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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††tricycle tires posted by: Dennis on 7/7/2002 at 9:47:40 PM
Can someone assist? I am restoring an old tricycle for a book I am writing, and I need the hard rubber tires. Does anyone know a source on these? I am willing to list the source as a supplier in the index of the book. My deadline looms closer, so the sooner the better. Thanks and I share all of your enthusiasm for bicycles as I have at least 20!
Sincerely, Dennis www.dennisdavidauto.com

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††tricycle tires posted by Joel on 7/9/2002 at 9:44:30 PM
Memory Lane Classics lists some in their catalog.

††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††tricycle tires posted by sam on 7/11/2002 at 1:31:29 AM
Some sizes of these are very common and can be found at most hardwear stores.Or try Northern tools.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Rust Removal posted by: Jon on 6/30/2002 at 3:23:09 AM
I found the easiest method for removing rust from chrome is wire wheel cleaner from the local auto store(it contains phosphoric and hydrochloric acid). Spray it on, let set for a minute, then scrub with a small brass wire brush from the hardware store. The brass brush won't damage the chrome. Flush with water to neutralize. Repeat if necessary. Then polish. Wear gloves, glasses and old clothes as these acids can be pretty nasty if you're not careful.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††bondo posted by: shorty on 6/22/2002 at 12:16:28 AM
c'mon guys all i am asking is the steps to costomize my lowrider with bondo i really want an answare soon if you know how tell me pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeezzzzzzzzzz

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††bondo posted by sam on 6/24/2002 at 1:37:43 AM
That's a pretty easy answer.The less you use the better.And I'm not being smart here that's the real answer.No matter how wild your kustom will be , use as little as it takes to do what you want done.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††bondo posted by: shorty on 6/22/2002 at 12:16:28 AM
c'mon guys all i am asking is the steps to costomize my lowrider with bondo i really want an answare soon if you know how tell me pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeezzzzzzzzzz

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††rocket ray posted by: Bob on 6/19/2002 at 7:46:47 PM
I see there is a "super rocket ray" light on ebay, the question is, if I am restoring a 1950 Hornet, should I stay with the normal rocket ray or would the "super" nos light add to or distract from the value after restoration? And while I am on the subject, should I stay with nos parts altogether?
Bob
Bob

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††rocket ray posted by MNSmith on 6/20/2002 at 9:06:56 AM
Well, the regular Rocket Ray would be correct for a restoration. So would NOS parts.

Are you going for original correctness, period correctness or just a quickie cleanup?

www.bunchobikes.com




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††bondo posted by: paco on 6/19/2002 at 12:13:25 AM
i want to know in steps how to costo mize my low rider with bondo

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††rivet removal posted by: Bob on 6/17/2002 at 5:50:09 PM
What is the best way to remove/replace rivets on fender braces? I am trying to remove them from a 1950 Schwinn Hornet.
Thanks

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††rivet removal posted by MNSmith on 6/17/2002 at 6:50:56 PM
I usually use a drill with an 1/8" bit from the back side. I remove just enough material to get the rivet loose. I don't drill all the way through.

As far as replacement, you will need a tubular rivet setting tool to replace with new rivets. You can use the threaded type of replacement rivets ( a bolt with a smooth rivet head ) which are available from various sources. Either way, there is no way to save the old rivets when doing a proper fender restoration.

www.bunchobikes.com




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Skip Tooth chains posted by: Cory on 6/13/2002 at 5:40:47 PM
I just bought an old Firestone Pilot, and it has skip tooth chainrings. Anyone reccomend a good source for a chain? I was told it was a 1951, but I thought skip tooths were pre-war. Any help?

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Skip Tooth chains posted by sam on 6/13/2002 at 10:08:38 PM
Memory Lane has it.Ph419-832-3040.(thay cost big time)ebay for used ones.

††††††††††RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Skip Tooth chains posted by Chris on 6/16/2002 at 5:04:04 PM
Diamond chain company is still in business, go to them directly and ask about inch pitch chain.

††††††††††Skip Tooth chains posted by Cory on 6/17/2002 at 10:13:41 PM
Memory Lane sold me a used one.....


Thanks for the replies.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Decal Removal posted by: Serge on 6/13/2002 at 2:38:10 PM
Anybody out there have any tips on removing decals without destroying the underlying paint? I am working on an early eighties Fuji Touring Series with dinged up decals, but otherwise excellent paint. Thanks!

