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Vintage Bicycle Discussion Area

Vintage Lightweights

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AGE / VALUE:   FIRST 622 mm RIMS posted by: Jorge on 2/24/2010 at 9:09:06 AM
Does anyone know when the 622mm (700C) rims where introduced?
by: 66.50.219.63

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   FIRST 622 mm RIMS posted by David on 2/25/2010 at 9:06:19 AM
I, too, would like to know the history of the standardization of different tire sizes. A little internet reseach has showed the following: Dunlop's tire [re-]invention 1888, C.K. Welch clincher tire & rim 1890, C.H. Woods' valve 1891, F. Westwood's tube-edged rim 1893, C.K. Welch's fabric cord casing system 1893.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   FIRST 622 mm RIMS posted by Jorge on 2/25/2010 at 12:05:19 PM
And 630mm. (27 x 1 1/4) the old British touring size; now almost obsolete, became popular after the fifties on Sports and Club bikes.

And the 622mm?
by: 66.50.219.63

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   FIRST 622 mm RIMS posted by Keith Body on 2/25/2010 at 1:51:20 PM
Incredibly a bit before my time. By the 1950/60's in the UK 95% of cycle tyres were 1 of 3 sizes. The measurement was simple. 27 inches by 1 1/4 inches. 27 inches outside diameter, 24 1/2 inches diameter inside the wire bead. Car tyres were sized this way into the 1930's. 24 1/2 inches is very close to 622mm. After Dunlop gave up then we got millions of continental sizes.
Clincher tyres were replaced early on by wired-on, but were still used on cars in the 1920's. The clincher, also known as beaded-edge, fitted into a recess at the edge of the rim, with some difficulty, and were soon replaced by the non extesible wire bead. I believe wired-on tyres are erroneously called "clincher" now, which they clearly are not.
27 x 1 1/4 were available late 1930's, but were not in common use (UK) until after WW2.
by: 92.23.99.79

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   FIRST 622 mm RIMS posted by Jorge on 2/25/2010 at 8:25:02 PM
Been searching trough internet for the answer to no avail, it seems 622s originated in France and according to Sheldon Brown and I quote,
"Back in the 1970s, 622 mm clinchers were very rare in the U.S., and most sporty bikes used either 630 mm (27 inch) clinchers, or standard (622 mm) tubulars"

by: 66.50.219.63

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   FIRST 622 mm RIMS posted by Warren on 2/26/2010 at 12:52:24 PM
Early Canadian 20th century wooden (and steel) wheels are identical to 700c although they were labeled 28 inches. I have no idea when it became a standard.
by: 24.215.80.230

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   FIRST 622 mm RIMS posted by Gralyn on 2/26/2010 at 10:36:26 PM
I have some wheels and tires labeled as 28 inch, which ironically are smaller than 27 inch......as they are actually 700C.
by: 74.235.75.199

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   FIRST 622 mm RIMS posted by Henry on 4/19/2010 at 7:38:20 PM
Here's my understanding of the French, or “Continental” tire sizes:

I don't really know when this system was developed, I think it was in the 19teens or twenties.

The tire size designations tell the nominal diameter of the tire, and the width series. Thus any tire designated “700” would have originally been 700 millimeters diameter, which is actually about 27-1/2 inches. “A” series tires were smallish, say about 1-3/8 or so. “B” series tires were somewhat larger, and “C” series tires were close to our 1-3/4 or larger “balloon” tires. This tire width specification held true throughout all the diameters.

Do the math; a rim with a bead seat diameter of 622, with 40mm tires (about 1.6 inches) gives you 702 millimeters nominal outside diameter. That tire might well be marked 700x40C, 28 X 1-5/8, or something very close.

This is the rim diameter, 622mm, that came into use for racing cycles with tubular tires. As time went by, and roads improved throughout Europe, the need for large tires diminished, and smaller tires were fitted to the same rim diameter. Rims began to be made narrower to accommodate the smaller tires, but the 622mm bead seat diameter remained the same.

Nowadays, our 700C wheels are still using the same 622mm rim as was originally intended to be a 28 inch wheel, but with, say, 20mm tires you get an actual diameter of almost exactly 26 inches.

