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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   No Name Bike posted by: Carl Trainer on 5/17/2009 at 8:38:37 AM
Found a Ladies' old Bike, in neighbour trash. No decals, no brand name, no head stamp, no name or model #. Tires still inflate, paint & chrome OK, no rust, except on rims, 26 X 1 3/8. Rear axle showing Sturmey-Archer 5-speed Derailleur, chain & front sprocket in good condition. Need to identify to restore. Currently gear shifter not working & whole front brake group missing. Have been through this website already, thanks.

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   emergency tire repair posted by: mike on 5/10/2009 at 5:09:07 PM
large cuts in tires aren't as frequent as they used to be when roads were littered with discarded glass bottle chunks & shards, but a blowout from whatever cause can still ruin your day. fiber - reinforced packing tape, (in 3/4 " strips)can be used for an emergency fix, is cheaper, easier to carry and if done right rides better than a boot. lay the strips over the hole overlapping somewhat, aligning with the body fibers. leave a VERY slight gap between tape and the inside of the tire so that the tape , not the damaged section takes the strain. (too much gap and the tire will ride with a noticeable bump) for large holes ,use additional strips running crosswise over the first layer. the tape should protrude just beyond the bead / rim joint; adhesive alone won't hold; trim as needed,( maybe with the same piece of glass that bit your tire ). for small 1/4 to 1/2 " slices, i've had such patches last for the remaining life of the tire - tho i don't recommend it; the edges of the tape and/or adhesive can cause surface cracks and eventual leaks in the tube after a few months or a year. if you must use up the tire rotate it relative to the tube every month or so to preclude this type of damage. i pre-cut a number of strips,fold over the ends for easy removal and wrap around some part of handlebar or frame where they aren't in the way. cover with a layer of electric tape as sunlight quickly degrades tape and adhesive; check every 6 months or so to make sure they will still peel easily; also check your tube of patching glue to make sure it isn't drying out.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   easier freewheele removal posted by: mike on 5/10/2009 at 4:16:45 PM
old threaded freewheels, after maybe years of torquing can be difficult to unscrew without damage to the hub, spokes or freewheel itself. after many years of experimenting with various lubes,tapes, anti-seize compounds, etc i tried the opposite approach; make it harder for the freewheel to work itself tighter & tighter onto the hub. after cleaning both pieces use loctite LIGHT DUTY threadlocker (light blue), enough to completely fill the threads. then snug the freewheel onto the hub with the wrench; not too tight, just until it binds. for best effect don't use immediately; let the loctite cure for the recommended time before riding.
to remove, heat the freewheel with small torch or electric heat gun until a drop of water on the hub flange will boil immediately. (before heating loosen one cone slightly to prevent the expanding hub from possibly damaging the bearings) - this is usually plenty of heat to soften this type of loctite and the 'wheel can be removed with only a little more torque than you used to seat it.
if the retaining ring / cup on the bottom bracket is worn or tends to work loose, loctite green helps here; clean threads thoroughly with solvent first. assemble with proper bearing fit, then apply the loctite to joints; this is a wicking material and will readily flow in and fill the threads. as before heat (takes more than above) until the compound softens, unscrew ring & cup. you may find this a useful alternative to using extreme torque to insure that the cup(s) dont work loose.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Cleveland Welding posted by: Dawn on 5/7/2009 at 8:19:19 PM
have a bike that in the frame is embossed with the information "Cleveland Welding" the numbers "C134" and the date of "9-11-54". On the steering head it says it's a Roadmaster AMF. What have I got and am looking to put fenders on it. This is an unusual frame,it is one piece of flatstock steel, it has a girder front end on it and I've never seen another one. thanks

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Bendix 76 Assembly posted by: Scott Fagerstrom on 5/5/2009 at 6:42:11 PM
I have purchased 4 used Bendix for parts. I am ready to reassemble, but I don't know how much of it needs to be lubed besides the bearings. Any ideas? No rush or anything, but I need to get it done by this weekend.
Thanks

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Bendix 76 Assembly posted by ken on 5/15/2009 at 10:30:57 AM
Scott, sorry I'm after your deadline- you can and should grease everything you can find in that hub shell. Check the Park Tool website to get more details.




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RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   Stingray Junior posted by: naburris on 5/5/2009 at 6:11:47 PM
Is it possible to reupholster the saddle on one of these bikes?

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Stingray Junior posted by: naburris on 5/5/2009 at 6:02:55 PM
Looking for replacement tires for a Stingray Junior that I am restoring for my grandson. Ideas on where to look greatly accepted.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   dyno lux posted by: Dave on 4/24/2009 at 1:43:37 PM
HI, I am restoring an old raleigh into an autocycle and want to put a dyno luxe onto it fror lighting and need to know a bit of info like how is it wired? the old batterys are dead what do i replace them with? what amps should the dynamo be to power it ? Thankyou... Dave

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Vintage Sears Ted Williams 3 Wheeler posted by: burlesonbill on 4/22/2009 at 7:45:28 PM
Hello, I have acquired a vinatge Sears Ted Williams trike in blue, mostly there, still rides but very rough. I'm trying to do at least a "rideable" restoration and could really use an original manual or factory diagram. Can anyone either provide me with one (will gladly pay for copies and postage) or point me to a source for these?

