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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Conversions and Repairs posted by: Rachael on 8/8/2003 at 6:02:23 PM
Hello,

I pulled a Montgomery Ward Hawthorn bicycle out of my grandmothers barn and am in the process of fixing it up. It is a coaster brake. It had a stripped axle in the rear wheel, so I replaced that myself with the help of the friendly people at one of the local bike coops. First, I was wondering if it is possible to convert it to hand brakes? Is there maybe some kind of conversion kit available somewhere? I just feel so unsafe when I ride because it doesnt stop very fast. Second, it is pretty badly rusted and missing alot of paint. Is it okay to sand down the rust, primer, then use canned spray paint? Third, can anyone tell me about what era the montgomery ward hawthorn bicycle's are from, to give me some idea of it's age?
I am sure I will have more questions eventually, but that is all for now.
Thanks!
Rachael

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Conversions and Repairs posted by JimW. on 8/17/2003 at 1:02:42 AM
It's perfectly all right to do a spray-can repaint on your bike, especially if its original paint is really rusty. You won't be hurting its value, because it has less value than the hot collectible bikes. Use the same brand of primer and finish paint. Follow the directions on the cans. For the best job, you should strip all the parts off before getting into paint prepping. It's best to use several grades of sandpaper, ending up with about 400 grit (finest grade you'll need for this stage), before priming. For a really good job, you should strip the paint, or have it sandblasted before sanding. Getting a really good paint job involves wet-sanding the primer between several coats, The same applies to the finish coats, except you wet-sand between coats with finer sandpaper (600-grit, or finer).
Let it have at least several days to dry before putting it back together.

Some Schwinns came with handbrakes, and they may bolt right onto your bike's frame. The people at your local bike shop can help you with this. If your coaster brake is that ineffective, you probably need an overhaul on it. You can also buy a new wheel with coaster brake pretty inexpensively. Your bike shop can sell you one, or order it for you, or you can shop for one on eBay. It doesn't have to be exactly identical to the original wheel, as long as it's the same tire size.

As for the vintage of your bike, MW Hawthornes were sold for a very long time. The general age can best be determined by tire size. If it has 26 X 2.125" tires on it, it's from the early '50s and before. If it has 26 X 1.75" tires, it's from the mid '50s and later. For more specific dating, take a photograph of it as it is now, and e-mail it to Leon Dixon at the National Bicycle History Archive http://members.aol.com/oldbicycle/ He's extremely knowledgeable about that sort of thing.



          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Conversions and Repairs posted by GMS on 9/23/2003 at 7:04:10 PM
Its fairly simple to convert to hand brakes, you can buy the calipers, levers and cables that will untversally fit any bike(as long as it already had holes where the brakes should go, like where the fender bolts to it)




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   horn tank resto posted by: DaveB on 8/3/2003 at 11:42:10 PM
I have a '68 Schwinn girl's bike with the horn tank between the top and bottom tubes. The horn isn't connected, and i need to know if there is a way I can reconnect or order a new horn. Any help is much appreciated.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   horn tank resto posted by MNSmith on 8/7/2003 at 5:25:42 AM
www.bunchobikes.com/horn.htm

www.bunchobikes.com




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Removing Paint/ Repainting posted by: Chris P on 7/27/2003 at 10:46:29 PM
I have a fairly new CCM mountain bike whos paint has scrapes, has begun to peel off in some places, and whos plastic coating is similarly starting to peel off. I am interested in repainting the bike .. how might I go about removing the existing paint/plastic with a new coat of paint? what kinds of paint would work well? how could one ensure that the new coat is weather resistant? Moreover, should I remove everything down to the metal or could I paint over the existing paint? Any ideas/suggestions/questions .. send a reply

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   JC Higgins posted by: How to best restore? on 7/25/2003 at 5:21:24 PM
Hi just found the site I was wondering what is the best way to remove rust. I have used bronze wool for other applications with vinegar will that work on bikes? I have used it on tools before. I would like to keep the paint as original as possible. I live at the beach so rust has taken its toll. Thanks,

What is the value of this bike I would guess circa 1940s.


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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   JC Higgins posted by Sam on 7/28/2003 at 1:34:47 PM
Get the cleaning kit they sell here. It's easy and it works. There is a link at the top of this page.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Removing spray paint? posted by: Jenniferj on 7/23/2003 at 7:51:00 PM
I recently picked up a bicycle at a farm auction. I have no idea what make or model, I'm guessing it's from the early 60's. The former owner coated it liberally with white spraypaint, which has rendered the serial numbers unreadable. How do I remove the paint without damaging the underlying, original coat? The original is visible where the paint has flaked off, and is a very nice metallic blue. I'd like to keep it if at all possible. Thanks, Jen.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Removing spray paint? posted by Stuart on 8/25/2003 at 3:25:06 PM
I've heard EZ Off oven cleaner will work but I'd test it on an inconspicious spot first. Or try cleaning with "Goo Gone" Stu




