotate the pedals
by: 24.215.86.150

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   My back is aching ! posted by JDuck on 9/24/2008 at 9:07:00 AM
Yes, a stand like the Park stand. The free standing ones are very sturdy. They will work on almost any bike. Fold up quite nicely for transport. I also have one of the cheaper ones that hold by the bottom bracket. It works great for some bikes but not at all for others. Doesn't work well with any of my bikes with side stands.
by: 64.201.65.22

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   My back is aching ! posted by Kevin on 9/24/2008 at 1:59:17 PM
After years of wrestling with bicycles, I finally bought a used Park stand for $40. It's the portable kind that stands on the floor, and it's great. I can turn and lock the clamp so that it grips the crossbar or the downtube. It's really handy when I'm adjusting cables and derailleurs and I need to turn the pedals. It also keeps me from messing up the brake cables, as I used to do when I turned a road bike upside down on the floor. My little stand doesn't take up much room and it has paid for itself already. I wish I'd bought one 10 years ago!
by: 72.12.200.38

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   My back is aching ! posted by Steve on 9/29/2008 at 12:54:39 AM
I've managed to acquire a used PCS10 (I think that was the model number).
Should do nicely, the only fiddly bit so far is actually lifting the bike into the clamp/jaw whilst turning the jaw screw with your other hand, otherwise it's looking good.

Thanks for advice...just need a tea machine to attach to the side of it now !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Parts cleaning (again) posted by: al fickensher on 9/23/2008 at 8:00:05 PM
Matthew's good intentions notwithstanding, I am too old to switch from my cleaner of choice of more than 30 years running, good old lacquer thinner.

First reason, it cleans and degreases fantastically efficiently.
Second, it leaves no oily residue and it darn well leaves no after smell, either on the parts or on me like kero or diesel does.
That second is what got me using it in the first place, I just don't like the kero/fuel oil kinds of smells that linger sometimes for days.
Thirdly, while the stuff will of course burn, it's flash or flame danger has never become an issue in my indoor use.

I tried one gallon of white gas (Coleman lantern fuel) and while it does sorta degrease and is a whole 5-bucks/gal cheaper than lacquer thinner, the results just aren't worth saving the fiver.

I have given the modern orange and green-colored products a fair try and find them to be pathetic compared to the results gotten with laq thinner.

BTW, for old Chicago Schwinns I can even use the laq thinner safely on the painted parts. I can't do that on the English bikes' painted parts without softening and dulling the paint. Less aggressive solvents are definitely in order for the painted parts of our Raleighs et al.
alf
by: 204.181.94.127

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Parts cleaning (again) posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/24/2008 at 2:56:51 AM
"White Gas"... wow... I've not heard that in a long time. Actually... before gasoline was "modernized"... I used to run regular unleaded in the Coleman equipment. 'Twas pretty much the same... as white gas and a damn sight cheaper.

Lacquer thinner is pretty tough stuff on grease... and will also, given time, dissolve EPOXY finishes as well. I would not use that at all if what I'm cleaning is painted... or propinquitous to painted surfaces.

Personally I use different solvents for different things and do try to be conscious of the environmental impact of same.

Not real keen on kero / paraffin except for the cleaning of chains... both bicycle and motorbike. It does have some limited lubrication as well as barrier properties. Intersting note... O-ring chains on motorbikes... they say to use kero to clean them.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - to us here... paraffin is actually candle wax... ;-)


by: 4.154.222.194

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Parts cleaning (again) posted by Steve on 9/24/2008 at 9:04:42 AM
I kid you not about the following.

Many years ago when dealing with small parts, I used to place the parts to be cleaned in individual sealable plastic containers (filled with the appropriate cleaner...I do admit to using GUNK), I then used to attach the containers to branches on TREES in my garden in order for the earths natural resources i.e. WIND to rock the tree gently hence the parts were getting a continuous cleansing for as many days as required...it always worked.

Problems arose when I wanted to clean chunky parts...neighbours don't take too kindly to seeing 50 litre containers hanging from a tree (a very large tree) !

I once hung a VW Beetle floorpan (minus axles) up a tree at the bottom of my garden in order to paint it...I only did it once !

