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Vintage Lightweights

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MISC:   Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by: the harv on 9/15/2007 at 5:20:34 PM
Hi all, I picked up a Miyata 'Three Ten' S/N 0G74566 recently and have got myself thoroughly confused about wheels and tires.

It came with a 27x1 Araya rim on the rear, built on a Suzue cup'n'cone hub. The front however was an Ambrosio Extra Elite 19 on a Shimano hub - no obvious sizing info on it (and tire to far gone to tell) but I think it's a 700C.

Assuming the rear to be original I picked up an almost matching 27in Araya/Suzue wheel locally. I fitted a pair of Conti Ultra Gatorskin 27 x 1-1/4 but when I went to fit them they do not clear (well the rear BARELY clears and the front rubs hard on the fork crown - sidewall clearance is OK it is just the overall tire height).

So - is this a 700C bike? Or is the Conti 27 x 1-1/4 a tall tire? Everything I have read on the early-80s Miyatas lists 27 x 1-1/4 as the original size. Would I have better luck with a 27x1 (unfortunately nothing available locally in that size to try)?

Thanks in advance.


by: 209.217.93.54


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           RE:MISC:   Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by Steve on 9/16/2007 at 12:44:39 AM
Hi!
It´s funny but true: 27" wheels are bigger in diameter (630mm) than 28"(622mm)also called 700C. This confusion is caused by different ways of measuring tires in Britain and continental Europe. You won´t find 27x1 tires. I believe there is only one size of 27" tires.
See this: http://sheldonbrown.com/tyre-sizing.html
by: 80.138.109.39

           RE:MISC: Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by the harv on 9/16/2007 at 2:08:11 AM
Thanks, I am aware they are different sizes - I am confused about which is correct for this frame.

27 x 1-1/4, 27 x 1-1/8 and even 27 x 7/8 are all 'available' sizes according to sheldonbrown / harris
by: 64.26.167.62

           RE:MISC: Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by Warren on 9/16/2007 at 5:31:16 AM
FWIW, I had a three-ten and had 700c wheels. It might be different for other years.

Watch for cracks on the top tube where the internal cable routing enters and exits.
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:RE:MISC: Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by Warren on 9/16/2007 at 5:32:05 AM
...and the ambrosio elite is a wonderful rim.
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:RE:RE:MISC: Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by Gralyn on 9/16/2007 at 7:32:11 AM
Sometimes you can use either 27" or 700C wheels - just depending on the tires you mount on them. On some frames built more for 700C wheels - sometimes a 27" rim with a low-profile tire will work just fine......but mounting a taller profile tire - and it won't even fit - it rubs the fork crown.
by: 205.188.116.198

           RE:MISC:   Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by T-Mar on 9/16/2007 at 1:17:45 PM
700 x 28C is the original tire size for a Miyata 310 of that vintage. The OEM wheels were Ukai 20A rims laced to Shimano Z-series hubs.
by: 66.78.121.18

           RE:RE:MISC: Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by the harv on 9/16/2007 at 1:48:03 PM
Thanks! that's exactly the info I was looking for.

Makes sense too because the brakes are Z-series (BR-Z57 calipers + BL-Z326 levers) - the rest is 105 'Golden Arrow'


by: 64.26.167.62


           Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by John E on 9/17/2007 at 8:08:03 AM
Thanks, T-Mar. I believe most 1980s and even late 1970s road bikes came with 700C rims, even in the U.S., where 27" wheels were standard through the 1960s and into the mid-1970s.
by: 66.185.168.82

           RE:MISC:   Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by David on 9/17/2007 at 10:29:15 AM
There's usually a bit more clearance at the rear brake bridge than the fork. You can often get away with using a 27" wheel in back when a smaller 700C wheel was original. Check the wheel sizing info from a cyclocomputer and you can get an idea of the relative sizes of different rims and fatness of tire, since the overall circumference is what matters to the computer.