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Schwinn MarkIV Jaguar posted by: Jim Buckley on 7/22/2003 at 11:31:29 PM
Hi, I am am in need of some help on what and where to go to bring my original bike back to life. Not too many dings on this bike but it it is dirty. It has a 3 speed hub that needs work/parts?? The stainless fenders are dirty and the paint is not rusted, but it has some minute scratches on the the tank and chaingard. One tank decal is missing as is the light and horn. Where do I begin to search for someone near to me do the work or where do I send the bike? Also how much am I looking at (money) to get this done and is this bike worth putting money into it? I am Lionel PostWar train collector and repair/reconditioning person and I know that some stuff is not worth the effort.I live in Scranton, PA. Thanks for your help, Jim

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Schwinn MarkIV Jaguar posted by Diane on 9/14/2003 at 2:36:11 AM
HI JIM,
IT LOOKS LIKE YOU AND I ARE IN THE SAME BOAT. I'VE GOT A 1960 SCHWINN 3 SPEED THAT I'VE JUST FINISHED CLEANING UP, AND I REPLACED THE TIRES AND TUBES. THE GEARS AREN'T SHIFTING LIKE THEY SHOULD AND I LIKE YOU NEED INFO.ON HOW TO FIX THEM WITHOUT SPENDING A FORTUNE. IF I FIND OUT ANYTHING I'LL LET YOU KNOW AND I HOPE YOU'LL DO THE SAME FOR ME. I'M REALLY ANXIOUS TO GET RIDING. GOOD LUCK TO YOU.





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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   BMA/6 Decal & Murray Headbadge Downloads *Free* posted by: Shannon Reynolds on 7/22/2003 at 4:04:40 PM
I just thought I'd post this thread to announce that I have created files that can be used to recreate the early 70's BMA/6 headtube sticker. This sticker was found on Huffy, Murray, and Roadmaster bikes of this period. As well, I have created a headbadge decal recreation for the '71 Murray Alpine.

I'd like to add that I made these recreations out of frustration in not being able to find sources for old Non-Schwinn stickers. These files are totally free and I ask that you do not try sell them or recreation stickers produced with these files. They are for owners of these sort of bikes to use in restoration projects, not for you to make money on.

To find these files please visit my F-Series Murray Eliminator website. The url below leads to my site's Links page where you will find the downloads. Please take note that they are in Photoshop (.PSD) format.

http://tinyurl.com/hosg

Let's keep those Non-Schwinns rolling!!

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Stripping paint from bicycle rim posted by: Andy Skiles on 7/22/2003 at 2:49:51 AM
Hi folks,

I've searched around and can't find an appropriate way to strip the paint off of my bicycle rim. I have a Velocity Deep V rim on a 1982 Grandis road bike. Problem is, the rim is painted black and the rest of the bike is
red and chrome. I want to chemically remove the paint so as to maintain some luster to the alloy, but I have heard that some chemicals will adversely affect the alloy. Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Andy

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Stripping paint from bicycle rim posted by tyson on 7/25/2003 at 7:36:15 PM
hi andy in regards to stripping paint from your rim id like to help but need to know some things first. first off is the rim chrome or did it have an original coating you would like to maintain? secondly and this is the most important piece of information, what kind of paint is on the rim? is it laquer, enamel, polyurethane or something else? if the rim is chrome and you want back that way there really isnt much going to hurt it. without knowing what kind of paint that is on the rim, i would advise you to start with laquer thinner or paint thinner and try that with just a cloth. if the paint on the rim is laquer or enamel based this should soften it up enough to be scrubbed off with just a cloth unless it has been on there for a long time. if thinner wont touch it, the paint is probably poly based and your only option here is to use a chemical stripper, i am a big fan of aircraft stripper brand, if you have to use this be careful this is nasty stuff read the directions on the can and make sure you have access to running water as this is the only thing that will neutralize this stuff. if you go this route it would probably be best to get the aerosol type over the gel, just make sure it is not windy and you are not near anything that has a painted surface like your car or garage door or anything. if you have any questions feel free to get in touch. best of luck




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   restoring bent fork top tube posted by: dean on 7/15/2003 at 7:49:46 PM
has anyone been succesfull at straighting a bent top tube on forks . The steer tubes , this is a common problem is there a way to fix this , or is there a jig you can make to straighten this. most people would say get a new fork but some forks are hard to come bye and replacement is not a option . Thanks DEAN

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   restoring bent fork top tube posted by MNSmith on 7/20/2003 at 10:04:28 AM
I do them all the time, usually on a press.

