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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Need Fender/dent Roller... posted by: MikeH on 8/19/2001 at 12:34:50 PM
I'm looking for someone in the MA area with a fender/dent roller? All of the shops that I've tried in my area look at me as if I have two heads. Please email. Thanks,

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Need Fender/dent Roller... posted by Wings on 8/26/2001 at 12:06:44 AM
For minor dents set the fender in a sand box and gently message the top side (underside) with a spoon or similar object. Be patient. Enjoy the beach!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Pierce bike about 1890 to 1918 posted by: Rick on 8/18/2001 at 5:00:04 AM
I have a Pierce bike that is from the late 1800 to 1918. I need help. the ser. num. is 25558 can any one tell me anthing about this Pierce? I don't know the color or anthing about it. It is very rusty and I would like to restore it and give it back to the person that gave it to me. I'll have to remake the handle bars do to rust. the wood back fender is 1/2 missing so I'll make that too. The wood wheels are not to bad so I can save them. Spokes are shot and I must find replacments if I can. Any help will be grate. Thanks Rick

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Pierce bike about 1890 to 1918 posted by sam on 8/21/2001 at 6:53:49 PM
Rick take it easy on this one!Pierce bikes were made by the same people that made the Pierce Arrow car,they bring big bucks.Contact Joel on the Balloon group for info on the Company,leave the bike untouched until you talk to some of the experts out there.this might be one for Cycleart or other big name restoriors.Contact them first---good luck!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Pierce bike about 1890 to 1918 posted by JOEL on 8/29/2001 at 1:50:01 PM
I am not familiar with Pierce bikes. The Wheelmen might be a good info/parts source. Try contacting someone through their website.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Pierce bike about 1890 to 1918 posted by: Rick on 8/18/2001 at 5:00:04 AM
I have a Pierce bike that is from the late 1800 to 1918. I need help. the ser. num. is 25558 can any one tell me anthing about this Pierce? I don't know the color or anthing about it. It is very rusty and I would like to restore it and give it back to the person that gave it to me. I'll have to remake the handle bars do to rust. the wood back fender is 1/2 missing so I'll make that too. The wood wheels are not to bad so I can save them. Spokes are shot and I must find replacments if I can. Any help will be grate. Thanks Rick

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   removing chainwheels posted by: JohnK on 8/17/2001 at 9:17:14 AM
I have a 1974 Schwinn Twinn tandem. My 6 year old daughter and I use the bike
for riding around the neighborhood. The problem is my daughters legs are too short
for the bike at the bottom of the rotation. I had the idea of putting shorter cranks
on so her feet could stay in contact with the pedals. When I took apart the crank assembly,
I couldn't tell if the chainwheels were fused to the crank arm or if the piece holding them
to the crank arm is actually threaded and would come off.
The piece was odd shaped and I couldn't fit any of my wrenches on it.
Any help would be appreciated.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   removing chainwheels posted by Doug on 8/17/2001 at 1:10:08 PM
I have never seen a twinn crank and chainwheel,but I suspect they are prabably the same as a regular single piece crank,if so you should be able to see acouple of threads on the crank where the funny shaped nut holds the wheel to the crank,put the crank in a vice, use a small pipewrench if thats all you can find to fit on the odd shaped nut and unscrew it as you would any nut;if it wont budge it may have left hand threads try turning it the other way a few raps to the wrench with a mallet may help break it free,easier fix get some pedal blocks to make the pedals fatter will take up an inch or 2 good luck.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   removing chainwheels posted by Jon on 8/20/2001 at 4:59:17 PM
You might see if your local dealer still sells pedal blocks. They're two blocks of wood that rest on each side of the pedal and held in place by a large rubberband-like piece. That said, the crankside cone on a Schwinn one piece crank is a right hand thread.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   removing chainwheels posted by MNSmith on 8/20/2001 at 7:39:40 PM
One more thing to take into consideration. The rear crank, which is the one I am assuming is the one your daughter is pedaling on, is a special crank made just for the tandem. It has a longer pin to hold the dual chainwheels from spinning. Putting a different crank on could make the "drive" chainwheel slip. Also, there might not be enough thread on the new crank to hold both chainwheels as it has a longer thread "shank". Your best bet would be Jon's suggestion, which is to get the blocks, effectively making the crank rotation diameter smaller. Also remember, with a smaller roation diameter, she will be pedaling faster than you will. So be good to your little girl and pedal slow. Good Luck!

