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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Musselman Hub posted by: Bill on 4/7/2003 at 8:33:53 PM
I have just repacked a Musselman hub and can't seem to make it work right. It spins freely and the drive works but the brake either doesn't engage (freewheels and doesn't catch) or it engages but doesn't activate the brake much if at all. With the axle assembly removed, the mechanism seems to work and none of the parts seem worn out. It was not working before I repacked it. I repacked it with 30 weight oil and grease on the outer bearings. Any suggestions?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Musselman Hub posted by sam on 4/9/2003 at 1:37:43 AM
the book says: Brake shoe sleeve 10831,brake wedge 10830,brake spool&drag 10827,and driving clutch 10829 came as a 'cartriage unit' which replaced all wearing parts.Where to find those parts or a "unite" I have no idea.The book also says should have a small amount of end-play when reinstaled.---sam




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cro-Mo Forks for 27" wheel size posted by: Rich on 4/7/2003 at 5:33:30 PM
Never figured the restoration on the Ross Paragon would be harder than on the Signature but here I am still looking for a set of Cro-Mo (not hi tensil steel)forks for my 19" Ross Paragon. Steerer tube diameter is 1" length of tube 4.5" threaded, classic lugged crown, has to be for 27" wheel size (not 700)1.5-1.75 offset. Tange#1 or 2, 024,531 will pay reasonable price plus S&H..Paint doesn't have to be oem. no rustouts tho. Contact me via e-mail

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   THE W BIKE posted by: VINCE on 4/3/2003 at 11:27:15 PM
HI THIS IS SORT OF A RESTO QUESTION. I WAS TRYING TO DETERMINE WHAT KIND OF BIKE FRAME I HAVE. I HAVE BEEN RESTORING IT, AND I AM NOT SURE WHAT THE HECK IT IS. ITS A RAD BIKE, AND THERE IS A "W" ON THE BOTTOM BRACKET NEXT TO THE SERIAL #. THE W LOOKS LIKE THE ONE FROM WONDER WOMAN. THE SERIAL # IS K1 13051. PLEASE HELP!

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Restoring an old rusty Tricycle posted by: Angela on 4/2/2003 at 5:54:22 PM
Hi all you smart people!
I'm trying to restore a old Tricycle for my daughter and it's seriously rusty EVERYWARE! I need to know what the best way to remove the rust from the paint and how to go about repainting it. What kind of paint should I use?
Hey does that cleaning stuff on this website clean up rusty plastic?
Im sure someone here can help thanks a bunch!


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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Restoring an old rusty Tricycle posted by JimW. on 4/2/2003 at 7:11:04 PM
Take all the parts off the frame. Use paint stripper to remove the existing paint. Use fine emery cloth to remove the rust, followed by even finer wet-or-dry paper to get it ready for primer. Wipe it down with vinegar after sanding, then rinse with water. After it's completely dry, spray on several light coats of spray can primer, until it's completely covered. After the primer dries thoroughly, wet sand with 400 grit wet-or-dry paper. If this reveals pits, fill them with spot putty, wet-sand and prime again. If you're satisfied with the way it looks, spray on your finish coats, and let it dry for several days before putting the parts back on. I prefer Krylon primer and finish colors, but others will do about as well. Krylon doesn't drip and run as easily.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Restoring an old rusty Tricycle posted by Ronzo on 4/9/2003 at 8:46:16 PM
I have about twenty years experience doing restorations, and for a home project, forget the paint stripper and sandpaper, spend a few $$$ and save yourself a lot of time, mess and effort. Look up sandblasting in the yellow pages, call and get a price. I had two road bike frames (old ten speeds) in the past month, done for about $30.00 each with "sugar sand". Very fine grain sand that takes off all the old paint, rust etc., leaving it like it was at the factory. Get all the sand out of the crevices with a keyboard cleaner aerosol can or similar method, then wipe the bike down with isopropyl alcohol to remove any oil from your hands. Hang it from the garage door struts using wire coat hangers (unplug the garage door opener). Primer it with Rustoleum Clean Metal Primer, White. (Home Depot). Follow the directions on the can. Two light coats should do, one can should be plenty. It will NEVER rust again. Paint it with your topcoat color, then maybe a Rustoleum Clear Enamel for some extra shine. Let me know how you make out!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Restoring an old rusty Tricycle posted by JimW. on 4/10/2003 at 7:53:38 AM
$30 is a fair-sized chunk of change to add on to the cost of fixing up an old tricycle; at least it is to me. Or am I the only one around here who's suffering from our economy going down the toilet? I'll stick with elbow grease, but the more fortunate among us should probably pay someone else to do the job. At least that person will have a job to do.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Restoring an old rusty Tricycle posted by bob goatse on 7/22/2003 at 11:41:52 PM
Thanks for the tip about sandblasting! I was looking forward to a long weekend with a wire brush and the bike frame but I was able to locate a local company to blast it for $25.