(BTW, don't call 700C 28", since the so-called 28" size is even bigger at ISO 635. I know; many Europeans do call 'em that.)
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:MISC:   Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by T-Mar on 9/17/2007 at 12:01:59 PM
Harv, the only 105 should be the derailleurs/shifters. To cut costs Miyata downgrqaded the brakes and hubs (Shimano Z), headset (Tange), pedals and crankest (SR). From what I can see it is a 1986 model. The color, components and serial number all corroborate the year. I even bet it has a silver head tube.

John, I think that statement is a little broad. Many entry level models used 27" wheels through the mid 1980s. For instance Miyata did not introduce 700C on the 310, a lower-midrange model, until 1986. Some true entry level models like the 110 and 112 still had 27" as of 1990. And if we look at Peugeot, the entry level Monaco and Marseille were still using 27" wheelsets in 1988.

David, there are at least four different 28" tire/rim sizes with distinct bead seat diameters. One of them has a 622mm bead seat diameter, the same as 700C. Back during the 1970s boom, many racers used them for training wheels so that they did not have to reset the brake pads when switching from their race tubulars, They were commonly known as 28 x 1-5/8 x 1-3/8.
by: 66.78.123.194

           RE:RE:MISC: Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by the harv on 9/17/2007 at 3:55:46 PM
Thanks T-Mar, you are spot on - I shouldn't have said "the rest": pedals are SR SP-153; crankset SR 'Signature' 170mm with 52-42 chainrings; bars Sakae CT. I am having trouble finding clips to fit the pedals so for now I've swapped on a pair of 600's.

The head tube is kind of flat white with a 'Miyata' sticker rather than an actual badge - see pic. Haven't positively ID'd the stem/headset or BB yet.

I put on a new chain today and swapped a take-off Challenge Gara that I had lying around onto the front (700C) with the Kenda gumwall 27x1-1/4 off the intended 'replacement' front wheel onto the rear. She rides and shifts really nicely and will be a great replacement commuter for the low-end Dawes 12sp ('Sterling') that I brought over and promptly got stolen (before I had even re-taped the bars...)

I was originally planning on making her my 1st single-speed project but the Golden Arrow is so pretty that I'm going to keep it. The Ambrosio runs super true and I will be on the look-out for a rear to match it!

So all-in-all not too expensive a lesson - I only paid $15 for the 'new' 27in wheel and I got a usable tire for the rear that will tide me over until I find a suitable 700C replacement wheel... at which point I will have a nice pair of Araya 27in alloys to find a project for :)


by: 64.26.167.62


           RE:RE:MISC: Miyata 310 wheel confusion posted by David on 12/31/2007 at 11:56:29 PM
I, too, have a pair of SR SP-153 pedals. Do you have any info on these pedals such as who makes them, quality, year made, etc.? This is forum thread is the only result I found when googling the pedals.
by: 69.133.110.120




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AGE / VALUE:   marzano track bikes posted by: edward on 9/15/2007 at 11:40:10 AM
does anyone have info/history for marzano bicyles? i cant seem to find any info anywhere. here links to to bikes that are/were on ebay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=170145069991&_trksid=p3907.m32&_trkparms=tab%3DWatching

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=170149440881&_trksid=p3907.m32&_trkparms=tab%3DWatching

all comments or infi is appreciated.

thanks, ed.
by: 68.49.35.166

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           RE:AGE / VALUE: marzano track bikes posted by Warren on 9/15/2007 at 2:55:11 PM
Never heard of them but I find it very interesting how dissimilar those two examples are. No one element of construction apart from maybe the rear track ends, are identical on these two bikes. Maybe ones a fake?
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: marzano track bikes posted by edward on 9/15/2007 at 5:44:36 PM
the larger of the 2 appears to be 15 or 20 years older then the red and yellow one. i purchased the red and yellow frame and it arrived yesterday. its a nice looking frame. feels like the tubing might be spx. i havent had a chance to remove the headset and bb yet.