www.bunchobikes.com




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Fitting crank cotters posted by: Randy on 6/30/2003 at 8:28:28 PM
Had a good idea the other day and thought that I would give it a try. While fitting a set of Stronglight cottered cranks to a sixties Peugeot UO 8(the Frenchmade model) I was faced with the problem of filing cotters and keeping them the same. Let the flat face on the cotter be held by a magnet(the magnet must be wider than the cotter). Put the cotter in a vice and slip a small shim between each supporting side of the magnet and the vice. Clamp the vice firmly and remove the magnet. Visually inspect how the cotter is positioned and, if satisfied, begin filing slowly. Do not take a big bite(don't press hard). Push and lift the file at the end of a short stroke(helps prevent rocking) and continue, visually inspecting frequently, until the file rubs consistently on the vice jaws(care will go a long way to ensuring uniform results and prevent damaging the file.) Repeat for the other cotter. Try the result in the cranks, looking to see how far the pins fit into the cranks when positioned on the axle and looking to see if the cranks are at 180 degree intervals. This worked really well for me.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint for my '62 Schwinn Fiesta posted by: Lori on 6/25/2003 at 10:03:08 PM
Hi! I just bought a '62 Schwinn Fiesta that's in pretty good shape, but needs some touching up. I'd like to try to do this myself, but I have no idea how to match the paint (or find old Schwinn paint that matches). Does anyone know: a) the actual name of the paint color (it's turquoise blue flek) for that model year-so I can check for it online; or b) what kind of company would be able to match the paint?

Thanks so much!

Lori

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint for my '62 Schwinn Fiesta posted by doug on 6/28/2003 at 12:58:20 PM
Hi Lori you can probably get the color custom matched at a auto paint supply store usually wholesale only,they might have computer matching,but heres the bad news they wont mix small amounts and you will nedd profesional equipment to spray it with all very expensive,if the paint just has a few scratches and is origional the best thing is to leave it alone.or totally re paint the bike.which can deter from the value,Schwinn touch up paint is no longer available and hasent been for a long time.if you want to totally re pain just let me know and I will help you with any ? is a difficult but rewarding job sometimes best of luck blue skies

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint for my '62 Schwinn Fiesta posted by Lori on 7/26/2003 at 12:14:28 AM
Thanks so much for your advice! I think I'll just leave it alone for now. The scratches give it character. I'll definitely be back with tons of questions if I decide to restore it. Thanks again!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Motorized bicycles posted by: Jeremy on 6/21/2003 at 5:38:53 PM
Convert your bike motorized! Check out CaliCruzer.com for some cool custom motorized bikes. 48cc gas two-stroke, chain drven with a manual clutch for a real motorcycle feel. Complete bikes and motor kits available at CaliCruzer.com

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   stuck in the dark posted by: jennifer on 6/12/2003 at 8:09:05 PM
hello my name is jennifer and i recently received a female Columbia
"Tourist" from my grandmother and she and i are both unsure of the year of it.i have examined the bicycle and could only find a few things about it. the serial # was located on the right rear fork and the #s were P424073. and the tires are 26 x 1 and 3/8 . it is robins egg blue color(unsure if that is the orginal) with white pinstripes
and painted lettering lettering.it has a rear fender thingy that can hold a bag or
something.i believe it is a 3 speed. and it rides well and is in very good condition,i was just looking to maybe restore it. if you have any answers to my ?'s please let me know.thank you for your time.

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Bent Rim posted by: CMK on 6/6/2003 at 1:44:54 PM
Hey i was wondering what the best way to fix a bent rim is, its bent pretty bad, and sience its a rod brake rim, getting my hands on another one isn't very fisable right now, i tried tightning the spokes, but i am thinking i need to use some violence and hammer this one back into shape, BTW the bike is a Phillips, does anyone know anything about it? I posted a message under 'english roadsters' and nobody has responded yet.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Bent Rim posted by Wings on 6/21/2003 at 6:23:35 AM
Where is the bent?

1. If it wobbles because it started to taco -- it could be trued by adjusting the spokes carefully and slowly -- depending on how bad it is. I have seen a bike shop guy hold the wheel above his head and come down as hard as he could on the bench. He would do this a couple of times and then true it. I have don similar things but never with such great force.

2. If the side of the rim is bent there is a tool that will straigten the side out. I don't have the tool so I use a big crescent wrench to gently bend the side to where it belongs.

3. If the dent is on the flat portion of the rim -- I think it is time to get a new rim. There are wheels available that will work with rod brakes. There is one rim that is on Raleigh's that will work with rod brakes. Try the Rod Brake guys again for more expertise!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Bent Rim posted by Chris on 6/24/2003 at 4:39:10 PM
In the pages of my 1956 Brown Brothers catalog there is two tools made for removing the bends and buckles out of a standard 26 or 27 inch steel rim
Also for removing a buckle dent out of the old Westwood rims.

Never seen that tool any place, they want you to buy a new rim today.
We can't have people fixing these rims and not buying a new one now can we?
No, everything has to be cheap and disposable and now, made outside the country.

Cyclo tool's
long defunct Rosa rim tool.

Aw,the past! The glorious past.

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Bent Rim posted by Chris on 6/24/2003 at 4:40:16 PM
It went into operation when you trued the rim.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Removing clear coating on alloy parts posted by: Russ on 6/5/2003 at 10:33:05 PM
What's the easiest way to remove the clear coating on my Campy parts, cranks, levers?? Yes, I want to polish my butt off from now on. Thanks for the help, Russ




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