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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   upholstery posted by: isaac ray on 2/23/2003 at 5:39:08 PM
im trying to upholster a traler with some the same material as most lowrider seats are made of. my problem is how to cut the material so that there are no lines showing where the material has been cut. i want it to look like it is covered in one piece of material. any tips and advice would be greatly appreciated.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   upholstery posted by sam on 2/23/2003 at 11:48:28 PM
Well Isaac,Not seein the project puts me at quite a disadvantage! Sew lines can be hid using cording.Some things are vinyl covered using a heat and vaccum process,like car dash boards.You can heat vinyl and strech it around foam to cover say a seat bottom with no lines.Use cheep vinyl if you plan on heatin it cause cheep vinyl works best for this.---sam

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   upholstery posted by JimW. on 2/24/2003 at 12:28:05 AM
In most upholstery, the edges are hemmed. That means that the material is turned under at the edge. Normally, the edges are sewed together, with the overlap on the back side.
This gives a clean edge. You can do it without sewing, by using contact cement. You coat the material from an inch in from the edge, on the back side. When it gets tacky, fold the edge over with a 1/2" hem. This will give a cleaner edge, even when you use welting. With a sewed seam, the welting would be sewed at the same time, but you can glue the welting, also.




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   RUST ON WHEELS posted by: ANDREW CHEMERS on 2/22/2003 at 4:14:24 AM
HELP!
I HAVE MAJOR RUST ON BOTH WHEELS OF MY SCHWINN STING-RAY.

HOW DO I GET RID OF IT?!?

HELP!

EMAIL ME: SIMPSONSCRAYZ@MAIL.COM

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   RUST ON WHEELS posted by Skip on 2/25/2003 at 3:03:35 PM
Get the kit they sell on this site. It's on the top of this page.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Ross Paragon Decals posted by: Rich McCarthy on 2/20/2003 at 2:10:15 PM
Need help..Removed (almost unreadable)Paragon script decals and 024 frame tube decals from bike.Apparently,restorer cannot duplicate. Does anyone know of the whereabouts of one of these rare road bikes that's still in decent shape/where I might be able to pick up a set of the paragon script decals and 024 tubing decal? Even photos of the script decal would help. Bike bead blasted and ready for respray..need the decals!

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What kind of paint posted by: Justin on 2/18/2003 at 7:26:00 PM
I was looking at repainting a bike of mine. I was wondering what kind of paint should you use when you repaint a bike. Thanks

Justin

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What kind of paint posted by Skip on 2/25/2003 at 3:06:02 PM
Somebody wrote a good description of how to use regular Krylon spray paint here. Click on "More Messages" at the bottom of this page and keep reading until you find it.

I think there's also a way to search the articles here and that would be an easier way to find it.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by: Denise or Dave on 2/12/2003 at 2:24:59 PM
Hi!,
Is there anybody out there that can HELP ME??? I have recently acquired a rather "SAD" Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. The two rear wheels are buckled. I am looking for replacement wheels or some advice on how to straighten them,

Many thanks!
Denise.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by sam on 2/14/2003 at 11:39:23 PM
contact Al Petri,And send photos of the wheels.If they can be repaired this is the person to do it.email is petribike@hotmail.com this is the Al Petri bike shop in Lincoln park Mi.good luck--sam

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by Denise on 2/17/2003 at 8:32:55 PM
Hi Sam,

Thanks for your reply, it's much appreciated, guess what had some great luck, managed to pick a second "Sunbeam Winkie" tricycle up today, at a Flea Market, wheels are good, and I might just get some extra parts of it also. I will keep the E.mail address of Al Petri, incase I need any extra bits!

Thanks once again,
Regards,
Denise.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by Denise on 2/17/2003 at 8:33:04 PM
Hi Sam,

Thanks for your reply, it's much appreciated, guess what had some great luck, managed to pick a second "Sunbeam Winkie" tricycle up today, at a Flea Market, wheels are good, and I might just get some extra parts of it also. I will keep the E.mail address of Al Petri, incase I need any extra bits!

Thanks once again,
Regards,
Denise.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sunbeam Winkie Childs Tricycle. posted by Denise on 2/17/2003 at 8:33:05 PM
Hi Sam,

Thanks for your reply, it's much appreciated, guess what had some great luck, managed to pick a second "Sunbeam Winkie" tricycle up today, at a Flea Market, wheels are good, and I might just get some extra parts of it also. I will keep the E.mail address of Al Petri, incase I need any extra bits!