Steve - I love trees !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Parts cleaning (again) posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/24/2008 at 4:30:20 PM
Joyce Kilmer.... smiles approvingly.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - I just so happened to be UP a tree not one half hour ago....
by: 4.154.220.88

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Parts cleaning (again) posted by JDuck on 9/25/2008 at 9:29:46 AM
"I think that I shall never see" answers and asides as lovely as Larry's.
by: 64.201.65.22

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Parts cleaning (again) posted by Steve on 9/25/2008 at 1:53:47 PM
I didn't know of Joyce Kilmer.

From parts cleaning to a poet in the trenches of the First World War !

That's quite something (and quite a sad story).

Steve = Cedars are great !
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Parts cleaning (again) posted by Chris on 9/25/2008 at 5:45:15 PM
The cleanest parts are out of the ultrasonic parts cleaner found at one of my favorite bike shop haunts.
by: 209.86.226.13

           RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Parts cleaning (again) posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/26/2008 at 3:04:00 AM
Chris's method FTW here.... I can only imagine....

Additional aside: I used to fly model aircraft off the Joyce Kilmer Parade Ground in Edison, NJ.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - Ultrasonics.... awesome.
by: 4.154.223.20




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Pashley spotted posted by: Geoff Rogers on 9/23/2008 at 12:25:18 PM
I am lucky enought to work in a town where there are numerous old English bicycles in circulation. Today I saw several of the usual suspects, a lovely gold Dunelt, a Rudge ten-speed, a nice green Sports with punmp and bag, and the forlorn remains of a single-speed from around 1960, locked to a tree with its rear wheel stolen (why anybody would steal a single-speed coaster wheel from this bike is a mystery to me). At the library I saw a Pashley Princess, obviously in near-new condition. What a great-looking machine! It has a bow frame like an old female DL-1 Raleigh, alloy rims and hubs, gearcase, skirt guard for the spokes, a 5-speed SA rear hub and hub brakes front and rear. It's a nice dark green like an old Superbe, with matching green alloy rear carrier and Brooks leather saddle. I'll bet it wasn't cheap.
by: 216.153.152.113

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AGE / VALUE:   Chain question posted by: David Poston on 9/23/2008 at 11:27:42 AM
I'm curious what brand you guys are using for replacement chains. Harris Cyclery doesn't seem to sell any black ones that look traditional. Everything these days are all silver or worse--gold, blue, or pink! I was told by someone at Harris that the old chains were black b/c they were made of inferior steel, but Renolds chains never struck me as inferior.

BTW, this is for my Phillips bike which doesn't have an enclosed chaincase, so the chain will be rather visible.
by: 166.127.1.220

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Chain question posted by Chris on 9/23/2008 at 6:04:50 PM
Then don't go to Harris. Buy chain off of e- bay, or from another place on the web. Today, bicycle chain comes in all sorts of hideous colors.
by: 207.69.139.154

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Chain question posted by al fickensher on 9/23/2008 at 7:52:58 PM
Good heavens, Google is your friend. KMC sells 1/8" black chain, and brown too for that matter. Quite inexpensive, around $5 maybe at Niagara Cycle dot com.
by: 204.181.94.127

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Chain question posted by Steve on 9/24/2008 at 8:44:50 AM
KMC also sells 3/16" chain, but I only got it in silver...beggers can't be choosers !

Steve
by: 93.96.36.127




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AG dynohub (cont.) posted by: David Poston on 9/23/2008 at 11:20:09 AM
(I'm continuing my AG dynohub thread from below b/c it is getting towards the bottom of the page)

I've got the hub apart and been able to inspect the internals (haven't yet tried taking apart the pawls). Everything looks pretty clean and well oiled. I am thinking to just leave things as they are but just clean the bearings and bearing surfaces. Just a couple additional questions:

1. Is it just me, or is the dust cap on the driver nearly impossible to pry off without damaging it or the ball retainer that is underneath? Can I get by just cleaning the retainer in situ and greasing it as it sits? (I did get the dust cap off the RH ball ring).

2. The AG dynohub manual says only to put grease in two places: a) the dust cap of the driver and b) the recess of the RH ball ring. (The AW manual says to also put grease in LH ball ring, while the general maintenance directions for Sturmey Archer hubs says to put grease on bearings). Surely I can apply to grease to all bearings and bearing surfaces?

Thanks
David
by: 166.127.1.220

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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Funny thing happened the other day ! posted by: Steve on 9/22/2008 at 3:07:17 PM
It's not that funny really, I just thought it a little odd.

