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Vintage Bicycle Discussion Area

Vintage Lightweights

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AGE / VALUE:   Suncrest??? posted by: Steve on 9/27/2009 at 5:14:41 PM
I just got home with my latest find... a Suncrest? Never heard of one, but then there are many bikes I've never heard of. Head badge says SUNCREST across the top with the roman numeral two, (II), below. It seems to be a decently made frame, nicely lugged but not fancy, with the lower 1/2 of the forks being chromed. Pretty much all Shimano components, brakes, (center-pull), and cranks, (3-piece, sealed) are "Tourney", derailluers are "Titlist", (yes, thats how it's spelled), stem-mounted shifters, Araya rims and Sakae bars. Anybody know anything about this bike?? Quality, potential value, age?? Any info would be cool, but with a little, (ALOT), of cleaning and polishing I think it'll be a nice piece. Thanks!! Oh yeah, best of all, it was $5.94!! yep, that's right, less than six dollars!! Gotta love it!!
by: 99.37.49.19

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Suncrest??? posted by Steve on 10/12/2009 at 12:05:50 PM
Here's a few pics . . . maybe it'll help???


by: 208.124.118.125





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MISC:   87 Schwinn Traveler posted by: David on 9/27/2009 at 7:34:53 AM
CL furnished a very good condition 87 Traveler. Apart from crummy derailleurs, it seems to be a pretty good bike. The frame has a Tru-Temper DB cro-mo main triangle. Where were these frames made? I can find no label mentioning nationality and I'd expect that, in 87, "made in USA" was a selling point. I may keep this baby as a beater for errands. Thanks in advance for info.
by: 216.15.114.27

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           RE:MISC:   87 Schwinn Traveler posted by Gralyn on 9/27/2009 at 6:36:09 PM
I believe some of the Schwinn Travelers with the True Temper tubing were made in Chicago. There were other Travelers that weren't quite as good - and they were labeled as made in Taiwan. I had a sampling of both. I really liked the ones made with the True Temp tubing - they were really nice bikes. I had some of them that came with a crank set drilled for a 3rd chain ring. They had Suntour AR ders and Suntour indexed down-tube shifters. I added the 3rd chain ring on a couple of mine - and they worked great for riding up in the mountains.
by: 74.235.34.62

           RE:RE:MISC:   87 Schwinn Traveler posted by Bob Hufford on 9/28/2009 at 1:21:05 PM
Weren't the TrueTemper versions made in Greenville, MS?
by: 63.77.139.254

           RE:RE:RE:MISC:   87 Schwinn Traveler posted by Gralyn on 9/28/2009 at 2:16:40 PM
Yes, they were made in Miss. not in Ill.
by: 74.235.34.62




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MISC:   1972 Bottecchia Giro/Seatpost Binder Bolt posted by: Dean Glaros on 9/26/2009 at 9:16:46 PM
I disassembled my old bike a year ago to have the frame painted and am just now getting around to putting it back together. I can't find the seatpost binder bolt. This bolt also (I think) holds the rear brake cable quick release. Any ideas of what bolt I should buy?
by: 96.244.50.178

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FOR SALE:   Schwinn Sierra 10 speed posted by: Kevin on 9/26/2009 at 8:05:49 PM
I have a red Schwinn Sierra 10 speed tall. its a Chicago made, mostly Schwinn aluminum components, nice chrome fork,white cable sheaths, has 6" gold decal w/black stripes on down tube under seat post that has Schwinn quality logo on it. Quick release front wheel. Serial on neck near fork CN540598 Can someone tell me anything about this bike? is it just older generic? I cant find anything about it. Can post pics if needed.

Thanks,
Kevin
by: 173.19.54.233

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           RE:FOR SALE:   Schwinn Sierra 10 speed posted by Bob Hufford on 9/28/2009 at 1:22:54 PM
March, 1977. Basically a Continental.

http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/detail7579.html#1977sierra

Sorry, the catalog pages are broken right now ...

