OldRoads.com > Discuss: Restoration
Discuss: Restoration Tips Scroll Down For Messages



NOTICE

I'm selling the OldRoads.com website.

I started the site in 1995 and sold my retail shop in April of this year.

I'm retiring from the bike business.

Here's a link to the eBay auction:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/122248859390

Vinny


All pictures and text in these pages are (c)2010 Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm) and may not be used in any form without written permission from Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm).

Search 18 years of ARCHIVES:  


Disclaimer:
Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc. has set up this discussion area for the sharing of vintage and custom bicycle information. Anyone may add their opinions to this forum, as long as they follow the rules outlined below. We are not responsible for incorrect or misleading advise which may appear here.

RULES:

All pictures and text in these pages are (c)2010 Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm) and may not be used in any form without written permission from Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc.(tm).


See the BEFORE and AFTER pictures:
  
  It's what we use every day!

Vintage Bicycle Discussion Area

Restoration Tips

Post a new topic, or click an existing topic below:




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1939 Shelby ? posted by: Jack Bennie on 3/4/2002 at 12:16:44 AM
We just acquired what we think is a 1939 Shelby. It has a Western Flyer badge on the front fender. It is a girls bike. We saw pictures on the internet that makes us believe it is 1939. If anyone has any tips for restoring this bike (original paint color, etc.) please contact us. The paint is faded, but it looks like Royal Blue and a pale yellow. All help would be appreciated. Please email or post here. janben@hyperhog.net

Thanks a lot.

Jack Bennie

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1939 Shelby ? posted by Joel on 3/4/2002 at 5:47:35 PM
To match the colors, try to find a place where the paint was protected (fork steer tube, inside BB, under chainguard, fenders,badge...). It could be a very valuable bike so do your homework and restore it properly. Try the picture database at Nostalgic.net for photos.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1939 Shelby ? posted by sam on 3/8/2002 at 2:15:20 AM
Be sure to look at the Dayton/Huffman bikes too. Shelby and Daytons looked a lot alike.And huffman made Western Flyer bikes at that time too.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1939 Shelby ? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/29/2002 at 10:20:38 PM
Wald made a wide variety of repair parts. Schwinn, Shelby, new departure parts. hub cones for Schwinn, ball bearing retainers, axles, pedal striped? they sold a kit to fix it! Yellow tags, with plastic bags holding parts. All sorts of bit parts. I hit a casche of old parts and whats so cool is it's in cute little labeled bags.




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   No Steel Wool!!! posted by: PaulO on 2/27/2002 at 3:42:34 PM
Just a reminder. DO NOT USE STEEL WOOL!!! Use soft copper or bronze wool on chrome. Steel wool will scratch chrome, and the microscopic bits of steel will rust in the chrome.

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Black Phanton posted by: Shamas on 2/26/2002 at 7:08:28 PM
Restoring a '52 Schwinn Black Phantom. Anybody got a paint number for the red on the frame and chainguard? Thanx

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   peugeot 20" posted by: adam on 2/17/2002 at 11:44:38 AM
hey there, i picked up an old peugeot bike. the frame has a removeable bar to make it a girls bike or a guys bike(i think) it doesnt have a name or anything... except for the peugeot badge, some stickers, and a logo with french flags etc on it. if you could point me to a page or a similar fram that would be a great help.
thanks

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1920's Troxel leather seat. posted by: Jes on 2/15/2002 at 10:08:48 PM
I recently bought a very nice Troxel bycicle seat from the 1920's. The leather has minor crackings but it looks like "paper", I mean the leather is hard and dry.
I would like to know what can I do to help this leather to get soft. I don't pretend to sit on it but will like to prevent from serious cracking and preserve it for a long time.
Somebody told me I should rub some oil on it, but I don't want to do anything that can damage that ancient leather.
Any helping tips will be highly appreciated.