The beauty of finding old wrecks is that you never quite know what to expect until you start to scratch below the surface.

I was about to clean up an ancient 3/16" chain off an Elswick Hopper the other day, on looking for the split link, I noticed not one...not two...not three...not four...not five...but SIX split links in which to choose from !

I thought Christmas had arrived early.

Funny thing is, I've been scouring motorbike shops over recent months asking them to search out the backs of their drawers in the hope of finding 3/16" split links that they maybe used to use on mopeds back in the dark ages.
I managed to obtain ONE...they actually call it a "415"

Now I've got SIX in one hit, is this a record or is this fairly common to you gents who've been involved in this game for longer than me.

I've dealt with approximately thirty five bikes this last twelve months and the most split links I've ever come across in one chain is TWO.

I've since found out that some heavy duty BMX bikes also use 3/16" chain, hence I no longer have to bother the motorbike boys, still enjoyed finding SIX in one chain though.

Steve - content
by: 93.96.36.127

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Funny thing happened the other day ! posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/23/2008 at 4:56:09 PM
I've oft heard that someday, someone would find the "missing link"... but SIX of them?

Well DONE, sir! Impressive!

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - half a dozen even!
by: 4.154.220.76

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Funny thing happened the other day ! posted by Chris on 9/23/2008 at 6:07:55 PM
I had split links for derailer chain it came in a small plastic bag with a red card. I forget the name of the maker.

I was forever finding weird things like this.
by: 207.69.139.154




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MISC:   Parts cleaning posted by: Matthew on 9/21/2008 at 12:07:59 AM
Hi Folks,

Further to some discussion below about parts cleaning. Here are my thoughts.

Petrol - No, No and double No. For so many very obvious reasons.
(Methylated spirit - wood alcohol should be treated similarly)

Parafin - well it won't improve your good looks or your soft hands and it has a low flash point. Don't try Boom Boom shake de room! (I think you say Kerosene in the States?)

Diesel - (aka Gas Oil) Not so good as a cleaner, less tricky than the above but quite good for parts soaking if bits are seized together.

White Spirit - Will do the job but can be difficult to get rid of and isn't good for your hands.

Parts cleaner solvent - many different brands. Keep your hands out of it, wear gloves and follow the instructions. Use it in a parts cleaner if you have one.

Gunk - yes that is the trade name. Use cautiously, it does work but it washes off with water, not so good if there is a chance of rust at a later date and the waste is difficult to catch before it gets to the drains.

With all of the above please dispose of them carefully. Not down storm water or foul water drains, Never into streams, ditches or other water courses. (In UK and EU you could face prosecution).

The cheapest and most simple small parts washer is a baby milk tin with a resealable lid. Get and empty tin, clean it out, put in the parts to be washed, put in a little of your chosen cleaning fluid (see notes above), fit lid tightly and shake. Other resealable tins will work too, drinks thickener etc etc.

Matthew - lecture over, class dismissed.
by: 82.20.18.172

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           RE:MISC: Parts cleaning posted by Al on 9/21/2008 at 3:05:42 PM

I like to use less-toxic degreasers. In the States we have Simple Green (some kind of ester that claims to be biodegradeable) and Citrasolv (a synthetic turpentine touted as "green"). These are both water-based. They do an admirable job of removing stubborn grease at full strength, but can be diluted.

Disposal is less of an issue than petrol-based solvents. And I don't worry as much about poisoning myself or blowing up my bike barn. Still take precautions.

I think most cyclists use this stuff to clean their chain, followed by a thorough dry time and lubrication. I've had good luck with Boeshield T-9. Goes on wet, drys waxy. Dirt doesn't stick to my chain!

For internal hub parts, I'm still experimenting. It makes sense that kerosene would be good to clean with. It wouldn't remove all the oil film like a degreaser would. But I don't like the toxic side of it.

So, for really dirty parts, I scrub with a copper scrub mesh called a Chore Boy. Doesn't scratch chrome. Doesn't leave little bits all over like steel wool. If the part is still greasy, I use a little citrasolv full strength. Wash and dry it right away. Then I just use 20 weight cycle oil to clean it. Put back together and ride!