Bob
by: 63.77.139.254

           RE:FOR SALE:   Schwinn Sierra 10 speed posted by Kevin on 9/28/2009 at 5:26:51 PM
Thank you for your help!I have to many bikes and just bought another new one "Diamondback 29er" so some have to go.
by: 173.19.54.233




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AGE / VALUE:   1974 Motobecane Le Champion posted by: MM on 9/26/2009 at 7:51:45 PM
My bike, bought new back in the day. All origibnal except for the fork. Reynolds 531 frame. All Campy NR except for the brakes which are Universal 61 center pulls. Super Champion tubular rims w/sew ups. Lilac/silver(?) origunal paint. I have the original owners manual around here somewhere.
Can anyone tell me the value of this bike?
by: 68.11.191.73

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1974 Motobecane Le Champion posted by David on 9/27/2009 at 7:34:40 AM
Look at completed auctions on ebay. These come up fairly regularly and there's a market for them.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   1974 Motobecane Le Champion posted by Dave on 9/28/2009 at 12:57:00 PM
These are nice bikes. I've also got a '74 Le Champion, but with Silver paint. My bike has Rigida alloy clincher rims with Campy NR hubs though. Otherwise it's original. I suspect the original owner opted for clinchers when new since the rims are period correct.

The market and value of most vintage bikes has suffered a little with the economy. Two years ago you could get $500+ pretty easily. Now it might be tough.
by: 75.60.69.1




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MISC:   Trying to identify vintage bicycle posted by: John on 9/24/2009 at 7:16:26 AM
I have recently come across a vintage bicycle with no identifying markings. All I have is a serial number from under the pedals. It reads 04 FH 14265 Any help ??? I will attempt to post a picture soon
by: 69.114.3.63

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AGE / VALUE:   K-Mart All-Pro posted by: Jack Gill on 9/23/2009 at 8:46:07 AM
Hoping someone can help with this: I have a 1976 All-Pro Model No.E-988KM that my parents bought from K-mart. Being 33 years, all original, really good shape since it's been in the attic for at least 27 years. Is it worth anything or should I just give it to one of the kids in the neighborhood? Any clues would be great. Thanks.
by: 75.163.115.76

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   K-Mart All-Pro posted by David on 9/23/2009 at 10:36:03 AM
One would guess that a bike sold by K-Mart would be very low quality. But Huffy and Sears both sold bikes made from 531 tubing, so you never know. Post some pictures with details of the joints in the frame.
by: 216.15.114.27




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AGE / VALUE:   Help ID mid-80's racing bike posted by: Luke on 9/21/2009 at 10:25:02 AM
I picked up a light, lugged steel frame race bike at the flea market over the weekend. Original decals are gone except for "Tange 3 double butted" and a sticker on the left chainstay reading "Tri-Sport". Has full Shimano 600 group, Fiamme Hard Silver rims with tubular tires. Date codes on some components put it around 1984. Serial number begins with "84" (can't make out the rest). Weighs about 21 lbs. I've been doing some web searching but haven't turned up much except that it's possibly Japanese. Any ideas?

http://lh3.ggpht.com/__h_s6a95Dn4/Srap_XFzxsI/AAAAAAAABaQ/t-HP3zkH34M/s640/img_2013.jpg
http://lh4.ggpht.com/__h_s6a95Dn4/SraqAPrVFeI/AAAAAAAABaU/mguvR4leSDw/s640/img_2014.jpg
http://lh4.ggpht.com/__h_s6a95Dn4/SraqA5KK9NI/AAAAAAAABac/_ELxh-A1hFk/s640/img_2017.jpg






by: 72.76.177.90


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help ID mid-80's racing bike posted by Gralyn on 9/21/2009 at 11:12:17 AM
It looks like a nice bike for its age. Maybe it was one of those where you bought a frame - then put, or had a shop put, the components and wheels on it. I'm just thinking in terms of the frame material.....like Tange 1 being best and Tange 5 being the lowest....and wondering whether a Tange 3 frame would have had a 600 group - but may rather have had a 105 group. But then again, I've seen 20-30 high tensile steel frames with original 600 group.
It does look to be a mid-80s bike.
by: 74.235.34.62