I'm sorry I cannot provide footnotes or sources for this info about the origins of the “A” “B” and “C” widths, but I'm dredging this out of a long disused memory bank, and I really don't remember where I got the information to begin with.

I've scanned some tire size information from my archive, and also a couple pages of spoke&rim information from an old Raleigh dealer manual. These are on a webpage at:

http://www.auldooly.com/bicycletires.html

I hope this helps a bit to clarify a perpetually muddy issue.
by: 75.228.64.86




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AGE / VALUE:   70 ? huffy bike posted by: J on 2/23/2010 at 6:20:50 PM
I found a huffy echelon in good shape everything is black except the tires which are white,anybody here of this model and maybe when was it made
by: 71.64.129.42

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AGE / VALUE:   what is this? posted by: ray on 2/23/2010 at 12:59:09 PM
this is my cusins bike really cheaply made look at the stamped forks.i would like to know what this is if posible.why won't it let me put a picture on here?
by: 72.84.4.112

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MISC:   Parts for Sears Lightweight posted by: Jerry on 2/23/2010 at 8:13:03 AM
I am attempting to restore a mid 70's Sears Lightweight. All parts are on her except the chainguard. It might need a new crank as how the pedal on the left side wobbles a lot. But that might be repaired with a new cotter. My biggest concern is the chainguard. Can anyone give me an idea where I could find one of these. I have searched ebay and googled, all with no success.
Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
Jerry
by: 168.251.194.19

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           RE:MISC:   Parts for Sears Lightweight posted by David on 2/25/2010 at 3:05:40 PM
Probably an exact replacement will only be found by buying a parts bike. It might be easier to find one that will fit but is painted wrong. Most mid-70s Sears bikes were Steyr-Daimler-Puch of Austria, so keep an eye out for parts for their brands, too.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:MISC:   Parts for Sears Lightweight posted by Jerry on 2/26/2010 at 10:09:50 PM
David. thanks for your reply. I will keep an eye out for those brands.
by: 66.157.97.161




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AGE / VALUE:   Bottom bracket cup - drive side posted by: Gralyn on 2/21/2010 at 9:24:29 PM
Does anyone have any tips on how to remove the bottom bracket cup on the drive side? These are the standard, threaded cups found in so many old bike boom bikes. I know the drive side cup unscrews clock-wise. Some of them look to be for 1 3/8" wrench size.
by: 74.235.75.199

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bottom bracket cup - drive side posted by David on 2/22/2010 at 7:57:32 AM
If it's a French or Italian frame, consider that the cup may come out counter-clockwise (i.e. it's right-hand threaded). DON'T try to use an ordinary wrench on it; the slight taper of the wrench will cause it to come off. If you have a "real" fixed-cup wrench, arrange to fasten it slightly loosely (to allow for the cup to start coming out) with a long bolt and a big washer. Or use Sheldon Brown's method: see http://sheldonbrown.com/tooltips/bbcups.html
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bottom bracket cup - drive side posted by ken on 2/22/2010 at 12:02:08 PM
I found a 1-3/8 socket at a garage sale that has worked well for me. I've also used the bench vise method: with a couple of wood blocks and a long bolt you can secure the whole thing so it won't fly out of the vise when you start turning the frame; my big challenge when that side is face down is visualizing which way to turn and getting it right the first time-
by: 70.105.104.148

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bottom bracket cup - drive side posted by David on 2/23/2010 at 6:58:56 AM
I'm surprised that the big socket works. Most sockets have a slight chamfer inside that I expect would allow the socket to ride up over the thin edge of the fixed cup. I'd try the cheapest (Sheldon's) method first.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bottom bracket cup - drive side posted by Gralyn on 2/23/2010 at 4:21:12 PM
I think I'll try the Sheldon Brown method with the bolt.
by: 74.235.75.199

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bottom bracket cup - drive side posted by Gralyn on 3/1/2010 at 1:01:10 PM
I tried the method using the bolt. It worked!
by: 74.235.75.199




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AGE / VALUE:   Minerva Track Bike posted by: Lyle Paul on 2/20/2010 at 10:02:32 PM
Below is a link to photos of my Minerva lightweight track bike. Had previously posted a few weeks ago until my old computer clapped out. Sorry for the delay. I would like to find out any information on the age of this bike. It has new Velocity wheels - imitation wood grain rims. Have yet to find some better peddles. http://www4.snapfish.com.au/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=1623987018/a=1199641018_1199641018/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/

