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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:    posted by: gary phelps on 4/1/2004 at 6:19:41 PM
I have an original monark super deluxe 1948,its got original paint exceptthe tank,paints fairly good.i have a complete original decal set,should i paint it?also need original pedals.would like to find some crown tank inserts as mine are not the best.any help or tips would be greatly appreciated.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Painting over chrome posted by: David Poston on 3/24/2004 at 7:07:22 AM
What's the word on painting chrome? Do I need to use a special "etching" primer? I don't have any access to power tools. I was just going to wet sand and then prime with a basic metal primer.

I also need advice on selecting paint. Would it be worthwhile to have a paint supplier make me up a batch of automotive paint (I have NOS touch-up paint in small bottles for sampling)? I need to do some touch-up work on some of my bikes as well.

Thanks,
David.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Painting over chrome posted by Steve Ringlee on 4/1/2004 at 12:20:39 AM
While I've yet to do it, I am told that using muriatic acid in a dilute mixture will "etch" the chrome sufficient to apply primer. The chrome plate itself is very thin and cosmetic: beneath is a nickel and then copper plate for corrosion protection.
Take a look at the POR-15 website for unique products for car restorers that deal with these issues.




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   tires and speedometer posted by: Niels on 3/19/2004 at 1:00:04 AM
Hi everyone; two questions. First, does anyone know of a way to soften up old tires? It's already got a little crack on the tread, and I'd like to avoid any more. Also, for the mechanical speedometers, when it says it's for a 20", 26" or whatever wheel, what does that mean? Is it the gearing at the driver, or the gearing in the speedometer? Or it is just cable length? Thanks!!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   tires and speedometer posted by metlhed on 3/20/2004 at 8:09:49 PM
i have no idea if it would work, but i believe castor oil softens rubber, i have no idea how or if it would work to soften up your bike tire though. and for the speedometer, whatever wheel sixe ir says, it is made for that size wheel, so it can accuratly tell you the speed

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   tires and speedometer posted by Niels on 3/21/2004 at 1:09:42 AM
Thanks, I'll give it a shot on an old tire. So the mechanism in the speedometer is specific to each wheel size?

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   tires and speedometer posted by metlhed on 3/23/2004 at 10:33:23 PM
i believe so, yes




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for information on the bike posted by: Tino on 3/10/2004 at 8:57:23 AM
Hello All,
This post may be under the wrong topic, but it was closest. We have recently aquired this bike and are trying to determine whether it is a project to take on or just an imposter. I have posted a couple of pictures on an external sight if anyone might be able to offer a couple of words.
http://www.all3com.com/T_auction/schwinn.htm
1.) Why we might not find any signs of a serial number?
2.) How to determine model?
3.) How to dertermine if original or replicate?
Any other thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance.
Tino

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for information on the bike posted by metlhed on 3/12/2004 at 1:35:20 AM
i definetly dont think the fork is original...for a serial #, look either under the crank housing, or on the rear dropouts, then compare it with the serial number chart on this site, it is probably from the late 50's or mid 60's...personally, i would customize it.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for information on the bike posted by Stacey on 3/12/2004 at 2:27:29 AM
I can hear you striking a spark already Metlhed LOL :-)

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for information on the bike posted by z on 3/13/2004 at 4:32:30 AM
some bikes dont have serial numbers beacause they were made in europe and not ment for export so they didnt put serial numbers on them. Also take on the project any time u can restore a bike it's a time to learn and have fun.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for information on the bike posted by Joel on 3/30/2004 at 5:10:05 PM
It is possible that the serial number was filled when it was repainted, or that it wasn't stamped well. It might also be one of the many Schwinn copys that have been made over the years. The parts (except maybe the crank) look like reproduction or aftermarket stuff.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   serial # on columbia tandum posted by: Art on 3/7/2004 at 7:02:24 PM
Where do i find the serial # on an old columbia tandum bicycle. Can you give me some history on this bike? I know that the brake are from Germany.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   serial # on columbia tandum posted by Tom on 4/27/2004 at 7:14:10 PM
The serial number for your bike can be found on the bottom of the bottom bracket shell, (the frame tube that houses the inner workings of your crank). As for the history behind Colubia bicycles, Columbia is based in Westfeild Massachusetts and has been around scince the late 1800s. Columbia is still building bikes right up to the present day. Best of luck!!!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   serial # on columbia tandum posted by Tom on 4/27/2004 at 7:23:25 PM
I forgot something, sorry about that. Another place to look for your serial number is on the side of the head tube, (the frame tube which your fork runs through to attach to you handlebars).