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help ID mid-80's racing bike posted by ken on 9/25/2009 at 10:50:11 AM
Gralyn, I agree you can't count on what gruppo you find to limit the frame quality- I had a top of the line Ross ten-speed, I think it was late 70s, that was spec'd with a full Shimano 600 group, the ones with the curlicues- and the frame was a boat anchor.
The bike in question looks to me very like one imported from Japan by Performance Bicycle- but then the Giant and other factories wanted them to look like the Italians, so more research- I'd check the forged dropouts for markings.
by: 216.124.178.125

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help ID mid-80's racing bike posted by Gralyn on 9/25/2009 at 6:25:11 PM
Yes, that's what I had - a Ross boat anchor - with the full Shimano 600.
by: 74.235.34.62




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AGE / VALUE:   rowil? posted by: bob on 9/19/2009 at 12:30:29 AM
i have an old rowil,and a flandria from the early 70's.worth the time?also a german/austrian-made sears.fix or flush,original or re-store?
by: 98.245.69.198

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   rowil? posted by jj on 9/25/2009 at 5:03:31 PM
Flandrias make good commuters and they usually have unique paint colors
by: 71.174.125.242




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MISC:   Any ideas what kind of Raleigh this is!? posted by: Randonneur on 9/18/2009 at 6:43:17 PM
First off, it may have been the Raleigh "Rampar" variety, maybe the nuts with the big "R" on them as well as of course, the Raleigh marqueed front and rear derailleurs (Mechs). Those I kept.

The frame itself was red, lugged, with an all chrome fork, I think light aluminum handlebars, all kept really except the fork, I did not have much room at the time and there were no decals. In fact, maybe the markings such as the head badge and the derailleurs, nuts, etc. were the only way to tell it was a Raleigh. At one time, I wrote the serial number down but I don't know what it was now. I thought it was probably high tensile steel and not high quality tubing.

Any ideas on what kind of Raleigh bicycle may have been??

Now, I kick myself that I couldn't keep the frame but basically everthing else I did.

I followed a conversation on another forum and from the sounds of it, it seems this may be one of the "Rampar" or "Rampart" Raleighs so, not an extraordinary one. That is what I am hoping.
by: 172.132.28.94

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AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holland posted by: Davin on 9/18/2009 at 7:35:18 AM
Please tell me how I find more on my bike.
I think it's 1978, could be earlier or later.
Most were made in Nottingham, England. Mine was not.
Does that lower the value. The Frame Tube is High Carbon 20-30. So does that make it a light weight racer?
It's in fantastic shape and gently used. The color is burgandy red with gold and black decals. Shines like a gem, (I use to wax it). I would like to know more please.
I tried to send you a picture, but it did not work. If you need one please let me know.
by: 99.250.40.84

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holland posted by David on 9/18/2009 at 9:28:34 AM
For purposes of this discussion group, it's "lightweight," but it's not particularly light weight and a racer it's not.
GP is the next-to-lowest quality Raleigh 10-speed. They sold jillions of them. They were produced all over the place during the bike boom, as you see from your Dutch-built one. I think value is the same as English-built, but that's no more than a couple hundred unless it is really just like new. Enjoy it.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holland posted by Randonneur on 9/18/2009 at 9:30:16 AM
When you say you wax it up, is that because the way they decalled or marked those Raleigh Gran Prixs were real strong. I had decals come off of one Raleigh I had but they didn't the Grand Prix. Here is a picture of one:

http://www.cyclofiend.com/cc/images09/cc624-1RaleighGP0039.jpg

Does it have "white" or "Carlton" marked brakehoods?? (plastic) Is Carlton written elsewhere??

Does your make have that type of gold lettering on black?? (YES, I believe from what you said)Those are nice. Made strong.