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   removing chainwheels posted by Rick on 8/24/2001 at 12:21:30 PM
I've put non-tandem cranks on as you describe. Yes, the
pin that extends thru the chainrings is shorter. I put
a couple of bolts, nuts & washers on to hold the two chain
rings together. Works fine for this kind of bike. Once
the stoker is old enough, put the orginal crank back on.


          RE:RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   removing chainwheels posted by Rick on 8/24/2001 at 12:30:48 PM
BTW, adding blocks to the pedals does not make the rotation
smaller, it just raises the pedal surface. Similar to
lowering the seat. But it also give the pedaler a very
unstable pedal! Their feet are much more likely to roll off the
pedals. Not good on any bike, especially a tandem. You might want
to add toe clips for safety. Try it yourself sometime. Putting on
shorter cranks is a better way to go for shorter people.
The standard 6.5" cranks are probably too long for a 6 year old on
any bike. Most 20" bikes come with 4.5" cranks. Some with
5.5" cranks. That extra inch really makes a big difference
in leverage for kids.

Another fun thing to do is use different size connecting
chain rings. You can have different cadences that way.
Spinning is something that has to be learned and an experienced
spinner will pedal the stoker to exhaustion very quickly. You can
use a smaller ring in fron to give the captian a lower gear. OR visa
versa.

PS, there are usually sufficent threads on the 1-piece cranks
to allow for 2 chainrings.

Rick

          RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   removing chainwheels posted by MNSmith on 8/24/2001 at 6:47:13 PM
Your right, I don't know what I was thinking. Pedal blocks don't make for a smaller diameter! Great tips for making non-tandem cranks work!!

          RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   removing chainwheels posted by Wings on 8/26/2001 at 12:14:36 AM
When a foot slips off a pedal it can be disastrous with a kid and it can throw the bike balance off momentarily also. I put 152mm Dotek cranks on the BMX bikes my grandkids rode when they were 5 or 6 and that worked great! Used kid cranks are available on $3 bikes in many thrift stores!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Schwinn Spitfire posted by: Tim on 8/17/2001 at 5:10:15 AM
I own a 51 Spitfire that has been repainted at least twice. Is there any way to only remove the new layers of paint and leave the original intact? Also what is the best method of cleaning a headbadge that has been painted over?

Thanks.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   basic care tips needed posted by: gezellig*girl on 8/13/2001 at 10:44:20 AM
Hi everyone - I just bought a (1959, I think) Schwinn Hollywood at a yard sale. It's not too rusty, but it's quite grubby. I want to give a good cleaning without doing anything dumb like scouring the paint or decals off - what would be the best thing to do?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   basic care tips needed posted by Doug on 8/13/2001 at 6:31:45 PM
Im not sure what you are capable of doing but I usually tear the bike down to give it a really good cleaning it makes it much easier to do a good job;Either way I use mineral spirits for grease and grime removal(no smoking or open lights!!!) put used rags outside in a metal container away from anything flammable wet down if possable with water.(Sorry I used to be a firefighter!)That said then clean bike with a good carwash soap and wax or polish with a good non-abraisive car wax McGuires is a good one Simonize liquide chrome cleaner works well on chrome as does the menotomy mixture sold on this site; great stuff old terry cloth bath towels work great for polishing the whole project,have your favorite beverage at hand and favorite music playing make a day of it have fun!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   basic care tips needed posted by sam on 8/17/2001 at 8:08:28 PM
Doug's right,takes all day.I'm always supprised at how late in the day it is when I finish cleaning a bike.How tired I am and how much fum I've had when the job's done---sam

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   basic care tips needed posted by MNSmith on 8/18/2001 at 12:30:09 PM
You know it Sam! Great form of relaxation!! Plus the results are usually very satisfying.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Free Wheel Removal posted by: Brian on 8/8/2001 at 1:14:32 PM
I have what I think is an easy question. I have never removed a freewheel before so I am ran into a roadblock. I purchased the Park Freewheel remove for my Regina freewheel from the early 80's or late 70's. I have removed the quick release skewer. The problem is that there is another nut in the way preventing me from fitting the tool onto the freewheel. I am afraid to remove that nut because I think it may be holding in the bearings to the hub and I don't want to mess with that. Should I remove that nut or is it possible I bought the wrong tool even though it says it is for a Regina and I have a Regina? Any help would be great!
Brian