Bill

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Vintage Sears Ted Williams 3 Wheeler posted by Jeff on 5/10/2009 at 6:34:07 PM
Hello Bill, I also have a vintage Sears Ted Williams trike. Mine is powder blue and yes, does ride very rough. I'd like to know how many yeras and what years these were produced.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   CAMPY gran sport crank posted by: nick on 4/22/2009 at 1:56:05 PM
I need chainring bolts for a Campagnolo Gran Sport 3-pin crank (1970's). Thanks for any assistance you can offer. nick

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   CAMPY gran sport crank posted by David on 11/3/2009 at 6:34:59 AM
I wouldn't be surprised if the GS uses the same chainring bolts as the 5-arm cranks. Check the old catalogs at www.campyonly.com and see if they're the same part. Probably generic chainring bolts will serve, too.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cant somebody help me find parts posted by: Justin Kaser on 4/22/2009 at 9:18:48 AM
I have aquired matching his/hers/ Huffy Silver jet bicycles. These bikes have a two head light system in the front and a horn in the tank. Can anyone tell me where to find replacement horns or lights for these?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cant somebody help me find parts posted by Dee on 6/6/2009 at 5:00:18 PM
I have a womens silver jet with all parts in good condition. Would u sell the men's bike by any chance?

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cant somebody help me find parts posted by Julie on 2/24/2010 at 4:00:49 AM
Hi, I have men's Silver Jet. It needs some work but not in bad shape. If interested, let me know, will send pictures.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   pre war seatpost / seat clamp posted by: brian on 4/17/2009 at 1:51:28 PM
i recently bought a prewar frame that has a seat post diameter of 5/8 inch. what is the best solution to get a new seat clamp onto a seatpost to fit the frame. i am having difficulty finding seatclamps to fit. a seat post came with it but it is shaped like an 'L'.

this is the first prewar bike i've worked on so any help is appreciated.

i was told it is an elgin frame, but i dont know for sure.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Huffy "Good Vibrations" USA posted by: Kelly on 4/15/2009 at 3:32:04 PM
Hi There! My dad recently gave me an old bicycle but..I don't know much about it. I do know it's a 16" girls Huffy "Good Vibrations" USA with what I believe is the serial # HC5608808. Where do I begin to find Parts etc to restore what needs restoring on this bicycle. I just adore it but...I wish I knew when it was made and it also is missing a rear fender :( and needs some tlc. ANY INFO anyone can help me with to point me in the right direction to the Year and where to gets parts etc would be of GREAT HELP to me. THANKS SO MUCH!! A new, old bike enthusiast,LOL. ;)

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Huffy posted by jj on 4/16/2009 at 3:29:54 AM
Lots of info on them in the archives here.




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Replace Schwinn Town & Country Wheels?? posted by: Allison on 4/6/2009 at 6:31:11 PM
I have 2 Schwinn Town and Country Tri-Wheelers (a 1974 and a 1975) and I was wondering if it would be possible to replace the original wheels. I've replaced the tubes a few times (which is a huge pain since the wheels don't come off), but the tires are just so old they just go flat in a couple of days. I'd really like to get rid of the originals and get some fatter, beach-cruiser type tires instead but I don't even know if it's possible. Has anyone ever done this and. if so, how hard was it and were you happy with the results?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Replace Schwinn Town & Country Wheels?? posted by fran on 4/7/2009 at 5:17:48 AM
Being a Scwhinn of that era, it is going to take Schwinn's special-sized tires.
Unfortunately, your only choice is bew tires of the same size.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Abandoned Bicycle Built For Two posted by: Lesley Ward on 3/23/2009 at 6:29:58 PM
I have an old bicycle built for two.  I want to restore it and have no idea where to start.  I know I need new tires, but there's rust on the handle bars and it will need to be repainted.  What materials do I use and what are the steps? 

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Abandoned Bicycle Built For Two posted by jj on 3/24/2009 at 3:43:38 AM
Welcome to the hobby.
Check out the Step-by-Step restoration tips under the "Technical Resources" section above, and also check out the "Before and After" pictures from the Cleaning Kit sold here under "For Sale" above.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Abandoned Bicycle Built For Two posted by ken on 3/24/2009 at 1:48:40 PM
In some cases painting can hurt value. Does "old" mean pre-1980, or pre-1930? Don't rush into anything until you know what you have. Cleaning and lubricating are always a good idea. Take pictures.

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