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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   The back wheel on my apple crate posted by: james on 12/28/2004 at 4:10:56 PM
I have some rust on the back wheel of my aplle crate. It looks like surface rust but i can't seem to get it off. Any tips? Also on my back tire there is a strip of red that follows the outer edge. It is faded but the tire otherwise is in good shape. What do I do to restore that stripe? Thanks for any suggestions.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   The back wheel on my apple crate posted by Kim on 12/29/2004 at 7:02:40 PM
Get that cleaning kit they sell here.
It'll clean up the rust and you can use the cleaning oil on the tire

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   The back wheel on my apple crate posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 3/1/2005 at 10:27:08 PM
Another thing you can try is the olde WD40 and aluminum foil trick. The aluminum foil will remove the rust but is too soft a material to damage the chrome.

Good luck!

Larry "Boneman" Bone




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   prevent dryrotting posted by: mike on 12/12/2004 at 7:01:04 PM
Pour some motor oil on a rag and rub it into the tires. This technique works very well. The original owner of my friend's stingray did that 20 years ago and it has no dryrotting after sitting in an attic for 20 years.

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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:    posted by: mike on 12/12/2004 at 6:56:50 PM
This technique can be used for pitted rust. soak a rag with coca cola and rub it on the rusted area then use aluminum foil and rub the rust until it dissapears. Works very well on chrome.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:    posted by: paul on 11/14/2004 at 4:09:33 AM
hi what are the right steps and procedures for painting a bicycle. from what i know these are the sets:

1) remove existing paint using paint remover and sand blasting it or use 120 grit sandpaper until all paint and rust are removed.
2)use primer 1-2 coats.
3) use filler if needed.then use 120 grit or less sandpaper and for final shaping use a fine (320 grit) sandpaper.
4) use primer 1-2 coats. and rub it down with a 400 grit sandpaper .
5) apply 2 coats of color paint
6) then apply graphics paint /design
7) use 1200 grit sandpaper
8) and apply clear coat
im trying to paint my columbia bicycle and pls let me know if i have the right procedure.thanks
by: 202.81.166.36

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:    posted by doug on 11/14/2004 at 1:00:10 PM
I would not reccomend sandblasting this can warp sheetmetal and do more damage thn good.I take my bikes to a dip and strip place.cost is reasonable and frames come out nice and clean.after you must neutralize the frame as well because the stripper can sometimes hide in the little crevises and come back to ruin your new paint job.As far as painting a lot depends on the type of paint your using The newer paints almost take a chemistry degree to figure out.I usually stay with laquer just because its easy to work with. but just my 2 cents good luck. Also powder coating is a cool way to go. as well




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   to paint or not to paint? posted by: Charl on 11/12/2004 at 10:55:44 AM
Hi

I am restoring a 1950/60-something Hercules mens bike. It is black but the paint job isn't in good condition. I dont know what the rules are... Does one re-paint vintage bicycles or is this heresy?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   to paint or not to paint? posted by John Metz on 12/17/2004 at 2:29:57 AM
Even if the paint is just fair you will be better off cleaning up and leaving it alone if you want to preserve the value. Its only original once. A top restoration can
still be worth more than a total wreck but not as valuable as an original. The question you must answer is,are you
interested in monetary value or do you want it perfect.
Cycle on!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   CCM 2 seater posted by: Ray on 11/11/2004 at 10:54:49 PM
Hello
I was windering if anyone has any info on a bike that my great aunt has?

I'm going to guess 60's or older....

CCM (???) mark 4 two seater.

She isn't interested in selling, but she would like to fix this bike.

It seems to be all there?, but I would like to see some pictures of one either restored or in good shape etc.

Thanks
Ray

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   indian princess posted by: zach on 11/11/2004 at 10:32:10 PM
hello,
I have aquired an indian princess bicycle frame and forks and I am interested in restoring the bike to original, but I am having alot of trouble finding parts or anyone that knows anything about these bikes. Any info that anyone can give (books, websites, shops, ect) would be greatly appreciated.
thank you

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   indian princess posted by dennis on 3/7/2005 at 10:25:19 PM
i have a complete indian princess bicycle if you would like to talk about it

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   indian princess posted by Brian on 9/7/2009 at 1:04:32 PM
Hi there. I have a Indian Princess Bike, and am trying to find information on it, but am having no luck yet. It is a complete bike with no missing parts that i am aware of. So any help you might have would be helpful.