This is from Marco at hubstripping.com - an internal gear enthusiast in Switzerland:

"When you “strip” a old hub you should disassemble it into it´s major parts and clean all parts with standard bicycle oil and tabs. Use no degreaser because this would destroy the oil- and lubricating films of the different parts. A result would be a increasing mechanical wear of slide bearings."

I'm not sure what a tab is. Maybe "tap"?










by: 71.135.52.109

           RE:RE:MISC: Parts cleaning posted by Christopher on 9/21/2008 at 7:06:15 PM
Disobey the professor and there will be real, serrious consequences the least of which you will be saying "cog" instead of "sprocket"

Really, I have heard horror stories about people cleaning parts the worng ways.

Thanks Mathew!
by: 207.69.140.20




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hub Noise posted by: Bob on 9/20/2008 at 4:18:25 PM
I have a '73 Raleigh Superbe 3-speed that has a noise coming from the hub as I ride. Every nine revolutions, it clicks once per revolution for three revolutions, then does the cycle again. The loudness of the "clicks" is directly proportional to the pressure on the pedals.

Other than that, the hub works fine. No slipping and positive shifts. I've never disassembled one of those hubs, but am OK with doing it. Can anyone give me a clue as to what to look for? Is this a common problem? Will I need special tools?

Thanks!
by: 66.248.82.214

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hub Noise posted by Keith Body on 9/21/2008 at 12:11:33 PM
If it happens in all gears I would look first at the ball cages by undoing the bearing cones far enough to see if you have a cracked ball.
If you have access to a fairly strong vice you can take the left end plate off (left hand thread). Remove the RH cone and driver with sprocket. Undo the end plate and lift the wheel so that the gear internal is upright in the vice.
As it is over 40 years since I have done this I hope the memory is OK.
If you can't move the LH end plate, the RH is right hand thread 2 start, and you mark the hub and end plate before you start. Used to take these off with a flat ended chisel and a light hammer, rapid light hits. Never failed.
by: 195.93.21.98




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Maker of trade bike baskets posted by: Kevin on 9/20/2008 at 11:25:42 AM
I found this maker of willow baskets for trade bikes. Aren't they loverly?
http://hembrow.eu/index.html
by: 205.188.116.138

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Maker of trade bike baskets posted by Steve on 9/20/2008 at 2:17:37 PM
Well spotted Kevin.
I was going to forward the address (but had to dash to work) !
Theres some wonderful pictures of bikes on this site (even if you hate wicker) !
Steve
by: 93.96.36.127

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Maker of trade bike baskets posted by Matthew on 9/20/2008 at 11:58:15 PM
Hi Kevin,

That just goes to confirm that this DB is a meeting of great minds. I had found the same site when search 'delivery bicycles' on the web. What you didn't mention was the rather good conversion that Mr Hembrow can supply to make (almost) any bike into a delivery bike. I have not seen his work in real life but if it is as good as the photos then it is a treat. Also worth watching is the video of how he makes a basket.

Matthew - great minds think alike.........(fools seldom differ?)
by: 82.20.18.172

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Maker of trade bike baskets posted by kg on 9/21/2008 at 7:37:00 AM
Actually, his delivery system looks very similar to similar mountings we see here on bikes in China. Perhaps a bit more robust.

Here is a Forever that is so equipped.

http://www.forever-bicycle.com/showproduct.asp?ID=660

by: 210.82.65.25

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Maker of trade bike baskets posted by Kevin on 9/22/2008 at 6:44:24 PM
Matthew --
I'm glad you spotted the brackets for sale. I was so fascinated by the beautiful baskets that I overlooked them.
Any true delivery bike puts the load on the frame and keeps it off the handlebars and front forks. The conversion brackets do just that. They would certainly make hauling a heavy load much safer than using a basket that attaches to the front axle and the handlebars.
by: 205.188.116.199




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FOR SALE:   NOT my auction posted by: Matthew on 9/20/2008 at 11:07:57 AM
eBay Item number 310085382110

I think it is over priced but this may enable some one to complete a restoration and the seller will ship to US of A.

I have no idea who the seller is so I am not implicated in any pecuniary interest regarding this iem.

Matthew - above board.
by: 86.27.226.232

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           RE:FOR SALE:   NOT my auction posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/23/2008 at 5:01:37 PM
That is quite nice. As to price... a little high but if I had the machine it went to and needed it, not an insurmountable sum for certain.

