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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:Recovering bananna seat.. posted by: Harry on 3/15/2003 at 5:59:46 AM
hey, I was wondering what a good way to recover a seat would be. I have a schwinn stingray bananna seat that I dont want to take the vinyl off of, I just really want to make a slip cover type thing, nothing permanent. I was wondering if there was any good or bad way to do this. I am covering the seat in a hawaiin hisbicus shirt my friend gave me, but dont wanna permanently cover the original seat. Thanks for any input.
Harry

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:Recovering bananna seat.. posted by sam on 3/17/2003 at 9:14:31 PM
First,make a paper pattern of the seat top.(2)cut sq of material for seat top.(3)spray glue 1/4 foam to material and set aside to dry(3) cut strip of heavy material wider than the seat is wide(4) hem heavy material for draw string(5)cut seat top material using paper pattern--allow 1/2" for hem(6)sew side to top from back side,starting from the rear of seat.(7) turn right side and install draw string.TOP IS FINISHED




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:chrome posted by: Harry on 3/15/2003 at 5:55:09 AM
Hi, does anybody else ever use aluminum foil to remove rust from chrome? I sometimes use this along with petrolium jelly, and brass wool, but when nothing else is available I use aluminum foil. Does anybody else ever use this, and does it damage the chrome?

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:chrome posted by JimW. on 3/18/2003 at 6:09:27 AM
I use it all the time for that purpose, and it doesn't hurt the chrome. Aluminum is softer than chrome. I've never used it with vaseline, but I doubt that would hurt it, either.
I also don't know whether it would help.

RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:chrome posted by cindy dmn on 3/30/2003 at 7:47:17 AM
The best part of cleaning with aluminum foil is instant gratification. The second best part is getting your friends and neighbors doing your chrome. Always use a lube between the foil and chrome. WD 40, S-100,Dawn dish soap,Pro tect, Pledge lemon or. The best chrome seems to be from England,it shines more. I demonstrate with a flair and let the audience get their hands into it. They won't stop and soon ...

RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:chrome posted by cindy dmn on 3/30/2003 at 7:47:30 AM
The best part of cleaning with aluminum foil is instant gratification. The second best part is getting your friends and neighbors doing your chrome. Always use a lube between the foil and chrome. WD 40, S-100,Dawn dish soap,Pro tect, Pledge lemon or. The best chrome seems to be from England,it shines more. I demonstrate with a flair and let the audience get their hands into it. They won't stop and soon ...




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:Decals posted by: Ralph on 3/15/2003 at 4:02:58 AM
How do u remove decals the easiest.


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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:Decals posted by JimW. on 3/18/2003 at 6:14:56 AM
By decals, do you mean vinyl stickers, or traditional water-slide transfers? If vinyl, a hair dryer will help loosen it, and GooGone will remove the residue. If water-slide decals, nail polish remover on a soft cloth should do it.
Saturate the cloth, swipe it over the decal area, and repeat every five minutes or so. You don't want to let the polish remover sit on the paint, though, as it would eventually cause it to blister. By briefly moisteneng the decal with it, it will dissolve and wipe away with several brief applications

RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:Decals posted by Gino on 3/22/2003 at 3:54:13 PM
Use finger nail polish remover. It works great.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:Is It Worht It posted by: Dave on 3/15/2003 at 3:52:34 AM
How much does it generally cost to restore a bike without the breaks. This includes replacing all the parts and buying materials. Thank You.
XXX

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:Is It Worht It posted by sam on 3/17/2003 at 9:20:50 PM
For me it runs between $18 to just ovet $800 , but then again I haven't moved into the big league---yet!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:how to get started on painting a found bike posted by: Dave on 3/14/2003 at 9:14:16 PM
I recently picked up a bike that a neighbor threw out called Vertical Nitrous Freestyle Series. I was wondering if anyone knew how to restore the paint job on it. It has a lot of rust also. Any proffessiional input would be greatly appreciated. Credentials would be nice.
XXX

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:how to get started on painting a found bike posted by JimW. on 3/18/2003 at 6:25:26 AM
What's required to restore it depends on the type of paint job it originally had. Some are easy, like solid, non-metallic, easily-matched colors, others are hard, like kandy colors and special effects paint combinations, or colors which have to be mixed to match. Assuming that you can duplicate the finish paint, all you have to do is strip off the old paint, sand the whole thing with fine emery cloth to get rid of the rust, give it several coats of primer, using spot putty to fill any deep scratches or pits, wet-sanding as needed. After you have a perfect primer finish, you apply as many coats of finish paint as needed, wet-sanding as needed between coats. Stop when it's perfect. Polish-wax it after about a week

My credentials are that people pay me to paint things perfectly, including bicycles, and I've been doing it for a very long time.

RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:���how to get started on painting a found bike posted by Donald Gillies on 8/8/2003 at 1:14:29 AM
I have recently (mid-2003) been involved in restoring some very fancy raleigh international bicycles with chrome lugs, and chrome fork tips and seat stays. These are probably the most expensive bicycles to restore and they look similar to a schwinn paramount. Only a cinelli super corsa which adds a chrome seat lug would be more complex. An all-chrome bicycle would be cheaper because no painting is required.

Anyway, the process is to strip the paint, then sandblast the tubes and bottom bracket, then sand the areas near the chrome until you get to bare metal. you don't want to blast the chrome because the chrome might start to delaminate, causing serious troubles (not sure what these troubles are, but don't want them nonetheless.)

then take it to a plater and have him electrolytically strip the chrome.

then polish the chrome areas once again so that they are mirror smooth and can re-plate well.

then send the frame back to the plater who will rechome everything. in my case the fork was badly rusted (531 fork) with pits, so we needed full triple chrome (brass, nickel, chrome). after each plating step the plater would buff and smooth the metal so that it is a mirror finish. as you can understand this is getting quite involved, with lots of hand labor on a buffing wheel.

up until now we've spend $400 - $500 and most of it is the man-hours of labor.

now you want a good quality paint job, as can be seen and described on Joe Bell's web site (http://www.campyonly.com/joebell.html). In my case it involves a single color, masking off the chrome as you paint, and then outlining the lugs in gold trim, and applying somewhere between $50 and $100 worth of decals. Just this basic repainting part can cost another $500.

don't forget $50 to repaint a head badge under a microscope.

So it can be $1000.00 to do a really good refinishing job on and turn a trashed but classic bicycle back into something that looks brand-new. Actually it will look better than new since these prices are for premium artisans to do the work.





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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:re-chrome cost posted by: isaac ray on 3/13/2003 at 6:24:57 PM
what would be cheaper to rechrome my handle bars and fenders or just buy new ones. also where would i look to find a shop who does this?i live in s.f. bay area.

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:re-chrome cost posted by JimW. on 3/18/2003 at 6:29:34 AM
Unless it's a very old bike with a very distinctive set of handlebars or whatever, it's cheaper to replace, usually.
It's very hard to find plating shops now, compared to the old days when no one worried about disposing of toxic chemicals any old way. Now environmental regulations mean that it costs more to be in the plating business, and the customer pays more as a result.

RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:re-chrome cost posted by Chris on 3/26/2003 at 6:51:31 PM
True.
Also it is not easy to get hooked up with a shop that will stand over the operator and make sure that the proper amount of polishing and prep work is done.The guy with the buffing wheels can get lazy and that messes everything up.

RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:re-chrome cost posted by Andrew C. on 3/27/2003 at 2:17:05 AM
I'M NO PROFESSIONAL. I LIKE TO CUT CORNERS AND TAKE SHORT CUTS. JUST SAND IT DOWN, AND SPRAY SOME "SPRAY PAINT CHROME" ON IT. YOU CAN FIND IT IN HARDWARE STORES. IT'S USUALLY USED FOR PAINTING RUSTED BUMPERS ON TRUCKS ..... IT WOULD WORK GOOD FOUR YOUR BIKE THOUGH.

GOOD LUCK

RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:re-chrome cost posted by steve on 8/30/2003 at 5:51:28 AM
*never use "chrome paint".

there is chrome, and there is paint - "chrome paint" is paint!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:paint posted by: Jason Nethmith on 3/11/2003 at 10:07:50 AM
I have this old frame that has been painted with this realy
dumb paint. I was wondering how I could get it off without
damaging the origanal coat.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:chrome scratches posted by: isaac ray on 3/7/2003 at 3:56:52 PM
i was wondering what is the best way to remove tiny scratches from my handle bars, fenders, etc. there are no deep or major ones, just those little ones you see when polishing that just get on your nerves. thanks, in advance, for any responses.

isaac ray

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:chrome scratches posted by Kim on 3/11/2003 at 2:45:49 PM
Those scratches probably came from somebody using steel wool on the chrome.
DO NOT USE STEEL WOOL. Use brass wool like they sell in the kit here.
Sorry Isaac but there is no way to remove that spidering. Yoou'll have to re-chrome.

RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:chrome scratches posted by JimW. on 3/19/2003 at 3:01:59 PM
Here's something you might try, since the chrome's not any good at this point. Steel wool comes in many grades, including ultra-fine. Start out with a grade only slightly finer than the current scratches. Go over the whole thing, until the even finer scratches are consistent. Then go to the next finer grade and repeat. Then go finer still. By the time you get finished with ultra-fine, if you haven't gone through the chrome into the copper underplate, the piece is ready to polish. A cloth polishing wheel used with white polishing rouge, will polish the piece back to bright finish, without the obvious scratches the piece now has.

This is the procedure I use to end up with a chrome-like finish on aluminum pieces, and it works. In my opinion, the problem with steel wool isn't that it's inherently bad. The problem is that people don't use it properly. For polishing light rust off chrome handlebars, bronze wool or aluminum foil is better, because it's softer than the chrome, and it won't be as likely to scratch it, but the idea behind abrasives is to make scratches. So working with that idea, and applying ever-finer scratches to a surface will let you end up with a very smooth surface. All metal polishing works that way. Polishing is just an even finer grade of scratches.




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RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:Tandem Columbia Playbike posted by: Jim on 3/7/2003 at 2:47:34 PM
I have a tandem Columbia Playbike, half of the bike is one color green the other half another color green. Back half that is bright shiny green needs to have the bananna seat replaced. Any idea on where to get a seat like this or any idea the worth of this bike? I have not seen this bike or its serial number 9597572 on any websites.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:question posted by: matt on 3/6/2003 at 5:57:08 PM
I would like to know what schwinns would be the best to restore for profit right now. thanks

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:question posted by Stacey on 3/7/2003 at 10:52:35 AM
If you gotta ask, you shouldn't do it.

You'll take a bath.

RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:question posted by MNSmith on 3/9/2003 at 9:49:31 AM
An Aerocycle comes to mind. Sure winner.

www.bunchobikes.com




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:schwinn flamboyant red paint? posted by: Danno on 3/4/2003 at 2:19:09 AM
Does anyone have a paint code and manufacturer to replicate schwinn flamboyant red? I am trying to do a couple of restorations low budget and cant seem to find a match. Schwinn made all kinds of bikes in this color for probably 35 years or so. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance! Sincerely, Danno

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:Cant tell what kind it is! posted by: Allison on 3/2/2003 at 1:02:36 AM
I bought a bike today at a thrift store and I cant find anything about it. All it says is "BMA/6 CERTIFIED" and a little about it tested by BMA/6 and for america. Anyhoo, plz help, email me. :) thanx.

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:Cant tell what kind it is! posted by Ron on 3/2/2003 at 1:32:40 PM
The BMA sticker only means that the bike had all the necessary reflectors and safety equipment to meet the Bicycle Manufacturers Association standards. Almost every bike sold has the same sticker. BMA/6 was issued in the early 1970s.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:boys sears bike posted by: rich on 3/1/2003 at 11:17:33 PM
i have a20 in. boys bike made by sears that resembles a stingray type bicycle other than alittle rust in very good shape. any value too this?

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:boys sears bike posted by sam on 3/2/2003 at 1:44:31 AM
Most sears bikes were made by Murray. not a lot of value but a good bike should make a good rider,have fun with it.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:boys sears bike posted by: rich on 3/1/2003 at 11:17:33 PM
i have a20 in. boys bike made by sears that resembles a stingray type bicycle other than alittle rust in very good shape. any value too this?

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:Western Flyer posted by: TJ on 2/28/2003 at 2:26:34 AM
I'm trying to restore a W/F(Buzz Bike) that had a 3 speed shifter on it.Not sure the year. Looks to be early 70's.
Where can I find some parts

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RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:Western Flyer posted by sam on 3/1/2003 at 1:09:22 AM
This bike might be the same as AMF,or texas ranger,and others by AMF. The 3 speed most likely is a 333.Ebay would be the best source for parts.These bikes are not as pricy as Schwinn,so it's a good starter bike.

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