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1920's Troxel leather seat. posted by sam on 2/16/2002 at 2:34:03 AM
What the leather needs is water.But if you just put water on it it will only make it worse.You need water,lard,and neetsfoot oil.Put the water and oil together.Then heat to a boil and add lard.let cool but not cold and brush on leather.And remember do not heat the oil and add water!--sam

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1920's Troxel leather seat. posted by Jes on 2/22/2002 at 2:30:54 PM
Thanks Sam. I will do it as you explain and I really hope I can preserve this beautiful seat.
Than you again.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1920's Troxel leather seat. posted by paul viner on 3/22/2002 at 2:08:32 AM
i dont know if this product is available in the u.s.a but it is the best for anything leather,it is called R.M WILLIAMS LEATHER SADDLE DRESSING. it smells wonderful and is really cheap. i have used it for over 20 years and i still wear belts from then.the process of tanning leather is quite destructive because it actually draws all the good oils out of it.if that product is not available go to your local tannery [smaller the better] and ask for a tub of leather fat. its the crud that they pull out of the leather.just smear it on to your saddle and work it in then wipe the excess off. dont dry it in the sun if you need to know any more just email me




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   bondo posted by: charles on 2/12/2002 at 12:20:46 PM
hello im building my first lowrider bike and need to know how to bondo it can someone give me tips and instructions or a web site that might help me out.

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   bondo posted by JimW. on 2/14/2002 at 10:19:37 PM
There are some pretty decent instructions for doing a bondo tank at: http://www.lowrideronline.com/articles/how_tos/bondo_your_bike.htm




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best stuff for removing stickers/decals??? posted by: tyler on 1/29/2002 at 11:24:38 PM
hi all,

i've got an aluminum frame...i've removed decals and want to get rid of the "sticky stuff" from the frame. what's the easiest/most effective way of doing this???

thanks for your help.

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best stuff for removing stickers/decals??? posted by Stacey on 1/30/2002 at 11:38:25 PM
Lighter fluid works well, you can also try a product called Glu-B-Gone, though I've had no experience with it.

In the wind,
Stacey

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best stuff for removing stickers/decals??? posted by sam on 2/3/2002 at 2:05:48 AM
Stacy, don't tell anyone but I use finger nail polish remover!---sam

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best stuff for removing stickers/decals??? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/3/2002 at 6:14:31 PM
There's a thingie that you chuck on a drill and it removes decals without hurting the paintwork. Hardware store.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best stuff for removing stickers/decals??? posted by mtlhed on 2/19/2002 at 12:13:06 AM
glu-b-gone works great

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best stuff for removing stickers/decals??? posted by mtlhed on 2/21/2002 at 7:08:13 PM
i did this just the other day. I used a product called goof off, and it seems to work pretty good.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best stuff for removing stickers/decals??? posted by paul viner on 3/22/2002 at 2:11:19 AM
eucalyptus oil is the safest and cheapest and it evaporates

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   best stuff for removing stickers/decals??? posted by darryl on 3/25/2002 at 3:00:57 AM
Remove the sticky stuff with FORMULA 409 DEGREASER.




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   help with taking apart schwin speedo posted by: john on 1/27/2002 at 8:48:34 AM
hello
need to get a speedo working again, body is in great shape. i f' ed up another speedo body by not taking it apart correctly. i don't want to butcher this one. any tips?
thanks
john

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cottered Cranks posted by: Bryant on 1/24/2002 at 12:44:50 PM
I'm fixing up a 1976 Raleigh Space Rider and am having trouble trying to get the cotter pins out of the crank. I don't want to smack it too hard for fear of bending them. Any ideas??

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Cottered Cranks posted by sam on 1/27/2002 at 2:57:28 AM
They make a tool for this job and it's the right way to go..............but if no body is lookin you can use a socket and a large "C" clamp----sam




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Aluminim Alloy Parts - Polish and Pitting posted by: Gralyn on 1/22/2002 at 9:26:38 PM
I get some aluminum alloy parts...stems, cranks, etc....and they clean-up beautifully with Mother's Aluminum Polish. But when the metal becomes oxidized badly enough....where there's little bumps of rust showing-up....I can't get it to polish. What should I do? A very fine sand paper?...then more fine paper...then polish....or is there anything I can do?