thanks for the comment, ed.
by: 68.49.35.166




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AGE / VALUE:   French bicycle old frame newer coponents posted by: Ed on 9/14/2007 at 6:44:57 PM
I grabbed a Motobicane Mirage frame out of the scrap metal pile. This had 27 inch wheels. I had herd that French frames had wide spaced frames. I put a pair of 700 x 38 wheels on it and it fit. This included Raleigh sprite fenders! I use a modern hybrid bicycle for my primary ride. I hope to use this as a second bicycle and depending how this feels and rides, it may replace the modern one. I would rather ride an old French Bicycle. I have to find good brakes for this that clear the tires. Keep an eye out for old 70s French 29er Bicycles! Ed
by: 69.207.93.153

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           RE:AGE / VALUE: French bicycle old frame newer coponents posted by Warren on 9/15/2007 at 10:16:27 AM
Mafac racers...original equipment, cheap, efficient stoppers that should reach.
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:AGE / VALUE: French bicycle old frame newer coponents posted by Ed on 9/15/2007 at 7:26:00 PM
Thank you, I will try to find them. I remember seeing those or some other center pull brakes on French bicycles. The bicycle is looking stranger. I found the forks to be damaged at the top of the steerer. But fortunately I had a set of Peugeot forks that were just right. I now have a white bicycle with blue forks and white Raleigh fenders. I have used oval chain rings on other bicycles and this one got a triple SR 165 crank set with gold KKT pedals. Amazing what fun recycling can be. Ed
by: 69.207.93.153

           French bicycle old frame newer coponents posted by John E on 9/17/2007 at 8:11:21 AM
Keep "recycling," Ed! Centerpull calipers are an under-appreciated solution to the problem of providing effective braking across high-profile, wide tires. Weinmanns or Universals should work fine, as well, but Mafacs would be correct for a 1960s or early 1970s French bike. (By the late 1970s Peugeot seems to have converted from Mafac to Peugeot-labeled Weinmanns, at least on some models.)
by: 66.185.168.82

           RE:AGE / VALUE: French bicycle old frame newer coponents posted by Ed on 9/19/2007 at 4:03:06 AM
Yes I found a pair of Mafac Racers! A1 cool look and with some new modern pads I think this will provide stopping power. I am using nice Weinmann levers for a north road style handlebar. I was able to install a sealed bottom bracket into the old cups! I knocked off the cups on the sealed bracket and it went right in! It needs some tuning but a comfortable ride. Ed
by: 69.207.93.153




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AGE / VALUE:   Interesting, rare thrift store sighting posted by: Gralyn on 9/14/2007 at 9:25:50 AM
I really haven't seen anything at all at thrift stores for a very long time. But, the other day, I saw a Schwinn World Sport in a thrift store. The interesting thing about it was it's age and condition. It had a stamped date code of 0099, and components that would put it at 1979 (suicide brake levers, stem shifters). But it looked brand new. It looked like it had never been ridden at all. All the aluminum looked new, the frame's finish looked new. The price tag was about triple what they would normally have on a similar bike.....and probably about what I would expect to sell a similar (but not in as new of a condition) bik for.
I'll have to stop back by soon - to see if it will be one of those that sits for a while until it gets marked down - or whether someone will grab it up right away.
by: 198.137.214.36

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AGE / VALUE:   BIANCHI Identification posted by: Lane on 9/13/2007 at 3:41:03 PM
Greetings!
I have had a Black Bianchi 10 speed which I am looking to I.D. Serial Number 41125653. Has decal head badge, steel frame, made in Taiwan sticker, Mavic model 3 700c wheels, Shimano brakes and shifters(basic)Sugino Super Maxy crank/chainwheel, Sutour Bar end shifters and Brooks B-17 sadddle, black plastic/metal fenders. Looks to be a mid eighties low end but it handle well and looks great. Any ideas on model name?. I would put photos up, any ideas on free services for this Thanks Lane

by: 65.54.154.42

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           BIANCHI Identification posted by John E on 9/17/2007 at 8:14:47 AM
I cannot help you with a model number, but I think you have the vintage pegged pretty well. I am not surprised that it handles well and looks great; the Asian Bianchis share the frame geometries of some of their Italian cousins. I am consistently impressed by the ride and handling qualities of Italian road bikes, even the most modest ones.
by: 66.185.168.82

