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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Getting the dents out of my fenders posted by: Matt Johnson on 6/21/2001 at 3:04:10 PM
I recently found a 1951 Schwinn Streamliner at a yard sale
with a lot of dents in fenders. The guy selling it to me
said that he knew of a brake for rolling them out. Has anyone used this or should I just rig something up that matches the profile in order to hammer out.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Getting the dents out of my fenders posted by Doug Reed on 6/22/2001 at 4:59:05 AM
It is called a fender roller check with your local bike shops they should be able to put you in touch with someone who has one.(unless its a certain schwinn dealer in Omaha who couldnt be LESS helpfull if they tried) Rhymes with tie tack.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Getting the dents out of my fenders posted by MNSmith on 6/26/2001 at 1:29:05 AM
Here is one. http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1160136271

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Getting the dents out of my fenders posted by todjob on 8/7/2001 at 3:12:45 PM
hammering out fenders only works to a certain extent then you have to mud or lead them a roller will do about 90% of the work some fenders (especially rusty ones)will need some mud to fill pinholes anyway and peaked or crown fenders are a pain in the derrier




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Celluloid Bicycle Grips posted by: Stu on 6/20/2001 at 11:10:19 AM
Hi Everyone!
Does anybody out there know of a good source for celluloid bike grips (1938-1943 era). I have a bike without grips and would like to find either celluloid reproductions or nice originals. HELP! email Stu at dec_consulting@hotmail.com

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   repaint? posted by: john on 6/19/2001 at 10:17:38 PM
i have a 71 manta ray. i recently took it apart, and cleaned all nuts bolts, hardware etc as best i can, and im having a friend rechrome some parts. the paint has major chips, and was repainted befor i got it. i was thinking of getting it repainted. can anybody tell me a good place to get this done? thanks john

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   repaint? posted by Tony on 7/1/2001 at 5:22:10 PM
Try to see if any autobodies in your area will paint it they do a heck of a job.
Tony

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   repaint? posted by R. Aydelotte on 9/11/2001 at 6:36:17 AM
Does anyone have (2) 26x1.75 whitewall tires. Need !!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1977 King Kat posted by: Therapy on 6/17/2001 at 6:42:46 PM
Hey everyone -- i have this 1977 King Kat andi am doing my best to restore it but i have many parts that need replacing so i was wondering if anyone knew anything about this bik -- all the info and back ground would be great so i can try and find some parts - i have a pic of the bike but i can't put it on here for some reason -- so i can send it anyone that wnats to se what i am talking about -- also rust removal is also another thing i want to do -- just mostly surface rust -- is steel wool a god idea?

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Triumph 1960 Ladies posted by: John Birtles on 6/17/2001 at 5:53:38 AM
I am stripping a 1960 3 speed triumph, my problem is the retaining bolt on the pedals are frozen, consequently I cannot remove them -- help.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Triumph 1960 Ladies posted by BillG on 6/18/2001 at 7:04:24 AM
- Keep spraying them with WD-40 and letting them set overnight.
- REMEMBER: The LEFT SIDE pedal is LEFT hand threaded, so you turn in CLOCKWISE to loosen it.
- Slip a section of pipe over you wrench for better leverage.





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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Use of Naval Jelly posted by: David P. Goncalves on 6/16/2001 at 4:27:04 PM
Hello,

I've been using Loctite Naval Jelly (the rust removing, pink goo) to clean up my women's Robin Hood, especially the bolts, screws, nuts and all the important parts that keep the bike together.

The instructions on the bottle seem to recommend using Extend Rust Neutralizer within 24 hours. Is it really nessisary to use this product, or will a light coat of oil prevent rust from quickly forming?

Dave.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Use of Naval Jelly posted by Doug Reed on 6/19/2001 at 4:45:10 PM
Oil will make anything a dirt magnet and in my experience doesnt do that well in preventing rust I have not used the product you mention but a friend has and reccomends it highly good luck.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Use of Naval Jelly posted by todjob on 8/7/2001 at 3:16:36 PM
clean them off with a soft bristle brass brush (usually at the hardware store in a 3 pk for a buck or two)and then either a light coat of poof can clear or wax them before you put them on the bicycle