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Aluminim Alloy Parts - Polish and Pitting posted by sam on 1/23/2002 at 4:08:22 AM
Sears sells a buffing wheel that replaces the grindstone on a shop style grinder ,and buffing compound.Be carful if you use one they spin really fast and can cause the part to go flying!But you can do more in 15 min.than all day of rubbin--sam

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Aluminim Alloy Parts - Polish and Pitting posted by Gralyn on 1/23/2002 at 9:11:12 PM
I wonder if a Dremmel tool will work? With the right attachment....Most of what I am working with is small anyway. Like brakes, brake levers, stems - the biggest thing would be the crank arms. I will look into it. The rubbing gets old....and then - there is nothing to show for it in the end. Like I said...if the oxidation isn't bad....the parts polish up beautifully and easily.

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Aluminim Alloy Parts - Polish and Pitting posted by JimW. on 1/24/2002 at 6:17:41 AM
I'd recommend wet-or-dry sandpaper. Hit the bump or whatever with wet 220-grit, then proceed with 400 through 800 grits, 1000 if you can find it. After 800 or 1000, it will polish up beautifully. It really doesn't take a long time, doing it in sequence this way. 220 is fast on aluminum. I wouldn't recommend using a dremel. There's nothing you can chuck into a dremel except a polishing pad that won't leave it in worse shape than the existing corrosion. (It's impossible to sand out gouges, which is what you'll get with the dremel.)

          RE:RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Aluminim Alloy Parts - Polish and Pitting posted by sam on 1/27/2002 at 2:54:17 AM
I agree,Jim,Gouges are hard to get rid of.Had an alum. stem with a nice Gouge in it ,I used jewelers file then the wet / dry and finaly buffed it for hours--got most of it!




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Dealing with rust posted by: Dick on 1/22/2002 at 2:09:55 AM
For some insight on dealing with with rust when restoring vintage bikes, we can learn alot from auto restores. I found this website while looking for rust removal methods/products: http://www.restoration-resources.com/RestorationTips.htm

  Replies:



[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Early 50's Raleigh Sports posted by: Dick on 1/13/2002 at 6:14:02 AM
I'd like to get in touch with someone that has an early 50's mens Raleigh Sports bike. i am restoring one and have a few questions about the paint scheme especially the gold striping as the original striping on mine is barely visible.

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Early 50's Raleigh Sports posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 1/15/2002 at 12:49:21 AM
There is a company called Buegler in the U.S. and they make a tool that has a little wheel that the paint goes onto and you use that tool. You have to set it for the right size pin striping or as it is properly called "box lining"

Go the the "Nick at LLoyds" website and look all thru it and have yourself a chat with Nick Tithecloth. He is the man! Especially for decals! I have several of these bikes and another fellow here is Edward from Vancouver who did a Raleigh Supurbe which is very similar. Go to the roadsters section and keep going backward and backward until,you see something he wrote and e- mail him. Similar exploded diagrams are here covering your bike under resources section. Raleigh, Humber, Rudge resources




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Filling rust pits posted by: parsimony on 1/10/2002 at 1:19:14 AM
I've stripped all the house paint off my Super Deluxe frame, and I'm removing the rust. However, there are lots of little pits where the previous owner had removed rust, as well as some actual holes in the tube that had been filled with some kind of putty. I've been filling the small pits with Bondo glazing putty, but it seems really chalky and not very substantial. Is there a better product for this, or will it be okay once I get some primer on it?

I have Bondo body filler (the kidn with activator) to fill the holes. Should I just use this for the pits as well?

Note: Bondo rust remover did nothing to remove the rust. I still had to get it off the old-fashioned way--sandpaper and a whole lot of elbow grease. I would recommend not using this product.