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   BIANCHI Identification posted by Lane on 9/19/2007 at 6:36:19 PM
Thanks for your Information!
by: 148.78.49.226




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AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Headbadge questions posted by: Stew Lang on 9/13/2007 at 6:59:27 AM
I'm looking for any information on the raleigh oval headbadge's seen on some lightweights about 1970. I've heard it refered to as an anniversary headbadge, if so, what anniversary. Also...what are origins of the standard heren badge seen on all other Raleighs.
by: 68.160.2.247

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Headbadge questions posted by yudis on 4/14/2009 at 3:27:38 AM
my friend tells us about Raleigh Bicycly made in Singapore, it realy true becouse I know Releigh made in Singapore is Name "Simking" bicycle.
by: 118.137.45.147




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AGE / VALUE:   Univega sell price. posted by: ThomJ. on 9/10/2007 at 10:03:52 AM
I've decided to sell my Univega Super Strada but am not sure what to ask for it. I've been told, by LBS' and Capt Bike, that it is worth between $400.00 to $1,000.00 which includeds the 27" wheels and freewheel. Too big of a range for me to judge. I'd hate to let it go for too little but don't want to over-value it either. Your input would be appreciated. Thx, Thom.


by: 63.204.42.231


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           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Univega sell price. posted by ThomJ on 9/10/2007 at 12:00:43 PM
Let me try this attachment.


by: 63.204.42.231


           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Univega sell price. posted by David on 9/12/2007 at 7:45:46 AM
I think you'll be very lucky to reach the bottom of the range you've been told. Perhaps the people who've offered this price range think this is an Italian-built rather than Japanese Univega.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Univega sell price. posted by Thom J. on 9/12/2007 at 10:56:13 AM
David- Thank you for your input. Seems like $400.00 is the uppper limit from what I've been hearing from direct replys.
by: 63.204.42.231




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MISC:   Help me please!! posted by: John on 9/7/2007 at 1:24:05 PM
I found an old Huffy Good Vibrations bike that needed fixed up...well I think it is old. Is there any way that I can tell if it is an original or just a recent replica??? And does anyone know around when the originals were made? Thanks!!
by: 71.60.134.10

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           RE:MISC:   Help me please!! posted by jj on 9/7/2007 at 5:50:42 PM
I think you've got a 1970's musclebike.
It could have great nostalgic value.
Post a picture and we can all tell you if it's been repainted.
Look in the archives for info on them. It is a Huffy, and there's a huge following of that brand.
by: 68.239.52.221

           RE:MISC:   Help me please!! posted by David on 9/8/2007 at 9:19:50 AM
Wrong forum for this bike, but it must have been named for the Bleach Boys hit song of the same name.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:RE:MISC: Help me please!! posted by John E on 9/8/2007 at 1:17:42 PM
True on both counts (forum and name). I wonder if it comes with a theremin. :)
by: 66.185.168.82