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Decal Removal posted by elroy on 7/14/2002 at 8:43:03 PM
Here's a great way of removing decals. Grab an ordinary pistol type hair dryer and warm up the decal. Using a plastic wedge tool or your finger nail begin to free up the edge of the decal while directing the heat from the dryer to the area of the decal. Try to keep the entire length of the decal warm at all times.
Don't overheat the decal and bubble the paint!

††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Decal Removal posted by elroy on 7/14/2002 at 9:05:53 PM
PS. After you've removed the decal from the frame there will probably be a certain amount of gummy-gooey stickum you'll need to remove too. The best way to remove this is to use a laquer base paint thinner and a rag. Saturate the rag with thinner and rub the areas of goo until the goo is gone. Afterwards, rinse with H2o and then use wax to bring out the painted surface. If you're anal (like me!) after removing the goo from the frame use a fine-cut polish (Use Meguiar's Fine Cut Cleaner!) and polish the area where you removed the decal, then apply Meguiar's wax!
Additionally, if your bike is worth the effort of restoring, I recommend using Meguiar's Fine Cut Cleaner on the entire painted portions of the frame. The cleaner WILL clean off the dead pigment so that when you apply the wax you're guaranteed the deepest shine and max luster!
What the hell, as long as I've gone this far, if you really want your bike to sparkle like a diamond after waxing it, go out and get yourself a bottle of "Klasse" paint sealer.
After you've polished and waxed, then apply Klasse for the ultimate shine!
Klasse WILL blow you away, outside of re-painting, the method I've recommended WILL make your bike a thing of beauty! Klasse is usually available at automotive dealerships like Lexus, Mercedes Benz, Porsche etc. Do a search on Google.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††I Need Help posted by: Jimmy Bowman Jr on 6/10/2002 at 9:33:34 PM
I am trying to restor a 1960s Murray Bicycle 3 speed

am looking for factory replacement weels for the arrigional ive had them on there since the bike was new and was wondering were i could find some

reproduction or factory
my old ones are starting to dryrott

HELP!!!!

Jimmy Bowmna

please email me with sugsestions at jrsbow@bellsouth.net

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††I Need Help posted by Former posts had same question on 6/15/2002 at 1:48:22 AM
http://oldroads.com/d_rst_ra.asp?OQID=935&QuestionNum=935&RID=0

††††††††††RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:†††I Need Help posted by Mark on 6/15/2002 at 1:50:18 AM
Sorry, this was meant for removing decal question above




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Repainting my favorite balloon bicycle posted by: Jeff on 5/30/2002 at 5:50:57 PM
Hi Folks,

I want to repaint my old friend, my favorite balloon tire bicycle. The original paint job is quite thin. I would like to remove the paint myself and get it down to bare metal. If I sand it, can someone tell me the grades of sand paper I should start and end with. My biggest concern is how to remove the paint from the welds joining each steel tube. Would paint remover work better then sanding and if so will it cause any damage to the welds? Thanks all for any help you can give me. I'd like to try my hand at this stripping process and I'm just learning.

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Repainting my favorite balloon bicycle posted by MNSmith on 5/30/2002 at 9:42:47 PM
Hey Jeff, My website might just be right up your alley. I am currently working on a Phantom that had to be stripped and painted. I also have a "Repair and Restoration" section that addresses bearings and such. Stop by and visit and if you have anymore questions, feel free to ask!

www.bunchobikes.com

††††††††††RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Repainting my favorite balloon bicycle posted by Jeff on 5/31/2002 at 7:11:24 PM
Hello my friend,

Well, I have to tell you that your website is really a wealth of information. And the bikes! You know which one really catches my eye? The Schwinn 1955 Cycletruck. Brother do I love that bike! Thanks for the response and for pointing me to your site. Some really nice work there.

††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Repainting my favorite balloon bicycle posted by Bob on 6/11/2002 at 5:35:28 PM
Howdy!
I just rebuilt my 1960's Huffy. I took it apart and had a local sandblaster remove the paint. A once over with scotchbrite to remove the fuzz and it was ready for primer. Cost about $20.00 and saves a lot of time.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Silver King Tube Re-glue posted by: Jay on 5/30/2002 at 3:23:59 AM
One of the tubes on my '35? Silver King frame has come loose.
Tried squirting some epoxy in there through the head tube with no luck. Any ideas?

