OldRoads.com > Discuss: Restoration
Discuss: Restoration Tips Scroll Down For Messages



NOTICE

I'm selling the OldRoads.com website.

I started the site in 1995 and sold my retail shop in April of this year.

I'm retiring from the bike business.

Here's a link to the eBay auction:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/122248859390

Vinny


All pictures and text in these pages are (c)2010 Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm) and may not be used in any form without written permission from Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm).

Search 18 years of ARCHIVES:  


Disclaimer:
Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc. has set up this discussion area for the sharing of vintage and custom bicycle information. Anyone may add their opinions to this forum, as long as they follow the rules outlined below. We are not responsible for incorrect or misleading advise which may appear here.

RULES:

All pictures and text in these pages are (c)2010 Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm) and may not be used in any form without written permission from Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm).


See the BEFORE and AFTER pictures:
  
  It's what we use every day!

Vintage Bicycle Discussion Area

Restoration Tips

Post a new topic, or click an existing topic below:




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   head badge posted by: meg on 4/29/2005 at 4:46:13 PM
I want to powder-coat an old bike frame and I assume this means removing the head-badge. How do I do this and how do i re-attach it afterwards?

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   head badge posted by Peter on 5/12/2005 at 1:12:00 AM
The badge is probably riveted on. Option 1 is to remove the head set, and file down the portion of the rivet inside until the badge pops off. A Dremmel will make short work of this. The other way (if you don't have a dremmel) is to drill out the rivets, using a bit that just fits inside the rivet. In either case, unless you have a tactical rivet gun, you will need to reattach the badge with small sheet metal screws. I recommend using stainless steel. If you don't want that, call local bike shops to see if anyone can re-rivet the badge on. If it is held on with an adhesive, just use a hair dryer to heat up the badge, and the adhesive will eventually give way.

Good Luck!




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Old tandem parts interchangability posted by: jay on 4/27/2005 at 7:23:53 PM
Hi! I just picked up a 60's - 70's Schwinn Twinn. The frame is good, everything else is in tuff shape. Do all bikes have the same sizes when it comes to where the fork bolts in? I would like to take the fork assembley from a Huffy or some Walmart bike and just slip it in. Same with the crank bearings. It would be nice if all bearings were the same!!

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Old tandem parts interchangability posted by Peter on 5/12/2005 at 1:17:12 AM
Unfortunately, Schwinn was its own animal during that era. Nothing you can buy today will be interchangeable. I would guess that it is not in as bad of shape as you think it is, unless the metal is actually bent. If unbent, use Simple Green on painted parts (and for degreasing bearings), and chrome polish on chrome parts. If it is bent, look for a doner Schwinn of of similar vintage to pillage the parts.

Good Luck!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Old tandem parts interchangability posted by Peter on 5/12/2005 at 1:28:08 AM
FYI, I just restored a 1972 Schwinn Twinn Last year. It is in great shape, except for the wheels. Let me know if you find a line on some replacement rims, please!

Thanks!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC: Old tandem parts interchangability posted by Ed Lang on 7/22/2005 at 3:27:35 AM
Dont use SIMPLE GREEN on bearings! Put some old junk cones into simple green and see how badly it etches the metal! Use low fumes paint thinner. Simple Green is great for other cleaning. Ed Lang




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Help posted by: Jennifer on 4/19/2005 at 8:24:15 PM
I just found my old bike... great memories. It's a Schwinn and it says Hollywood on the chain guard.

My poor bike had been left under the eves of my parent’s home and it's in bad shape. The chain is rusted and won't peddle, tires are shot and it needs some serious cleaning up. I don't even know where to begin. Can anyone offer any suggestions, web sites, books, etc?
Thank you,

Walking Down Memory Lane

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Help posted by kim on 4/20/2005 at 11:56:33 AM
You're in the right place!
Start by looking in the archives and databases here to learn about your Hollywood, it's age, etc.

Then get the cleaning kit they sell here. It will work well on that old Schwinn chrome.


          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Help posted by laffingriver on 6/14/2005 at 7:31:55 PM
yeah, this is a great place to be. but i have to say, the first place i found was a site called http://buchobikes.com the man who made the site has a walk through restoration of a schwinn phantom, from disassembly, to painting, to putting it back together. i was able to rebuild a '63 corvette using his site alone. kudos. and good luck.




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Early 50's Rudge posted by: Ron Peterson on 4/5/2005 at 6:24:05 PM
I bought on ebay last year. It's in pretty good overall shape, but I'm looking for advice on restoration. The paint is a bit scratched up. What about decals & pinstriping? Are there any guides or books available?