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   serial number posted by: chris on 3/2/2004 at 3:07:43 AM
Where can I find the serial # on old schwinn suburban?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   serial number posted by JC on 3/3/2004 at 1:50:08 PM
Next to the headbadge or on the left rear dropout.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   serial number posted by z on 3/13/2004 at 4:34:26 AM
look for the serial number under the crank housing as well as the back dropout and next to the head badge.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Newbie? Where to find Serial On Columbia posted by: H Keith on 2/29/2004 at 10:44:04 PM
I am new to all this! Bought a Columbia 500 tandem at a flea market. Just wondering where I might look for the serial number on this model. Also, are the serials on a seperate tag (like on a car) or are they stamped on the frame or what??? Thanks in adavnce!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Newbie? Where to find Serial On Columbia posted by ziggy on 3/6/2004 at 6:09:36 PM
Look at the rear dropouts, or look under the crank tube.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   union two light generator problems posted by: andrew on 2/25/2004 at 7:50:09 PM
can't seem to get both the front and rear lights to work, front works alone, and when I wire in the rear the front is the only one that works. new bulb and wire have been tried.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   union two light generator problems posted by Stacey on 2/28/2004 at 11:45:24 AM
You make no direct statement as to wether you can get the rear light to light alone. It sounds like a grounding problem to me... Try running a jumper wire from the tail light ground point, usually the mount to the generator ground point. This should light the light. The next step is to determine where the open is in the ground path.

I had a simmilar situation though it involved the head light. Seemed as tho' the open was at the head bearings. A short jumper from the headlight to a grounding point on the headbadge was all it took... viola! Lights!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   redline bmx posted by: kevin on 2/23/2004 at 7:57:51 AM
Does anyone know how to read redline serial# ? I have a early to mid 80's proline and would like to know exact year.Also any idea when the stickers changed from the red yellow fade to the red on black and grey. thanks

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What Paint? posted by: Mike on 2/18/2004 at 10:05:35 PM
Hello,

I have a 1980s Italian bike that needs the forks repainted white. My question is what durable paint can I use (brand and type that will allow fairly accurate matching)? I do not want to buy a large quantity for such a small project.

I do have the equipment and facilities to allow for a professional application.

Thanks,
Mike.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What Paint? posted by Steve on 2/22/2004 at 2:33:40 PM
When selecting paints for my old Sunbeam, I had very good luck with Dupont Centari automotive paints. They have a huge color selection, so matching was relatively easy. A pint cost $20 and was sufficient for the entire bike. No clear coat was required on top. Thinned down, the paint was suitable for a Preval cartridge sprayer and the results (after wet sanding) were magnificent.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Belknap built by Murray tandem bicycle posted by: Craig Crosson on 2/18/2004 at 4:57:35 AM
I have a Belknap tandem bicycle that I acquired from an estate auction. I can't find any information about Belknap bicycles other than that one was restored by dave@nostalgic.net., but it wsn't a tandem. I want to fix it up to ride. Any info out there?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Belknap built by Murray tandem bicycle posted by JimW. on 2/23/2004 at 8:46:18 PM
Belknap was a hardware distributor in Louisville KY. They sold their goods to small-non-chain department and hardware stores. Their house-brand bikes were made by various companies, including Murray, Raleigh, etc. You can pretty much identify the maker of a given Belknap-branded bike by the detail characteristics of a given company. For example If It's a Belknap "Bluegrass" 3-speed "English-style" bike, it's a Raleigh- and so on. This was common practice with many hardware and department store chains.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Schwinn seatpost size posted by: Ron Georg on 2/7/2004 at 3:23:12 AM
Howdy--