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Silver King Tube Re-glue posted by sam on 6/2/2002 at 3:23:09 AM
Silver Kings tubs were held together with wedges,just like the wedge that holds the handlebar gooseneck in.You'll have to look inside the head tub or BB to find the head of the bolt.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Fuji Touring series IV posted by: Mark on 5/30/2002 at 12:12:15 AM
Hello,

I have a mid '80s Fuji Touring Series IV. That I purchased almost new. (it was a theft recovery)
I love this bike but haven't ridden for 10 years or so. The bike has a damaged fork. The part that goes into the head tube is not straight (Don't ask :)I would like to replace the fork and get it back on the road.
It has a 56 frame and 27" wheels.
Can you help?

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:†††NEW WAY ON RIM POLISHING posted by: Kurtz Weilzmann - Germany on 5/27/2002 at 6:33:04 PM
Hy pals, I discovered a new way for to polish rims, it consists in rub firmly with a piece of cloth the rim after passes a depth surface of car polishing wax above the rim surface...

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Damn dirty paint! posted by: seany boy on 5/27/2002 at 4:22:16 AM
I've just spent months lovingly repainting my '47 Monark Super Deluxe frame. I removed all the rust and filled the pits with glazing putty. Then I used primer surfacer, several coats of primer, and primer sealer. I used a good quality lacquer and sanded between coats. But now every little ding I make when putting it back together results in massive gouges and chips. Just putting the rear fender in place took out two chunks. What have I done wrong, and how can I fix it?!

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††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Damn dirty paint! posted by A Friend on 5/28/2002 at 2:30:52 AM
Seany Boy,
Thats good hear you attempting your own prodject. Thats how we learn. So I am writing too you give you some constructive advise. First of all, "you can not" use glazing putty on bare metal areas where rust once was. You must clean and blow dry area real good, and rough up the area in question with 36 grit sandpaper and use a little bondo in these pits. Then lightly sand and blow off any residue. Then Primer your area. Like I have told people in prior posts use a giuld coat. Meaning if you use a red oxide primer; then you lightly dust coat a grey color primer too make it look like a speckled trout, if you get what i'm talking about. Then wet sand your primer, and what will happen is; you will see the remains of your guild coat where filling is nessesary. NOW use your glazing putty. Remember! don't thin your pimer too thin, and don't do fast passes with your appling of primer. Remember your building a new foundation. If its too thin your throwing away your hard earned money. Before you even put primer, or paint on any parts, build your bike first in the rough form and correct and make any adjustments at this stage of restoration. This way your not trying too fix this and that when the bike is already painted. Good luck too you.

††††††††††RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Damn dirty paint! posted by sam on 5/28/2002 at 3:35:18 AM
A Friend,arn't you suppose to shoot etching primer before using bondo to seal the metal from the bondo?(bondo absorbs water)I try to use body solder as much as possible.Funny how I never thought of pre-fitting the bike before final paint--thinks for that tip,It will surly help me a lot--sam

††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Damn dirty paint! posted by Seany Boy on 5/28/2002 at 8:35:48 PM
Thanks for the tips. I actually used bondo on some of the larger holes, and applied the putty only after the primer sealer and a coat of primer.

My problem seems to be more that the lacquer is too soft. I can scratch it with my fingernail!! Is there perhaps a certain amount of time that the paint needs to cure? It's been on there a couple weeks now. Should I use a clear coat?

††††††††††RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Damn dirty paint! posted by A Friend on 5/28/2002 at 8:36:27 PM
Your right Sam, You can use the material you just talked about. Or you can do it the economic way; buy a can of oven cleaner and spray the bare metal, and let it sit for one minuite and hose it off with a garden hose. This is a mild acid wash also, too bare metal. In other words this is also etching the metal. Then take a SOS SOAP PAD and wash the parts real good! and rince and blow dry off. Take a "CLEAN RAG" and soak it with LAQUER THINNER, and wipe down the parts real good. Blow out the orfuses with compressed air. This way you don't have water drips while spraying your choice of primer. Or you can allow it too sun dry so the water can evaporate. What I try too do is give alternitive ways of approaching a situation with new people when it comes too doing things with the least amount of dollors and cents. And get the same results from using expensive materials. I hope I cleared this up. Thanks Sam for your constructive comments. This is what positive posting is all about. People helping one another.

††††††††††RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Damn dirty paint! posted by steve on 5/30/2002 at 3:14:32 PM
I had the same experience using LAQUER paint. I switched to ENAMEL and havn't had a problem since.

††††††††††RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:†††Damn dirty paint! posted by Joel on 5/31/2002 at 2:20:38 PM
Did you allow time for the paint to cure before assembling?

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