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   rare wheels and tires posted by: Maxy on 4/2/2003 at 12:24:40 AM
I got an older 10 speed Triumph with Sturmey Archer wheels. The wheel states: STURMEY ARCHER EA235 26"X1-1/4". The currnet tires (which I need to replace) says 26"x1 1/4". Will a Schwinn 26"x1-3/8" (37-597) fit this rim??????? The small info on the net seems to say yes.
Please let me know. I will restore the bike if these tires will work.
Thanks.
Cool site!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   rare wheels and tires posted by Jeff R on 4/3/2003 at 1:06:21 AM
A 26 X 1 1/4 tire will fit a Dunlop EA 1 rim. A schwinn S6 26 X 1 3/8 tire will also fit the EA 1 rim. The S6 Schwinn 26 X 1 3/8 tire is a little wider than the EA 1 26 X 1 1/4 Dunlop tire. The tires should be interchangeable. The EA 1 rim was used it the early 50's. Thats whats on my Raleigh Clubman. When I couldn't find 26 X 1 1/4 Dunlop super lightweights for the bike I used the Schwinn S6 tire size.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Frame Type posted by: J West on 3/31/2003 at 3:56:29 AM
I have recently aqcuired a lowrider bike. My question concerns its frame. It is very similar to a Schwinn Fair Lady but it doesnt have headbadge holes or a schwinn serial. can anybody help with hints on what type of frame this could be? thanx

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Frame Type posted by JimW. on 4/10/2003 at 7:59:57 AM
Are you planning to restore it? If not, it shouldn't really matter. It's probably one of the Taiwan repros designed for people to make lowriders with. Although I wasn't aware that they made repro girl's bike frames. The Fairlady frame isn't a whole lot different from a lot of others, so it could be almost anything.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   PAINT posted by: ANDREW C. on 3/28/2003 at 3:45:24 AM
WHERE CAN I GET PAINT, TO REPAINT MY STINGRAY, (IF I DECIDE TO)? APPROX. HOW MUCH WILL IT COST? I'M TRYING TO MAKE IT THE ULTIMATE OLD-SKOOL BIKE. PLEASE HELP ME WTIH TIPS, ON WHAT I SHOULD ALSO GET FOR IT.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   PAINT posted by danny on 3/29/2003 at 3:58:03 PM
you can get paint aswell as most of your other stingray needs thru pete aronson, www,hyper-formance.com




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   REPAINTING posted by: ANDREW C. on 3/28/2003 at 3:10:09 AM
I WANT TO KEEP THE BIKE, I'M ONLY 13. WHAT I REALLY WANT TO KNOW IS, WHICH WOULD LOOK BETTER? REPAINT, OR CLEANING IT? AND WHERE COULD I GET REPLACEMENT STICKERS FOR MY RAY?

P.S. IS IT JUST ME, OR R "MANTA RAYS" REALLY UGLY? GET A STINGRAY, IT'S THE ONLY WAY TO GO.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   PAINT posted by: ANDREW C. on 3/27/2003 at 2:11:00 AM
IF I WERE TO REPAINT AN OLD RAY, WOULD IT DECREASE THE VALUE? IF I WERE TO DO THAT, WHERE AND HOW WOULD I? COULD I GET REPLACEMENT STICKERS?

ANY INFO/HELP WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   PAINT posted by Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc. at OldRoads.com on 3/27/2003 at 4:36:32 PM
Unless the paint is pure rust, you're better off not re-painting. Just clean it up as best you can. It's kind of like cleaning an old coin - you don't do it because the patina is important.
And you've got to be sure the shiny new repaint IS the right color. And the plastic decals (.vs. silk screen) just don't cut it.

I know a lot of collectors who not buy a repainted cycle.

Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.
http://OldRoads.com





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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Cry For Help posted by: Rif Addams on 3/22/2003 at 7:05:28 PM
Hi All,
As you may or may not know, I am involved in the George A. Wyman Centennial Recreation of 2003.
I am to be 'the man in the saddle' (or as Jim W. likes to call me 'the intrepid motonaut'); in which I will be riding a near replica of a 1903 California brand Motor Bicycle from San Francisco to New york City. We are recreating the first crossing of the United States (Coast to Coast) by motor vehicle. All the details can be seen at:
http://bikerodnkustom3.homestead.com/wyman1.html
Our replica is nearly ready, but we have come upon a major roadblock. We have the wrong length spokes. Our spokes are just slightly too long. We are having a problem finding the proper length spokes in the proper diameter.
This wouldn't be an issue if we had a spoke thread roller, as we could roll the threads a bit longer then cut or grind the spokes back to the length we need.