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   I can't get a rusty seat post off my bike. posted by: James on 3/30/2005 at 11:15:37 PM
The seat post on my stingray is stuck. I've tried everything I can think of, any suggestions? Thanks.

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   I can't get a rusty seat post off my bike. posted by kim on 3/31/2005 at 1:02:28 PM
Put an old seat on the post and tighten it as much as possible. THis will give you good leverage on the seat post.

Then spray lots of WD40 or other lubricant. Tap aronud the seat post so the lubricant can make it's way down the seat post.

Let it sit for 24 hours

Then start yanking and twisting on the old seat.

Repeat until it comes out.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   I can't get a rusty seat post off my bike. posted by John M. on 4/2/2005 at 2:32:04 PM
Go to www.sheldonbrown.com and click on "repair tips" .You'll find 15 ways to unstick that post! Good luck!

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   I can't get a rusty seat post off my bike. posted by Joel on 4/6/2005 at 8:21:54 PM
To add to Kim's instructions, you can remove the crank and invert the frame to get penetrating oil to the bottom of the post. If WD40 doesn't cut it, go to an auto parts store and get some better penetrating oil. If the oil alone doesn't do it, try tapping, twisting,... to work in the oil.




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Schwinn Fiesta..early 60's model posted by: Bill Durham on 3/27/2005 at 12:22:35 AM
Hey..my wife has one of these and we are looking for a set of pedals. Also, coaster brake parts. Any help appreciated
thanks,
BD

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   aero bee chain guard posted by: chris on 3/11/2005 at 3:11:35 AM
hi folks --- anyone out there that can tell me of a product that will remove paint, but not hurt the crome on my aerobee 5 sp avenger? does anyone know if the crome under the paint is the same quality as the exposed crome around the lettering (it is in the normal places on the bottom of the guard and left curved area)? if so, I know it can handle normal stripper --- just checking --- thanks!

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT: aero bee chain guard posted by Anthony Smith on 3/16/2005 at 2:52:11 PM
Try standard paint thinners and aluminium foil, or a brass wire brush, just nothng steel. You don't want to scratch the chrome when it could be avoided.




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Murray tricycle tyres posted by: Jeremy on 3/8/2005 at 5:54:56 AM
Can anybody help me source NOS non pneumatic tyres for a 1940's Murray Tricycle. Google searches have led me nowhere. Thanks in advance. Jeremy Crowley.

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT: Murray tricycle tyres posted by Dave on 3/17/2005 at 4:12:30 AM
I'm in the same situation. I'm trying to restore 2 1960s Murray tricycles for my girls and have almost resorted to buying brand new tricycles just for the wheels. If any one can offer some suggestions you'd be helping both of us.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Murray tricycle tyres posted by ozzie on 3/25/2005 at 2:45:03 PM
You might check with pedal car part supliers like (blue diamond classics). Murry made many pedal cars & I know you can get them.To put them on you just heat them in hot water in the sink for serveral min. That will make them flexable & they go on very easy ,.also pedal car tires come in a lot of sizes. Ozzie




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Schwinn Head Badge posted by: Laura on 3/3/2005 at 5:06:36 PM
I'm fixing up an old Schwinn for my daughter. The head badge is chipped up and I'd like to fix it up rather than buy a new one for $20+. Any ideas how to leave the raised letters one color while painting the rest another?
It is a SunRise. I can't find any info about these. How old?? Thanks.

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Schwinn Head Badge posted by John M. on 3/4/2005 at 2:02:24 PM
Check the serial number chart on this site to determine age. As for the head badge I'd say either spray the whole thing then carefully brush paint the raised letters or break out the masking tape and paint one area then mask it off and paint the other

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Schwinn Head Badge posted by doug on 3/20/2005 at 2:20:34 PM
head badges are very difficult to restore and make look good however there are a few people who do specialize in this work post on middleweight section and maybe someone will have the info.although 20.00 is diddlysquat to spend on any restore project. good luck




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Vintage Tire Air Pumps posted by: BigEddieM37 on 2/22/2005 at 4:43:02 PM
Does anyone know of any sources on the internet who sell misc replacement parts for restoring old bicycle tire air pumps?
Thanks in advance for any info. Ed

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   sturmey archer front drum hub posted by: Chris on 2/21/2005 at 11:18:13 PM
Anyone know how to repair a sturmey archer front drum hub?