Alas, I don't own a Triumph... particularly a pre-Raleigh machine. I've seen a few Triumphs here in the States though... and not a single one... that lovely colour.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - start with the chaincase... the rest is EASY.
by: 4.154.220.76




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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Webb Girder Forks and Truss rods posted by: KG on 9/20/2008 at 4:11:47 AM
I know that Webb made girder forks for British Roadsters. They also made these for motorcycles as well. However I have not seen a picture of the bicycle version. Can somebody post one if they have them?

Also, does anyone know if anyone made truss rods for a 26" tire roadster?
by: 210.82.65.25

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Webb Girder Forks and Truss rods posted by Chris on 9/20/2008 at 6:50:09 PM
Scroll down a bit and you will find the e- mail address for Bruce Robbin's that sam gave us. e- mail Bruce, buy a copy of the brown brothers c.d. that he sells

pop that into your computer and you will see the web forks you are mentioning. then go and look for one for sale.

the Brown Brothers catalog was the "mother of all wish books" or the "vintage bicycle Bible"
by: 207.69.139.156

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Webb Girder Forks and Truss rods posted by Matthew on 9/21/2008 at 12:04:26 AM
Hi Folks,

Once again Chris is 'right on the money' here. The Brown Brothers catalogue was an incredible publication. Where else could you find frame tubing, lugs, bottom brackets, forks, racks, wheel rims / spokes / hubs all listed as separate parts ; available individually, by the dozen or by the gross (144 at a time). The illustrations alone are works of art. I sincerely hope the Science Museum, British library and the Smithsonian institute all have a copy or two.

Matthew - books a place of comfort and learning.
by: 82.20.18.172

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Webb Girder Forks and Truss rods posted by sam on 9/21/2008 at 7:04:42 PM
I have a set on the staton motobike I just built.It was built using a 1938 Melvern Star frame with webb forks.In a few days I'll try and up load some Pics of the forks
by: 68.90.164.131

           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Webb Girder Forks and Truss rods posted by KG on 9/23/2008 at 4:07:05 AM
Thanks Sam-

I look forward to your photos.
by: 193.23.43.2




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AGE / VALUE:   Newletter posted by: sam on 9/19/2008 at 6:15:36 PM
Guys Check this out;
http://www.classicbicyclenews.com/

Now if only we could locate Ol P.C. and get him writing about British iron.....
by: 68.90.164.131

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AGE / VALUE:   Bruce Robbins posted by: sam on 9/19/2008 at 2:26:51 PM
Bruce Robbins
brucerobbins@supanet.com
by: 68.90.164.131

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ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   SA Parts interchangeability posted by: Warren on 9/19/2008 at 12:07:24 PM
You've gotta love the British bike industry. Included with my 50's parts manual is exactly what David wants to see in the post below.

http://oldroads.com/oldroads_files/329_14.jpg
http://oldroads.com/oldroads_files/329_15.jpg


by: 24.215.86.150

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           RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: SA Parts interchangeability posted by Al on 9/19/2008 at 7:17:06 PM

Looks like the only difference between an AW hub and the Dyno-3-speed AG is two parts! Except for the dyno parts, of course.

The left-hand ball cup and the left-hand axle cone with dust cap have different numbers. And these are only found on drum brake AB hubs.

So, we should be able to service an AG with the AW parts at Harris Cyclery. That's good, 'cause I have an AG I'd like to take apart.

I find that the only parts I've ever had to replace were pawl springs and chipped pawls. And once I had to replace a driver that had pitted races. Never saw anything else broken in the 12 or 15 AW hubs I've re-built.

Thanks, Warren.




by: 71.135.35.143

           RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: SA Parts interchangeability posted by Chris on 9/20/2008 at 6:56:29 PM
A.W. 3 speed clutches,clutch keys are cheap and are usually replaced while you have the beast opened up on the operating table it is the perfect time.
by: 207.69.139.156




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AGE / VALUE:   AG dynothree hub question posted by: David Poston on 9/18/2008 at 8:56:29 PM
The bright side of Houston having been wrecked by Hurricane Ike is that I've had the whole week off work...time to work on restoring my 1952 Phillips roadster that has been languishing in the garage...