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Filling rust pits posted by JimW. on 1/10/2002 at 4:14:32 AM
For the sort of little pits you are describing, I'd recommend that you use primer spot putty after the frame has been primered. Also called "glazing" putty, it is made for this sort of use. Simply swipe it over the pits with a plastic squeegee blade. It sets up pretty quickly, and sands easily. You will probably want to apply more primer after you've done the sanding. You may need to apply it in certain areas again, after you see the surface primed again.
The putty is made by 3M and many other sources, and may be found any place that sells Bondo and other auto paint supplies.




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   Seat clamp came off!! posted by: parsimony on 1/10/2002 at 1:15:27 AM
I've been cleaning up my Monark Super Deluxe, getting the rust off, etc. I was trying to clean up under the seat clamp (and applied too much pressure I guess) and the durned thing started to actually come off of the post! The welding spot was very weak apparently. Any suggestions for putting the clamp back on without a welding torch or soldering iron?

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   Seat clamp came off!! posted by Doug on 1/15/2002 at 11:05:20 PM
Find a auto body shop that is into custom work I only say that any body shop can do it but the customizers understand us restorers better,They will have a MIG welder or a wire feed if you prefer which would be able to fix that in a jiffy if the metal is not rusted through and such probably get it fixed very cheaply will take longer to unload it from the car than the repair.




[X]  Report inappropriate messages
............................................................

RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What's the most valuable bike to restore? posted by: Jes on 1/9/2002 at 9:50:13 PM
Hi,
I would like to start a ballon tire bicycle restoration project and I'm wondering what's the most (or one of them) valuable bike to restore. I want to invest in a bike that worth the time (and money of course) that I will invest on it.
I was told I should restore a stright bar motobike like the Iver Johnson or the Mead Ranger, but could those bikes worth more than a classic ballon tire?
I really need to know cause I don't want to spend my money I prefer to invest it instead.
Any comment will be highly appreciated.
Thanks,

  Replies:
          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What's the most valuable bike to restore? posted by MNSmith on 1/10/2002 at 3:47:27 AM
A Schwinn Aerocycle would be up there I would say. Maybe a Bowden Spacelander? How about the Indian that Dave at Nostalgic.net was selling? Finding some of these bikes would present their own set of problems!!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What's the most valuable bike to restore? posted by JimW. on 1/10/2002 at 4:37:47 AM
If you've never restored an old bike before, I'd suggest that you tackle one at the lower end of the price scale.
If you spend a lot of money buying a marginally restorable classic, then screw it up, you're throwing money away, as it'll be worth less than before you started messing with it. If you buy a basket case lower tier bike and do a so-so job on it, it will probably be worth more than you paid for it. Gordon T. Bradbury is a good source for starter restorations, as well as the higher-end balloon-tire machines. You can see some of his raw material bikes at: http://bikerodnkustom.homestead.com/gordon.html
His E-mail address is there, also. Be advised that there's a lot of work and parts scrounging required for a bike project that actually needs full restoration. If it only slightly needs restoration, you may be better off not doing anything to it. It is also best to do it because you think it would be a fun thing to do. If you are looking to make serious money off it, you'd probably do better at something else. Flipping burgers at Mickey D's probably pays better, but it's less gratifying.

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What's the most valuable bike to restore? posted by Doug on 1/15/2002 at 11:11:51 PM
If your looking to make money restoring bikes I have some enron stock you might be interested in.Just kidding when you count your time for all the work and scrounging parts etc most restores would have to sell for 5 to 10 thousand if you really keep track of the amount of time spent and pay yourself a decent wage to do it,Im sure some folks make a decent profit but I doubt that is the norm,good luck do it for fun.

...>>>>>>>> MORE MESSAGES >>>>>>>>



HOME (OldRoads.com) Discussion Areas Literature and Price Guide Cleaning Kit Glossary
Stat and Feature Database Picture Database Serial Number Charts General Resources