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MISC:   schwinn world tourist posted by: jason on 9/6/2007 at 5:24:56 PM
just pulled this bike from under the house where they sit till I get time to look at them... I had kind of dimissed it at first, cause it looked sort of like a varsinental that was to small, anyway, its a 1972(CHO70688)with a three piece crankset, a neat looking nervar, with a recessed area on the crankarm with heavy texture in it, alloy chainrings. weinnman 27" wheels on french, Schwinn approved QR hubs. Schwinn letour rear derailer and one of those rear freewheels with the skip tooth teeth on the big rings, works out to 34 teeth on the big cog. Regular schwinn approved front derailer, alloy randoneur style drop bars on a british made alloy S stem. Uber long headset mounted shift levers(the kind like stem mounted but on that big plate).
the weird thing is that it looks at first glance to be a tiny frame, a real short head tube, but its almost 23" along the seat tube. the BB is really low, about 10 1/2 inches from the ground, and the top tube is 23". it has forged drops with a derailer hanger. the chainstays are almost 19" from the BB to the end of the dropouts. there is a strange little stop in the leftside dropout, only letting the wheel go back halfway. I don't see the use for this thing, but its removable. there are no frame mounts other than the fender eyelets. the only real damage to the bike is the seat tube collar has been pried and there is a break in the metal next to the bottom of the slot. annoying but brazable. paint is rough but OK enough.
it feels like a decent touring geometry to me, long chainstays, low BB and all, and even though it feels like a 23" bike the top tube does that schwinn thing and sets an inch below the top of the head and seat tubes, so a lower standover hight, I kind of like that.
Does anyone know anything about this kind of rig, what it was for, or why schwinn painted things such a horrible yellow?
If this frame is as sturdy as varsitys or contys, I think that it would make a grand little tourer.
But I would like to add bottle eyelets, fender mounts, and possibly brake bosses to upgrade to cantilever or V's. and of course barend shifters, alloy seat post, maybey a triple. but I will leave the schwinn approved bottle generator and lights.
or should I leave it as original as possible?
jason

by: 4.253.5.112

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           RE:MISC:   schwinn world tourist posted by David on 9/12/2007 at 11:24:02 AM
This sounds more like a Sports Tourer than a Japanese-built "World" bike. The ST usually has a Nervar crank, the stem you describe, and is fillet-brazed rather than lugged construction, which is what all (?) the Japanese-built Schwinns would be. Look at http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/models.html?200525
and see if you find it there.
by: 216.15.114.27




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MISC:   Worth a single speed conversion? posted by: RC on 9/6/2007 at 3:12:59 PM
I was at a thrift store the other day and saw them getting ready to send an old Gitane frame (with SOME components intact) to the scrap metal company. I decided to save it temporarily.

Anybody able to give me an idea what model it would be?

I can't get pictures right now, but will see if I can later.

To describe it...
Frame feels very lightweight. But that's hard to judge as it's missing bars, wheels and derailleurs.
Paint appears to be original and is brown. (Maybe "bronze" or "copper," but seems to dark for those descriptors I've seen.)
It has a small "Cycles Gitane. Made in France. 44" label on the seat tube. This one is multicolored and appears to use the logo from the late 60s.
It has clear decals with yellow-gold "cycles gitane" on the down tube. This appears to be the font style they began using in the mid 70s. Very plain, only a single line for flourish.

Fork tips are NOT chrome (as in most of the TdF models I've seen). It has a chrome cap on the very top of the frame. Under that on each side of the frame is a small gold logo decal (three circles overlapping with a tail dropping from the top one to make a "g"). And, there's another decal with a v-shaped multicolored insignia.

Brakes are both present and are Mafac Racers.
Levers are DiaCompe.
The remaining cranks is a cottered Solida.
(Missing the right crank and chainwheels.)
Stem is Pivo.
Saddle is San Marco.


Since it seems to be a pretty good frame but is missing so many original parts, I thought it might be a good candidate for a single-speed or fixie conversion.
I know there would be some obstacles to doing this. I wouldn't mind some advice on that later.

Thanks.