Can someone tell me what size seatpost I need for a '52 Scwhinn cruiser? I started with bare frame, and that's the only part I'm having trouble fitting. The closest I've been able to come is a 13/16, but I'll need a beer-can shim to make that work. 7/8 is too big, and none of the BMX posts we've got laying around are right either.
This isn't a real restoration, as I don't have any original parts, but I think even some of you authenticity buffs would take a second look when I'm done with this clear powder-coated, seven-speed townie. She'll be a looker, if I can only get that Brooks saddle to stay at the right height. Thanks for your help.
Happy Trails,
Ron Georg
Moab, Utah

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Schwinn seatpost size posted by Kim on 2/13/2004 at 2:05:12 PM
They sell one here on this site. Click on parts for sale at the top of the page, and then click on balloon tire parts.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Schwinn seatpost size posted by Art Lewy on 5/19/2004 at 5:46:41 PM
I have an early 1980s Eddy Merckx. Seatpost opening is 7/8" (22 mm). Can someone tell me what seatpost size I need?




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Where to find Schwinn bearings posted by: Mike on 1/25/2004 at 6:47:38 AM
I just tore the hubs apart on a recently aquired '67 Shwinn. The front was bone dry. The races are perfect but the cones are scored. Anybody know where I can get some of those? Also the bearings were caged 7ball, 7/32". Is it possible to get these anywhere or should I just go with loose balls?

Thanks,

Mike


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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Where to find Schwinn bearings posted by z on 3/13/2004 at 4:38:10 AM
just ask the local bike shop they usally have some lyin around




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   How to rebuild Bendix 2 speed? posted by: Mike on 1/22/2004 at 5:24:02 AM
I just picked up a 1967 Schwinn with a 2 speed Bendix kickback. I swear I have seen a website that goes through a rebuild but I can't find it now. anybody have a link to something for me?

Thanks,

Mike

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   How to rebuild Bendix 2 speed? posted by Marty on 1/23/2004 at 2:57:14 AM
Check Bunchobikes.com in the repair section. Good Luck

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   How to rebuild Bendix 2 speed? posted by Marty on 1/23/2004 at 2:57:32 AM
Check Bunchobikes.com in the repair section. Good Luck

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   How to rebuild Bendix 2 speed? posted by Chris on 1/26/2004 at 7:28:36 PM
Used bookstore, in the cycling section. JUST DO IT!
Awesome old books with pictures!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint Masking posted by: Steve on 1/20/2004 at 3:34:19 AM
I just repainted my 1965 Sunbeam three-speed using DuPont Centari metallic green in as close a match as possible to the original. I used some 3M auto masking tape to mask off the decals, which are irreplaceable. The results have been spectacular, but I wonder if another approach might have allowed me to get a better edge on the decals. Does anyone know of a masking liquid which can be painted on top of the decal films, masking them against spray paint, and then be easily removed afterwards? Such a liquid, if it exists, would allow a fine edge between the new finish coat and the existing decal, better than one can achieve using masking tape. While I was able to fill in some of the edge using a 000 brush, the results are just slightly noticeable.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint Masking posted by Stacey on 1/20/2004 at 12:36:34 PM
Masking liquid should be available at any hobby & model shop. Though it won't solve your problem. You see the paint it's self is the culprit, not the masking material. For sake of discussion lets assume that a layer of paint is approx .005" thick and you've used a primer, two color coats, and a clear top coat. In just four coats you've built up a film thickness of .020"... quite noticable from smooth! What the brush work does is lay down a fillet to smooth the transition of the layers. Probably giong to be as good as it gets unless you sacrifice the transfers and replace them (if that's possible).

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint Masking posted by Steve on 1/21/2004 at 2:48:54 AM
You're correct, although I may fill in the difference in film thickness by clearcoating the transfers so as to smooth the surface.

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