Thanks
Lyle
by: 123.211.211.165

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Minerva Track Bike posted by Keith Body on 2/21/2010 at 3:59:52 AM
Hi Lyle, If the chrome on the head lugs is original then it is after 1930. It certainly looks 1930's, and the seat stays and curved bridge would be very advanced for that time. When you said it had large letters on the down tube I could not see it as early 1900's. It deserves some light fast tyres.
by: 92.16.124.107

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Minerva Track Bike posted by Lyle Paull on 3/2/2010 at 12:56:04 AM
Thanks for that Keith
I may post some pics of my Coventry Rotary tandem replica if you like
Thanks Lyle
by: 124.185.227.43




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AGE / VALUE:   Minerva Track Bike posted by: Lyle Paul on 2/20/2010 at 10:02:32 PM
Below is a link to photos of my Minerva lightweight track bike. Had previously posted a few weeks ago until my old computer clapped out. Sorry for the delay. I would like to find out any information on the age of this bike. It has new Velocity wheels - imitation wood grain rims. Have yet to find some better peddles. hashttp://www4.snapfish.com.au/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=1623987018/a=1199641018_1199641018/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/

Thanks
Lyle
by: 123.211.211.165

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MISC:   Ultimate SA bike posted by: David on 2/17/2010 at 9:26:05 PM
Ebay # 320487377012, a beautiful S5-equipped Jack Taylor.
by: 216.15.114.27

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           RE:MISC:   Ultimate SA bike posted by Warren on 2/18/2010 at 4:45:01 PM
Integral saddle bag support, cool chainset, stem shifters?? Truly unique.
by: 24.215.80.230




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AGE / VALUE:   Art Event posted by: sam on 2/17/2010 at 7:43:27 PM
http://www.allartnews.com/twenty-one-hand-built-bicycles-to-be-showcased-at-museum-of-arts-and-design/
by: 99.70.102.61

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AGE / VALUE:   Firestone Flight 880 posted by: Tim on 2/15/2010 at 10:08:57 PM
I bought this bike at an auction a number of years ago and
can not find any info on it. Mans has flight 880 on tank on
one side. Any info as to age would be of help

by: 75.6.7.47

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Firestone Flight 880 posted by ken on 2/16/2010 at 11:34:46 AM
You should post on the balloon/middleweight page. Pictures would help.
by: 70.105.104.148




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AGE / VALUE:   Leather stitched bar wrap posted by: Gralyn on 2/15/2010 at 10:38:16 AM
I picked up a Volkscycle Mark XV this weekend. It has old Shimano 600 components - but interesting to me is the leather bar wrap. It's the stitched-on type. I was wondering if anyone had any experience with this type of bar wrap? Can you use seam rippers and remove it - then re-stitch it back on?
by: 74.235.75.199

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Leather stitched bar wrap posted by David on 2/15/2010 at 4:31:44 PM
I'm sure you could rip it off, but do you want to? I've never tried sewing leather onto handlebars, but I have sewed oar leathers and it's a lot of difficult work, at least if you're inexperienced. I'd change my plans so that I could leave it on.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Leather stitched bar wrap posted by Matt on 2/28/2010 at 10:14:04 AM
I've sewn on new Toshi wrap and it just took some time. Although the wrap came with thread, I bought a longer amount from a hobby shop. It wasn't particularly difficult, but it took time to get it to look right. One think that I will note is that you might want to try to put some sort of adhesive on the bars near the point you will have the most hand contact and the edges. Otherwise, the wrap may start to slip and rotate around.
by: 98.206.239.108




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AGE / VALUE:   1950's era Hercules Tourist posted by: Emily Raymer on 2/9/2010 at 12:37:22 PM
hey all, wondering if there are any herc fans out there. I'm thinking she's a 1950, but would like some confirmation.

The serial # is OB 5340, the stamping on the rear hub is "A type 1 *break* Hercules *break* -3 Speed- *break* Made in England.", the stamping on the front hub is "H(possible &) R pattern *break* made in England". She is made in Birmingham.