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Repainting a Rudge posted by: Ben on 6/15/2001 at 3:11:49 PM
I have an old 'sit up and beg' rudge bike. It was built to never fall apart, and it hasn't. However, over the years it has been inexpertly repainted many times, and now looks horrible with many layers of paint on the frame. I want to repaint it, but have no experience. I assume I need to strip off the old paint because as it is the surface is not smooth. My instinct wouldbe to use a light emry cloth, but I am just guessing. As for the paining, for a smooth coat would a spray can from a car shop be the best bet? Any tips would be very welcome!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Repainting a Rudge posted by Jon on 6/16/2001 at 10:52:56 AM
Use a chemical stripper and a scraper assisted by a wire brush. You can even use a wire brush mounted to a variable speed drill. Be sure to wear old clothing and eye protection. To remove rust, try auto wheel cleaner with phosphoric acid in it.
You can sucessfully use a spray can. It requires keeping the can the proper distance from the frame. You must move the can while spraying or you'll get runs. Start spraying before you hit the frame and stop after you pass the frame. I might also suggest painting tight areas (where tubes meet) first. As for types of paint, consult an auto painter or auto paint supply store. Your local library may also have books on the subject of auto painting. The same steps and techniques apply.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Repainting a Rudge posted by Doug Reed on 6/19/2001 at 4:53:57 PM
You can do all of the grunt work yourself if you want I used to also but chemical stripper costs a lot and you have a mess of painty goo left on the floor I found a paint stripping shop in my town who will do the frame and chainguard for a mere 30.00 well worth the price believe me sand paper and stripper would run about that much not to mention your time its worth a look in my opinion good luck. Doug

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Repainting a Rudge posted by Jon on 6/23/2001 at 4:34:14 PM
Thanks for reminding me. In a previous post I mentioned that you could take a frame to a shop that rebuilds engines. They ususally will have a dip tank for stripping and degreasing car engines. For a nominal fee they may throw your frame in. It will save you a lot of trouble.

          RE:RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Repainting a Rudge posted by JimW. on 9/6/2001 at 3:51:39 PM
If I were going to do a Rudge, or one of the other "widow-spider black" English Roadsters, I would strip it, steel-wool it, prime it with Krylon sandable spray-can primer, then spray it with Krylon semi-gloss black, then polish and wax it. It will look beautiful and authentic. Krylon resists running, so it's easy to to a nice job.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Shelby Eagle posted by: Dan on 6/14/2001 at 7:06:51 PM
I have a Shelby Eagle bicycle from the late 40's or early 1950's. Does anyone have any information on this bicycle.
I would like to restore it if possible.

Thanks

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   How do I find out what model I have? posted by: Joy on 6/14/2001 at 3:41:49 PM
Hi All, I just bought a Schwinn 3-speed and a garage sale and I want to know what model it is. Here is what I found out so far. Made in March 1971 it is Magenta or some kind of Red in color and has 27 x 1 3/8" tires it also has the kind of breaks that tighten on the rims. Any and all advice is needed! Thank you!

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Need help identifying this brake.. posted by: GS on 6/13/2001 at 9:42:40 AM
Need Help....
Can anybody tell me what kind of brake this is?
Sorry for the poor pictures.
Any help will be appreciated. Thanks

http://web2.airmail.net/kgould/DGDiskpicture2.jpg

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Need help identifying this brake.. posted by Jon on 6/16/2001 at 10:41:35 AM
Looks like a Shimano disk brake, but I can't believe it doesn't say Shimano somewhere.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   grip replacements and seat restorations posted by: Stu on 6/7/2001 at 5:30:13 PM
Does anyone out there know if somebody makes or offers a wide selection of vintage handlebar grips (bike was made in Japan between 1935 - 1942)?
Also, I may need to restore a leather seat from the same bike. Any suggestions on an approach or recommendations on who does this type of stuff? Thanks!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   grip replacements and seat restorations posted by sam on 6/9/2001 at 2:21:01 PM
Wow,this is something we don't see often,a per-war japan bike!Try this site for info on the seat etc http://www.nostalgic.net/ hope that helps.This bike comes from an interesting peorid in japan history.there is a web site with japan bike history,maybe some of the other readers here can tell you how to find it.Would like to know how you came onto this bike---sam




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   bare metal world tourist posted by: LAura farabo on 6/4/2001 at 6:10:27 PM
Hi. Just found the bike of my dreams, a schwinn ladies world tourist. I don't know the year, and the numbers on what I think may be the back dropout do not match any of the posted lists. I guess she is about 40 or 45 yrs old.
I'm stripping off the old paint. The metal is in great condition, very little rust. I plan to keep the metal bare - it looks so cool - but I need to find a good sealer to protect it. The headbadge reads "Schwinn Chicago."
Anybody else out there with a stripped down bike?
farabo

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   bare metal world tourist posted by JOEL on 6/7/2001 at 6:39:08 AM
Live the dream...