Here are the spec.s for the wheels and spokes:
We are using 28" X 1 1/2" rims with a 1949 New Departure Model D rear brake hub.
Our current spokes are 3mm diameter (.105") and 305 mm length.
We need, for the rear hub, a spoke length of 299/300mm and for the front a spoke length of 302mm,.
This would be in a 3 cross pattern. We ran the numbers for a 4 cross pattern as well and that won't work either.

Basically what I am asking of you is this:
Preferably- if someone has a thread rolling tool that we could borrow just for long enough to do the minor adjustments neccessary to these spokes could we pretty please make arrangements for the use of the tool just long enough to correct this problem?
if that isn't a possibility- if you know of a supplier where we can get these in short order please let us know.
Thank you for your time,
Rif Addams

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:    posted by: Gino on 3/22/2003 at 3:54:51 PM
Got your cleaning kit oldroads. Thanks. it works great.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Old dragster frame posted by: Mark Leighton on 3/21/2003 at 1:07:17 AM
Hi, ive recently stumbled across an old frame, its still got a "Hanimex" sticker on the frame with a "Sport" sticker on the seat post bar thingy. Any information on theses bikes would be appreciated. Cant find anything on the net about them. Also, and tips on restoring a rear brake drum??

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Old dragster frame posted by JimW. on 3/24/2003 at 8:32:27 AM
Based upon the Hanimex sticker, I'd say it's probably a Dragstar, and you mis-spelled the name. (notice the A instead of E). It was made by Malvern Star (hence the "A" spelling) Cycles Company of Victoria, Queensland, Australia. There's an example in the Canberra Bicycle Museum. http://canberrabicyclemuseum.info/manuf%201960-1980.htm at the bottom of the page. If you run a search under Dragstar + Malvern Star, you'll find lots of information on it.
Malvern Star was the major bike company in Austrlia, in the same way as was CCM in Canada, and Schwinn in the USA.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Women's Ross Eurotour posted by: Adeye on 3/20/2003 at 6:13:59 PM
I just bought a women's Ross Eurotour bicycle which is in alright condition.....does anyone know what year this was made in? Aslo is Ross considered to be a good manufacturer I couldn't find any history of the brand. Thank You!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Women's Ross Eurotour posted by JimW. on 3/24/2003 at 8:41:07 AM
I have a male Ross Eurotour. It's a typical example of a Raleigh Sports knockoff, with Shimano 3-speed mechanicals rather than Sturmey-Archer. It's a decent bike for riding around the city-very sturdy and simple to maintain. Ross is/was headquartered in PA. I paid about $40 for mine in clean, lightly used condition a couple of years ago; and it was worth it.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Junior Tricycle Parts posted by: Zaysma on 3/18/2003 at 1:35:55 PM
I know this is a little out of your guys area but, I am looking for the front decals and pedals to a 1960's Junior Tricycle; where is the best place to find them?

Thanks

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cleaning a Chain posted by: Gralyn on 3/17/2003 at 9:07:07 PM
What works best to clean up a really grimy chain. I have many - on practically every bike I have - they need a thorough cleaning - but I would like to know what folks have found works best - the tools, (like a wire brush? brass brush? - what solvent?, etc.)

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cleaning a Chain posted by Tom Collen on 3/18/2003 at 2:20:33 PM
I've had good luck with those foaming engine cleaners, the type sold in auto stores. I get mine at either Walmart or the local grocery store. I think the brand is Engine Brite (or something clever like that). These types of cleaners are designed to strip off every bit of grease/oil, so you MUST lubricate the chain afterwards.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cleaning a Chain posted by Larry Bone on 3/31/2003 at 2:40:47 AM
I bet they are not as grimy as the chain gets on my motorcycle. And the owners manual for the MC sez to clean it with a kerosene soaked rag. Thinking that a bicycle chain is considerably smaller, if you could remove the chain entirely and just drop it in a coffee can full of Kero, let it soak overnight, the grime would come off easily. Allow the chain to then "dry" completely and most definitely re-lubricate the chain prior to use.

Good luck!

Later!!!

Boneman

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cleaning a Chain posted by George Summers on 6/24/2003 at 5:46:26 AM
Put the chain in a peanut butter jar or something similar, fill it half with kerosene, place the lid on securely and shake violently for ten minutes.

You can put on some Latin music and shake it in rhythm.

Simply soaking the chain will not do it as you need agitation and lots of it to flush out the grime.

Pull the chain out with a bike spoke and hang it up to dry.

Put a small bucket under it to catch the drippings.

All the best

George Summers

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