I'm currently trying to work up the courage to disassemble the rear AG dynothree hub on the bike to get it in tip-top shape. I've tried loosening the left hand cone, but the hub seems to run a bit stiff. I spin the wheel and it comes to a stop after 3 revolutions or so. What gives? It also feels as if there is some drag--is this being caused by the dynohub magnet? It almost seems as if the hub is trying to drag the dynohub along with it. So...advice? Would disassembling the hub and putting new grease and/or bearings help it run more smoothly? I do have Glenn's Bicycle Manual handy...However, I've never disassembled an SA hub, much less a dynohub and am scared that parts might fall off and never get back on...Should I get spare parts for replacing the worn ones? Can I get by with just lubricating or replacing the cone bearings and leaving the rest of the hub intact?

I do have a 1965 AW hub lying around that I was going to practice on but for some odd reason it doesn't have any flats on the left hand side so I can't figure out how I would unscrew the right hand ball cup.

What should I do?

thanks
David
by: 98.194.204.124

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   AG dynothree hub question posted by David Poston on 9/19/2008 at 10:10:16 AM
I just noticed that Harris Cyclery sells replacement parts for AW hubs. Which parts should I replace? Will these parts work with my 1952 AG dynohub? Will the quality be as good as what I already have?

Can I get by with not separating the internals, just cleaning the surfaces with kerosene and applying oil to the internals, grease to the bearings/races?

thanks in advance for your help

David
by: 129.7.125.9

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: AG dynothree hub question posted by Warren on 9/19/2008 at 12:12:19 PM
See my post above David. Be aware that the modern AW hubs have some different or improved parts and may not fit your AG. You could always use an older AW for parts.
by: 24.215.86.150

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: AG dynothree hub question posted by Chris on 9/19/2008 at 6:09:46 PM
Take care not to turn it the wrong way upside down and have those pawl pins fall out and thus loose the little springs that hold the pawls in place.
by: 207.69.139.147

           RE:AGE / VALUE: AG dynothree hub question posted by Al on 9/19/2008 at 7:03:55 PM

I learned how to tear apart and lube an AW using info from Tony Hadland's site:

http://www.hadland.me.uk/samaintind.htm

If you scroll down, he's got the AG hub listed as well. These are original S/A instruction manuals written for folks like us.

Yes, you might have a pawl pin fall out, but with the manual, you'll be able to figure out how to put it back!

I've learned a couple things. One is use only cycle oil to clean the parts, rather than harsh degreasers. From what I've read (hubstripping.com), the degreasers remove the helpful film that's been on these parts from the start.

At the risk of re-starting another go-round regarding which oil to use in a S/A hub, I vote for Weld-Tite Cycle Oil. I ordered it through my LBS since Sturmey Archer oil is no longer available. The Weld-Tite product is British-made and comes in a bottle the exact shape as the most recent Sturmey Archer plastic bottles. Even down to the annoying and useless cap. Might very well be the same stuff!

Further revealing my inner bike nerd, I offer this question to all you out there brave enough to read this far:

What kind of grease did Raleigh use in these hubs? Was it lithium-based or poly urea grease, and does it matter which one?

Have fun David.




by: 71.135.35.143

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   AG dynothree hub question posted by sciencemonster on 9/19/2008 at 11:00:28 PM
Yes, an AG will have a ton of drag from the magnets. It 'chugs' as each magnet passes. Be very careful about removing the Dynahub - if that magnet drops out the thing is shot. The hub is lubed with 20 weight oil, so replacing the grease doesn't do all that much after some miles. The oil will just wash it out anyway.
by: 70.231.246.188

           RE:AGE / VALUE: AG dynothree hub question posted by Matthew on 9/20/2008 at 12:14:33 AM
Hi Folks,

I would use an LM Grease such as Castrol LM. It is a low melting point grease and over time and summer weather it will ooze but very unlikely that the less viscous oil in the hub will wash the grease out.

The drag on an AG hub is considerably less than the drag of a 'bottle' dynamo. Given the leverage that a 26" or even a 20" wheel has from the axle the resistance to turning is quite low. You can turn an AG hub by hand even when it is not assembled into a wheel. If you can't then it is a bearing problem not a generator problem. Some of the biggest advantages of the dynohub is its free rolling ability and ease of use.

I hope this adds usefully to the information above.

Matthew - spinning along.
by: 86.27.226.232

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: AG dynothree hub question posted by David Poston on 9/20/2008 at 10:51:39 AM
Thanks all for the replies.