A can of clearcoat from the auto parts store should work for you.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   bare metal world tourist posted by judy on 6/10/2001 at 7:50:11 AM
I also have Scwinn Touring bikes! We have neglected them for many years because we really, really didn't have the time to ride. Now we are retired and drug them out, rust and all. You have given us hope! Thanks!!!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Schwinn gooseneck is STUCK posted by: dwl on 6/1/2001 at 4:14:36 PM
This problem keeps getting more technical all the time. The threads on the top bolt are gone from trying to get the wedge unlodged. I put a screwdriver down there and hammered away only to ruin the screwdriver. It appears to be totally frozen in place. What to do?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Schwinn gooseneck is STUCK posted by A friend on 6/1/2001 at 6:40:49 PM
dwl, Try using Liquid Wrench down the fork tube, under the fork where the fender bolts up. Let it sit over night. If you still have problems, put a pair of old handle bars you can spare on the goose neck. Take a hard plastic hammer, and hit the top of the goose neck down into the fork. If you still have problems, flip the frame over and hit the bottom of the goose neck down. Watch for the liquid wrench to seep down the goose neck. W.D-40 works good too. When you start to see some movement happening; grab the handle bars and twist back and forth. If you have a problem holding your frame still, put your forks in between a tree branch that will fit between the forks. This will keep the fork from moving. Help along every now and then with a hard plastic hammer, by tapping around the goose neck.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Schwinn gooseneck is STUCK posted by Wings on 6/2/2001 at 11:02:48 PM
If the gooseneck is loose -- remove it and leave the wedge -- or if the threads hold it in place keep it there. I strip Schwinns all the time and I have found that the following always works: 1. soak it with liquid wrench.
2. I have purchased a long pin punch for this next step (Cheap at Harbor Freight). I turn it upside down and put the puch up the fork and hit it a couple of times and out it comes! The pin punch is at least .5 inch where I hit it and it tapers to about .25 inch where it hits the wedge! Better than a screwdriver! I also have a narrow tub that the head will fit in -- horizontal to the ground - where the entire head can soak in solvent, but after the pin punch I have never had to use it! Be patient!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Help I don't know what it is? posted by: KC on 5/25/2001 at 1:36:52 PM
In 1975 my father bought my mother a used bike, It is probably not much older then 1975, all the parts on it say suntour, and the logo on the front of the bike is a crown, but the words have faded off, all I can tell is that the model is Jupiter-Beat and that it says deluxe, but I don't know what bike company had a crown like logo. I am asking about it because I have never seen one like it and was thinking of tring to get it running again. It is a ten speed, the sifters are at the end of the handle bars, the bike pump mounts are welded to the frame, unfortunatly I don't think they make pumps that fit it anymore. Also the tubing for the frame is not round, it is kinda oval, the top and bottem of the tube is round but the sides are flat with an indent, that my mother always ran reflective tape in. The bike in not the orginal colors since it liked to walk off, but being a one of a kind in a small town she always managed to get it back. Thank You for any help you can give.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint posted by: Dan on 5/24/2001 at 3:35:24 PM
I have acquired a 1963 Schwinn Racer, coaster brake model. I need to repaint because of all the rust. Only thing is I do not know where I may find some Schwinn decals. The decals on the bike have Schwinn with the little twinkles at the beginning and the end of the decal. I would like to repaint and from what I can gather the paints used are just regular car paints?? I have the original Schinn made in Chicago sticker and also a 'Arnold/Schwinn sticker on the seat tube. I am going to preserve these two stickers. Any help from out there would be very much appreciated.... Dan

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint posted by (419) 832-3040 on 5/25/2001 at 5:46:03 AM
$5 each. Call 9am-5pm edt. New paint, even if the same formula, will not match 40 year-old paint.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Paint posted by Doug on 5/28/2001 at 6:24:48 AM
I bought decals from maple island sales in MO. also and was very happy with them(417)682-6655 have them send you a catalog nice people to work with.Ive had luck at the automotive paint stores getting matching or very close color paint good luck.

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