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   sturmey archer front drum hub posted by John M. on 3/4/2005 at 2:14:27 PM
Go to www.sheldonbrown.com and click on "old bikes". Scroll
down to Dynohubs




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:Restoration of 1946 Hercules - Rusty Rims posted by: Anthony Smith on 2/15/2005 at 10:17:43 PM
Hi there. I just acquired a 1946 Hercules gents' bike, rod brakes, black frame, Sturmey Archer 3 speed (retrofitted?). It's in a bad way.
The brake components have lost most of their chrome and are now rusty.
The rims have 30% rust on the braking area where the chrome has gone. Some chrome still remains.
The frame is restorable and I'm not too worried about that.
The tyres and tubes are in a complete mess and need replacing.
The mudguards are largely rusted and many of their mountings are broken. I have a friend with a welder so these can be repaired.
The saddle is not in great condition: all the metal underneath is rusty , and one of the rivets holding the leather (or whatever it is) over the springs has torn through the leather.

Only one pedal is present. The other pedal, including sprocket, chain and chainguard, is missing. It's possible that these parts may be located, and it's also possible that they're lost forever!

However, as grim as this description sounds, the bike is restorable because virtually none of its moving parts have seized!! This is due to it having been ridden regularly up until a year or so ago, after which time it was left outside to rot.

My main concern is the rims: how can I disguise the rust without compromising braking? The bike won't be used regularly.

Please email me any advice!
Thanks
Anthony

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:Restoration of 1946 Hercules - Rusty Rims posted by Anthony Smith on 2/28/2005 at 1:38:20 PM
OK, the SA is from 1962 IIRC, an AW. It was therefore certainly fitted a long while after the bike was bought!

I have found the chain and bought a new sprocket and crank arm, with cotterpins.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:Restoration of 1946 Hercules - Rusty Rims posted by Anthony Smith on 3/14/2005 at 10:00:57 AM
I've put together a web page about the restoration on http://homepages.tesco.net/houseofsteel/hercules.htm . There are also a few pictures of other nice bicycles that I've seen around London and Canterbury.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:Restoration of 1946 Hercules - Rusty Rims posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 3/16/2005 at 10:26:21 AM
Good luck with the restoration. Checking the site out, seems your approach is on the money. Also was looking at the other bikes. A lot of drooling material there... we don't tend to see anything rolling around like that here.

As to the Pashley being in excellent condition, could be it's a relatively new machine as they are still being manufactured to this day.

Regards!

Larry "Boneman" Bone

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:Restoration of 1946 Hercules - Rusty Rims posted by Anthony Smith on 3/16/2005 at 2:47:46 PM
Cheers, Boneman. You're probably right, if it is a new one it's nice to see rod brakes and everything. What is interesting is the rubber brake lever grips: it could do without those (and without all those plastic light-system parts and so on).

I'm going home for the weekend so I'll be able to work on the bike a bit more. Then the following week I'm home for Easter, so it should be rolling within a month or so.




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Preventing rusty rims posted by: John M. on 2/12/2005 at 1:30:36 PM
Does anyone know of a polish or wax for chrome rims that wouldn't compromise braking?

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Repairing old "rod-style" brakes posted by: Chancey Tilston on 2/5/2005 at 3:42:42 PM
I have an old Bianchi bike and the front brake is broken. The breaks are of the rod type (probably not the right name). There seems to be some disconnect inside the handlebar. Any ideas on how these things work? Thanks!

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:    posted by: Zack on 1/19/2005 at 6:42:28 PM
I took apart a shamano 3 speed gear off an old cruiser and now I can't get it back together. A long pin sits inside the bolt that runs thru the rear hub. There is an attachment that screws to the boldt and the when the gear adjuster is moved from gear one to two then it pulls the cable that pushes the lever inside the adjuster which pushes the pin into the hub. But now it doesn't work.
I would love some help.
much thanks
zack

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:    posted by John M. on 2/6/2005 at 12:06:24 PM
You said the long pin sits in the axle. It should screw
in. On Sturmy Archer hubs you screw it in until it bottoms
(do this gently And DON'T tighten it)then back it off one half turn. Connect the cable and adjust it with the hub in
second gear. The pin should just come to the end of the axle. See www.sheldonbrown.com for more info.

...>>>>>>>> MORE MESSAGES >>>>>>>>



HOME (OldRoads.com) Discussion Areas Literature and Price Guide Cleaning Kit Glossary
Stat and Feature Database Picture Database Serial Number Charts General Resources