1. So you are saying that kerosene (paraffin) should not be used for cleaning the parts? Glenn's Bicycle manual says to use solvent and then blow dry the parts with compressed air. I've been using kerosene to clean bottom brackets, headsets, front hubs, with good results (although the stuff smells pretty bad).

2. Regarding grease, from what I've read in some of the SA manuals posted online, grease could/should be put in the ball races only. I've read elsewhere that grease should be put in the dust cap groove only. What's the consensus here?

3. Regarding drag on the AG dynohub, does this mean that you CAN'T test the cone tightness by spinning the wheel like you normally do with a standard AW hub and wait for the valve to settle on the bottom? Will the magnet always bring the wheel to a halt after 3-4 revolutions, making it seem that the LH cone is overtightned?

thanks again
David
by: 139.52.196.23

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   AG dynothree hub question posted by Keith Body on 9/20/2008 at 3:22:48 PM
David,
I used to run a front dynohub in the winter, practically no drag until the lights were switched on. The "armature" (the part the wires are connected to) was removed and gently given a little more clearance from the magnet by tapping with a light hammer, plus a little filing of the high spots. Also sometimes the dirt builds up. Never had a problem with a magnet when removed. Also mal-adjustment of the cones can make the "armature" drag on the magnet cover. My front dyno has a BH quick release, 12 ounce rim, and 10 ounce tubular tyre for winter use. About 20 years since it was used.
Cone adjustment: feel just a small movement sideways at the rim, and reduce by adjustment to a minimum.
My local cycle shop has now closed, I have not forgotten your rod brake guide.
by: 195.93.21.98

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   AG dynothree hub question posted by Chris on 9/20/2008 at 7:12:31 PM
David,
You could not be in better hands! read and follow the advice and links to the web sites!
As for the oil question, I use the singer sewing machine oil because like the original Sturmey Archer cycle oil it does not gum up the pawls. I discovered the "Phil tenacious oil" in the green bottle from Phil Wood sold in some local bike shops. I use it in lubricating the 3 and 4 speed trigger shifters. It's better than anything else. also in chains, and bearings but not in the sturmey- Archer hubs there, you use the Singer sewing machine oil.

We are blessed to have Keith here with us. Hey Keith, can you buy up the old back inventory of that now closed bicycle shop so it does not get thrown away? can you save the contents of the shop?

Keith, can you describe what types or brands or versions of grease that Raleigh and Sturmey- Archer used back in the day?

We are currious as we see it gummed up and dried. It is brownish today, was it brownish originally? what brand did they use? The grease is a bit of a mystery to us youngster "Raleighites". Thanks!
by: 207.69.139.156

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   AG dynothree hub question posted by Chris on 9/20/2008 at 7:18:22 PM
I would recommend parts cleaner solvent and advise you to steer away from Kerosene. You can really hurt yourself with some solvents.

parts cleaner solvent from an auto parts store is best.

Never ever use gasoline to clean bike parts.
by: 207.69.139.156

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   AG dynothree hub question posted by Keith Body on 9/21/2008 at 12:26:34 PM
Hi Chris, The local shop was only there 20 years. Nothing in old stuff.
I am trying to remember what was in the raleigh hubs when we opened them back in the 1950's. I think the bottom bracket and hubs had very little light grease, users were supposed to apply some light oil, but rarely did so.
Campagnolo introduced a white water absorbing grease in the late 1950's, with hard chrome surface hub cones.
by: 195.93.21.98

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   AG dynothree hub question posted by David Poston on 9/21/2008 at 2:39:54 PM
As for oil, I have been using genuine S-A oil. (I have about 6 tins of it stashed in my garage).

As for grease, I have Phil Wood waterproof grease (in a green squeeze tube). Will this suffice for the bearings in the AG hub?

One thing on greasing hub bearings--the AG hub instructions say to only grease the dust cap groove in the driver and the groove in the RH ball ring. The AW hub instructions say to grease the LH ball races as well.

Elsewhere (under general instructions?), it says to apply grease to bearing surfaces, but nowhere else. Glenn's bicycle manual says to work a generous amount of grease in the ball cages (L and R) and a small amount of grease in the RH ball ring where the 24 loose bearings sit.

Should I go with Glenn's?

thanks
David
by: 129.7.158.30

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