What is the serial number?? (bottom of the bike, under the bottom bracket probably.... but one might look in other places they put serial numbers as well like on the chainstays just in case...) http://www.sheldonbrown.com/retroraleighs/dating.html And there may be more tables to be found on the web.

Compact Racing Geometry!!! No matter what one can say about the tubing probably being "High Tensile Steel" or whatever the "20-30" is, they steel can be pretty fast as I found out on some downhills. Honestly, I was use to riding a 531 Touring Bike and once I road a Gran Prix down the hill and it was like "whooah!!!" They are somewhat pursued bicycles, especially the early/mid '70s ones and before?? Maybe too.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/retroraleighs/dating.html

Also, again, not speaking about being an expert, but Gazzelle is I understand a good company in its own right and has a "relative proximity" to England. Some Grand Prixs were also made in Republic of Ireland. I've got to think these have to be faithful to the original marque.

For space considerations, I no longer have the Raleigh Gran Prix but I see them often on Craig's Lists and they are always on Ebay.

They can be sold for quite a bit. Some guy here even fixed gear one! And it must be the wheels and saddle but he was selling it for $350!!

I would also go to http://www.fixedgeargallery.com and search out the Raleigh Gran Prix name and it will come out with a ton of bikes I am sure. International and Competition tend to be the top of the line for back then. Grand Prix is still probably one step up on the lowest product.

That you have a Holland made bicycle might in fact, lend to it's uniqueness. I think if you search out Gazzelle, you will see they still make top of the line bicycles in a big bicycling country.

One guy out of Utah, I've got to say, was selling a Raleigh Gran Prix from the 1950s, rod brakes. I can't verify it without seeing it and it would have been a restoration project but that sounded real interesting.


by: 172.129.132.178


           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holland posted by Randonneur on 9/18/2009 at 9:44:35 AM
The Bike in the picture above of course, is not my bicycle but a picture I found. Lots of Gran Prixs around, I think the http://www.oldtenspeedgallery.com (I think that is the web address) had some guy who had 3 Grand Prixs.

They sure were nicely colored, in blue I've seen many of, I haven't quite seen red ones too much and I understand there are green and yellow ones too. Good bicycle.

There are a few other color schemes too around, like blue and silver from the late '70s.
by: 172.129.132.178

           RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holland posted by Randonneur on 9/18/2009 at 10:33:25 AM
here is a fine one at ebay.com ; 330360018485 , a "Super" Grand Prix. Despite the seller saying this is a frame made in about 1977, it has the Tour De France winning sticker. Raleigh won the 1980 Tour. So, the bike still must have still been sold sometime after the Tour win.
by: 172.129.132.178

           RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holland posted by Chris on 9/18/2009 at 12:21:10 PM
I have found the huge! large Raleigh R nuts with the serrated captive washer on these bikes and they gather nice prices from folks. Enjoy the bike I enjoyed reading the post
.
as for a rod brake bike bearing the grand prix name, I hanve never seen or heard of it but this stuff is delightfully crazy I would not doubt it.
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holl posted by Randonneur on 9/18/2009 at 6:30:50 PM
I thought there was a White Grand Prix and I looked it up, voila! http://cratedig.blogspot.com/2008/03/new-project.html and linked picture maybe.

My friend has one and I rode on it one day. I should tell him, if he ever should sell it, I'd buy it. It is one of the blue ones and I believe blue was the most common color. Now that I don't have one, I really thought when I rode it, it felt good. The one I had also must have been a relatively "small" frame and his is big, at least big enough.

I seemed to find material on the web talking of a Raleigh "Lenton" Grand Prix so perhaps that is what this early one was this gentleman was trying to sell.

Names like "Sport""Grand Prix" and a few others come under different bicycle makers. Claude Butler or one of those kinds of companies I believe had a Grand Prix.

My old one had the blue plastic tape. I had little space then and so I did not keep it.


by: 172.132.28.94


           RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, H posted by Randonneur on 9/18/2009 at 7:20:04 PM
http://oldroads.com/img/rsDSCN0115.jpg

Old Roads sold it but here is a nice image of a green Raleigh Grand Prix, tange fork, Brooks Saddle.