Thanks once again,
Regards,
Denise.




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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Polishing aluminum posted by: Gralyn on 2/10/2003 at 8:30:11 PM
I polish the aluminum components (brakes, levers, stems, cranks, etc.) with aluminum polish (like Mother's Aluminum Polish) - stuff like that. It makes the parts shine like new. But after a while - especially in high moisture environment - they will oxidize again. I was wondering - could you spray the components with clear-coat after polishing them? Would this be a detrimental thing to do? Or, would it help protect the metal? I dont' know - but before I try something like that - I thought I would ask.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Polishing aluminum posted by Jeff R on 2/11/2003 at 12:50:21 PM
It will work for a while. Eventualy the clear coat will chip and the aluminum will oxidize and spread under the chip. Then you have to remove the clear coat, which requires a lot of polishing, and start over. I prefer to just keep polishing the aluminum when it needs it.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Polishing aluminum posted by JimW. on 2/24/2003 at 12:37:02 AM
I use Cape Cod metal polishing cloths to keep polished aluminum oxide free. It comes two cloths in a foil pouch.
Just wipe the cloth over the aluminum, then wipe the residue off with a clean dry cloth when it dries. This isn't as good as Mother's, Simichrome or other real polishing compounds, but it's easy and great for cleaning an already polished surface when it gets oxidized again.
It smells really good, too- kind of like bubble gum. Probably a bad idea for it to smell so yummy. I can just visualize some toddler sucking the polish out of the cloth.
I get it at my local hardware store.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   yellowed rubber mud flap posted by: Mike T on 2/5/2003 at 4:29:07 AM
I have a vintage mud flap for my 1957 J.C. Higgins. Overall it is in great shape ansd is still flexible. But it has turned yellow from age. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to get it white (or close to white) again? Thanks

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   yellowed rubber mud flap posted by Stacey on 2/5/2003 at 1:35:56 PM
You can try Bleech-White (sp). It's a white wall tire cleaner/rejeuvinator available in the auto parts store. Be carefull though to keep it away from Black rubber parts as it will tend to try and turn them white if left on too long




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   ? - how to keep grips from sliding on bars posted by: Brian on 2/3/2003 at 9:38:00 PM
I have Raleigh twenty grips on North Road handlebars & I'd like to get them to grip really well to the bars..they now slide a bit. One old trick I picked up over the years is to use hairspray (just areosol starch-no?) on the bar ends prior to installation of the grips. I'm looking for other tips from you other "pros" out there. I don't want to use anything that will screw up the grips (super glue-get real!)
as these older NOS bits are getting costly!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   ? - how to keep grips from sliding on bars posted by sam on 2/4/2003 at 10:34:40 PM
The only other trick I've heard of is an old motorcycle/BMx trick of using double stick tape.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   ? - how to keep grips from sliding on bars posted by Stacey on 2/5/2003 at 1:39:21 PM
Hairspray works great. As also does putting the grips on with soapy water. the secret to both is adequate drying time.

Then too there is a motorcycle product called "Gorrilla Grip" the MX guys swear by it!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   ? - how to keep grips from sliding on bars posted by Ron on 2/7/2003 at 9:20:41 AM
My father-in-law was an avid golfer and this is how they put golf club grips on: Wrap the club with grip tape (double sided tape). Plug the hole with a tee and pour a little grip solvent into the grip. Slosh it around so the inside is coated, then pour the excess out and slide the grip onto the club.
The solvent acts as a lubricant but it evaporates quickly, leaving a permanent bond. You can get the tape and solvent at golf shops.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Make of bike posted by: Schuyler Quackenbush on 2/2/2003 at 12:10:14 AM
I have an old track bike, but only know two things
-it has Airlight hubs
-the head badge has "London" on it (all else worn away)
Take a look at
www.audioresearchlabs.com/bicycles/

Any tips on how to identify the bike? I figure I need to at least do that before I start restoring it.