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Free Wheel Removal posted by Wings on 8/12/2001 at 11:26:17 PM
1. Remove the nut. The nut may be on top of a collar or it may be part of a collar. Usually when I try to remove the nut the it turns the nuts on the other side also. I use a wrench and/or cone wrench on the other side if the nut on the freewheel side does not move. I also have special aluminum vice jaw covers that are softer than the axle. These covers have an indent for the azle so if the nut on the freewheel side is really stubborn I remove the nut on the opposite side and put the axle threads in the aluminum alloy vice jaws and tighten it downk! Then, I am able (99%) of the time to remove the stubborn nut on the freewheel side. Liquid wrench helps also. Bearings will not fall out of the freewheel side when you do this. When I get the stubborn nut off I take it out of the vice. I put the freewheel remover on and attach a nut to hold the freewheel remover in place (Otherwise you can kill the remover.). I put it between my legs, brace myself and use a wrench on the freewheel remover and it does not move! Then I pick up a 2 inch diameter pipe and slide it over the wrench handle and apply a little pressure and it is loose!!! I then remove the nut and screw the freewheel out.
Now sometimes noe of this works!!!!!!
In that case I remove the nuts and loose bearings from the oppossite side and remove the axle. Yes, the bearings are loose when this is done! Be careful!!!!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Free Wheel Removal posted by Wings on 8/12/2001 at 11:28:26 PM
Keep the tire on as you do all of this!!! The tire is easier to grip and stays put on the floor!!!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   how do i remove old grips posted by: todjob on 8/7/2001 at 2:58:32 PM
i have a pair of old grips to remove off of a pair of handlebars and they are on there pretty good the rubber has got to be pretty brittle so what can i do to save them?
email me direct if you could thank you.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   how do i remove old grips posted by James on 8/9/2001 at 5:54:49 AM
Stick a thin screwdriver or old spoke underneath the bottom of the grip.
Squirt in some oil or water.
Wrap grip with large towel.
Twist it off!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   how do i remove old grips posted by Wings on 8/12/2001 at 11:34:59 PM
Yes, slide in a thin screwdriver and lift up and spray in HAIR SPRAY! I have tried water and liquid cleaners and Hair Spray works best. I then slide the screw driver around a little and repeat on the other side and then pull out the screw driver and the grips slide off. Watch the angle of the bars -- you want the Hair Spray to seep in there!
When you put on new grips spray the inside with HAIR SPRAY. Slide them on and let them dry in place and they will stay!
I use a finger activated pump spray. I prefer Extra Hold :)




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   HOW TO SELECT YOUR GEAR RATIO ON MONOGEARED BIKES!!! posted by: Richard Gevedon, a.k.a."Gear Dicky" on 7/28/2001 at 11:09:54 AM
See the comments about this gear ratios for decide why you will use on your bicycle´s restauration...
46/16=2.875. Seens good for final speed, but you must be with steel legs for push it on. Too "heavy"!
46/20=2.300. The standard gear ratio on Brazil (For what you need to know it?). Nor too heavy or too light, you could uphill a mild hill with this.
40/16=2.555. Ok! This is the medium term between standard ratios and more final speed ratios. Choose it if you want to walk at front of other cyclists. But beware you must be have legs for push it fastly.
44/20=2.000. Ideal for to use on english roadsters restauration. It´s light ratio, but nor too light.
34/20=1.700. The gear ratio I use on my 18 kg krate bike. It is very good for to push an 18 kg monster bike with one meter front fork.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   HOW TO SELECT YOUR GEAR RATIO ON MONOGEARED BIKES!!! posted by Wings on 8/12/2001 at 11:48:28 PM
The above ratios only have meaning if the diameter of the wheel is given that you use and of course this information depends on what the land is like (Hills, flat, Mountains).
46/16 = 2.875
If your bike has 26 inch wheels you are talking approx. 75 gear inches which is great for cruising at the beach. But if you ride a 20 inch wheel bike like I do it would be approx. 58 gear inches which is very common on BMX bikes which I would say would be medium. Where I live I have gone to a lower ratio than 34/20 because I am surrounded by hills and some are very steep. Age, muscle, wheel size, geography , wind are all factors to consider. I tend to think gear inches rather than the ratios. I have my 20 inch bike set for a low of 22 g.i. and a high of about 110 g.i. I can go up any hill and go fast on the flat -- but this of course is not a fixed gear bike.
Thanks for the post.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Bearing wells? posted by: geoff on 7/25/2001 at 2:28:16 PM
Can anyone tell me if the bearing wells on the bottem bracket and head tube come off a 1950's girl's Schwinn Tornando? I plan to repaint the bike and want to know how to handle these areas. Thanks in advance, Geoff.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Bearing wells? posted by MNSmith on 7/25/2001 at 7:18:34 PM
They sure do! They can usually be driven off with a punch and a few good hits. If you don't have a punch, a hefty screwdriver will do.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Looking for Sturmey Archer AW Indicator Chain posted by: David P. Goncalves on 7/11/2001 at 8:34:40 PM
I have been looking for a replacement indicator chain HSA125 (the shorter chain), and have only been able to find the longer HSA126. Anybody know where I could pick up a couple of the shorter indicator chain?