RC
by: 132.178.110.147

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           RE:MISC: Worth a single speed conversion? posted by Warren on 9/6/2007 at 5:09:49 PM
Probably gaspipe with the Solida crank/Mafac etc. Perfect for a fixed conversion. Don't try to jam a standard stem in that headtube. Need a bar to match the french stem. That's Brake reach can be iffy if you go 700c rims. Chainline/axle width is the other typical consideration...keep it dead straight. I saw a similar Peugeot conversion with a Raleigh cottered crank (and axle?) that just looked good that way. Do it.
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:RE:MISC: Worth a single speed conversion? posted by Warren on 9/6/2007 at 5:22:55 PM
as far as the frame is concerned, 6 lbs stripped indicates gaspipe and under 4 will be butted. Thereabouts...
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:revised posted by Warren on 9/6/2007 at 6:32:52 PM
...around 4 to 4 1/2 will be butted
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:RE:revised posted by Gralyn on 9/7/2007 at 6:23:39 AM
Excellent candidate for a fixie!
by: 205.188.116.198

           RE:MISC:   Worth a single speed conversion? posted by RC on 9/7/2007 at 11:18:51 AM
Thanks for the response.

Sounds like I should strip it down and weigh it if I want a better idea of the frame quality--suspecting that it is cheaper steel.
Any other ways to get a sense of that?
Can you tell much by the thickness of the steel (maybe taking out the seat post and measuring the thickness of the wall of the seat tube)?

Thanks for the advice on the headset. I'm planning to leave that alone for now. It appears to be in good shape. I don't think the bike got that much mileage.

As one of the cottered cranks is missing, is it possible to replace the spindle with something that would allow a wider variety of cranks? Any idea what I would ask for at my local bikeshop?

RC





by: 132.178.110.147

           RE:RE:MISC: Worth a single speed conversion? posted by John E on 9/8/2007 at 1:19:35 PM
Assuming the seat tube has a standard 28.6mm outer diameter, a seat post diameter of 27.2mm would indicate butted Reynolds 531; 26.4, straight gauge 531; smaller, gaspipe.
by: 66.185.168.82

           RE:RE:RE:MISC: Worth a single speed conversion? posted by Warren on 9/8/2007 at 5:02:21 PM
What John says is true but there were special Reynolds french tubing sizes that were I believe, slightly smaller (metric instead of imperial). Vitus was a possibility too. If it has stamped dropouts, it's not going to be butted. A forged drop will suggest a better steel.
'
Theres an interesting french bike page here.
http://www.retroraleighs.com/kunich.html
by: 24.224.141.224

           Worth a single speed conversion? posted by John E on 9/11/2007 at 1:44:12 PM
True to form, the French used a "hard metric" 28mm outer diameter on the seat tube, instead of the otherwise ubiquitous 28.6 = 1-1/8". I believe a Peugeot PX-10 takes a 26.4mm or 26.6mm seatpost, rather than a 27.0 or 27.2.
by: 66.185.168.82




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MISC:   SCHWINN SPEEDSTER posted by: JOANN on 9/4/2007 at 2:22:41 PM
Just a question. Does anyone know if they made the Men's 1975 version with a camelback like the Boy's or if the Boy's that year only had the camelback frame? Thanks.
by: 71.100.41.176

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           RE:MISC: SCHWINN SPEEDSTER posted by John E on 9/5/2007 at 5:09:47 PM
I strongly recommend reposting under balloon / middleweight discussion area.
by: 66.185.168.82




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AGE / VALUE:   Date/age posted by: Melissa Smothers on 9/3/2007 at 8:04:18 PM
I recently bought a Hercules bicycle. The head badge reads Birmingham, England and not Nottingham (which would indicate it was made before 1960 when Raleigh took over). However, lettering on the frame reads AMF Hercules (which means that it was distributed in the USA by AMF for Raleigh after 1960). It is a one speed with a coaster brake. The hubs read "made in America" and I assume they are not the originals. Any input you could provide would be extremely helpful. Thanks!
by: 69.129.46.19

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           RE:AGE / VALUE:? Date/age posted by Chris on 9/4/2007 at 7:09:36 AM
Change the rear wheel out to a 3 speed.
by: 66.51.146.59