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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Trying to Restore my Mother-in-laws 1947 Schwinn Meteor posted by: Caleb on 11/11/2004 at 11:52:56 AM
The bike is all rusted and the chain guard is destroyed completely. I would like to restore it as best as possible but I need to find a chain guard for it. Plus I have no clue how to even begin this project. Any information would be greatly appreicated. Thanks, Caleb

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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   rusty fenders... posted by: brian on 10/28/2004 at 3:10:04 AM
hello. i have a 1963 schwinn corvette. the frame is in good shape and i want to turn it into a beach cruiser, but i am broke and dont want to replace very many parts. the mechanics are in great shape and everything is running smooothly, but the fenders were covered in rust on the inside, and i brushed it all away with a scotch pad. is there a way to prevent the rust from coming back? could i apply an undercoat? i dont want to change the original parts very much but dont want all my hard work to be in vain. any help is appreciated.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   rusty fenders... posted by jr on 10/28/2004 at 8:22:54 PM
For the underside, apply a thin coat of grease. You can wipe all of the chrome with an oily rag ocasionally to prevent rust.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   removing forks.??? posted by: shannon on 10/25/2004 at 3:30:22 AM
I am refurbishing a vintage girls sting-ray and can't figure out how to take off the forks? Also, how do you remove the crank case?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   removing forks.??? posted by doug on 10/26/2004 at 7:38:23 AM
Hi Shannon,This can be a very simple task or a real pain.Remove the handlebars to make it easier to work.otherwise they just seem to get in the way but you dont have to if you dont want to,you will see a long bolt going down from the gooseneck,to the fork.remove this bolt,,next remove the large chrome nut,that the gooseneck goes through.If you can put the forks in a vice ,padded so you dont damage them ,work the gooseneck back and forth,holding the forks still and wiggle it out.note the way the bearings go back together for re assembly.Inside the forktube will be a odd shaped nut a cylinder with a 60 degree slash on one end ,note this as well for re assembly.If the internals are rusted up,and nothing will budge.start out by spraying penetrating oil rust buster or any one of a dozen products available and letting it soak adding a few sprays a day untill it finally becomes free.if your keeping the paint job,be carefull with the rust remover,may damage the paint, takes time ,dont be in a big hurry, Crank is easy as well remove pedals.one of em will have left hand threads,turn it oppisite of normal to unscrew,remove large nut on gear side, after nut removed.gear will come off of the pin,note bearings for re assembly crank will slip out the other side of the crank hanger tube,very simple.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   removing forks.??? posted by doug on 10/26/2004 at 4:58:09 PM
Sorry i miss wrote the large nut opisite of the gear on the crank but im sure since there is no nut on the gear side you would have figured it out..(but i hate making mistakes sorry) good luck e mail if any ??

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   removing forks.??? posted by Beth Wise on 5/24/2007 at 9:37:51 PM
We have an old bicycle that my daughter would like to have refurbished. Is there a shop or repair person that anyone would recommend near Palo Alto or Mountain View, Ca?




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Shortening spokes?? posted by: Harry on 10/12/2004 at 7:56:17 PM
Hello everyone, I have a 26in rim, and a new hub that I would like to lace into the rim, but the spokes are too long, and I need to shorten them. I was wondering how I would go about doing this? I do not want to spend $2,000 on a Phil Wood spoke machine, I am just looking to build my rear wheel, and shorten the original spokes to acept the new hub. Thanks.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Shortening spokes?? posted by doug on 10/17/2004 at 1:27:06 PM
sounds like you need to cut them off and re thread the ends.tricky part might be finding a die to cut those fine threads.a good machine shop should be able to do that though.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS: Shortening spokes?? posted by Peter on 10/19/2004 at 5:07:01 AM
No! Do not use a die -- won't work. Spoke threads are not "cut" (which a die does), but "rolled". The difference is that no material is removed with rolled threads (look closely at a new spoke, and you'll see that the outermost parts of the threads are a slightly larger diameter than the shaft of the spoke). You'll need a specific spoke threading tool, which is a pretty simple device, and not super expensive. Problem is: where to find one (I've seen a few come across Ebay).

