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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   SEIZED SOLID WITH COMPLICATIONS posted by: Luddite on 7/29/2004 at 9:52:48 PM
I'm from uK where we have SERIOUS rust issues, but I'm hoping I can get ideas somewhere!!

I'm trying to remove the chainside bottom bracket ballrace from a '69 Raleigh Rodeo frame. It's rusted solid in the bottom bracket and I can't use heat as the frame is brazed-lug construction. The race is no longer usable due to rust so must come out. Anyone have any ideas?

Cheers; Lud

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   SEIZED SOLID WITH COMPLICATIONS posted by Jeff R on 7/31/2004 at 2:44:14 AM
Try inserting a large bolt and tighten 2 nuts against each other really tight then use a socket wrench to loosen the race. Use plenty of penatrating oil. Remember its a left hand thread.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   SEIZED SOLID WITH COMPLICATIONS posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 8/8/2004 at 1:30:23 PM
Don't know if it's available in the UK, but here there is a product called "PB Blaster". Aerosol can and the stuff is about the best for loosening rusted bits.

Available at auto parts stores here. Hopefully that, or something similar can be found....

Regards,

Larry "Boneman" Bone




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Wheel sizes for Orange Krate posted by: Tyson on 7/27/2004 at 7:41:24 PM
I found a Orange Krate Frame in a shed along whith some other accesories. Im trying to restore the bike but i cant find the rear and front wheel and tire sizes for the Orange Krate.

I would also like the sizes for the springer forks, im guessing i need 20" but im not sure let me know if im wrong.

Thanks alot if you have answers.


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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Wheel sizes for Orange Krate posted by mike on 12/12/2004 at 7:10:41 PM
The rear wheel was a 20 inch 5 speed rim and the front was a 16 inch drum brake rim




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Boston Bike swap posted by: Linda on 7/26/2004 at 1:43:13 PM
Sorry for short notice but it took a long time to find a place. There will be a swap on August 7th from 10-2 at the Hibernian Hall in Watertown MA. 151 Watertown Street. Contact me for more info. Be there or be square.


Linda

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   c. 1970 Chiorda with cracked brazing posted by: Georges on 7/22/2004 at 7:56:08 AM
(Also posted - in modified form - to Vintage Lightweights)

I picked up a c. 1970 white 10-speed Chiorda for $15 at a garage sale. For the life of me I can't find a serial number on the frame (I've spent a great deal of time going over and over the frame). It had a Campagnolo "Valentino Extra" rear derailleur, Campagnolo freewheel, Balilla centre-pull brakes, cottered crank, and a very nice ride.

However, at the juncture of the right seat stay and seat cluster, the brazing is partly cracked. There, at the top of the braze a small "glob" of extra brazing material runs across from the seat stay to the cluster, this is cracked, but best I can see, the main weld isn't cracked, certainly there's no evidence of the stay being detached. One high-end bike dealer seemed quite insistent that I was flirting with death (and offered to have it fixed for about $350 Can. (about $275 US; way beyond my budget), whereas another dealer suggested that it was likely only a crack in the extra glob but had no impact on the structural safety of the bike. I've probably done about 400 km with it so far, with no apparent change in the crack.

I have access to a qualified and well equipped welder/brazer but have no idea what sort of materials the frame might be made of, what sort of material should be used for the brazing, what I should expect to pay for the job, or for that matter if it's best to leave well enough alone, or alternatively just scrap the bike...

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Want Great Paint Restoration posted by: Brian on 7/11/2004 at 4:23:39 AM
I'm restoring my 1972 Schwinn Continental. I was the first owner back in highschool! I want to get it repainted with all the decals. Can anyone recommend a shop that does great Schwinn paint restorations? Of course I could send it to them but if there is a shop around Seattle that would would be perfect! Thanks, Brian

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Want Great Paint Restoration posted by Brian on 7/16/2004 at 2:57:37 AM
http://www.cyclart.com/ Probably the best you will find




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Modifications on beach cruiser trash find posted by: Old Spoke on 7/9/2004 at 5:25:01 AM
My questions are more of the "Frankencycle" than the "Restoration" variety.

I found a single-speed beach cruiser (Chinese-made Hampton Cruiser)with 24" wheels that someone had set out for the trash man. I figured this bike might be small enough for me to haul around in the back seat of my car. Unfortunately, though, the handlebars are HUGE. North Road style handlebars like those found on English 3-speeds would help make it more portable. Would they work on this bike?

Anoter question related to the portability issue: Would it be possible to retrofit the wheels with quick-release skewers?

Many thanks for any help you might be able to give.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Modifications on beach cruiser trash find posted by JimW. on 7/29/2004 at 4:48:59 PM
You shouldn't have any trouble switching handlebars, as they're pretty standardized. However, there's a difference in the hubs of skewered axles, so you'd probably need to replace the wheels if you want skewers. You might be able to find wing nuts for use on the existing axles, although that thread pitch isn't common at most hardware stores. Simplest and cheapest would be to just carry a small wrench with you. It doesn't take all that much time to do it that way.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Firestone/Monark Super Cruiser... posted by: Fred A on 7/2/2004 at 7:12:03 PM
I just got a woman's 1952 Firestone/ Monark, 100% original right down to the bolts. Problem is, it languished in a damp environment for a very long time. The surface of the paint is marked with rust spots (dots) and mold. Any idea as to how to get this off without ruining most of the paint? I've tried rubbing and polishing compound with marginal results. Hopefully someone out there has encountered this and will be able to offer some advise.