Photos are here http://www.flickr.com/photos/queenofsingle/4034104445/ here http://www.flickr.com/photos/queenofsingle/3930025445/ and here http://www.flickr.com/photos/queenof...7612016321150/ Can post any other photos as requested.


I am leaving the paint as is, have polished up the chrome and other shiny metal bits. the only non-stock parts are the rear brake assemblage, saddle, rear tyre and grips.


by: 69.133.127.190


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1950's era Hercules Tourist posted by Chris on 2/9/2010 at 5:00:00 PM
You are in hercules fan central but post this under Roadsters

. Nice bike1 yes pree Raleigh, remove the front wheen you have the dynohub screws on the wrong side flip the wheen and re- install in with the terminals on the right side.

I love these bikes! I love to find these at the church rummage sales! love to re- grease, install new bearing cups and true wheels and install new cables and take them out for a ride. I really love these. I had a few of these and also the "Royal Prince" models.

I think most of your questions are already being answered. but do stay in our midst!
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1950's era Hercules Tourist posted by Chris on 2/9/2010 at 5:01:08 PM
flip the front wheel, I mean to say
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1950's era Hercules Tourist posted by David on 2/10/2010 at 8:55:08 AM
I'm curious about the generator. It's not a Dynohub (and, it it were, it makes no diff which way it's oriented) but an accessory unit that attaches to a regular wheel. Any chance we could get a closeup photo of it?
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1950's era Hercules Tourist posted by Chris on 2/10/2010 at 7:15:21 PM
Makes no difference which way it is situated but I was told the "correct" way was for the terminals to be on the right side but whatever you want to do it is your bike
looks like a 1940's bakelite version dynohub these have fragile terminal screws these break off with the slightest bump
by: 69.153.86.42




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MISC:   Phillips P6 posted by: Carmen on 2/4/2010 at 11:32:18 PM
Apparently the holes along the rear mudguard of this bike originally had some kind of string tied into them that went from there down to the centre, to prevent one's skirt from being caught in the spokes etc. Does anybody know what material this would have been and/or where to source it from? This is for the purpose of restoring one. Thanks in advance!
by: 121.72.157.196

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           RE:MISC:   Phillips P6 posted by David on 2/6/2010 at 5:19:18 AM
You see this frequently in Europe. Often they have elastic cord strung through little eyes with hooks into the holes in the fenders. If it's strung directly through the holes, I think it will chafe and break very quickly. I'd surf around and find pictures of these on the internet.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:MISC:   Phillips P6 posted by Steve on 2/8/2010 at 4:33:24 PM
A few pix & info to help.
Thin leather laces work well, too.

http://www.copenhagencyclechic.com/2009/06/cycle-chic-guide-4-diy-skirtguards-for.html
by: 209.26.58.179




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AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Princeton posted by: Tom on 2/3/2010 at 6:47:20 AM
Hi, I hope I have the right forum. I have a soft spot for Peugeots, and picked up a mint Princeton commuter bike for nostaglia's sake. I can't find much info on it. Does anyone know anything about this bike? Thanks.


by: 173.9.127.153


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Princeton posted by David on 2/4/2010 at 5:25:46 AM
(If you fix the URL after your browser fails to find it, you can see the photo) It looks like a good commuter in a style that's never been too popular in the US.
by: 216.15.114.27




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AGE / VALUE:   1910 track bike posted by: Lyle on 1/22/2010 at 4:35:46 AM
Anyone know any info
I have a Minerva Bicycle , no brake mount drillings small diameter top tube.
Has Minerva transfer on the head tube and the seat tube and large letters (MINERVA FLYER) on the down tube.
I know Minerva made early Motorcycle's and supplied a lot of other early make's with engines , I will try and post a link of some photo's
by: 123.211.127.188

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1910 track bike posted by jj on 1/23/2010 at 6:43:30 AM
Lots of info on them in the archives here. Use the Google Search box on any page or use the black "Search the Archives" box above.
by: 71.174.125.242

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1910 track bike posted by Warren on 1/23/2010 at 6:02:49 PM
Love to see pics. Not sure there's much info in these archives on a Minerva from that period. Sounds unique.
by: 24.215.86.83

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