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS: Shortening spokes?? posted by Peter on 10/19/2004 at 5:16:11 AM
www.mikesbicyclecenter.com has one for $120




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   wheel out of round posted by: Arthur on 10/7/2004 at 7:00:30 PM
Hello All,
I have an old Raleigh 3spd and the rear wheel is out of round and no longer spins true. If any of you can lead me to a web site that might explain how to fix this, or a particular book it would be greatly appreciated. Also if i need to replace the rear wheel completly do you know of any web sites that might be selling them?
Thanks
Arthur

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   wheel out of round posted by doug on 10/8/2004 at 5:32:27 PM
Hi Art lacing and trueing wheels is a art in itself and difficult to self teach.....ive tried not with much success. my recomendation is to take it to a bike shop which trues and laces wheels and have them fix it if it can be fixed about a 40.00 job here not much really.when you think about the cost of most things. good luck.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   wheel out of round posted by Steve on 10/10/2004 at 2:36:08 AM
Have a bike store re-true the wheel, but before you take it in:
-remove the tire, tube and rim tape
-drip a little PBlaster or Liquid Wrench penetrating oil on the spoke where it enters the nipple and on the outside, where the nipple threads end. Let this soak in for about a day. Do it several times in very small quantities.
Doing this will help the bike store in freeing what are likely rusted spokes and enabling them to true the wheel without damaging the nipples.
When you get the wheel back, use rubbing alcohol to remove the oily residue.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Good Repair Book?? posted by: chris on 10/1/2004 at 9:32:48 PM
can someone help he out with a good book for repairing 60's and 70's muscle bikes? --- especially need to learn how to work the shifter cables on 3 speeds and 5 speeds so I can replace rear tires (which I can do, thank goodness!)--- funny as it sounds, I would also like to learn a good way to raise the seat (other than using a hammer - ha!)

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Good Repair Book?? posted by John Metz on 12/17/2004 at 2:39:14 AM
Go to www.sheldonbrown.com and click on then geras and driuvetrain icon and you will find the answers to your questions. Sheldon Brown is a top notch bike tech at Harris
Cyclery in Boston and is an encyclopedia of knowledge.
Cycle on!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Ted Williams Sears Roebuck Bicycle posted by: Claudia on 9/30/2004 at 4:54:22 PM
Hi All,
Looking for some help with a bicycle that I would like to have refurbished. It is a Ted Williams Sears Roebuck Bicycle.

It has 26x 1 3/8 tires with tubes, Synchron brakes, BMA/6 certified, and has Free Spirit printed on the side of the frame. On the front of the fork is the Sears/TW signia. It is a regular cruising bike but I understand there were not many of these made. I would love to get it cleaned up and restored as closely to new as I can..

Can anyone please give me names of people who could do a job like this?

Thank you!
Claudia

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Ted Williams Sears Roebuck Bicycle posted by doug on 10/2/2004 at 12:16:52 PM
Hi Claudia..are you new to this type of thing? First thing you will need to know is If the bike is already mostly origional. if it is the value will be higher if left alone and just cleaned up.If you want it to be like brand new and origional with all factory origional parts and perfect paint etc..the bottom line is $$$$$ mucho money for something which may not be worth near as much when finished.The best place to start is to locate pictures of the bike when new to see how it should look when finished.Then find a reputable restoration company or do as much as you can yourself. sometimes just a really good cleaning and polishing works wonders for these old machines.I would be happy to quote you a price on professional cleaning up of yours.if interested, email me Doug




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   seeking information on original finish on 1942 Schwinn New World lightwe posted by: Lenny on 9/24/2004 at 3:56:42 PM
Hi All,

I'm currently doing some repair work on a 1942 Schwinn New World for a friend of the family. It was the bike he rode as a teen in the early '40s. I want to preserve the origninal finish as much as possible (there's quite a bit of rust on it but everything appears to still be sound structurally) so I'm just trying to clean it the best I can, protect the finish with paste wax, and redo all the bearings.

My question is this: does anyone know what type of finish Schwinn used for the wheel rims of these bikes during the WWII era? I can find no traces of either chrome or any kind of paint on the steel [EA1] rims. There is a brown rusty coating on the rims now but it is so uniform that I suspect that the rims may have originally have had some type of rust-retarding treatment applied in place of a paint finish. I have seen firearms that have had a "parkerized" finish to retard rust and I've read that this process was developed during WWII. I'm wondering if Schwinn used some similar process during this time, as chrome was, I assume, in short supply during WWII.

A rough original finish on the rims would have not caused problems with caliper brakes as this model has only a coaster brake.

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