One time on Ebay I think a green Raleigh Grand Prix came indeed from the Emerald island, Ireland.

I wonder if it is possible they had a color scheme, Reds, Holland, I've only seen a few Reds, Blues, UK, of which I've seen quite a few, 2 this year, greens, Ireland. Probably NOT, I'm on a tangent.

One time, this guy said in England, the Raleighs were marked differently and they did not have Grand Prixs. I have no idea whatsoever if this is true.

Gran Prixs have indeed, been a sought after bike it seems to me in the past 18 months, much more than before.

That's good, in the past, I might have scavenged a few bicycles, mainly for parts and mainly for maintenance. No more than a handful. But now, that is basically a no-no, if they are in fair condition. Better to restore them to their splendor or find someone who really wants it. Then a good solid price is more acceptable.


by: 172.132.28.94


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holland posted by Randonneur on 9/18/2009 at 7:33:26 PM
Cycling, still for sure is big in the UK, but when you speak to these people, many times, you'll find their heart was really in it.

Club Cycling use to be a big deal in England and that is where the Raleigh Clubman comes from. From what I can gather, they had big clubs that would go on leisure rides, it was a real big deal, community and the like. It was popular before the war and after the war and then in the 1950s, telivision and other things came in and we, mankind modernized. It must have been a lot of fun though when they were so into this.

I add that little bit in because there really is a whole lot as to why some of these are pretty good bicycles.
by: 172.132.28.94

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed 1978? made by Gazelle, Ruwielfabriek, Holland posted by Gralyn on 9/18/2009 at 8:28:36 PM
At one time, I had 3 Raleigh Grand Prix's.......all 1974 models....a red/black, a blue/black, and a white/black. I had to sell them. Now I have a 1978 Holland-made GP in red/black....I built it as a fixed gear - I actually rode it this evening. I also now have a blue blue/black GP - which I believe is also a 1978 model - but it was made in England. (although not any difference I can tell between the Holland-made and the England-made. My opinion is that for high-tensile steel frames - those Raleigh GP's were pretty good.
by: 74.235.75.9




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AGE / VALUE:   Girard Debaets e- bay photo posted by: Chris on 9/17/2009 at 1:36:12 PM
e- bay item # 270454785580 G. Debaets photo

of course he won the race the bikes were the first to use aluminum alloy instead of steel and they trained all the time and were disciplined. "They were called the red devils because they were devils who could not be beat and if you tried you had a devil of a time""

I went to the house on Cadieux in Detroit and bought his tool collection, his personal bike with silk tires and prototype Campagnolo Componets on it, a metal turning lathe, componet parts, his wifes bike and the daughter's bike. I met the daughter in Michigan and because the grandson had rode and damaged the grandmothers bike and been rude to her and also because I showed up at the right moment with cash I walked away with it.
Hillary Stone eat your heart out! interesting to see this on e- bay!
by: 69.153.86.42

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Girard Debaets e- bay photo posted by Randonneur on 9/18/2009 at 7:07:19 PM
I like the old pictures where you see those guys wearing inner tubes around their chests like bandoliers.

Yes, I get a kick out of the old bike history. I'll remember these guys. I read Major Taylor's autobiography, there are actually 2 out there and I've read both of them though he is quite a bit earlier than this fellow.

That kind of history is fascinating like I read Joe Falls book Boston Marathon book, Falls who wrote for the Detroit Free Press wrote extensively about the history of that Marathon race up to about 1980. Fascinating.

I'm confused at when they say "6 day racing", because I think some races were run constantly for a week at a time but others were run just at night. Or they might have started running them at night because racing straight through was not healthy. The Madison race in the Olympics comes from the concept of some of those types of races.

And I admit here, I may not have my facts all correct. So anyone can feel free to correct me on it. There is a book on this topic of these kinds of races at amazon but it seemed a bit pricey, I should still find a way to read it.
by: 172.132.28.94




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AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by: Jim on 9/16/2009 at 11:01:03 AM
I recently acquired a 73 Raleigh RRA which a friend of mine was going to throw away. It appears to be in very good condition.