Thanks!
Fred a

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1948 Monark Deluxe posted by: Carrie on 6/30/2004 at 4:08:47 AM
Hi- I have a 1948 Monark-Silver King Inc Deluxe bike. I ride my bike everyday in good weather. I'd like to restore it so it at least looks origional- I am not selling it- I love this rusty thing!

ok. I HAD to replace the tires this year- no ifs ands or buts about it. Not safe to ride on baldies!

It is missing the headlight, the rear carrier and has one pedal. I'd like a pair! :D I've been scouring ebay without luck.

It has a pushbutton on the tank. I was told this was for the light, but someone else said it was for a horn. Any idea?

The bike right now is a blue shade. The paint is powdery and obviously not origional. Does anyone know what color this bike would be authentic in?

Please email me directly at whipstaff_ranch@yahoo.com with the info. I'll gladly send photos if anyone would like them.
Thanks in advance! Carrie

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   handle bars posted by: Elaine on 6/24/2004 at 12:22:56 PM
I have a 1975 Schwinn Breeze and I need to raise the handle bar post. Do you completely unscrew the middle bolt? I tried, but after a while I got scared, gave up and rescrewed. Thank you.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   handle bars posted by Morgan Styer on 6/24/2004 at 5:55:04 PM
A bike of that age most likely has a quill type stem. There is an expandable wedge at the bottom which is controlled by the bolt down through the center. Try unscrewing the bolt about a half inch and then tapping it back in with a hammer. This should loosen up the wedge and allow you to move the stem.

Morgan Styer

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   handle bars posted by Elaine on 6/27/2004 at 10:32:03 PM
OK I tried to unscrew 1/2 inch and hammer. Nothing. Removed the bolt completely. Hit mallot from bottom of handle bar to remove..Not an inch. Sprayed silicon down stem, set. Hammered with mallot again. Not an inch. Any other suggestion to move this handle bar up? Thanks. Elaine

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   handle bars posted by Steve on 7/1/2004 at 12:43:50 PM
Forget silicone. Get some PBlaster (Walmart or an auto parts store) and use that. Spray generously and let it soak for several days, then hammer on the raised bolt to release the wedge. A rubber mallet will likely not work: try a hammer. Use a piece of copper or brass in between to prevent marring the chrome on the bolt.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1960/70's Schwinn Breeze 3 speed posted by: Linda on 6/23/2004 at 6:43:45 PM
I have an old female schwinn bicycle that is in awesome shape. It is a three speed schwinn. Everything is good on it the tires have some weather cracks, and I am missing the back reflector. I need to know if I can get tires for it, and possibly how much it might be worth.

Thanks,
Linda

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1960/70's Schwinn Breeze 3 speed posted by: Linda on 6/23/2004 at 6:43:45 PM
I have an old female schwinn bicycle that is in awesome shape. It is a three speed schwinn. Everything is good on it the tires have some weather cracks, and I am missing the back reflector. I need to know if I can get tires for it, and possibly how much it might be worth.

Thanks,
Linda

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1960/70's Schwinn Breeze 3 speed posted by michael on 7/21/2004 at 2:38:58 AM
Tires and tubes for old Schwinns and other 3 speeds are still being made. Any bike store could order them for you. I have used this site to help me identify the specs of a 1974 Schwinn Suburban I recently bought: http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/cover.html. It has a serial number chart that will help you identify the bike's year.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   stuck crank posted by: Abbi on 6/21/2004 at 8:06:14 PM
I found this old Raliegh on the side of the road and I have been taking it apart, cleaning it and getting it ready to paint, but I can't get the crank out.The bike shop I took it to says the only way to remove it would be to destroy the chain gaurd. I really don't want to do this because the chain gaurd is one of those neat gaurds that is only open around the chainwheel and it is in pretty good shape. I see their point however, because you can't get close enough to the point where the crank connects with the crank arm to hammer the crank arm off. Any suggestions???

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   stuck crank posted by Beth on 6/23/2004 at 4:18:41 AM
Depending on how old a Raliegh, and the model. Do some trolling around on the English Roadster Board. Much discussion has gone on around the Cottered Cranks. A search will pull it up. But read before you go any further, it is possible to do serious damage to your bike if they aren't handled properly.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   stuck crank posted by Abb i on 6/24/2004 at 4:10:42 AM
Thanks for the reply Beth, I'll see what I can find online. I'm not sure how old the bike is. It's serial number is 898 AL, which I think meant its from the 60's. There is unfortunately no serial number on the back hub. Let me know if that info inspires any more helpful thoughts!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   stuck crank posted by Steve on 7/1/2004 at 12:48:21 PM
Use lots of PBlaster (from Walmart) to loosen the cotter pin, then take the bike to a bike store with a cotter pin press which will remove it. They may have to use some heat. Don't use a hammer.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Hard Rubber Tricycle Tires posted by: Barry Merrill on 6/20/2004 at 4:19:00 AM
I am looking for a way to retread old deteriorated trike tires as part of the restoration process. Any links or clues would be great.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   HUB repair posted by: Beth on 6/13/2004 at 1:57:34 AM
Ok, We had a bad thing happen to a 3 spd tandem bike which was donated to my campus bike shop. In packing into the truck, too much pressure was put on the indicator chain. The small threaded end snapped of the rest of the chain and is still inside the hub. It's a torpedo made 3 spd. Is it even possible to fix this? If so how? Thanks for any information.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   To Restore or not to Restore posted by: Brian on 6/12/2004 at 2:19:20 AM
Just the other day I picked up an old rusty bike off the side of the road for free. Upon investigation I found that its about a 1963 Columbia. It has a tank and a button on the side. Was it for a light because there isnt one on front like I saw in some pictures. Anyway I was wondering, being a newbie would I get more $ out of the bike if I sold it as is(rusty and nonfuntional) or if I tried to restore it myself?
Thanks for any and all advice
Brian

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