Looking at the technical drawings on the Sturmey Archer website, it seems that the length of the indicator chain varies with the length of the axle.

Longer Axle = Longer Chain.

If it is not possible to find the shorter HSA125, can I replace some of the other parts in the hub (such as the axle) so that I may use my supply of the longer indicator chain?

Anybody know why the axle come in two lenghts?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Looking for Sturmey Archer AW Indicator Chain posted by Paul Aslanides on 7/15/2001 at 4:46:00 AM
Good question, David. I did hear a good reason long ago, but
have forgotten it. Perhaps the longer axle allows for the mudguard stays, as not all frames had threaded eyes on the dropouts, to keep the mudguard, and carrier (rear rack) mountings separate from the wheel mounting. Some axles can be awfully cluttered supporting all those extras.
Also, perhaps the AG (3 spd. dynohub) and the AB (3 spd. brake drum hub) required the longer axle. I dunno.
The longer selector rod can be used in the shorter axle BUT do check that the selector chain does not run out of the R.H. axle nut, i.e. first gear selection may be tricky because the rod is being pulled 'around' the curve of the nut. One can use a spacer under the nut, to position the nut further out on the axle, but make sure there is enough thread for the nut to grip on.
I can see no reason why AW axles cannot be swapped in
AW hubs.
To adjust the cable, set the false neutral position of the trigger lever so that it occurs half way between 1st and 2nd gear positions of the lever. This is done by counting the number of links which move out of the axle nut when selecting 2nd gear from first. There are other ways, see Sheldon Brown's website if ness. Cheers.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Newbie needs general restore advice posted by: MikeH on 6/29/2001 at 1:47:45 PM
I'm just getting started on restoring some older (50s,60s) bikes that I found at the dump (nothing rare, but fun riders). Can you folks suggest literature, web sites, articles, parts sources, etc. on vintage bike restoration. How to clean chrome, touch-up paint, where to get the right colors, suggestions for rechroming & repainting sources, where to get decals, parts, etc. Thanks!!!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Newbie needs general restore advice posted by MNSmith on 6/29/2001 at 2:13:02 PM
Sure! Feel free to stop by my web site where I have a section dedicated to restoration tips.

http://www.concentric.net/%7Errrrguy/bike.html

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Newbie needs general restore advice posted by MikeH on 6/30/2001 at 12:44:18 PM
Thanks! Good tips and links. Followed a bunch through. Still more to go. How about recommended sources for DECALS, re-chroming, repainting? Many thanks.

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Newbie needs general restore advice posted by MNSmith on 7/1/2001 at 10:18:33 PM
Decals: Try Memory Lane ( http://www.memorylane-classics.com/ ) or Maple Island Sales ( http://members.tripod.com/maple_island_sales/contents.html ).

Chrome: There are a couple ways to do this. The same can also be said for paint. Go to your local bike shop and ask if they know the local bike restorer / collector. He is usually someone who can do the work or knows where to send you.

You can also look up your local chrome shop and ask to see some of their work. Also ask if they do bike parts.