           RE:AGE / VALUE: Date/age posted by John E on 9/4/2007 at 7:14:14 AM
I concur that the bike may have started out as a 3-speed. You may want to repost under "English Roadsters" to obtain feedback from folks who really know Raleigh, Hercules, Armstrong, etc. 3-speed bikes.
by: 66.185.168.82




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AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Super Course TT ? posted by: Mike T. on 9/3/2007 at 10:20:12 AM
Was wondering why Raleigh stamped the bottom bracket 'TT' on this model, the only difference I see is the use of tubular tires. The frame itself seems to be exactly like the regular Super Course. Pretty sure it's a 1972 model I have.
by: 151.204.252.98

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           RE:AGE / VALUE: Raleigh Super Course TT ? posted by Warren on 9/3/2007 at 3:57:28 PM
Never were tubs on a Super Course. 27" till around 75 and then they were 700c clinchers. Maybe the bottom bracket was sourced from outside. The lugs were Nervex.
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Super Course TT ? posted by Mike T. on 9/3/2007 at 5:13:50 PM
In the 1973 Raleigh catalog they show the Super Course TT and wheel size is listed as 27" with tubeulars. The regular Super Course is a seperate model in the catalog. Check Sheldon Brown's Retro-Raliegh website, the have many images from cataloges.
by: 151.199.43.166

           RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Raleigh Super Course TT ? posted by Warren on 9/3/2007 at 5:55:42 PM
Beg your pardon...never heard of one with tubulars but as you point out, it's in the catalogue. Nisi sprint rims maybe. I had looked at the 72 catalogue and didn't see them there. 74 just lists high pressure alloy.

TT is usually short for Time Trial. Tubular tires would be an odd thing to name a model after but hey, stranger things have happened.
by: 24.224.141.224

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Super Course TT ? posted by Mike T. on 9/4/2007 at 3:11:46 AM
Does seem odd, mine has the pre 1973 graphics with bronze paint. Only red paint offered on the TT in '73. I was Looking for a serial number and simply found "TT" on the bottom bracket and no numbers. Anyway, thanks for your input Warren.
by: 151.199.31.151




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MISC:   Looking for information posted by: John McTaggart on 9/2/2007 at 10:46:38 PM
Can anyone help me with any iformation on a bike I just aquired. It is a Woolco Timberline, distributed by the Woolworth Corp.
Thanks
John
by: 68.62.29.226

  Replies:
           RE:MISC: Looking for information posted by Warren on 9/3/2007 at 7:49:43 AM
Woolworths were an american department store chain that branched out across the globe and Woolco was a late 1980's big box experiment. That likely dates the bike. Timberline sounds like a mountain bike though. If it is, the mountain bike forum might help. If not,if it's a lightweight, describe it further, take pics etc. The devil is in the details.
by: 24.224.141.224




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AGE / VALUE:   Carlton Flyer...wow posted by: Warren on 9/1/2007 at 1:46:10 PM
Here's a perfect club bike from '48. All the right bits and what a frame. Full price too.

ebay item 150157096961
by: 24.224.141.224

  Replies:
           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton Flyer...wow posted by Jack Anderson on 9/2/2007 at 5:00:05 PM
OMG! That's so pretty it hurts to look! Saved from fatal attraction by the "UK DELIVERY ONLY. NO OVERSEAS POST."
by: 74.75.79.201

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton Flyer...wow posted by David on 9/3/2007 at 5:41:14 AM
I've thought that it could be cost-effective to take a little trip to England to pick up a bike, given the present cost of shipping.
by: 216.15.114.27

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton Flyer...wow posted by Bryan on 9/3/2007 at 6:52:08 AM
It would be great to go bike shopping in England in person, but you still have to get the bikes back here somehow. So I don't know if it would really be "cost effective." Not that I'm against the idea or anything.
by: 71.234.69.86

           RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton Flyer...wow posted by David on 9/4/2007 at 4:53:35 PM
You check it as baggage on the plane.
by: 216.15.114.27

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