I have not been able to find much information on this bike -- basically just enough to identify it as a 73.

Is it worth it to restore this bike? At the min. It will need tubless tires and I don't know the status of crank bearings or hubs. Also needs a seat. I saw somewhere that it originally took a Brooks B-17 which would look sharp. From what I can tell, everything else looks good but I'm not an expert.

I currently ride Mt. Bike but I've always wanted a good road bike but have trouble dropping the $ needed for today's higher end bikes. I also like the idea of riding a vintage beauty.

I guess the question I'm asking is what is this bike worth? Is it worth it to restore? Seeing as how I'm going to have to put some money into it before riding (min. $100 dollars in tires?), is it a good bike to ride? Is it of a high enough quality that I'll get back what I put into it if I find I don't like riding it?

Thanks for any help in advance. This is my first experience with vintage bikes but I am sensing that it might be addicting.

Also...I can't find a tire size on the tire or rims. The rims measure a diameter of 25". Does anyone know what size I need?

Thanks,

Jim
by: 96.244.6.21

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by Keith Body on 9/16/2009 at 11:56:00 AM
Hi Jim, Have you looked here? http://www.sheldonbrown.com/retroraleighs/rra.html

Full spec. This is not related to the quite good early post WW2 RRA. But a more modern bike, and if its on tubulars its surely easy enough to get 3. Many years since I bought any, but nominally 27 inch. This should fly on medium weight tubulars.

by: 92.11.15.217

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by Jim on 9/16/2009 at 12:28:50 PM
Thanks for the quick response. I did find those specs which helped me identify the bike. The specs pretty much describes the bike I've got. I haven't gone over every inch of it but for the most part, I think everything's there.

I've never used tubulars but the guys in the bike shop seemed a little confused on the size when I brought in the wheels.

Just how hard is it to install tubulars? Again, the guys in the shop sort of scared me away. I pulled one of the tires off and it looks like I'm going to need to pull off the old rim liner and clean up the old glue.

Any good instructions on doing it?

Thanks again,

Jim
by: 96.244.6.21

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by Keith Body on 9/16/2009 at 1:10:16 PM
The base tape is part of the tyre, normally used to be latex glued to the underside to protect it. Various types of tyre cement about, which remains slightly tacky. Tyres stretched on from the valve, and pumped up, first before cement is applied.
I preferred tubulars around 8 ounces, but down to 6 if silk. You would probably get about 11 or 12 ounce. We used to put about 120 PSI in the light ones. The aim was to ride on a solid block of air rather than spongy rubber.
I wonder if there are tubulars available in Italy, not too dear to post.And get 3 minimum, you can't mend a puncture on the spot. I used to put about an ounce of water in them if they were a bit used, which will seal a small puncture.
Someone might take fright at this, but in the early 1950s we had to change tyres during a race, so put a little french chalk round the rim to help remove the tyre.
by: 92.11.15.217

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by Jim on 9/17/2009 at 5:50:05 AM
I sort of figured that the base tape was part of the tire. It separated from the tire fairly easily leaving the stitched threads exposed.

I love the image of a rider gluing a tire to the rim in the middle of the race. A little different then today's riders with support cars right behind them.

I looked online for tires and found a few in the 27 inch range. Any way to determine the width? The hub has a sticker which says 700. I believe that translates to a 27".

Thanks,

Jim
by: 96.244.6.21

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by Gralyn on 9/17/2009 at 1:28:05 PM
Wow! I wish I had friends that were throwing away bikes! It will be a lot of fun getting it ride-able - and a lot of fun riding it!
by: 74.235.75.9

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by Warren on 9/17/2009 at 4:04:42 PM
There are no 27" tubulars. They are the same diameter as 700's but they are not generally referred to as 700's...just tubulars. There were some 650 tubulars but they are rare as hens teeth. I've also followed a heated debate on the Classic Rendezvous list where a couple of very credible bike enthusiasts swear up and down that there were some actual 27' tubulars but fear not, you won't find them.