There are also the links that you found on my web page. Many of those collectors also restore bikes and can do paint work. It also helps to know what part of the country you are in so your choices can be narrowed down. My links page is California heavy.

I have a local chrome shop that does excellent work, but that won't do you much good if you are on the east coast! Good Luck!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Newbie needs general restore advice posted by William Love on 8/20/2001 at 5:38:02 PM
I have been collecting and restoring old bikes for many years, and just wrote a book that answers all of your questions. It is titled: How To Restore Your Collector Bicycle. It is published by MBI, and will be shipping in a couple weeks. It is for sale now at Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, Motorbooks.Com, and other sites. The author is me: William Love. Good luck, and have fun working on those old bikes!

          RE:RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Newbie needs general restore advice posted by R OBERT WILLIAMS on 9/5/2001 at 5:49:52 PM
GO TO AIRGLOWPAINTING.COM




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Would like more info posted by: Pete Torres on 6/25/2001 at 5:35:49 PM
I recently purchased a 3 speed traveler. The bike is complete and original from the foot pedals to the seat.
I would like to know if it is worth restoring or should I
leave it as is. The bike is green with cream or white colored emblems. I am guessing it is from the fifties. I couldn't find a serial number on the bike. The only letters or numbers stamped on the bike were an "AH" I believe. If anyone has info on where to look on the bike to specifically find certain characteristics to help me distinguish how old this bike is.
Thank You kindly,

Pete

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Would like more info posted by JOEL on 6/28/2001 at 10:56:18 AM
If the AH is the beginning of the serial # it is January 1972. See if you see any numbers afterwards. If you like it, it is worth restoring. Best to keep original if not too bad.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   old hiawathia posted by: Doug Reed on 6/25/2001 at 5:00:49 PM
Just bought a old Hiawathia on E bay for about 20 bucks needs a bit of work any speciality places sell Hiawathia headbadges or decals this one has dozen layers of house pait will need a complete overhaul ( Im in heaven) Thanks in advance Doug.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   old hiawathia posted by Doug on 6/25/2001 at 5:06:23 PM
Misspelled Hiawatha bonehead!!!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   old hiawathia posted by Mike Morse on 7/5/2001 at 4:17:46 PM
What are you the spelling police-this is about bike restoration PINHEAD!!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   old hiawathia posted by geoff on 7/25/2001 at 2:23:10 PM
just a note, Doug seemed to be criticizing his own poor spelling. I too jumped to conclusions that someone was a bit too surly, but that wasn't the case.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   old hiawathia posted by todjob on 8/7/2001 at 3:07:47 PM
if it was doug that is i quit going to the schwinn site because of someone using me to harrass others i havent been there but once since it shut down but ive heard ive been real regular on there and even i was going broke and selling all my stuff.




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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Rust on Chrome - restoration posted by: Stuart on 6/25/2001 at 10:36:25 AM
Can anyone recommend some tips and procedures or a exc restoration guide that can be applied to cleaning and restoration of chrome finishes on old bicycles (circa 1935-1945). Would like to get some advice from the readers for cleaning and if necessary preparing parts for rechroming. Also, if there are certain places that are recommended for re doing the chrome plating on wheels, handlebars, everything! Thanks - Stuart

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Rust on Chrome - restoration posted by Doug Reed on 6/25/2001 at 4:57:21 PM
The mixture and bronze wool works really well for surface rust removal that they sell on here if you are going to re chrome dont bother with doing anything the plater will do it all for you Ive got a 20 inch rim being re chromed right now and its not cheap though 65.00 Industrial plating in Omaha can do it for you too They win awards for theyre great work but be prepaired to fork over some bucks as they say you get what you pay for if you want the phone # for them let me know I will e mail it to ya, good luck in your restoration Doug.

          Sales posted by cindy rutherford DMN on 9/2/2001 at 4:22:51 AM
First of all thank you for making my day a little easier each time I work with my bicycles. I wanted everyone that loves swap meets, the El Camino Swap and Show will be held again on Sat. Sept. 29th. contact www.batorinternational.com This show is a real motorcycle and bicycle swap meet. Last year it was cancelled for reasons only the parties involved know about. The best thing to happen is that some fine people have brought it back. Go and enjoy the cheapest fun date you can have. You can even bring the children.Telephone 805 646 9566

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