Thanks!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Make of bike posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 2/4/2003 at 12:57:50 AM
I fainted after looking at the bike, was revived and sat there studying this marvelous machine. I don't know who made it but there were not that many bike builders in London over the years so at least you can do a search based on where it was made. No small task nonetheless because there were a good amount anyways. At least it isn't going to be like looking through the whole country of Great Britain. The C.C.M. crank is a track type as this is a track bicycle from the rear dropouts. C.C.M. means Canada Cycle and Motor they were bought up by another company a few years back.
Try to get a list of old London based bicycle builders and look amongst their work to see if you recognize the lug work.
I would ask Bob Reid in England and view his 'Bob Reid's Flying Scot' page on the net.
There is a bit on Airlight hubs at the Cycles De Oro site.
Under Great Britain in the componets section.
Oh, those hubs, rims with long spoke nipples the whole bike is marvelous. That fork is special, I have seen similar forks of that style pattern on old Schwinns. This fork was selected by the builder because he really knew bikes!
I'd love to hear the story where you found this. Hilary Stone in England would know, ask Bob for Hilary's web address.Good Luck! This is a real gem.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   10-speed bikes 1970 -1979 models posted by: mark on 1/29/2003 at 4:29:10 PM
i am looking for information on a 10-speed kia mens bike.
and a 10-speed western flyer mens bike. if anyone knows a good website for 10- speed bikes.thank you!

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Bike info posted by: Tom on 1/28/2003 at 5:03:44 AM
I have my father-in-laws bike, I think itwas built around 1940 or so by the "Standard Cycle Products" of Toronto, Canada. I don't know where to begin looking for bits and pieces for this old bike. I don't know what color it was or what the decals look like. It's well rusted, but is in working order. ANy suggestions on where I should begin?

Tom

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Bike info posted by sam on 1/30/2003 at 11:07:45 PM
You might pull the fork and see what color it shows on the part hidden in the head tube--and grease the barrings too!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best leather conditioner? posted by: Sweet on 1/25/2003 at 12:17:59 AM
I found an old 1954 Raleigh "Robin Hood" at a thrift store. It has the original leather saddlebag. What is the best conditioner to use for the old leather. My first instinct is mink oil, but thought I'd get opinions first. Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

chris

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best leather conditioner? posted by sam on 1/25/2003 at 1:58:50 AM
The best is something you will have to make.One part lard.One part neat's foot oil.One part water.In a pan heat the water,add the oil and lard. remember I said to heat the water and add the oil NEVER heat the oil and add the water!!! brush this on the leather in side and out(some say to place in plastic bag over night) then buff shine/use Kiwi brand shoe polish for a good shine

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best leather conditioner? posted by sweet on 1/25/2003 at 4:05:16 PM
Sounds like it is worth a shot. One question though, what is and where would one find "neat's foot oil"? Haven't heard of that one before............

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best leather conditioner? posted by sam on 1/27/2003 at 12:10:06 AM
Just my spelling is really bad!maybe neetsfoot?Just ask for it where they sell leather goods.Saddle shop or store that sells baseball gloves.Just ask like it sounds and they should know what you need!--I just gotta learn to spell one of these days!! ---sam

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best leather conditioner? posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 2/4/2003 at 1:01:26 AM
What color is the bike?
1954 was a good year! I had a ladies Robin Hood in this awesome lilac color!
You did very well really! If it is in anything else than black you are even luckier.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   columbia posted by: jordan on 1/24/2003 at 6:32:55 PM
Is it worth restoring a 1950 columbia built? it was my dads when he was a kid it needs new paint and rechromed. is it really worth it? thanks, Jordan

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   columbia posted by sam on 1/25/2003 at 1:53:09 AM
Worth? we talkin money or pleasure? If you plan to make a lot of money best advise is to run!If the worth is in the pleasure of ridin your dad's old bike then I envy you.Take it slow.clean and grease maybe new tires to see how it rides.Have fun with it---sam




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Question about bottom brackets posted by: Tim on 1/21/2003 at 11:25:53 PM
Are the bottom brackets for 26" bikes of today the same as ones for a 1950's schwinn?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Question about bottom brackets posted by Wings on 1/29/2003 at 9:19:00 AM
I have never tried to put one in a BMX bike or another bike that used the larger style bottom bracket. I would say they are -- but only guessing. The size is very close.

If you are looking to replace the bottom bracket assmembly in an old Schwinn I would suggest finding another Schwinn (Girls frame as they are hardly ever ridden) and transfer the entire assembly to your Schwinn.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1950's schwinns - frame material posted by: Tim on 1/20/2003 at 10:01:54 PM
This may sound dumb, but are the old cruiser frames from Schwinn made of steel or aluminum? Are the tubes butted or anything to lighten them or are they straight gauge?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1950's schwinns - frame material posted by MNSmith on 1/20/2003 at 10:56:54 PM
Steel. Made from formed straight stock. Look inside various tubes and you will see seams.

www.bunchobikes.com

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1950's schwinns - frame material posted by Wings on 1/29/2003 at 9:20:21 AM
Steel and they are heavy!

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