How about it Keith...seen any "real" 630 mm tubs?

Re Mavic rims... one of my first used road bikes had tubulars on it but I was young and brash and quickly had clinchers built up and I gave the rims away. They were indeed, deep blue Mavic SSC's. They were considered the finest rim in the pro peleton for quite some time. Good enough for Eddy Merkcx but not good enough for me no siree! I shed tears every now and then over that one.

Anyway Jim...you might want to find a another clincher wheelset you can swap in and keep the originals just in case. You won't find a lot of choice in tub widths and they can be a pain to mount. There's a bit of technique with getting the tire on straight, with getting the glue set up, with carrying a spare etc. Clinchers just make sense if you want to ride a practical bike. It you want to keep it authentic, no problem...go for it.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by Keith Body on 9/18/2009 at 11:29:22 AM
Hi Warren, You might have noticed I am in a sort of time warp, stuck in the 1950 - 1980 era. Tubulars were always described then as 27 inch, a nominal figure. Wired on British 27 x 1 1/4 were measured "top to top", and the 1 1/4" inwards so that the wires were 24 1/2 " . Rims for tubulars could vary a little in diameter, and the overall diameter obviously depended on the width of the tyre.

26" tubulars were made by Dunlop in the 1950s, and very rarely seen, even in the 1950s. If you need 26" for a collectible, it is quite possible to use a "27". Get a used tyre with a hand mounted tread rather than vulcanised pocket. Strip off the base tape and fix it on the 26" rim. Need some sort of flexible glue which will allow the tyre to be mounted before it fully sets, I would have used some natural latex containing water, I doubt if it's still out there. Something like 10 pounds pressure, then mount the tyre on the rim, and it will shrink to the size. Not all tubulars would do this.
If you want to keep the air in an old tubular I found about an ounce of water pumped in would work wonders with a porous inner tube.
When I bought our 2 Mosers (1980), at GBP 500 each, they came with Mavic blues and Campagnolo titanium group set. These 2 items in the UK then would have cost GBP 150 a pair for the rims and GBP 250 each for the Campagnolo set.

by: 92.17.149.31

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by humberchristopher29@hotmail.com on 9/18/2009 at 12:27:09 PM
Some of the sharpest, most accurate, information from a fine, experience gentleman who was there. Keith you are worth your weight in gold and I know for certain that Oldroads.com is damn fortunite to have you contribute to the pages here. I have been waiting to see someone of your calibre post here for some time.
Awesome please keep up the excellent work!
-Chris
by: 69.153.86.42

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   73 Raleigh RRA (Record Ace) posted by Jim on 10/12/2009 at 1:19:37 PM
Sorry it took me so long to get back to thank everyone.

Eventually, I'd love to get a pair of old style classic tubulars and a Brooks seat and restore this to it's original specs.

For now though, I think Warren's got a good point about finding clincher rims. I've never mounted them before and I'm not so sure about the guys at my local shop.

I think right now, I get it riding again. From there we can go for authenticity.

Thanks all for the help,

Jim
by: 96.244.6.21




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MISC:   Do these hold a pump? What are they? posted by: Rod on 9/14/2009 at 9:07:25 AM
I may be showing my ignorance but can someone tell me if the "clamps" for lack of a better word on the top bar of this Motobecane hold a pump or what might be their purpose?? The rear derailleur cable actually goes through the frame. So it is not for that or the brakes or front derailleur either.


by: 172.130.163.5


  Replies:
           RE:MISC:   Do these hold a pump? What are they? posted by Rod on 9/14/2009 at 9:29:30 AM
Okay, it must be the back brake cable that goes through the frame. But still, that doesn't pertain to much to the basic question. It's confusing. There are not many bikes that actually sent the cable through the frame itself.

The basic question is for what purpose are the clamps on the top tube? I've thought that maybe the original owner might have used them to hang the bicycle up too. That is one possibility though it does not seem feasible.
by: 172.130.163.5

           RE:MISC:   Do these hold a pump? What are they? posted by Warren on 9/14/2009 at 11:10:10 AM
They are likely pump clips, ...feel free to quickly discard them before they distress your paint and decals even more. Use a frame fitting pump if you really need one.
by: 24.215.86.83

           RE:RE:MISC:   Do these hold a pump? What are they? posted by Gralyn on 9/14/2009 at 7:06:57 PM
Yes, carefully remove those clamps. I really miss my Motobecane Jubilee Sport. The rear brake cable was routed through the top tube. It was really nice-looking - and very lightweight.
by: 74.235.34.233

           RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Do these hold a pump? What are they? posted by Rod on 9/15/2009 at 6:56:50 AM
Long Answer: (apologies)

Thx. Gralyn and Warren, I will remove those clips.

http://www.johnpiazza.net/bicycling.htm Here, this author wrote some interesting articles on French Radonneurs and the Jubile is mentioned specifically as well as Motobecane and are highly recommended. I have no or little problems obtaining things on French ebay for Motobecanes because they were well known for their scooters. Autocollant is decal in French and there are always some there for that. I even put on a "Velo Solex" decal on the Mirage Sport though it does not belong there.

Their bicycles are or were very fine: http://velosvintage2.ultim-blog.com/2009/04/19/velo-motobecane-1983/ This is a Motobecane Racing Classic from about the same year and it mirrors much of the styling or componentry of the lower level bicycles. They were sure a good company and stamped Motobecane on everything.

As long as I am here, lets' see if I can get those Classic Blogs up.

http://velosvintage.ultim-blog.com/

http://velosvintage2.ultim-blog.com/

One claims to have 'mythique' bikes, the other 'classique' bikes.

This Mirage Sport I have spent some time I gather at a horse farm so that is okay. I have another Motobecane also that is my tourer and it is built about as strong as a 3 Speed. I'm not greedy, a Jubile was out there for a very low price but I did not go for it because I'd just gotten this Mirage Sport and I'm not greedy or a heavy collector, they are great bikes, John Piazza says you can go that way instead of getting a Rivendell. In fact, just the way Motobecanes are built, they seem to rival much of what Rivendell offers aside from the problems of the French measurements on some of them.


by: 172.133.59.203

           RE:MISC:   Do these hold a pump? What are they? posted by Keith Body on 9/16/2009 at 12:23:42 PM
Hi Rod,
Thanks for those links, of course I liked the 1973 orange Colnago, my wife's slightly smaller one bought in 1973 is in our garage.
The Stella (L Bobet) should surely not have had Campagnolo ends, the Simplex gear cage was inverted, I think because it was as near as possible to the Huret which should be there. Also the 2 pairs of Mavic SSC (special service course, blue), I have 2 pairs of these here. They were 13 ounces each and incredibly strong.
Your Motobecane picture, I could not see quite enough, but it appears to be a massed produced model which the French did quite well. It obviously does not compare with Herse or Singer. It appears to have no seat cluster lug, but I can't see enough to judge the construction.
I am hoping the picture is my dear wife on her Colnago winning the National Championship 100 mile time trial in 1976. Gears, 55/53 and 13, 14 , 15, 17, 19.


by: 92.11.15.217





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MISC:   Proteus / It wasn't Protejus?? posted by: Rod on 9/12/2009 at 3:22:10 PM
Saw a green one today. I know little of them. I read the conversation on them at other internet websites.

I thought it said Protejus as I saw one parked outside of a restuarant and looked nice, but I guess it must have been Proteus.

I guess Proteus were hand made at a shop in Maryland.

Of course, I am only relaying things I have read in the last hour, so who knows.

I attach a picture I found of a Proteus.


by: 172.130.59.55


  Replies:
           RE:MISC:   Proteus / It wasn't Protejus?? posted by David on 9/15/2009 at 7:41:57 AM
See
http://www.classicrendezvous.com/USA/Proteus.htm
by: 216.15.114.27

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